Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 27

Share Page

Publication: Boston Daily Globe

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SOTDAY,, DECEMBEK 14, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 27 K yon have ever been engaged to two girls at onoe you know exactly how Harry Pollard telt after the second Lenox Club assembly. "I'll cut and run," he said to himself the following morning as the full realization of his embarrassing .position dawned on his mind. "It's a devil of a mess." Ho pondered the situation for a time, and finally decided to accept an invitation he had from an old college chum to visit him at Cape Cod. Harry Pollard forthwith wired his friend Bob Hewitt and told him he was coming. Fiancee No. 1 was a tall, stately girl of Bhout 25. She had known H.irry Pollard ever since they were children. He had .\1-waya liked Carolyn Cannon, and that evening after they had waltzed together he thought he loved her, and told her so. She thought she loved him. and said so. It would have been very well, no doubt, if matters had paused here; but they d' In't. Fiancee No. 2 was Miss Aspinwall-Jones, and she wouldn't have captured Harry Pollard If it hadn't been for a very scheming mamma. When Pollard accepted a seat in Mrs. AspinwalWones' carriage to drive to the assembly ho did not dream the conse-nuences of the rash oct. For before the cotillon was half ovar^he scheming mamma had a very bad headache-and would Jlr. Pollard mind if she drove home at onoe? They might finish the dance, and very likely could got some one to, chaperone them on their homeward drive. ' "Yory likely!"-nothing of theisort. When Harry Pollard a;nd IMiss Aspinwall-Jones got into the brougham before everybody and brazenly started oft for a two-mile flrive after/midnight, significaut glances wore exchanged among the onlookerB. "Too bad, you know," said one. "He's too (I'ood a fellow for her." It was tacitly understood that she was hunting his money. She was an awfully pretty girl and all that, but frightfully poor. Miss Aspinwall-Jones had passed through four seasons more or less and was too old a hand to lot such an opportunity pass. It was not every day that she could manage things to have Harry Pollard alone with her in a brougham.   / It was an alleged fainting fit that did the business then, and when a girl sinks down on your shoulder, and when her lips look very red and tempting, what are you to do? Harry Pollard was but human, and forgot all about Carolyn Cannon. When he left Miss Aspinwall-Jones that night there was an understanding between them. "But don't tell any one yet," he said. Everything seemed to go wrong after he left Lenox. He missed his connections at Boston, and at last when he reached his Cape Cod retreat he found no one waiting for him at the station. P.ain was falling, and a hazy fog obscured everythimr. It iras after o and gi-owing dark rapidly. Han'y Pollard stood on the platform in nis gray mackintosh, and looked about helplessly. He ciuestionea the station agent and was directed to a cottage a half-mile up the road. Then he resolutely tramped off, carrying a single hand bag.. "I'll find-the place, never fear," h e said. � Presently he came to a cottage answering to the.'description given him. He walked up the steps, but before he had time to pull the bell the door was opened suddenly, a pair of arms were around liis iieok and no was kissed heartily on the lips by an ex-tremely'pretty girl. He didn'tseom to mind it, and stood stock still in abject confusion. Then the girl drew back, saying: "Bob, dear, I'm so glad to see you." "Er-why, really.'^ie began. The-'mstant he spoke the girl looked frightened. A wave of color flooded her: face, As the light from the hall streamed oh him and she saw his face, hei' eyes-Harry Pollard retained his self-possession enough to note they were blue and awfully pretty-looked very nmch troubled. Indeed sbe had somothhig to be troubled about. "Oil I" she exclaimed, and ran swiftly awav. Ha'rry Pollard -watched her, and stood blinlcing in the light. "Deuced cordial reception," he said to himself. "Wonder who she is? Not Bob's wife, of course; I know her. His sister? Ho had hone. Aiid she called him''Dear. Bob'-I'haf 0 tt-his cousinilby^JoVe."' Odd I didn't thiiik of It hetore. Just returned : rom abroad. Wish I had Icnown she was lere and liwouldn't have coino. I've had ciulte enough of. women; and she begins like the rest-kissing and all that sort of thing. My luck follows me everywhere." The door Was open and Harry Pollard felt that lie couldn't walk in, so he pulled the, bell and waited. Presently a woman came into the hall, find the moment she caught sight of Pol-ard she gave hiin, her hand and greeted lim cordially. "Where did you drop from?" she asked. "I am awfully glad to see you, So sorry Eobertisnothere." It was Mrs. Hewitt, of course, and Pollard found that they had not received his tele-rram,. as, the wires were down; and as for Sob Hewitt he was in Boston, but expected lome every moment. . "You'll- find. It awfully dull here," said Fob's wife; "but Cousin Lou is v/ith us, and want.y.outo like her very much." And lie'- did ike her -very much.  When she oanip down to tea her face was still burningi..and she lookod(shy.!y at him. "Mr. Pollard, this is Cousm Lou," said Mrs.'Hewitt. ,     ., ,      , "We have already met," said Pollard, whereupon she blushed and looked iiugry, and he regretted his want of tact. Pollard had been there but a short time when he felt that after all there were worse nlaceslathe world; and, as for Cousin Lou, Aore wijr'e' -worse girls-Miss Aspinwall-Jones, iEor instance. Tliero wore walks on the beagh, drives; and chats >^ttor tea every day, ana he came to know Cousin Lou liotter In a week than if he had raet her in society tor a year, There was a pecnliar charm in her presence, a witchery in her manner that aided her physical charms , Her mind was a treasure house that day by day yielded its store, and Pollard began to feel ashamed of his ignorance of many things this girl knew better than he. ,       , The inevitable happened one day. They wore returning from a walk on the beach. Asou'woasler was blowing and a mist lay at soa;.rain had begun to drizzle when they reached tho house and a light streamed from the front windows. "This i.'i much like tho tot night I mot you," he said. . ,    . , "Yes?" she said, with a rising inflection that was pecuhar to her voice...... ||Anc|^itseemssoYery long ago," he added. "AndiSinoe then I have discovered some-thing-^iJhall I tell you what it is?" Silence. ,.        -,     ,      � "1 love you very much-may I hope? May I hope that sometime you will tell me that you love mo?" ..... "iles"-this time \v:thout the nsmg Inflection. ^ ,   , That was all there was to it, or nearly all, and the next day HariT Pollard went away. "Now for tho governor," he said to him-Belf as the train nearoU Boston, He found him at the oftice and.wasmet with a frown. ,       ____. "What's this I hear fi'ora Lenox?" his fatliersaid. ,^ ,,   , "From Lenox?" and the younger Pollard looked as innocent as a iamb.     ,   , "A person by the name of Jlrs. Aspipwall-Jonos -Ti-rites me that you liave proposed to her daugliter. Is it true?" ,  , "Well, yes, I suppose it is," replied the younger man, desperately. "You won't mai-r.v lier, sir-do you hear?" "Eh?" replied I'ollard the younger, sadly bewildered. "I have broken off tho engagement, sir; -wrote to her, and told her you do not get a cent of my money unless you marry as 1 direct; she wrote back that it was rci-y cruel, very -\^'ickod in mo to wreck two yoiuig lives, but I wrecked them. There, sir. is a laokage the young M'oman sent me, contiuning a few jim-cnicks yea tent her," and the elder man liiinded tlm asloundoU voungster a package. "Nov, don't let me LcM- of any more such nonsense." ^t seems too pood to bo true," almost shouted the exultant youth. "Thank you, Bovornor, awfully," and ho grasped his father's hand enthusiastically. "God bless my soul, what do you mean, t say? What do you meau?" "I'll tell you some day," and out of the offloa rushed Harry Pollard. He had scaroyly gained the street when he remembered Carolj-n Cannon-and he hadn't said a word to his father about Bob's cousin Lou. Perhaps he had better wait. But what did his father ine.in by saying that he must marry as he should direct. If be went against his wishes ho would not get a cent of money from his father, and money, you know, is an extremely necessary urtiole even if it is "love in a cottage." But Lou-his father must ste her to agree with his son tliat sbe was the most glorious woman in the v.-orM. -A-ud that Caioiyn Cannon affair-how could he get out of that'/ I-l-.! woulu go to Lenox, at ail events, and face the music, Perhaps Bomething would turn up. But liow could he explain his .sudden riepartui-e. Business?-yes, very important business, took him awav. When he got to Lenox It was about 31 o'clock in the morn'nir. and ho ielt very :aody, having had but little sleep the night lefore. He went to the hotel and freshened up a hit, and then started to walk to Miss Can-lion's cottftge. Tvhich -was but a short dis-tunoe away. s On the way a buokboerd drove by, and he saw Miss Aspinwall-Jones and her scheming mamma. The,latter bowed coldly, tho lormor ofifusively, as it to show-BhO didn't care much, after all. Pollard returned her bow, a little awkwardly. Ho felt sheepish, remembering what had passed in the brougham tliat night. As ho neared M ss Cannon's cottage lie nerved hirtiself up as to what he should say. Should he deny the existence of their engagement, say she misunderstood him, or should he throw liim-selt on her nieroy and say they had both made a mistake. , About a hundred yards ahead of him ho saw her turn a comer-how -well ho "remembered that tall, graceful figure and tliat languid, deliberate gait. He liasteiied his steps to overtake her, but she turned into her gateway before he could catch up with her. H would ha-\'o c.illed out to her. but some people were passing and he did not care to attract their attaution. She turned licr liead caralessly, but evidently did not SOB him, for she did not bow. She passed on and entered the house. An instant later he stood on tho steps and toHohod tho boll. A serviiigluaid answered. . Will you please ask. Miss Cannon if . she will see mo," he said. Tho m.aid went away, and a moment after^ wards returned.     . Xho answer dumbfounded him. Miss Cannon-is not at homo." He said not a word and then went away. It was a little unpleasant to be thrown over tliat way, btvt perhaps it, saved a good deal. He -ivrote her a note tiio next day oilerin'g to explain if she would see him. He said she was unjust and cruel; he could tell her everything. AVould she not spe him? The note he received in reply-yvas very lorraal; she declined to see him. That was all; but Harry Pollard felt relieved. Showas a woman' he had known for a louEf tiine, and without giving him an opportiuuty to reply to charges which were trivial m themselves she deliberately threw tliim over. But it was what he wanted- what he came to Lenox for, but, withal, very .humiliating. He went; back to Boston and wrote to Carolyn Cannon a full. confession, at tho same time telling her of his engageinent with:Bob's cousin Lou. A short time after--wards ho received a note from her congratulating him.^ When they meet' on Commonwealth av. thoy bow civilly, of course, but thafis all. :, Something very important took Harry Pollard away fi-om Lenox-a note from his father. When ho read it he frowned, for he felt that his troubles were not yet over. The letter read:, My Son-Come awiiy from Lonox immediately; I do not cure to hear,of any more engugemonts. BhaH expect to Bee you at tlie house tomorrow eveiir tag; I wish to, introduce your futui-o wife. Miss Miidlson. You linmv quite n3 well as I that if you m.irry us I direct you get a good part of my money, otherwise not a cent. Bllaa Mtidlson la one of the moat beautiful, InteUectual women I over know; her family Is Irroproaclmble, and abe Is not a money-hunter. If you go against my wialioa and throw over tlila girl and my money you are an ungi-atof ul cub. Tomorrow evening, at 8 o'clock, I shall expect to see you In the dra^vlhg-rooln. John D. Potr.AED. Should he go to the house, ho thought, as he walked aimlessly through tho public gardens. Tlirow over Lou for tliis money and the accompanying ine^^tab!e girl? Never, by Jove! "Beautiful, intelligent- bah 1" he muttered, as he walked up the steps of his father's house. He met his father in tho hall. "I'm here, governor," he said, forcing a laugh. "I suppose I shall learn my fate, hut suppose-^suppo'se this Miss M.adison doesn't Uke me?" 'No danger of that," replied the old man, rubbing his hands and laughing heartily. She is in the drawing-rpom. He pulled open the portiere and Pollard stepped In. "I'll leave you," said Pollard the elder. Harry Pollard stepped into the room and saw smiling, happy, radiant, Bob's coushi Lou. He stepped forward and then paused and looked at Tier blankly. "Lou, Lou,"  16 said,"Is 11 you? 1( pected to find M ss-Miss-" "Somebody else," she said, qtUokly. "I am she."   _ B-ASHIOWB MEVBIB OHANGH. Men end Women  In Iiapland Have Dressed the ^amo for 1000 Teara. [Domorest's Family Magazine.] The costume of the Lapps has not altered very much for the last thousand year,s. Their summer garment is usually of coarse woollen goods, and has somethingthe cut of a shirt with a high collar. Among the sea Lapps it is for the most part imdyed; among the other Lapps usually blue, sometimes green or brown, and even black smoot frocks have been seen. Around the -wristbondo, alons the seam in the back and on.the edges this smock Is ornamented-with strips of rod and yellow cloth. .Under;this gayment is a; similai! one, eitherplam or older, "worn next the body, for the Lapp never wears linen underclothing. The trousers or drawers are of -white woollen goods, rather narrow and reaching to the anlvles, where thoy are tied inside the shoes with long, slender shoestrings. Over these drawers are usually worn leggings of thin, tanned skins, reaching from the ankles to tho knees. Stockincs the Lapp never wears. He fUla tho upward cm-vmg tip of his shoes with a sort of grass, -which is gathered in summer and beaten to make it soft and pliable. The winter costume onlydilfers from tJiat worn in summer in that every piece is made of reindeer skin -with the hair:on. The dress of the women differs very slightly from that worn by tho men. .The smock is somewhat longer andis madff without tlie big, standing collar, instead of wliioh a kerchief or cape is worn about the neck. To the woven and often silver ornamented girdle hang a knife, scissors, key andneedle and thread. The head covering is not only different in the two sexes, but also differs according to the locality. He Slapped the Prince of Wales" Face. CSouth Side News.] Pjttshurg boasts of a man who slapped the I'rinoe of Wales in the face. He lives on the South Side and for many years has worked for the Monongahela Water Company as a laboring boss. The circumstances of the adventure as told by himself are as follows: � ' "In my early life I was a soldier in the British army, and onoe my regiment was reviowea by Queen Victoria, who held by the hand the youthful Prince of AVales, When the mother's hack was turned the boy playfully expectorated on my red coat, and I resented the insult to the British flag by slapping him in tho face with my open palm. He told his mother, and vorv soon tho colonel heard of it and came dancing along to \vreakven-gon,uoe on the man who dare lift his hand to a son of the Queen. "Tho Queen sought me out and graciously Inquired what my name was. 'Williaiti Dickson, sergeant, your majesty,' said I, and she commended my souse of propriety in administering a timelyrebuko to the heir apparent of tho English throne, and recommended mo for tlie promotion which never came."___ He Studied the Ov^l. CForeat and Stream,] Some of your readers might like to know of a new way to study owls. Some friends went out shooting a day or two ago. One shot at and -wounded the wing of a big Vir-giuia-horued owl. Ho was advised to kill the bird, but would notdoso. H^ wasgoing to study the bird alive, so he put the big bird down behind him in the blind. Soon a duck came flj-ing along, and he stooped so low in shooting he sat on tho owl. The ou'i, not liking this way of being stud-iod, fastened its claws into his back and re-fused all attempts to make it lot go. and the more they tried lo g^ him off the harder ho pinched, and from the howling of the man it would appear as if the owl was studying the man instead of the man studying the owl. The bird had to he killed before he would lot go, and although the man's back may not 00 as smootli as usual, and it may be some time before he can sit down, he knows more about owls than he did. The Man and the Mulo. tlndianapoUs Journal.J 1. The mule balketh, kicketh, waxeth stubborn and proolaimeth there is but one proper course, and that he is the sole patentee thereof. 2. Whereat mankind is fain to fall upon him -with clubs of great weight and heat him full sore. i!. Now, the man of like mind oomforteth liimself in a mauner similar to the mulo. i. And tho laborers in the vineyard look upon him with awe, and the people say to one and another: Let us grant him his v.'ishos that we may have peace. 5. And in time he is gathered to his fathers full of honors and followed by brazen instruments discoursing wails of Woe. AU'b Fair In Xiove. [Munacy'a Weekly.] He-Yon consider cngagementg binding, you say? She-Yes, He--And you confess that you wore engaged to two mm at the same time. How can that bo pos'-ibje? aiie-Iiie engagements were blading on them, but not on ine. Its �Whereabout. CKew York Sun.] He-Hello! 1 wonder where my hat has "^"she (glancing at the clock)-It must have gone home. OCEM lATES. Tlieir Size, Variety, Power and Scenic Effects. Last Winter's Troraondons Seas and Tlifiir Enormous Bestrnctivencss. What Sailors Mean When They Say That Waves Ean Mouatains Hig-h. [Kow York Sun.] The onorrnous might and destruotivenoss of ocean waves, altUotigh long well known by "those who go down to the sea in si - s," have never been more forcibly brought to the attention of landsmen thaii'during tho past winter. The reports of shipmasters engaged in the North Atlantic trade prove conclusively that tlie winter of lgi89-80 was marked by violent gales and more tremon-.dousseas than, any other w.intorof which we hiive any record. it is well known to seamen that about the nastl(33t open ocean waves in the world are in-the gulf stream, to the southward of the banks, whore tho current opposes them when theycomefrom the east. The current seems toTnake them narrower,and steeper. The size of awave is nothing to a sailor, provided it is broad enough oii the base and has sloping instead oflsteep sides. The largest waves to be found are off the Capo of Good Hope, whete, at times, there are not over h.ilf a dozen swells to the mile, but they are not at all dangerous compared -\vith such a sea, for instance,. as was encountered by the steamer. Glamorgan in her passage from Liverpool to Boston a few years ago. Tho stoamerwas noted for her structural strength, but slie was boarded during a g.ale by one wave that tore off her iron bulwarks ns if they wore n;ftde of oardooard, carried away her boats, broke away the whole side of the iron house on deck, tore off hatches, filled the hold and made her a complete wreck. The Scytiiia, in a voyage to Boston last January, made during 24 hours H07 miles by the indicated revolutions of tlie screw, hut, in fact, she made only 86 miles ahead, owing to the propeller .being almost constantly out of tho watei while the vessel was riding the enormous seas. In tho same gale the Sardinian, from Portland to Liverpool, shipped a sea that tore from its fastenings lier heavy iron smokestack, flooded the fire-room and put out the fires, smashed all- her boats but one, and killed three men. In the same month the steamship Bhyn-land, from Antwerp to New York, was boarded by one sea that smashed five of her boats, her wheelhouse and her port rail. Another sea fell on deck, smashing three more boats, oarryincf away the rail, breaking the hea-vy iron turtlobaolc and disabling the steering gear. The Italia was struck by a sea that snapped off two blades of her propeller as though they were pipe stems. Half the steamers tl-iat crossed the north Atlantic in the past winter had to put into Halifax for a fresh supply of cool, and several were obliged to burn their boats, flpars, bulwarks, and even portions of their cargo, to reach port. Many of them, with theii' bows pointed to tho sea and their powertul engines going at full speed, could not make any headway against the tremendous force of the Waves and wind. Many were obliged to put back to Liverpool, as during days and weeks of battling with tho waves they could make no headway against them. In several cases the crews refused to do duty unless the captain would put back to port. Some were actually set back by the elements in spite of their best efforts to drive against them; others were only saved from foundering by lying to and using oil, and others were overwhelmed in their terrible battle with the awful seas and went down. Perhaps the influence of the tides on the waves is nowhere more clearly shown than on the coasts of Scotland. In tho long, narrow bays that indent the coasts the tides have a very rapid current. No boat ean live therein a gale that is running contrary to the tide. Tliere is a tlieory that tho tides are tho cause of a very strllcing peculiarity of the waves in a storm. It lias been noticed that after a series of moderately high waves have passed a ship she will encounter three jn succession Tvhioh are conspicuously largrOi Then there will be a longer or shorter period of comparatively moderate waves, followed by three more very large ones, and so on. Some sailors believe that tides or cuwents tripping up the waves bring them together until thoy miite in those enoi'mous swells that carry havoo on their crests. In support of tills is cited a case at Peterliead Harbor, on the English coast. Over SO years ago there was a great crowd of people down near the beach one day watching tjie swells come in from tho severest storm on record at the time. About two hours before higli water three tremendous waves rolled in, and,breaking on the beach, carried away 315 feet of a great bulkhead, built nine and a half feet above high water of the spring tides. One piece of tlie wall weighing 13 tons, was carried 60 feet. Two hours exactly after high tide three more waves oame In of a similar bharooter, hut they did less damage. This -was tho first case on record in v/hich the formation of the big seas was oounooted with the tides; but similar observations have been frequent since then. It is on record that the -waves of the German Ocean once broke in two a solid column of freestone 86 feet high and 17 feet in diameter at the base, Tho diameter at the place of fracture was 11 feet. At the top of the Bound Skerry of Whalsey, in Zetland, tho waves have broken out of their beds, which are 85 feet above the level of the sea, blocks of stono weighing from eight to 10 tons. Snloaton, in his history of tho Eddystone lighthouse, says, in referring to tlie power of waves, that controlling these powers of nature is Hubjoot to no calculation." At Port Sonachan, in England, -where tho "fetch" of the wa-yos, or the breadth of the water over whloh they travel, is but 14, miles, a block of stone weighing a fourth of a ton was torn out of a solid stone stairway leading from a landing. It wre then rolled over and over. If sucn effects are obtained under such circumstances, what must be the force which Atlantio steamers have to encounter? But for the enormous strength of tho modern steamer and tJio facttliatsho rarely receives the full impact pf tho wave, few steamers could liopo to -witlistand tho tremendous power of tlie ocean waves in a gala of wind. Tho case is entirely diff'eri'nt with s.ailing vessels. Those are ligiiter, more buoyant, and ride tho seas butter than steamers. Besides, they are never, of course, forced head to the sea. In violent gales they either scud before tlio seas or lie to. while tho steamer is frequently forced, at a high r.ato of speed, directly toward the approaching swell. Although the Nortfi Atlantic is noted above every other body of -water in the -world for its dangerous seas, it has not a complete monopoly in this regard. At Tillamook Book Lighthouse, situated in the Pacific, otf the coast of Oregon, a stone weighing 62 pounds was tlirown by the force of the waves to the top of tne lightkoeper's house, 110 feet above the sea level. During the same gale tho waves were so high that the water came down the chimney of tlie boiler house of the fog siren in torrents and poured out through the tubes of the boiler. The chimney is 130 feet above the sea level. Tho spray entered the cowl of tho chimney over tne lamp, which is about 150 feet above tho sea level, and ran in streams to the bottom. Some experiments have been made with a view accurately to measure the {orce exerted by v.-aves. The instrument is called a marine djmaniometer. It has a known surface for the water to impinge on, tho force of tho impact being transferred to springs of Icnowu strengths. Tho distauoo to which the springs are compressed is self-registering. This instrument has recorded the force of tho waves, not under extraordinary circumstances, as high as three tons to the scjuare foot. No doubt, in exceptional cases, the pressure has been more than double that figure. Any one obsorving ocean waves cannot fail to bo struck with their rapid advance, even when their dimensions are small. A wave 200 feet in length, froha hollow to hollow, has a velocity of 10 Icnots an hour, and such waves are of common occun-enoe. A wave 400 feet in length has a velocity of 27 knots an hour, and an Atlantic storm wave eOO feet long moves at the speed of 32 knots an hour. In considering tho subject of the velocity of waves, it should be borne n mind, however, that in all wave motion t is the wave form which travels at tliose ligh speeds and not the particles of water. This has been satis Eactorily proven, both by observation and experiment. If a billet of wood is'dropped overboard from a sliip.past which waves are travelUii.g at great speed, it is v.-ell known that it is not swept away, as it would bo on a tideway where the particles of water moved onward, but it simply sways backward and forward as successive waves pass. The velocity of waves is said to depend primarily upon the power and coiicinuauce oi tho wind, but it is grially modihud by and bears an ascertainable relation to their magnitude aud ihe depth of water over which they pass. It has been calculated by Airy thatuM-avelOO feet in breadtii, and in water 100 foot di-op. travels at the rate of about 10 miles an hour; one 1000 feet broad, and lu water lOOo feet deep, at the rate of 43 miles; one 10,000 feet in breadth, and in water 10,000 feet deep, will sweep forward witli a velocity of not less than 164 miles an hour. Bache stated, as one of the effects of an earthquake at Samoda, on the island of Niphon, hi Japan, that the harbor was first emptied of j|ivater, and there came in an enormous wave, whloh receded and loft the harbor dry.' This occurred several times. The self-acting tide register at San Francisco, which records the rise of the tide upon oylmdors turned by clocks, showed that at that place. 4800 miles from the scene of the eartlKiuake, tho first wave arrived 12 hones and 16 minutes after it had receded from the Iiarbor of Samoda. Honco it had travollod across the broad bosom of tho Paciflo oooaii at tho rate of six and one-half miles a minute. Carefully repented experiments made by an experienced English navigator at San-taiider, on tho nortih coast of Spam, showed tlio crest of tlio sea waves in a prolonged and licavy gale oC wind to bo 42 feet high; and allowing tho sumo for the depth oo-tween tho waves the result would bo a li.oight of 84 feet irom crest to hollow. The distance from crest to crest was found to he afiH feet. Estimates of tho waves in the south Aclantio during groat stonns givo a height of 50 feet for tho crests and 400 feet for length. In the North sea tho height of crest seldom exceeds 10 feet, and tho length 150 feet. Tho Comto do Marsili, in his "Physical History of the Sea," says that the highest wave observed by him on the shores of .Languedoc, where tho fetch across tho Mediterranean was GOO miles, was ISVs foot from crest to hollow. No doubt this height has been exceeded at times, although the Mediterranean is by no means noted for heavy seas. The Gallia, in a voyage to New York last January, was boarded by a sea that her captain estimated was 100 feet high. The cnpt.ain stated that had the Gallia boon boarded by auotlier such sea she would have foiuidered inevitably. As to tho ratio of the heights to tho lengths observed in deep sea waves, authorities agree that as the lengths increase this ratio diminishes, and the wave slope becomes less steep. The shortest waves are the steepest, and the greatest recorded inclinations are for very short waves, when the ratio of height to length was about 1 to 6. For waves from sao to 850 feet in length t le ratio of 1 to 8 has been observed, but these ware exooption.illy steep waves; for waves of 600 to 000 feet in length it falls to about 1 to 20, and for the longest waves it is said to fall a9 low as 1 to 60. It seems probable that in waves of the largest size commonly mot the heiffht does not exceed one-twentieth of the length, and the highest limit of steepness in waves, which are large enough to influence considerably the behavior of ships does not give a ratio of height exceed one to ten. Waves from 600 to 000 feet in length are sorae-timos encountered having heights of from five to 10 feet only. THE ARIZONA KICKER. A Fresh Batch of Interesting kertis from a Great Paper Out In the Wild and Wooliy West. [Detroit Free Preso.J We extract tho foUovrfng Interesting items from the last issue of the Arizona Kicker; Gjitxino MoNOTONotrs.-Some one tn Omaha is selling off land in this neighborhood lor gardens and pasturage, and every day or two a tenderfoot shows up to take possession. He finds the laud to eelongto the government, aud to be composed as follows: Cactus......................... IB fiac:uba�2i,,......,............IB Sand...............04 100 In five different oa�es ottr privato pravo-yard has been included In sales, putting ns to considerable trouble and expense to liold it. We are getting racher tired of this sort of thing, and the next pilgrim who comes along and takes that graveyard for a oattle-rango of which ho is the sole owner has got to skip at the word, or make the tenth man sleeping imdor the sands;' We APOLoaizB.-The editor, owner, pnh-lisher and proprietor of the thing called "Our Contemporary" was driven frantic with jealousy because wo were able to order and pay for three Ibundles of paper at once. We happeiied to meet him in Bonny's hard-'ware store Tuesday afternoon, where he was dickering for a grindstone to use as a balance wheel on his "only steam press," and he boiled over aud called us a liar. We hone he can bo patched up, sewed together and saved from the grave, though the latest reports ai'O discouraging. We didn't mean to. If ho only will got well he may abuse us the rest of his natural life and vro won't say a word. Announcbmbnt.-We herdljy announce ourselves as a candldat* for mayor at the election in April. It is a little early, but no man eve.': secured an office by being a little late. We don't propose to let any sense of false modesty stand in the way of our getting there. We can read and -write and cipher. We represent tlie intelligence and manners of this commanlty. We are tho top-shoaf of Booioty and can borrow a hundred dollars at the hank any day. In brief, we are the best candidate who can bo put up for this office, and we are doing the pub-io a favor by consenting to run. Wo shall lavo something further to say on this subject later on. Wo don't want the office, but the olhce wants us. At least, wo think sho does. _ It's OtfB Wat.-Wo understand that Judge Rich fools very bitterly toward us be-oauso wo said in tho Kicker hist week that he got only his just deserts in the row with Maj. Baldwin. It's our way to state facts. The two gentlemen were disputing as to the color of a lack rabbit's eye. The major was tho soul of good nature until the judge pulled his nose. Wo stood close by and saw it all, and distinctly hoard the "spatl" of the huUet as it struck the Judge in the shoulder. Tho fact that Maj. Baldwin subscribes for five copies of the luoker while Judge Eioh worft have it in the house SOKS WE SAffi. does not bias us in the least. We say that when a man pulls another man's nose in malice he should he prepared for the worst. If the judge was not prepared it was his own fault. He is bragging that he -will serve our nasal organ in the same way before the year 1801. Judge, don't you tTy it -not miless you are tired of this vain world and want to go hence 1 Big Profits on Bmall qa-pltal. Ofow York Wookly^i Tramp (to handsomely dressed lady on fSie ovenue)-Please, mum, my family Is starv-In', on' I'll have tor sell my wheolbarrer ter buy bread. It's Just aroimd the comer, mum. Would ye like ter buy it? Lady-Mercy mel What could I do -with a wheelbarrow'i' I Uve in a flat, my good man. But I ^vlU liolp you gladly. Hero's a dollar. Tramp (to himself)-That's SO I've made ter day tryin ter sell a wlioulbarror ter kind people what lives in flats, an' I ain't got no wheolbarrer, uuther. Bather Alarming. CGood KewB.J Young 'wifo-r-Do you mean to say the company "Won't let you belong to tho Trade Union Benevolent Association any more? Young husband-I must leave It or be discharged. And they won't let me belong to the Help All Brotherhood, or the Fair Wage Society or tho Stick Together Association. Young wlfg-MeroyI Will thoy let yon stay married? Mistaken Idea, CCaiongo Triliuno.J       * Salesman (at hosiery department, loftily) -Of course. If the manager says for me to take the goods back I'll take them. Customer-You'll take them bank If he says BO?" "Certainly, sir." "Y'ou will be governed by what that plain little man in Waok says?" "Of course. Why not, sir?" "I thought you owned the store/" Willing to Help. [Good Kew8.] Fair oolleotor-Bog pardon, but I am out coHeoting tho means to build a new church, and our plan is a very novel one. I'ja sure you'll be Interested. Each one gives a brlok you Icnow, and- Housekeeper-Yes, mum, I see. Well, there's 10 foUcs in our family and I've no doubt there's 10 er 12 bricks in the back yard. Did ye bring a bag? Wot True Love, [New York Weekly.3 Daughter-I will have to break my engagement ^vlth Mr. Nlcefello, mother. I find I do not lova him. Mother-When did you make that discovery? Daughter-Last evening. I bbw him oat walking with .another womon and I did not want to muraer her at all. An Authority Speaks. [New York -n'eckly.} Citizen-Mr. Greatmaim, I heard a curious debate the other  ovcuiiig.   The subject was: "Can a Politician be a Christian?" Wliat's you opinion? Mr. Groatmnnn (local statesman)-He kin, but he'll git licked. A Sufferer. [Judge.3 "What nils Jones?" "He says he Is suffering from ayspepsia." "Why, he doesn't look Uke a dyspeptic." "Ho isn't; but his employer is." Mostly Balderdasli, but They Pleased Our Aunta. Tho Girls of Wlioni Tlioy Told Were All Under the Daisies or iu RoavoE. ITelly and Willy wera tJie Hero and Heroino of Many Pathetic Ballada. [Now Yo.rk ^vona.: ' The maiden aunt still has in her possession an old notebook into which she copied the favorite sougs of her girlhood, hack in the lato forties and early fifties. It w.a3 tho custom then, she says, for girls to keep song-books of this sort, and hers is so neatly copied in a round hand that the herringbone chirogapliy of lier niece gives tho impression of a lunatic's ra'vlngs beside Patti's songs. So I suDPOse that this old book of 'my maiden aunt, from which I shall make a few selections, mirrors tho popular taste in songs at that fat-away period wheti gold was being discovered m California. No D.an MotJintys or Mr. O'Reilloys were celebrated in song then. Tho Ii'ish song was luiknown. Dutch dialect had never been heard of, and sougs were written in English or negro lingo-tho stage negro dialect. The South was then looked at as a land of flowery beauty, and many were the songs referring to its b.almy winds, magnolia trees ,and orange groves. The sentimental songs are dead nowadays. Here is one of the old ones: KAir OAnuKo's oitA-ni. Oh, I'm liiiociUiig l)y thy gi-avo, Katy darling, Tills -world la all n blank -world to rao. Oh, conld'al. thou hour my walUng, Katy darllnsl Oh, think, lovo, I'm sighing for thoo. Oh, motlilnks tlio stars nro weeping, By tliolv soft and lambent light, And thy heart wotUd bo melting, Katy dnrUog, Could'at thou see thy love, this snd ulght. Oh, listen, awoet ICatyi Tor tlm wild flo-wcrs aro sleeping, Katy dnrltog, And tho lono birds are singing on oauh tree, "Wilt tliou never more hear �io, Katy darling? Oh, know, love, I'm kneeling by thee. Whether or not such a superfluity of "Ohs" caused Katy to rise from her grave Ig unrecorded. But that this song was immoiisely popular in its day is attestea by tho existence of about 090 parodies of it, liaving refrains such as "Ducky darling" or "Bobby darling" (Bobby standing for a policeman) or "Coolcey darling." Here is more sentiment: XnEIK lAY. Lay her where the -woodbine oUngvth To the darlt magnolia tree, When! tho breeao low music t)rlnBOtai From the bosom of tho sea. -With a Borro^Tf ul devotion, ., Lay her where sweet violets bo, Whore Uio le.ivcs keep gentle inoUoa To the brtatlUng of the asa. There l.iy her, there leave her, Our young EUa Lee, Ever blooming us tho anmmoiv '   Ever humming like tho beo, �Vrt believed her aomo bright beSnft rrom tho land whore angels boj Wo Imvo lost hor~over lost her- Our fair Etta, EUa Loo. The popular heroine always used to be dead; it may be noticed "Rosalie, tho Prairie Flower," was dead, too: FaAIIUB BLOESOK. Hut the summer faded, and tlie ehllly blut O'or that happy oottnge swept at laabi When the autumu song birds woio with tha mom, Little pralrto flower was gone. For tho angels \vhluperod softly hi bor QRXf Child, the Father ciais thee, stay not lser�i And they gently boro Uor, robed In spotloes vriiSte, To their bllBstul homo of light. Ohoraai Though we shall never look oo her eny more, Oono with the lovo and the ]oy she bore. Far a-way she's blooming in a todelesa bow�, Sweet BoB,ille,.tho pratrl* flower. Here's another melancholy bit obout girl niunod Nelly-dead, of courao I ......Kovr onAKO�. In 13is ha3:el dell my Nelly's slcoplnff, -IVhoro tho Oowors wavoj XDi tho silent stars are nightly -meptag O'or poor Nolly's grave. Hop�s that onco my bosom fondly ^btlWwA Smllo on mo no more; Jtv'iy dream o� Joy, alas I hue perlsllo  at home. To this homesick youtli the folio-wing reply was made: dm>i:il A h^tstack, moniLnLT. The shadows of evening aro falling. Oh 1 whero is the wanderer now? The brecz.e that fioats l]t;tiUy around me rorcbauoo may soon vlall his brow. Ob J bear on thy bosom a message, 'We're watching, oh why wilt thou roam. Thy heart has grown cold and dejected, l-'or we mlsB thee, we mlaii ihee ut home. As wus Nolly for a heroine so was AVlIIy ioi- a hero. Of coatiio there -\va� a "Wil!y wlio was "niisiied." w1i.LIAB: c-r::,? 1111:1:1;. Oh, Willy, Is It you, dc:ir'' b;ifc, saf,: at home; They did not tell inv true, dear; they sold you would not cmtie. I've wntthed for you at the gate, and It made my heart rtjoloe. When I hoard your woll-known footsteps and that dear, fanilllAr voice, SiaMng muElo on my ear In tho Inanely midnlgtit gloom. Oh, Willy, we have missed you; welcome, -weloome home. 1 We've longed to see you nightly, but this night of all; The (Ireaworo bhizlng brightly and the lamp wM la thohaU; The lltUs ones vron np tlU twn� 10 o-olook or pa�t| But their oyefl bogan to twlnklo, and thoy^ gone td sleep at last Thoy listened l!or yottr TOloo ffll they thought ym'A novor come. Ob, WlUy, wo hSTB missed you; woloome, walooma homo. Whero Willy went Is possibly explained by another song: OK Ttta OQjusr WAVa. My Willy la on tho dark bins soft, no's gone far over tho matn, And many a dreary day will pass 'Ere ho'il como back again. OnoitDo- Then blow gontlo winds o'er tho darH Woo sea, Aud tlio storm king stay Ids hand. And brlug my WlUy back to me To his own dear native land. Hero is one of the humorous songa of CO years ago: HurpoaKD To na mtouo. Oh, white folks, I will sing to you Abo:it my dear Buaanuah, Sho'fl tho gal that utolo my heart avny, 'V/ny down In Alabama. She's tall and slender 'bout tho wahit, Aud beantlful as Wcnus; Of all tho gala I ever soo She am tho greatest gonlns. CBonuB- Oh, glva mo the gal with the blno dress 00 Tho whlto folks call Susannah; Bho etolo my heart andawny she's gone. Away dovm In Alabama. My love can out do pigeon whig. And Ukowlae out do polka; Bho'a a aamaer In do darky Jig And a sylph In do cow chokper. Her gay htch heels doy go so fast Tho darkles look witti wonder, Eomo tall down and taint away And tlilBk they're struck with thtmder. I took her to 0 ball one night. And when -we wont to supper She tainted, and obov do turkey foU And run hor head hi do butter. Doy used camphlre to fetch her to, IJnt dou it was too later, For a turkey log etucU m hor throat And she cliokod to donth with a 'later. Similar would be the last minutes of any one who should attempt nowadays to iniilot on the public songs such as those. THE MOTHER'S JUST PRIDE. An Anecdote that Illustrates tho Impulsive Ways of the Chicago Girl and Her Aptness In Catching On. [Chicago Tribune.] "Mabel, my dear, is it true?" "Yes, mamma." The elderly matron fondly stroked the bright golden hair of her beautiful daughter, and a smile of gratified motherly pride played about her lips. Time had dealt gently with the elder of these two women. In the few threads of silver that shone in her still lustrous and wavy hair, in the scarcely perceptible linos at the corners of her soft gray oyes and iu the slight hollows that suggested rather than indicated an impaired symmetry in the piue oval of her pale ohoek might ho seen tlio evidences that tho passing years had touched with loving flngers the face of th s gentle mother. "Clarence Dashaway has aslcod you to be his wife?" "Yes, mamma." "I need hardly toll yon, Mabel," re oined her mother, "that your father and vrill Internoso no obstacle in tho way o your happiness. It I had boon asltied to name tb s young man to whom I should prefer abc j all others to intrust the future of my darling child I should have named Clarence Dashaway. He is a noble, liigh-souled, chivalrous young man, the native nobility of whose character mirrors tseif In tho glauoe of Ills eye, the tone of his voice, aud in eveiT movement of his manly figure. In winning tho ove of Clarenoe Dashaway, my child, you have fulfilled every wish that a fond mother could cUorisU for her only daughter." "Yes, mamma," said Mabel, her beautiful face aglow with love and pride, I have Kot there this time with both feet." ' Sensible Ohrlstmaa Hints.. CXlteabeth Btuart Phelps tn Ladies' Homo Jomtnal.] Buy no more than you can afford. Give no gift where you do not delight to. Shop no more than you have the strengtli for. Entertain only -within yonr meon^. Keep your Christmas nerve and mnsoJo and heart and hope and cheer first for your own homo, your own fireside, your dearest, your closest, your sweetest-and then for the homeless, the flroloss, the unloved, the undoared," and be true, true, true to the last Christmas card that goes to your post ollice, or tho last "Merry Christmas' that crosses your lips I We aro a generous people, and- a happy people, and a Christian people, and we must Keep our festival with sincerity, honor, intelligence and good sense, if we would keep it alive aud "in His name." Got the Informatloa. CiSpringlJeld Qrflphlo.3 Mrs. Hayfork-Anything for mel Rural postmaster-I don't see nothto'. Mrs. Hayfork-I was expeotiii' a letter er postal from Aimt Bally Spriggs, toUiu' what day she was oomin'. Rural postmaster (calling to his -wife)- Did ye see a postal from Mrs. Hayfork's Aunt Sally, tellin'what day she was comln'7 His wife-Yes; she's oomin' Thursday. The Costly Doraestfo Kitty, est. Louis nopubUo.J A gentleman returned homo early enough In tho morning one night to arouse tho wrath of his better half. 'Been playing poker, I supposo," oho said, an hour later, at the breakfast table. "Yes, but don't soold. Here's half of what I won," handlng'her a crisp now $10 bill, ''That makes me Just ?80 loser," he groaned to himself, as ho giilltly Bwallowod a hot bisouit;__i_ Tho Cost of Advortlatefit. [America.] A slntflo page in an issue of the Centuryi taken for advortiehig purposes, costs 8C00; In Harper's, $400 down to SIOO. A yearly advertisement in one column of the Now York Herald costs $.'10,,"lOO for tho lowest and $130,000 for tho highest priced column. Those figures will doubtless ho of interest to men who invest Si! to Hii per month and flatter theraselvus with tlie idea that they are extensive and liberal advertisers. How It HoUod In. [New York Sun.J toying-wife-Now that yon aro ruined, Henry, I will disclose my secret. For years I have been saving up, and now (pouring a shining heap of gold into his hat) this may tide you over. Husband-Oh. my darling, how did yon manage to do it? Wif o-Kasy enough. Every time you said a mean thing to me 1 put 10 cents into a hex. CHRISTMS YOim. Recorded by a Phonograpli that Strayed into Ohnroh. Can On� Gnltivate the Ohristlan fIrtnes �n Two Bonnets a Year! Can a Woman Sing in tho Oholr and Have Good Will Toward Other Women? A Small Matter. [Now York Woekly.l Young lady (out yachting)-What is the matter, Capt. Quarterdeck? Captain-The fact is, my dear young laay, we've broken our rudder. Young lady-I wouldn't worry about that. The rudder moiitly IS under water anyhow, you know, and it isn't likely people will notice it.___ Quite Enough. [ITalrlo Fanner.] Oonstanoe-I care not for your porverty, Qoorgo. Let us wed at once. We  -Glory to God in the highest. Bass-Glory to God. Alto-Glo-o-o-ory to God to tho high-highest. Soprano (dellcato)-In tha hlgh-hlgh-hlgh-higli-highest. Tenor (forte)-Peace on earth. Bass-Peace on earth. Alto (audaute)-And-good-wlu-to- men. Sonrana (ad libitum)-And good Jfll- good will-go-o-o-o-d wi-1-1 to men. Good will to men. All (staccato)-And I good I will! to I men 1 IJiminiiondo.) And good -will to men. Crescendo.) And good will to men. (Prestissimo.) And good will to men. (Legato.) And good wUltomou. (Morendo.) Ah-h-men. Ah-mon. m THit Ajatn. Mrs. Gummy (as tho conprogatlon oom-meucos to leave)-What a lervent sermon our dear doctor gave us this morning? Mrs. Gargoyle-Yes, it was a perfect treat. Is my hat on straight? Mrs. Gummy-Yes, how It becomes yon, tool And what seasonabio sentiments or lovely Christmasi feeling Dr. Thirdly expressed. Ha quite lifted mo out of myself, By tho way, did you notice what a fright 01 a cloak Sirs. Jaysmith had on? Mrs. Gargoyle-Did I? How could I help it? .She sat right in front of me and kept gazing around in such an unmannerly way. I don't believe she heard a word of the sermon. Mrs. Gummy-And it's just such women as sho who ought to have listened to it carefully, for they say she talks about hor neighbors dreadfully. Mrs. Gargoylo-Oh, she's a regular slanderer. And sho has such eseorahle taste lu di'csa. Mrs. Gummy-No taste at all. one might say. _ Mr. Bloobumpor-bid yon enjoy tho sermon, lovo? Mrs, Bloobumper-Oh, Jt was exoulslte, but I would have enjoyed it better If I'd had as pretty a bouuet as Mrs. Gimp's to wear. Mine's a perfect fright, and so old fashioned. Mr. Bloobumper-I guess you didn't notice what the minister said about envy? Mrs. Bloobumpor-AVoll, I don't oarel One can't eultiviite the Christian virtues with only two bonnets a year. Mr. Bloobumtier-Well, if I made my money as unscrupulously as- (iirap makes liis, I could afford to let you gat all the bonnets your heart conld desire. Mrs. Bloobuippor-I guess you didn't notice what the minister said about love and charity.        _ Mrs. DlniUng-How delloiously well the qhartet sang the last anthem I _ Mrs. Totling-They did. Indeed. The soprano seemed at hor very bast. Mrs. Diuihng-So did the aito. Mrs, Totling-That is quite true. Indeed, tho tenor anil bass also did splendidly, Mrs. Diniliup;-Yea; I thought while they wore singing that they threw so muoh fervor into tho piece. Mrs. Totling-Thev seemed to feol In their inmost souls the full slgulfloauoo of every word they sang. Mrs. Uimllng-Our (inartet get along so well. There Is no blokerlng among them, as Is too often the case with vocalists. They aro perfect ladies and ctautlemeu. Mrs. Totling-Indeed, I think our ohoroli Is to bo congratulated on Its singers. IN THU CHOro tOFT. Bass (lielplng the alto to put on her "wraps -You did superbly. Alto-Oh, I'm so glad yon think so. Bass-I liolievo clio soprano la Jealoiw 0/ you. Alto-I know she is. tho spiteful thing, heard  thi'.t she told Sadie Morrison _ couldn't toil a B fiat from a hole in the ground. Bass-You hover speak to her, do you? Alto-Indeed I don't. What do you take me for? Bass-That's right! The tonor and I never spoak as wo pass by, oithor. He's such a conceited puppy,   ._ Soprano (as she helps tho tenor on -with his overcoat)-What a botch the alto made of it today. I was so mortified." Tonor-She thinks she laiows it all, too. She's Just like tho bim." Boprano-If I didn't know any more about muBlo than sho docs, I'd go out as a dlsh-washor. She had tho gall to tell someof my friends that I oOuldn't toll one note from another, but ifsho ever opens her mouth to me I'll sCratoli hor face. Well, good by, ' hone you'll have a merry Christmas." Tenor-Good by I Same to you. A Newspaper Proprietor's WhlniB. [Pittsburg Dispatch.] "James Gordon Bennett's methods are peculiar,''said an old newspaper man last night in an Interview with a reporter. "Ha once brought up a man from an outside town to work tho police courts. After a day or two he just as auiokly sent him back to work there on spaoo rates. The boy got rather rattled and declared ho would get even with Bennett. He did. There was a bad smash-up on the road, and he sent an exclusive account to tho bun. Bennett, of course wanted to know why tho Herald was heat, and when he learned it was his whilom police miin who had scooped him lie sent for him again and made him assistant dramatic editor. Ho said ho should not beat him again. "Shortly aftoward. when in Paris, Bennett cabled this man to como there and act ns city editor of tho Paris edition. Ho wont, and remained for two weeks, when Bennett, who had gone elsewhoro, tologi-aphed him to go to London and report to Oakey Hall, who then had charge of the London edition. Hall told him he had no work for him, and sent a message to Bennett to that effeot. Bennett then at once replied: 'Tell him to go to hades.' Probably he did, for he remained In London." The tiongest Word. [Elootrlcal He-view.] The longest word in tho Welsh language has, after a long period of obliv on been onoe more oxliumed. It is Llanlairpwllgwy-ullgertrobgllgorohivyrnbyllgogerbwiv jzen-ttvsiliogogogock. Tills awful word of 70 letters and a2 syllables is the name of a village in Wales.-[Exchange. It is quite a "long-system" cognomen, to be sure, but how does it size up alongside of "Mpwapwolonembarosgarinoinolanl an bu-mbonogorrokokotomolarembapwapwa g g o-nagollobarlgoolokomemwbapwhlghtmtpt-mWopwokomcmharlngwapwam w a p w 0 ? " This horrific onslaught on tho alphabotioal capacities is said to bo tho name of a "city" in Africa, consisting of less than 100 huts and ruled by a dusky king, Tho name is said to signify "Palace of Mpwa, owner of 100 wives, CO elephants and 200 slaves, and supremo king over two hills and tho river between." Evidently the "short" craze has not yet fallen on African linguistic systems. though the warm ond glo-wing coloM which ho perceives may be nothlner moro than the effect of his own emotion in hanging dowy moisture on the lenerthof his own artlstlo eye-lashes._I_ BRIG-A-BRAC. XiOTWiy Wonum. dBprti�fl�M Qrnphtoj It yon boUeve hor Bba win dec*lv9| It yon deceive bat, SM will bollev* Be-wora. [Budyard KlpUnj.] My ton. If  maldon deny tlieo and seoflUnSly blA thea glva o'er, Tet Up meets with Up at the laatward~got onti Bin has been tlioro before. They are pecked ontheearand tho 
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication