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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 6

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                6 THE BOSTON SUTOAT GLOBE-SUNDAY. D!ECEMBER 14. ISDO-TWENTt-^EtGifi:^ PAGES. W^H.Hervey&GQ. WRINGER, RUG.OR LAMP To BT�ry .tPnroha�er of $50 WORTH OF GOODS AJXn U3?WAKD ui Chetee of the following artielett vit.r HANDSOME BANQUET LAMP, Bx�u or Niokelr SO Incites hlclit I-tnon �b�d�, with IPrlnKe and Diii>lex Burner, nil complete; AN ELEGANT RUG, Double JPaced, fi ft. X.DnK, -on A- First-Glass Wringing iHlaciiine FREE OF CHARGE. FREE DELIVERY At luiv JCbw Englana Frelclit Depot, and nt, Residences Within 10 Miles of Our Store. Prompt AttenUon to Jlall or Express Orders. We rnaranteo every article in our trtotslc to be lust as represented. _Th8 nbove out lllustTaies our new pattern of fARISIAK' COITCH, of which wa have just completed the manufaeture of 150. It Is upholstered In Oeiiiilne Velvet IEu(rs. Bmklng a very useful     -    -  - - anddnrablo lioUday Rift, and vre have Hied the price at XO such value was ever plven for tliis price before. �^Ve offer the above Couches upou a pa>*mcnt of $1.00 Doit'fi and $1.00 per week until paid, AnS. deliver Preo of Ciinrfre at any IreiRbt station In 1%'eiv Eiiftln'td and at rostdenoeH wltlilu lO miles of our tore. Only one Couch sold to a customer. _Mall or cKiiress orders for these Conches promptly attouded to. Send cash, or nrsi payment of Sl.OO, with order. Spalding and Ward in Conference. Welfare of Base Ball Their Theme. to 1)6 Fair. Justice Must be Bouc tlic BostouClub. Si 2.97. Tha nhove cut l!In�troies our 7-INCfI, C-HOLE DOUHLE-OVUK IlAXOli, with ALL IheWOlJKUN 1,MI>�0VI!MENTS, Buchaa I'-ULlz-SlZED OVIi.V, imOll.ek J)00]t, kfj;l)'.'3 i'atknt DAMI'EIl. SIFTING OllA'l'E, TOWEL DltlEK, POLISIIEU EPHES, SICKEL TltlSIMIKliS, etc. It is i'ek-FJECT In EVJCKY Ui:.Sl'Et:T, and is WAUnANTED to HAKE, or It will Ijo E.V01I.\.NC1ED fuee OF JiXI'ENSE. We offer tlie.se rnuoes to puroliasors anywhero In Kuw Engliuii} upon payment of $1.00 down  and   $1.00  per tveek until paid. nnixo the pipe siea.suue with you. TheBQ ranges will be deliviired and set up ready for uBe at vesidenoea free of charge within 10 miles of our store. MaU or express orders for tlt08� JRaiiKO.4 promptly attended to. Send cash, or llrat payment, of ISI.OO, with order. PARLOR STOVES. PKICJE, I 'nils cut represents a new pattern of �l  pot) ec'.onomltial In the use of co.il i so c.ibv to rcKiilnto that tho ftre need not (ro ojit nil M-inter. NotwithBtandins the above low price, these stoves are warranted perfect lii every respect, and are controlled exclusively by us. We offer them to purchasers anywhere in BTew Eneland on a payment of $1.00 dolun   and   $1.00  per week untUpaid. Mail or express orders for tliesa Parlor Stoves promptly attended to. . Send Cash, or first payment of 81. OO, wlUi order. Hsnd or brine yonrjnine measure. we also carry a FDXt, UNH of the well-known MAOEX:, WA.I.K.KR EttATX. NKW nvn and TAltrNXOW IRON WORKH RAWeES ami PAR-X.on STOV.X:s, illustrated circulars of which will big nuilled free upon annli- All Parlor Stoves and Ranf^es pur-ehased of us will be delivered and set up free of ohoree at realdeuoea '�vlthin ten miles of our storei or at any f relRht �tatton In STew Enslahd. W.H. Hervey&Go. 5- STREET-5 (9^Ask to see the "Standard" Com-bCoatlon Poldlnic �eds. price Ustfroe. HARRIS PALATIAL GAR -TO- St. AHpstiie, Fla, AND RETURN. baving Boston Dec. 29, 1880. ^ IVtlisT TarticmUrs Oall or AMnu LOUIE J. HAESIS, Soom SO, abbs Enildiag, MPMED SimOM PUYS 1000 TUNES. ZUl It fh* Bviis moBio box vliiob tUnotoi It tXtntian Bt tbfi Mieobiuilo^ Faif, lis esilnmmrfMitaniuidUv cost makt ItkTsry hMJicaw gUt tet flhrirtmtiv ZOnsttattd O&to-Ugs� but. FEED H. SlMHImporter, 102 High, Cor. Congresg St., Boston. YE OYSTERS ABE GOOD. For Oi� best in the world, oail for DAVIS'    SEA   PETS, Ani itXa so uthen.  Per sale oaif tif the foOinv Stii: partieij A. CKAPSlABr �fc CO., �1 ChArle* �t. He h&ndieii Medium, bmAll Mid X^brea. U. BSICUAAI .uo I tesigm-d v.-iui bfcuuoe a sit as director to good advantage, whore clubs linve few men with base biul tact at the head of affairs." Mr, Bpaulding assured Mr. Ward that It was his intention to have all the players treated as if there had boon no trouble. The piist was to bo forgotten. Ward looked verv determined and said; "It don't make the least ditterenoo to me what is done by tlie league, I am satisfied to go out, of tlie business and may. I worlced faithfully for principle, and don't know but what now would be the best time to Eton. I will enjoy a littlo country life from now until the first of the year, and then go into a law oilico here in New York and praetico my profession. "The only duty I have is to see that the Eo.ston club of the ployors' lB.iguo is treated fairly, as they were about tho only club, as a whole, that remained steadfast and gave tho now loaguo grand support." Spalding-Oh, you will play ball for 10 years to come, Mr. Ward, and must naturally get up in the business, as you have tho ability. Ward-I am hot certain that I will remain in tlie business. 1 certainly will not tmless 1 have something to say in the nmtter. Tho Boston players' league team is one of the few clubs tliat Ward is willing to play with. He has already sent word to Pittsburg and other cities tiiat lie will do no business with them, and intends to pick out the club ho is willing to play with, if at all. Tho eonversalion tlien drifted into the Inimorons. Spalding-Well, .lohn, if you had died Inst .Itme the iplayors'league would ho,ve gone to rest, as you were the man who, singio-hauded, kept it alive. Ward-I was almost dead long before that, but strugfflnd along, thinking the other follow was in a hard way. Spalding-You gave us a hard battle. Mr. Spa ding then went on toteJl how lie met the p ayors' league conference committee a few hours after landing from Europe and how lie learned that tlio P. L. people were in as biid a fix as the league. He then wentontotoll.thBthehad no personal objections to hating the players put on the conference committee; in fact, be thought It would be a pood thing, but the league had decided first to settle up with the backers./ . The gentlemen then entered Into a confidential talk tliat would be a broach of confidence to publish. The electric lights were throwing shadows over the carpet when the party broke up to go away feeling much better all roimd tor a thorough understanding of the situation. Mr. Spalding was interrupted for a few moments by calls from A. J. Reach of Philadelphia- and J.-Earl Wagner of the same city. Strangely enough the two magnates met by ncofdent in the waiting-room, down stairs, and bad a hearty laugh. Tho first real progress made in the effort to reorganize the association circuit was effected this afternoon, after a day of almost continuous argument. George K. Frazler, representing the Symcuso club, agreed to give up his franchise in the association wlien called tipon, for a consideration mutually satisfactory. The agreement provides that Mr. Frazier shall retain tho control ot Syracuse under the national agreement, and that he shall have tho right to enter any base ball league or association to the exclusion of otlior parties. Ho will also keen all his players. Mr. Frazier expressed himself as satisfied with the deal. "I will n9W interest myself," said he, "in the formation of a loaguo to comprise tho cities of- Buffalo, Kochestor. Syracuse, Utica, Albany, Now Haven, Worcester and Providence. AVith good teams such a circuit can undoubtedly be mado to pas'." As soon as tho Frazior matter had been settled, the Wagner brothers, who had been waiting in tho lobby of tlie Fiftli Avenue Hotel, were invited to Mr. Thurman'sroom, and, together with Mr. Soalding, discussed their chances as prospective representatives of an American association club. No definite promises wero made by Mr. Tluirman, but what ho said caused thePliil-adolphia gentlemen to fool more Contented with the Situation than when they came on.   They ^vill, of course, be called upon to pay their share of tho money the asstxiiation will have to expend in straightening out tho circuit. Just before the Wagners went up to Mr. Thurmnu's room President Byrne called Billy Harnie of Baltimore over to whore J. Earl AVngnor was standing and formally introduced the plaintiff and defendant in the famous suit for damages. Tliey shook hands cordially, and Bamie said shortly after: "I have no objections to the adrniSSibii ot Mr. Wagner into the American association." President L. C. Krauthoff of tho Wcatorn association was one of tho arrivals in town today. Ho came principally to argue an important case betoi'O Judge Wallace m the Uuited States Court. Ho had a long interview witli President Byrne on tlie subject of plnolnef the Wostorn- association on an eyual footing with tUu nationivl league am American association,' under the natioua agreement. ,, , , T, H. Mdenaue. WIND GAnUES HECESSAEY. Bullets Avoid Bullseyes at Walnut Hill. MB.  CABLE'S EDBAS,  They Differ Bomwhat from Those of Rev. Thomas Dixon. AMnBRST.Dec. 13.-Rev. Thomas Dixon, tho noted proaohof, and orator of the Now South, brought up in North Carolina and now a minister In New York city, lectured in College Hall last evening. The speaker, although only 20 years of age, has the an-pottranceof a much older man. His address coutaincd much of patlios and fervor.as well as many anecdotes which sent the audience into convulsions, His words were full of eai-nestness. He sliowod by statistics that North Carolina had done a fourth more proportionately for the negro than had Massachusetts, this answer being given to a written question sent up to him before lie began speaking, asking if South Carolina was doing all m her power to uplift tho negro. Mr, Dixon stated that on accoimt of his ignorance of tho state of affairs In South Carolina, and' his accurate knowledge of the condition of tho colored raoo in his own State, ho gave an answer with reference to the latter. In the oourso of his remarks he stated that he would guarantee that he could find in New York city more men without oven a board to sleep on than he could find negroes in tlio South who had to sleep on beds of straw. But that statement whs no more surprisliiB than another one which he made to the elTecf that the negro race was at present contented with its condition. In spite of all reports to the contrary, and that their dissansiactiou and tuieasiness were created only when they wero given more knowledge and advantages. He spoke of going through the South and Hoeiug very unsatlsfaotory crops, but at tho same time hearing hardly a word of discontent, the colored people bearing all misfortunes ohocrfuliy, and enduring their hard lives with scarcely n mm-mur. His remarks in regard to the contented condition of the negro race were so strong and so sweeping that it was not surprising to hoar ii reference made to them in the college chape! th s morning, when Geoi'ge W. Cable, the well-known writer of Soutli-orn fiction, mudo a few informal remarks before tho assembled students of tho college on the negro imcistion. Being wholly unprepared for a speech, an he waa at tho chapel simply lor the purpose of studying the religious life ot the college, his address was more in a studious than in an oratorical form. However, it was easily noticed that in one salient point ho took issue with tho prenohor, that point being in regard to tho coutontednoss of tho negro rac,e. He said thnthospoke of things he had soon himself, and not of things he had heard. From all he had seen the negro race wa,s not at all contented and that improvement should bo sought through tho Federal law, in tlie olHciency of Which Mr. Dixon had on last evening e.Kpressed lus disbelief. Mr. Cable was warmly applauded by the students at the conclusion of Ids remarks. BOSTON M.AN SOAJoDED. Mea at Wolmrn Injured by the Bemovol of Boiler Plate. WoBDRN, Doc. 13.-All accident occurred at the works ol the Joltnston Electric Train Signal Company this forenoon, by which several persons wero scalded. The works are now working night and day to fill orders, and tho boiler or engine gave out and it became necessary to make repairs. The men set to work and were removing a part of the machine, and .'is they romovea some nuts from tho ongluo plate scalding water was forced out by a vacuum and over the persons who were near it. They wore OliariosH. Delano, the superintendent; li^'ederick Hoskins, Daniel Nor-oross of Wilmington and Charles Smith of Boston. The two latter wore injured most, they being badly scalded on the face, nocit and hiiuds, and wero sent homo. They wero oil attended by Dr. H. G. Blake. Passengers Were Hurt. Dj�j.-nuKY, Conn., Dec. 13.-The West Ijound passenger trnin on tho New York & New England road, leaving Danbury at y.lO a jn., ran into a horse car at the Main St. cms.'iing. this morning. The locomotive struck tlie oar in tho centre and carried it CO loot, wlien part ot it drcpped and tho rest ivas strewn aloiiir the track for 300 feet. It wa.s totally demoliHlied. Alice Beiuiett uiid Nellie Kane were in the car and miraculously cscajwd death. Both -neie Hcriously iii.nueil. A gaieman'a carelessness caused tlie accident. Another Daily at Newburyport, NEWBUttvi'OE'r, Dec. 13.-Newhuryportis to have another daily morning paper, the first number of wliich will be issued about .lau. I. The paper will bn independent IJcmocraticiu politics, and v,-i 11 be published bv iidward A. Huse, .Vitliur Withington. J. Hermatua Carver and George O. Atliinson, Olays Eedneed to Dast by M Heii at Wellington. New Quarters of the Boston Curling Olub-Foot Ball, Piny "Iraofx-KCE AvhojlD,'' the popular naw U.tMx. Pdco il.-JS. .WA-T.nut Him,, Doc. 13,-The regular weekly shoot of the Massachusetts Rifle Association was held today at its range. A good number of riflemen were on hand, but the strong 7 to 11 o'clock wind was too much for high scores. Next Wednesday all the prize and practice matches will be open at 12.30. W. M. Foster won the silver victory medal, and P. S. Killam' won the bronzo and silver military modal. Following are tlie best scores made today, distance 200 yards, standard American target; (t) nliCOIlD ory-HAND MATCH. C. H. F.flstman................7.......... 79 It. L. Lee................................ 77 W. Uawloy.............................. 74 (t) EEOOBD 'UKST JIAIOH. W. rotors................................ no A.Bnllnrd............................... its JI. B. Biirter............................. 03 (*) OHAMriOK OFf-HAND MATCH. R. L. r,ee................................86 B.C. Sydney............................. 70 W. Cbiulcs............................... 70 X.Good................................. ec (*) OKAjmOM IlKST MATCH. M. B. Barter............".................102 (U.) VlOTOKY mkdal MATCH. TV. M. Foster............................. 84 (n.)   Mll-ITAEV MKDAJ, MATCH. T. S. KlUam.............................. 44 JI. T. Dkv............................... 43 A. .S. Kleid............................... 4a �1.1). Ilobba....................42 N. (lood................................. 41 F. W. Hart............____.............. 41 D. Mattlu..'........................;____S8 (n.)   ALL comkh3 llItST match. S. Wilder................................loa P. Daniels...............................107 J. Francis........,................ ^.... .10(1 A. H. JJalliira............................ion F. W. Oiiesler............................103 It. K. Barter..............................102 W. retera...............................100 A.B. l.orlng.....,....................... �7 J. French.........................flO M. F. Day............................... 83 J.B. Holibl.............................. 01 B. ailittlji............................... 80 (n.) ALi.-cOMnns' oui'HAiru matou. H.r.. Lob............................____ 83 N.O'uiih............................... 82 C. II. Kastmau':............;............. 81 W. Charlos.............................. 81 S. C. Sydney............................. 81 ir. T.Day..........................;____ 80 C. Bridge................................ 78 J, B. Holiba.............................. 7:5 A. S. Field............................... 7S D. llartm............................... 71 I. B. Thomas............................. 70 0. Moore.............,.................. 67 F. W. Uart.............................. 61 SILVnn VJCTORT MKDAI, Won on the following 10 scores of 80 or hotter by W. M. Foster.....80 81 81 84 82 83 82 80 80 34 nnoKZE i^n silver mimtaev. Won on the following 10 scores ot 40 or better liy P. S. lUUam......41 44 43 42 42 41 42 40 42 43 (k) aOO-SUOT OKl'-llAND MATCH. H.L.r.ee................................ 83 8, 0, Sydney............................. 7C (K)'OOO-SHOT IlEST MATOn. P. DnnlolB...............................107 P. W. Chestor............................lOB M. T. Day...............................103 A. S. Hunt...............................102 (t) Only one entry allowed each weelc. () Only one entry allowed each shoot day. (It) Itu-ontrlca allowed. BISDS THAT PEAK  EfO COLD. They Ply at �WeUlngton for tho Amusement of Gvmnera. WELLDfGTON, Deo. 13.-A cold, plercing wind blew across the traps at tho grounds of the Wellington Gun Club today, but it did not prevent a good attendance.' Perry won tho cup again today by brealuug 23 out of IB single and five pair bluerocks. The other scores wero: BaiTett, 22; Bond and Dill, 21; Cowee, Warren and Wheeler, 18; Bowker and Stone, 17; Gore, 16; San-bom and Peabody, 14. Tho winners in the sweepstake matohes follow; , Throe pair standards-Stone, Perry and 'Wlieelor fli-at, Coweo second. Uarrett and Brown third. Ten Icoystones-Barrett and Bond drat, Bowker second, Ooi-o third. Six standards-Bond and BroT^m first, Barrett and �Wan-on second, Bowker and .stone tlUrd. Throe imir standartlB-Barrett tii-at, Bowuer eeo-ond, Bradbury and Warren third. Six standards-Bond first, Stdne and Goroseoond, Bowker and Wurron third. Six slandnrds-Mooro first, Barrett, Gore and Bond second, Bowker third. Five standards-Barrett, Bond and Stone first, Moore, Cowee and Ooro sooond, Warren third. Sli clnys-reahody first, Stone, Bond, UUl and Barrett seaond, Cowee and .Sanljorn third. Sli clays-Barrett and Bowker first. Gore, Warren and Simhorn second. Wheeler third. "' Nine standards-Bond, Brartbnry and Dill Ilrst, Wheeler and Barrett second, Bowker and Gore third. Five poir standards, cup match-Perry and Dili flrat, Bond and Bi-adbury second, Barrefc, Cowee and Warren tliird, Bowker and Slone fourth. Plfreen standards-Barrett first, I'errv and Brad-bnry second, Bond and Wheelerthird, Dill lonrth. Six standards-Ooro, Sanborn, Stone and Wheeler first, Bond and Bowker second, Dill and' Barrett third. Six standards-Cowee, Gore and Wheeler first, Barrett second. ODBI.mO   OLD-B'S   OLXTB   HOUSE. Wew QuRTtera and Games Played at Fresh Pond. About all the members of the Boston Curling Club visited Fresh pond yesterday afternoon and inspected the new club house and grounds. I^st year two of the members of the olub had narrow escapes from droiviiing in Brooks pond, Brighton, where the club played its game, ajid it waa decided then and there to soonro a ulace where there would be no danger. A large lot of land close to tho Fresh Pond railway station was purchased last spring, and preparations wore at onca mado to havo ovorytliing completed for tho winter. The olub house is a two-story wooden structure, 50x18 feet, and ccst $2C0O to build and furnish. On the upper floor are four elegantly furnished rooms, whicli are occupied the year round by tho janitor and his family. On the ground is a reception room, 18x20 feet; a ladies' p.irlor, 16x16 feet, toilet rooms and ii largo room wlioro tlie mcmberR keep tho stones and other implements of the game. On one part of tlie grounds in front of the house is an artificial pond wlioro tlio club ?laya tho g.imo. It is 120.\n OU feet and is our feet deep, and lias been built so that it can bo flooded or drained oil at any time. Tho club intend also to havo a bowling green, 100x130 feet, m front of tho house, !ukI work has already been started on it. Tliis will be tho first bowling green constructed in the Unitod States. Tho game is played u tho summer by the Scotch people, and is similar to, and as fully exciting, as curling, Tiie club has expended $0000 on its now place, and tho coming spring it intends to make the grounds more attractive by planting trees all around tliein, and in the space betwoon tho bowling green and poud. There is a fine oiitz-nnca to the gi-ouuds, and adjoining the house aro lai-go horse sheds. Yesterday afternoon four teams played interesting games of cnniiig on the pond. Tho teams wero mado up as follows: Kink l-lt. Walker, Dr. Sluiih, Ii. Owler and J Wenivsa, Jr. (Bid])). Kink2-J. KussoU, S. MarshaJl. W. Luiab and J. lIcGaw (slUp^ iiiuk Z won, 24 points to 15. BlnU 3-W. JlcUoualti, 11. Auld, T. Ingraham and J, Brown (skill). Kink 4-OoorKO W^oinyss, .1. Wemyss, Sr., B. B Lcuchals and w. McBaln (skip). lUnk 4 won, ib points to 0. The beist playing of the day was done by Joliu McGaw. Next Wednesday afternoon several rinks will compelB.__ EX-CHA-MPIONS BEATBM. Chaoe Btroet Kovero of Fall River Dpset Pond Hopes. F-A-LL ErvKR, Dec. 13.-Nearly 800 spectators assembled on tho Rovers' grounds this afternoon to witness a Bristol county cham-piousiiip gaiuo of foot ball between the Rovers and the Chace Street Rovers. Although it was generally supposed that the ex-champions of America would win easily from their younger adversoi-ics, tho latter surprised their rivals and up.sot all calculations by winning the game on the only goal scored during a hardly-contested game. For the first half it wa-s give and tiiko play of the most spirited kind, the Rovers contenting them.selves with acting on the defensive, while their opponents mado many dashes and showed good generalship. Neither side counted in Ihc first half, and niter a short rest the fray was resumed with ft change of ends. The iiovers this time had the advantage of the wind in their favor. Brilliant work by Leneque for th OIub .Ti^uxna^ie^t SitmdiDB. Club life Hi thei subiii'bs has an added interest this winter ovidngto, tlie rivalry produce^ by tbe tnter-cliib totituftment. Each club has'pl'ayea ^twt Series, one at home and one abroad.. Next Week WedneSi day. Chelsea plays. aii � Maldefj': Thursday' Wmnbester at SoihervUle; ana Saturday, Beading at Melrose.      - ,   ,; ' ^ The follow ng is the staiidlos: in the three events to date;     .  siLLiAncg. Won. Lost. Somervllle........,................. 4        o Melrose..............____._____0 Maiden..............3 1 Beading...........'. .1        B Chelsea.............____...........0 4 Winchester...........0 4 ', yoOL,   , ' , Won. lost. Beading............'............. ..4        0 Melrose.............................4 0 Maiden.............. ...............2 S Somervllle..........1 3 Chelsea........... .,i......... .1        3 Winchester.........i..0 ,      4 '. win.?T.       � Won. Lost. Melrose.............�........',...>..& 1 Maiden............____& 1 Chelsea...........3 S Somervlliu.........................3 S Winchester....................1 6 Bending............._____..........1 B Algonquin Eool,Toiimament. The handicap pool touriaiiiont at the Al-songujn Club la n6w under way, and some of the matches; last. w6ek were very close and exciting. The if olio wing aris the results ofithe week's matche.s. ' E. E. Burnett heat H;     Hussell, EO^B. 0. B. Wales beat O. A. Jones, OO-^l.j H E. Westonbe4(T.a'.;Sa^vyeriJr.|6o-S8. A. P. Green boat-W; B. Spring,.60-'3!). A. P. Greene lieaC 1', H. sfmm�n8,'C0-45. E.D. Jordan, Jr., beat A. S. MoClcllaii, 60-22. W. (i. Colton beiit F,,V. tarker, COMiO. Bfelow is a siimmaryot the gariies played to date: ' rKEHltnf ART EpItltB. C, Spragne beat 1. li. Fay, 00-4B." K. 13. Burnett bent H. E.Kuteell, CO-hIB. G. K. Wales beat 0. A. Jones, 00-^1. A. ,S. Boloh heat W..H. Keeno, M4-�0. G. F. Wood beat B. F. Little, 60-^8. i �. D. Jordan, Jr., bent A; S. 'MoCleUan; 60-22. S. L. Gillette heal O. Pfoff; ()0i-43.. W. S. Stevens heat L. V, S. Wok, 60-48. W. O. Colton bent Fi V. Varket, 60-49. W. Ii. Kemiard beat G. S. Btainau, 60-34. H. E. Weston beat T. T.Sawy�r,-60-.;30. � F. O. Webster beatT. l'\ Moany, BO-48. E. B. HIU beat W. M. Paul. 00^40. O. S. StookweU beat.G. Wyiiton, 60-80. riBBx Eocin). , � A. P. Greene beat W. B. Sntlng, B0~80. T. A. Shimions beat T. W. PioctOr, 60-47, A. S. Baloh beaf G.'F. Wood, CO-IsB. SECON? EOCNB.    ;    . A. p. Greene beat T. H. Slmmoni, 60-46. Sale of the Cutl^i; Ohoctaw. New York, Doo. .J^i^.'jrThsAljafe Maiming sold Arnold .Tljaxeir'sWil'ftnilsppie centreboard cutter Ohootaw to CharlM F. Brown of Newburg, N. Y.. today. I'h4 Ohootaw was designed by'Burgess, and'waS launched at Boston in the fall of 1888 bJ-.T.awley, her builder. She is 53 feet ovelf .all, 39 feetS inches wator line, 14 feet beakn and' 0 feet draught. Price is not me^tldned. International Skatlhi^i'MeetinE. CQunlap'Cable iKewsCojhp'any.l Amstbedam, Deo. is.-^Tha .international skating meeting wiU tie held, at Heerenven on Wednesday and Thursday -next, while tho.ma1;oh for the Qhampibniibip_of tiie world will take place hero Oft Dec. 22. ffor the latter event the fastest skaters in the world will oompote.'lnjsludlng- the Engllah and American ohamiloftii;-':    L Youn^ and ponneff ^Winners. New York, Deo, 13.-At the Manhattan Athletic Club's grounds today. Young won the two-mile steeplechase in lOtn, �0 2-�s. George was second,i For the 10-milo championship run, Oou-aeff won in eCm. 3a 4-6s. Young waa seo-ond and Lloyd ,thir4.;.......____ Another Draw at qUesa. New York, Dec. .'is.-The ^championship chess match between Steinitz and Gunsberg resulted in a draw, today as on Tuesday. Stelnitz won on Thjoi'sday.' Sporting Notes. Tho Boston Chass Club will hfeMafteropen its rooms, 33 Pomberton sci., throe even&gs in each week-Monday, Wednesday and Sattuday-for the reception of visitors, Oaraman John Taemar is in San Franciaco trying to arrange a race with Henty I'eeter-8011, the champion of the oottat. Toemer will give the Callfornian a start of fire seconds in a threo.jnUe race. "BLUFF" m.BEAL ESTATE, Parnellites Eeady, to Meet O'Brien. Majority "of Party Want Jo Throes of Agitation. Important Sole of Ooncress Street Prop- .  ortiea....... It hos been a week of "bluff" in real estate affairs. Large offers have been made and declined, and many small isroperties sold. Two Important purchases were made, however, on Congress st.; No. 16. comer of Congress stj., opposite the Traveller ALL FOB BEATING YALE. Harvard Foot Ball Men Banqueted in New' York. New York, Deo. 13.-Tho Harvard Club of ihia city teiidored a rousing reception and biumuet tonight at thoir club house on West 22d .St. to members of tho victorious Harvard foot ball eleven in honor of thoir 'recent defeat of tho Yale blues. The members of the eleven who came wore Cn]>t. Cumnock, Upton, Findlay, Now-oil, Hallowell, Lake, Corbett, Lee and Ay 1 ward. Alter an elaborate menu had been discussed President King ot tho club welcomed tho victorious athletes and spoko of tho success of the crimson banner. Lawyer C. C, Breman made the snaecii of the evening, which waa responded to by Capt. Cumnock, _ BLAVIN BEADY  TO SAIL. California Sports Doubt Corbott's Sincerity. San Feakcisco, Dec. 13.-Joo Thompson, the Australian bookmaker, received a cablegram from I'rank P. Slavin today, stating that he would leave London at once for California to meet Jim Corbett unless advised to remain. Tlio California Club has offered a 510,000 purse for a contest in March. Sports generally doubt Corbett'a sincerity, but witli Jiickson, Slavin^ Corbett and Mc-AuiifJ'e on the ground, abig battle is assured to follow tho Ifilrain-Godfrey contest. Pais!.>,. Da\ni!r started Eiust tonight with WTostlerd Lewis and Mclnerney. Thoy will seek Corkeek for a mutch. Gibbons WUline to Heet Needham. President Fulda of the California Athletic Club tolsgraphed Capt. Cooke of this city yesterday, asking if he could get Austin Gibbons to meet Dannie Needham at the club next month. Gibbons was telegraphed and ho replied that he would accept if tho club made tho woiiflit 132 pounds, pay his gain was raud6 yesforday afternoon and tiie papers will be passed tomorrow. It is inx-probable that any change in the two structures will bo niado, at.prMept, as there are several leases in the way of immediate improvement. Tho price paid for tho two estates is said to havo been'8100,000. There seems to bo no foundation for the storv that James Ste>'enso� had been tendered and ret'uHod $1,000,000 tor his store property on tho 'east side of' CoiumbuB av. and Park sq; Tho tact that tliora are several largo firms loolting about tor sites upon which to build haJ9 led, and will lead, to scores of reported marvelloua ofifers that vdll never materialize. As a nlle holders of eligiolo property are content. Tho oisposaiof sovoraicoinpat.'jtlvely new store aiid waretiouse properties in the neighborhood of tlio southoni railroad stations recently, is explained by one of the sellers as being in consequence of lijs Inability to runt the upper floors. Consequently he sold to llrma that will- occupy entire proportie.s. Tlia Boston Cathoho UJiiou, It is roportetl, is contemplating an early removal, ,ana several sites for a new building have been examined. Tho Ryan estate, (nOODsmjare feet) ou Commonwealth av.. Beacon and Brogklino sts., seems tu be the favored spot at present._�   � AN ACCKPTABLH GIPT. AdvertlBing a Populai- Article and Getting Snowed Under with Orders. As a result of Tkk Globe's announcement on page � of last Sunday's issue that tho Dunlap Pen Company of 280 Washlugton St. would send byrottim mail their latest perfected double-feed fouutau) and gold pen at greatly reduced prices, a perfect avalanche ot letters was received from all parts ot New England, and the company wore snowed under with orders.' Tboy had 10.000 pens in stock, but as every one seemed to be taking advautaga ot the reduced prlco.it was feared that tie �demand would become greater than tho supply, and the mimufucturers would be compelled to advance prices. As yet no advance has been made, and so long OS the stock on hand lasts the Dunlap Pen Company will,continue their unpar-nllflled offer, and give each purchaser a lltioral discount from regular retail prices. This pen is deservedly popular in literary Boston, and also among writers in all parts of tho country. If you buy one for yourself, or as a present to some friend, it is sure to please, and will be kept and used for years. LADIBS.BOlBZEI YOUR HOM3D HAPPY. What la More Beautiful for a Slmas Gift to a Oentlemtn Than a Meerschaum Pipe ? The Inigeat variety ol this precious article is to be found at F. Abraham's palatial eatabliBhinent. 25 to 29 Court St.. whore during the holiday season tho commodious wholesale room in rear of atore Is especially fitted UD for ladies' trade. It will bo a pleasure to yon to inspect the endless devices made forthe ubo of araok-ers, and tlie heads ot Cleveland, Jolin Boyle O'Kellly. etc., carved in mearschaum. aro really a work of art. There is no deceit, as every artioia is warrantod as repreaeuted, and tho reputation of fair dealing is the pride of this old-establiahed house. Secured His Bondo. Btooghton, Dee. 13.-William. Cranston, who it is alleged committed an assault upon James Dykeman 'J'huisday afternoon, was ui'raigned before Judge. Itlorden today and held hi 8200 bonds for appear.Tjr named for flist-olaSs goods. lUo rnatter what kind of perfumo you want, you can save monay by buying it Bt'.40 Brqrnfield St.; 200 odors from 'tvhioh to. aelect, IVs recommend as Portioularly good, wood WAllD'S no. 40,SEXTUPI.E EXTRACTS: Jookcy Club, Mayflower, White Heliotrope, White R.oso, Violet, Kew-Moivn Hay, Ylang Yliuig and Uly of the Valley.    .   , TOIt a MOT1'X,j!! OP rrHK BKST peupumb. WOO�WAIt0>S Wo. <0 sextupi.b extract jocKmir ctcriB Is deservedly the most popular perfume In existence. Kverj'ljody likes it. it is the best perfume overma �IONS pi7T;irp Poie i;jESB thaw UAUB' OF O-THEKS' PRICES. BLUE STORE WITH RAINBOW SIGNS, BromfieEd St. For the Blue Store. For Iho Rainbow .Signs. For the Golden Mortiir over the door. For tho Number 40 which appears ou our signs 40 TISIES. OPEN EVENtNCS, AND ALL DAY, TOO! m mu- Only MfiTABLE SIDEBOARDS. Our line of Sideboards, from $26 to $60, include the best goods to be found in this country for tlie money. Every board is mado from tbe best kiln-driod Btook, and finished in Sixteenth Oentury or Antique, with handsome quartered tops. _ CHAIRS. "We are showine: some handsome patterns in high-back, oak Bining Ohairs, from $1.25 to $5. Arm and Tea-Ohairs to match. Furniture, Carpets and Ea.\ges, 1278 and 1280 Washinjlon St, Bosl&\ 220, 222 and 224 Brosdway, to, G SL, South Boston. OP*iN E'-i-ENINCS.' 47 4   

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