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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 25

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                .......,* -'Of:- THE WSTON.,.S,UKDAX GLOBE-SUNDAY* DECEMSK  1-1, 1890-T\TENT��EIGHT PAGES. 25 For this FIno CMPET EflGIl Only one sold to a ciistomor. Call early and BBouro the Best Bargain you avor saw. A large assortment of Fanoy Rockers, Student Gliairs, Resd and Rattan Chairs, De�il3, Bookoases, Gentro Tablos, Wlialnots, Mirrors, Lamps, Clocks, DInnor and Tea Sets, Toilet Sets, Albums, &o., &o. Chamber Stoves (Antl-Clinkor) . Chamber Stoves (Antl-Cllnker) . Parlor Stoves, with ovens, niokelled rails, vase and urn ... . $B2.00 Parlor Stoves, large sizes (to heat two rooms), niokelled rails, .vase and urn' . . . . .    . Small Cooking Ranges without ware, S@\SO,SB.BO, S9.50, $11.50 Double Oven Ho. 7 Ranges . , Cabinet Base, No. 7 Ranges . . 10-4 White Blankets per pair. . $1.00 11-4 White Blankets, per pair, ^ $3.00 Extra Large Comforters . . ,  $9.50 Satin-Finish Comforters  ,  ,  $2.50 Plush Parlor Sets  . Sultan Plush Parlor Sets Plush Sofa Beds , , Plush Sofa Beds . . � , $22.00 $35.00 $25.00 We will guarantee that when Ihp quality of the goods are considered we oannot be undersold in this olty.__ The Time to buy Is Now. The Plaoe Is Ours. The Opportunity Is Yours, CASH OR EASY TEEMS. No. 49 UNION STREET, -Aim- Wo. 757 Washington St., Boston. Restored brtlieusn of'SANAXIVO,' tic Wondorf ul BpanlDh Keracdy, cures fill Nervous jDinciises, Bucli us Weak Memory, Loas of Brnin Power, HondBcho, Wakef nl-nes3. Lost Manliootl Bofore & After Use. itndo, mi drnlns and ItisB oJ power of the GonoratlvoOritana In either RBx caused by overoxortlon, youthlullndlscretlonB, or the excessive UBe of tobocco. opium, or otlm-ulants, -wUicli ultimately load to Inilvmlty, Con-ennlptlon and Insanity, Piu op In convenient form (o carry In the vent pocket. Price Si n packngo, or 6 forfs. Six packages curea thB worst cqbsb. Setit by mall to any address. Clroulara free. Mention this paper. Address TT, S. Agents. Madrid Chemical Co,, 417 Dearborn St.. Chlcngo, tU. _    FOK SALB IN BOSTON, MASS., Bt 'Weelcs & Potter, JOU Washlnnton Street. Georgo C. Goodwill, 8B and 39 Hanover .strcict WSntf n6 GOLD MSDAL, gABM, 1878. W. BAICEK^ CO.'S Is dbBolxUely pure and it is soluble. No Chemicals aro usod in its preparation. It hni) vtorc tJtan three (�i;�et mo etrmsth oi Cocoa misttl with Htaruli, Arrov/root or,^iiB.ir, un nt �by muil prexi;iltl. With eiicti order fo;' clx boxe.'i ivitl Bend purcliuspr gnorauteo to rnfmid nionpy It tlio trRntniGnl falls to ouro. OuantnU'fH Indued and cjii-uinH sold onlv hv .*�-tr!]TE7, ICil^JX.frJj.Hiil^'r tfe SJLEGrKJSttJNW, 2U Treiiinn; St., IlOBtoii. .Sutf 87 GRATErUL-COMFORTING. BREAKFAST. "ISv a tlioroucTi Itridwkilgo of lliR ii.ita.ral InivB wMcli govorn ilio onpi-aaoiis of dlneotlon and nutrition, and by a cin-fiil (ippUcatiDn of \\w lino propor-tics of �woll-flch'ofod Cocoa, H/r. Eppii Imr. provided our breakfast liil;l*'S with a ilnlioauly flavored l)ev-erage which may .lavL' wa many heavy doctore' bills. Itifl by tliejudlclons Ufi& of siuOi arUclen of dlot that ft constitutiou may be grfttinally b\ilU up until strong enough to resist evi*iy tcKdeiicy tu disejiae. Hundreds of fiubUe maladies are floating iiroimd ns ready to .'\ttaok whcrevtr there iH a weal: pohit. We may escape many a fatal shaft by Ttcopinjj onreelres well foriilled with pure blood ^.nd ft properly nourlehod frame."-"Civil iScrvire ifazHtc. Jladesiraplv with bailing watfiror milk, .Sold only in half-pound tinH, by (jrocers, labelled thus; JAMES EPP3 & CO.,  Homoeopathic Ciietnists, London, Engisnd. SnTTBt b7 OX.I> CISOV/, Sr-^-fi; per ^i.Tl. Old Med. Bum. S2: Piuf Hoi. (Un, CaUTornla �R*iiics. �1; Iniportc-il Wines, ,*-2, f.'S and �!4 per Clal. All gooda warnuittd iia rej)rcse:iU'a or money re- J. E. DOHERTY & CO., B8S FEBEKAI. ST.....Kostna. SntI jiiG fsok-'b Pat. iKVIf.lBU! TtrEVL-VK Kab Ccshioxs perlecUy euro dsaicess und noises luthe he?-d. 8uc-rcsjful lyhen ell remedies fail. All conversation j,< ari dlrJnctly. Penil for lUusr'd boo'ris of proofs 3-llEE- Bolilt.iilybyJ'.IlISCOX, B*a Broadway, -BY- . SCOTT   CAMPBELL. AUTHOR OF "MARGIE'S VENGEANCE," "THE SMUGGLER'S DAUGHTER," "GREEN GOODS," "HELD FOR TRIAL," "THE GAMESTER," ETC. I was, at tlia time of which I wri to, in the employ of tho BOvornmeut as a oloric in tho railway mail aervico. My post was on a nig-ht m.iil cir, runniiipr botn'oon Now York and Boston, and my duty was to work for six consecutive nitrhta, gettiner my sleop in the daytime; and this was followed by a "lay-oft" of the same length of time. By hard work and close attention I had risen to tlio position of first assistant to tlie man who ran in olinrgo of tho oar, ono Richard DarroU hy name. Richard Darrell, tall and dark, was rather handsome, hut with a moat disaereeablo mannor. His habitual scowl had worn a li�ht furrow between his darlt heavy eyebrows, and his black cm'ly hair waved backward from afaco on which was soldom seen a smllo, save th.at which comes as the companion of a sneer. He rarely spolco unless his duties demanded It, and I vaaruely imagined that lie had some secret on which he was ever brooding. Few words passed botweeu us, I did niy work, he did his. But many a time I turned to find him furtively eying mo, or to see them fixed upon tho picture of my wife, which stood in a pigeon hole in the rack bofore me. I had, however, little time to thinlc of him during tho six niijhts of my run, for the mail was heavy, and I had all that I could do to wrestle with my portion of it. I was at that time a little less than SO years of ago. I had been married about three years and was proud of my beautiful little wife. I had mot her in a small v^Uago in northern New York and under rather peculiar oiroumstanoes. I hodbeeii away on a short vacation, and returning, was awaiting at a minor junction the do-ivn train to New York. It was a warm summer day, and I was lounging listlessly by the comer of the building which served for a depot, freiKlit house and what-not; and, thinking myseU to be entirely alone, was given up to my reflections. The train was overdue, when I suddenly hoard the window of the ticket office fly open. Then came the rapid patter of feet upon the floor of the womanis room, and I hoard a swoet, low; vqioe inquire the price of a New Vort ticket.' I analyzed the tone in an instant-musical, with traces of tmoertaiuty and trouble, perhaps disti'erfs. I turned toward tho door and saw-a vision I A slight young girl of possibly 10, daintily clad, in a soft gi'ay txavolUng dro.^s.' But what a I'aoo I Perfect in its symmetry, a clear bright complexion, her parted lips revealing just tho edges of her pure white teeth, her .soft brown hair waving backward from her brow to beneath her witching little hat. She stood gazing anxiously into space. What a picture she made standing there in the open door! An expression of doubt settled iipon her face; her Up began to tremble, and tho summer stm, shining full upon hor, sought in vain to kiss away the gathoring moisture from her clear blue eyes. She was In trouble and wanted to cry-I felt as if I mvist, unless something was done at onoe. I obeyed an impulse and sprang towards hor. "Pardon-"' She gave mo a quick, frightenod look, and shrank away. "No," I said, as kindly as I know how; "you are in trouble; let mo assist you." She looked r!ght,into my eyes, and I know she saw my heart-four times its natural siae-for slie hesitated an instant; and I added, as coherently ns was possible: "If I can aid you, pray allow mo." Tlio shrill scream of the looomotlvo told of the approaching train. She hoard it, and a determination appeared upon her face as she stammorort; I "Oh, sir;. I am short of money and wish to get to New YorJ:." �\Vhy, IC  Bllll�?IB9 Slngeru, actors, and public speakers use Ayi-r's Cherry Pectoral. It Is tbe favorite remetly for hoaisenoss ami all alleetloiis of Uie vocal organs, Uiroat, and lungs. As an anodyne and eipectorant, the effects oi this preparation are promptly roalljed. "Ayer's Clien-y Peotoral has done me great good. It is a splendid remedy for ai) diseases of the throat and lunirs, and I have much pleasure in testifying to lis merits."- (Kev.) C. N. Nichols, No. Tisbiuy, Mass. ' In my profes-sion of an auctioneer, any a/fsotlou of the voice or tliroat la a serious matter, but, at each attack, I have been relieved by a Jew doses of Ayer's Cherry Pectoral. This remedy, with ordluary care, has woii;ed such a magical effect that I have suiTered very Uttle Inconvenience. I Iiavo also used it in my family, with very er.cel. lent results, lu coughs, colds, iio."-Wm. H. (;!uartly, Blinlaton, So. .Australia. Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, PRErAEBD Br BB. J. 0. AYBE & CO., Lowell, Hass. Sold iy all Druggist*. Price $1; eir lotUes, #5. We were maa'riod. Wo loft Now York and moved to a small town suburban to Boston. There, in a sweet little cottage, I passed tho six days of my "lay-olT" in blissful snii.shine; and my work grow liglitor as I saw my money slowly accumulate to make her a happy home. Only once was the past referred to, and, when tho tears carao to her eyes, I felt like a big brute as I kissed them away. She was affeotionate and extremely sensitive, .and my whole soul was wrapt up in her. She had no letters, and sooraed to care to make no now friends. "I have only you in all tho world," she would say; and I believed her, and thought I was blostwith an angel, strayed from heaven. So three years of our married life passed away. Lata ono afternoon, my "lay-off" being over, I kissed my wife, bade hor carefully soouro tho house upon retiring-for we lived alono, at her request-and in a few short hours was speeding away over the iron rails toward New York. It was my duty to sort the New York city letters, that is to bimdlo them up as they came in from tho post office stations and arrange them for delivery at their respective precincts in the olty. On my return trip I did like work for tho oflloes flubuiban to Boston. My trip over passed awoy muoh as usual. Richard Darrell t^as morose and forbidding, but I gave him little of my thought, At 10.80 the following night we left New York for Boston, and I stood as usual bofore my rack, rapidly easting tho letters into thoir respeot-tivo pigeOn-holes. The weather was bitterly cold; the train soemed to labor a good deal, and tho winter wind whistled about tho car in fitful ffusts. A kind of melancholy soomed to bo upon me, from what oauae I did not know; possibly the weather, possibly the influence of the dark face whioh I knew was there behind me. The oar reeled on tho track. My wife's picture tottered from its position and fell to tho floor in front of Richard Darrell, who stood loaning upon the iron frame behind me, apparently engrossed in his own thoughts. Ho picked the photograph from the iloor and held it towards me. "liho must have fallen," ho remarked, with his customary sneering smile; and the hand from which I took the pioturo trembled peroeptibly. I looked into his face. HiSslnistor smile turned to a dork Soowl beforel'W gaze, and, turning to his rack, he went hurriedly to work, There waa something in his tone, 1 hurried to the sitting-room, but she was not there, nor could I find horin the house. Again a horrible misgiving tookpossosi slon of mo. As I turned to leave the library my attontionlwas attracted by a small bliiplf Stain, shaped like a diamond', upon tho marble slab of tho table before me. I examined it closely. It was a spot of ink, either a bl'ot or whoro a suporscribod letter had been laid Doforo tho ink had dried. Again I laugliod; again I ridiculed my fear; again I was heartily ashamed of myself that I could for a moment doubt her or that she would toll mo all. She has answered her lottor and gone to thn office to mail it, 1 said to myself. AVliat a fool I am, to be sure 1 And thoro she camo at tliat moment up the plank walk to tho side door. AVliut an ass I had beenl I felt quite ashamed to moot hor dear, sweet faoo after my dis-loyjvlty. My back was toward tho door, and I saw horroilectod in thoniirroras she cntorod tho room. Why did slio start when sliosawmo and suddenly stop? Why did her hand fly to her lips, as if to stifio a sudden cry? Wiiy did tire warm flusli, brousi\t to her cheolc hy her rapid wallt, fade to such a ciouuiy pallor? "My darling!" I turned with extended arms, and she camo to me as usual with a smile and a kiss; but there was something wrong, for she trembled violently in my ombraco. Caai my wife's past, which to mo is such a blank, have aught to do with this? "You are ill, darling; or are you cold?" "No, no, I am well," she replied; "only I �I wont for a wallc and have hurried homo so fast. Why did you get up so soon?" The question was almost plaintive in its intensity. I gazed ipto her eyes; for the first time in my married life they droouod bofore my own; but she drew her.self Into my arms and hid hor f aco in my neck. "It had cleared so beautifully, and was so warm hero; I did not moan to go so fai', dear." She had recovered her solf-possossion and looked up into my eyes with hor sweetest smile. AVhy could I not utter my thought? Why could I not aslt tho question upon my lips and end It all tiiero? But no, I moved away from hor and casually said: "Tho boll rang this morning. Who called?" Richard DarroU wero fixed upon me. The time spod on until it wns too late. Reaching New York, I left tho car and hurried to a hotol. Booking a sooluded spot, I tore tho letter from my pocket. "Conway Brayton, Now York." That wns all, I started to break the seal in tho maddening frenzy of my pasaionato jealousy, when my manlier nattire asserted itself; and, thrusMng tho lottor into my pocket, I strode from tho hotol. "WHAT is lOVVL NAME, BIO." THE MySTISHIOUS JiBTTKR. on THffilll WAY to new tokk. something in his look, that I did not like. Wondering if it was only my imagination, I replaced tho pioturo in the rack and nervously attacked the huge pile of mail before me. Package after package disappeared beneath my rapid movement. I seized another. Tlio string which had confined them had become loosened, and several of tho letters fell to the bench in front of rae. I started to gather them up, when tho addi'ess upon one caused me to stop short in my work, and sent a tlirili from my head to my feet. My wife! Yes; there oould be no doubt! It was Mrs., not Mr. And written in a bold, masoulinoliaud. I felt the hot blood rush to my brain as I studied the name over and ovoragain: and I winced undor the rricls: of tho spur on the gToon-oyed monster's heel, The car made a violent lurcii and a dozen letters fell at my feet. "You'll not get th.it mail out xmless you brace up." cried Darro!l,''BrmTiiy. Eveiythipg had v,'orkod to confuse mo and I seized the letters from the floor and hurried them into their boxes, my wife's among the rest. After fivo hoiu-s of hard worki had finished the last package, and sank exhausted upon the pile of mall bags in the comer. The strain had been ttiTlble; but when rest camo I laughed at myself �for letting such a trifle disturb me. Of course the letter was for my wife, and of course, being an unusual occurrence for her to receive one, she would tell me all about it; so, with a light heart and a loving kiss I greeted my Bessie an hour later. She was so aftection-ate, so busy tolling mo what she had done and how much sne had accomplished while I had boon gone that the letter passed fi'om my thonglit; and, half an hour after uiy arrival home, I was sound asleep in bed, making up for my long night's work. Tho ringing of tho door-bell woke mo. I hoard my wife cross tho room below and open tho door, and drawing aside the curtain I looked out. The.postmau was just leaving the gate. "Ah," I said to myself, "tliat tormenting letter!" 1 lay a few moments, thiuldng my wife would come up stairs; but she did not, and curiosity yielding to tired nature I dropped agam to sleep. At the culmination of a horrible dream of disaster to my home I awoko cold and damp, the moist sheets olinBing close about me. The afternoon sim, pouring in �t my west window, told^e that my dinner hour was near. I ropng out of bed, and while hastily dressiBg called down stairs to my wife. Not reeeivfjig anj' respotisa to my repeated c.-ill� ! Her back was towards me, and I oould see" lior hands tremblhig violently as her fingers searched along hor cap to find its pin; and her voice was husky when she replied. "The dinner came, I think," and she entered the olosot to hang up her garment. Gold with fear, I walked to the window and looked out. I pleaded an excuse and left the room. My Godl there could be no doubt; sho was deoeiving me I My closet's skeleton was unlocked at last! I felt that I must get out of doors or I should go mad. I invented an errand and hurried from the house. My brain soomed on fire. What should I do? Wliat course shpuld I pui'sue? The memory of the past was now vivid before me; our mooting, her secrecy, her desire for seclusion and to live alone; evoiy molehill of the past was now a mountain, towering upwai'd in my imagination. Istrode on, mihoediug distance, till tho sinking sun reminded mo of tho hour. I ro-traoed my stops, but it was dark when I reached tho house. How should I greet her? I paused an instant at the gate and made a final determination. I would allow her to go on, nor askher confidence; I would act myself, and wait-wait for hor to speak. My God! how long was that to bo? I hurried into the houso with a thousand excuses for my story; I was gay as a lark, with a gaiety every laugh of which stabbed me to tho heart. But, more horrible than all, sho-she, whose caresses wero tainted in my sight, was more loving and affeotionate than ever. My dinner was forced down my throat, and tho time dame for mo to go to ray night's work. I passed through tho library for my coat; the ink-stain had boon oarofully wiped from the white marble slab. "Oh, would to God." I cried in my frenzy, "thp hand that did it might wipe out all that I have seen, and leave me but the blissful happiness of yesterday I" X parted from her as usual, and as I strained her to my breast I could feel hor hooirt fiercely heating against my own. She twined hor arms about my nook and kissed mo again and again; a little, suppressed sob broke from lier bosom-and so I loft her. Half crazed I hmxy away, then stop short! I will not go back; I will wait if it kills mo! I reached my oar lato, and dazed by tho intense emotion through whioh I had passed, hurried nervously to work. Richard DaiTol, darker and more forbidding than over, stood in his aocustiomcd plaoe, his eyoa now and tlion cast furtively in my direction. Tho train lurched and started, and in a moment we wero (lying by the night express to New York. My work progressed slowly; tlio mail seemed heavier than ever. My. wife's pic-tare stood before me. I could ii�it cndiiro those beautiful eyes gazing at me ^vitli their seeming look of silent reproach, .iiid taking it carefully down, I placed it in my pocket. As I did BO I saw the cold, sneering smile cross tho dark face of tho man who stood near me, but ho did not speak. An angry question sprang to my lips, but by an effort I forced myself to keep cool; and throwing my whole energy into my work, the letters flow from my hands into their respective places. I was calm again, and the huge pile of mail sank rapidly before me. I would do nomoro cowardly acta; Iwould sift the matter to the bottom; I would find Conway Braj-ton and deliver tho letter into his own hands. I foimd a directory-thoro was no such namo. Though weak from work and want of sleop, my jnad excitement sustained mo; and I walked up and down near the post ofHco, planning what to do. At last I luid it-I would wait at the delivery window till tho letter was oallod for. I entered the building and took a position where I oould see and hoar. Several hours passed with no result. Well nigh exhausted, and remo^nboring the ni.^rht's hard work which was boCoro mo, I loaned against the oasomont and closed my weary eyes. "Is tliero a letter for Conway Brayton?' I turned like a flasli upon tho speaker. Bofore mo stood a young man of not more than 20 or 21 years, poorly dressed In a dingy gray suit and a flannel shirt. His blue oyea peered anxiously in at the window as ho waited a reply. There was no lottor for Conway Brayton. Who better than I could have told the reason? Ho turned from tho window and walked slowly away. A light-complexionod, boy-islt-looking fellow, with a pained, anxious expression upon his face, he passed out into tho street. Ills tliin, white hand pressing the light ourls back from his forehead, as if ho evidently sought to fathom some .troublesome problem. What could my wife have in common with this follow in a flannel shirt? I followed him to tho stTeot, trying to docido that I would hand him tho letter and ox-piain all. It was midday, and I had all that I oould do to keep him in view among tho throng of people hurrjing'up and down Broadway. SitddOnly 1 missed his already familiar form. I strained ovory norvij to regain him, but in vain. He had eluded me. Disappointed and chagrined, I watched and waited for an hour, but ho did not return. Yon, who have served on a night mail car. can best imagine what my condition tlien was. On my feet; all night, nearly 24 hours since I had tasted food, suffering the most harassintr mental oxoitemont, and with the prospect of a night of hard work before me, I tottered, rather than walked, to the nearest hotel, and sank heavily into a chair. Eat, I could not; rest. I must. I tried to compose my thoughts. The letter burned In my pocket, and, taking it out, I again ox-amined it. It was thick and heavy; it must bo very long. I resisted tho. terrible temptation to open it, and replacedit in my poolcet. I tried to reason, but in the midst of it all tired nature asserte'd itself and fell asleep. "Yoti will have-to move, sir; I wish to sweep 1"  I sprang to my foot to seo the porter standing beside me with a broom. It was 0 o'clock, and I was due at my post. Malting niy excuses, I hurried from tho hotel and tlirough tho post office. Thoro was no sign of Conway Brayton. H.ailing a cab I gave directions where to drive; and faint at heart and stomach, and witli aching, throbbing head. I reached the depot yard and hurried to whore my car was standing on a "siding." "is THEUK a LBTTKR Foil cokwat EJtAT- TOW?" My God! It was a cry from my heart that almost reached an existence. There, \ipon tlio letter m my hand, was that blot of inlc, sliaped like a diamond; thero was my wife's hand; thero was the reply to that letter which had sped from New York tho night before, and which had driven rae well-nigh distracted. There could bo no mistake; it BOS indubitable. I glanced about tho car-ovory eye was engaged; in an instant the letter wfis con-oealed upon my person, and-I was a criminal I I had robbed the mail I Fos five lone hours I worked beneath the tortures of my conscience. Again and again I started to place the letter where it belonged; but. aa often, the fiendish eyes of bbothbjv and SISTBll, The first load of mail had just arrived, but Riohai'd Darrell was not there. I left a few instructions, and, as I had eaten nothing since tho afternoon before, I started out to force uI)on mysolf a little lunch. As I crossed tho yard and w.as about to pass out through tho wide, open gate into the Btroot, I observed a person loaning against tho fence beneath' the rays of tho street lamp, and directly m my path. Something in tho form struck mo as familiar, and as I noarod him I recognized him as he whom I had lost in tho crowd upon Broadway sovor,al hours beforo. My resolve was made in an instant, and I walked directly to him. "What is your namo,' sir?" I demanded, sternly. Turning a pair of frightened eyes upon mo, he started to go; but I seized him roughly by tho shoulder and looked into his face. He grasped my wrist witli his wliite, delicate hand .ind bogged in a low, pathetic louo to bo released. "Not till yott tell mo yom' namo and what you are doing here," I said harshly. "Oh, nothing, sir," heple.adod; "uponmy honor, nothing. I wish to got to Boston, and thought perhaps to find a chance to work my v/ay. Please, sir, let me go; do not hold mo. Yoti look likoam.ani Ono who would not ,do a wrong to one who has done nonol Nice words, commg^from Conway Brayton to mel I relaxed my hold upon his shoulder, and said, more gently: "Ai'6 you in trouble?" "God only knows!" was the response, and Ms Up tremble and his blue eyes filled with tears as he looked me straight in the face. "And you wish to get to Boston?" I said, this time Mndly. "Oil! you know not how badly!" Thero v.'ore tears on his cheeks now. He had touoh'id the one chord in my heart which vibratos most easily. There was Bomothiiig in his pale, sensitive face, something in his blue eyes and curly hair, that carried me back to her I now felt I was wronging; and I tliought of her parting sob, and I felt that, miles away, she too was suffering. "Why do you wish to get to Boston?" My voice was far from steady when I asked the question. "To SCO ono'I love most dearly, and I-I am penniless." Again a prick from the green-eyed monster's sptir. But my determination was made. "Come with me and I will get you there." I shall never forget the look, the hand-grasp that he gave me. I hurried back to my car, determined in my mind to take Conway Brayton straight to my home. Darrell had not'yet arrived. I entered the car and told th^ "boys" what I wanted, and, ouasoftcouchboliiiida pile of m  of dinv, ^ Koelliig llirough ciuUoks suininor days, From Inns of moUe.u blue. When JaiuUonls tiirn the drmilcen boo Oat of tllf! foxiU^vo'H door, When buttcrlllca ronomico their dreams, I shall but drink tlio inoro. Till seraphs swliis their snowy hats, And saints to windows run. To seo the l.ttln tippler Lcanln;^ her life ugaUist tho sunt But tho pooina suggest that tho human, a.layfVLier will treasure. Fact, comment, oritici.'.iu ami aiie-.-doto combine to s^:?curo value, and a ireo ajid smoothly flowing stylo lead to tlu>lr grj.it interest. ~\ Tho voUirao ia published as a hohrt.iy book for which it.1 Kl portr.rlt.^, iiu'lmiiug ono of Jmniu-) Brutus Ikioth for frontispiece, beautifully fit it.W\l! aro vahiaMo, with It is pleasing to welcomy W. Hamilton Gibson in his volume for tho holiday season ot 1800. for his new book, "Strolls by Starlight and Suiisliine," has a text that makes ono more certainly acquainted with hts spirit and purpose asan artLst. What qualities his drawings iiavo already sliowa to tho aympatliotio critic aro mado oviiUuit to uttontivo readers. Wo now are siu-o that Jlr. Gibson is not only an artist, m tho common accoptanco of the term, but that ho is a philosophical and poetic student of the nature tliat he seeks to roveaJ, thus joining mind aud heart to full compauioiiship with tlio eyo in representation of tho beauty and tho soul of forms in small plant and animal life, and in the accumulation of them in tho broad I'eatures of landscapo and part views. Ho writes of "A Midnight iiamble," where ho observes and rertects upon the test of nlarita; "Night Wilcliiiry," wiioro .straugo inliuonces aro at work; ot "Bird Notes," with occult thought; ot "Bird Cradles." a peculiar illustration of his uiethod of close tiliservation; of "Prohisloric Botimists," whoro ho advauops an original idea of the t'lii't iiiKocts piay in doteriiiniiiig the relation ,nul classiticatioii of plaut.-;; aud of "The A\'ild Uardun," where he toiis of tho charms ol the llowera of forest and of fiohi liis part as an artist is most notiea-ahlo in tho illustration of .some unfamiliar appearances, roquirinc exceptionally close study, iuthough hera ami there, as on nagos 45. 4H. oi, lio, 84 and several othorg, he extends his art to ro-niiiul one of tho broaJ treatment of hla scenes ill "Pastoral liays" and "Highways and Byways," famous works of previous years. Tho drawings havo tbo fidelity and finish that only JMr. Gibson, among American artists, can aftain. Tbo letter-pr->ss and covers are the best in quality and m taste. XewYurk: Harper ,t Brothers. Boston: Bamrell &. Ui)h.am. _ ; A new edition, revised by the author, of Grace Greenwood's "History ot My Pots," ami "Stories of Jly Childhood," published jir.st nearly -40 years ago, wiU meet with u kind reception. Eaoli is moro or leas remiu-isi-eut ot tiio Kutlior's own childhood, from \vhii'lt slio learned so much that was helpful in wiiiuiug ttio hearts of the childi-en that in womanhood sho addre-ssed. Tbey wo sii full of syuiiiathy and eucouragement. am! so luiturally cxpre-sslve of chiid-hfe, that they siill retain tueir interest, Thov roaijpi.'ar witli lull-piigt) lithographs and liecoraiod covers. New Vork: lr,li piod lia ja i;uro ho bus a iiuidtsuii NC:iri in exact repro-ductuiis oi'seU-tied ij.'^fkwt'.ir. I? some r.tro and fiomnnovor ongi'avod before, Tho cover.s aro tastefully decor.ated. Kew York: Harper & Prothers; Boston: d,i,rareU & Upluim. Tho portrait of Richard H. Dan.a, Jr.' drawn by Charles Francis Adam.?, who was a student in Mr. Dana's law ofHco. is lov.ing, . but sad. A man of remarkable intellectual , strength and oratorical power, with tasto.^ for literature and politics, Mr. Dana felt ; : that ho was compelled to devote himself to   � tho drudgery of trying petty causes at law   ' to earn his liveUhood; to sacrifice the pleasures  of   home   and   the gratifioa- : � tion    of   his    tastes.    He   lost'  hia health,    and    died    a    disappointed , : man. Ho waa a good deal responsible for   : this himself, for, while eminently tatted for   ' tho law, ho disliked it, and sought poUHcal life with no particular political ability. His experience in the defence  ot Anthony Burns, and of the preceding ftigitive slaves, tnan which "there is nothing fairer and   . nobler In the long, rich archives of tho law," led him to politics, aud, to that ex?, tent, injured his career. He of whom Judge Spraguo said: "I have heard Mr. Danamako tho best arjnxmont that  I have over   , hoard from anybody, except, perhaps, some ^ of Mr. Webster's," might well have-.hopod v for the highost honors as a jurist. He did   , not realizo.. this, and found fault with tha need ot iiionoy, v.iiicli hold him to the practice of tho law.  As lato as 1873 (ho died m   ' i.Sii'2) ho wrote: "iMy talents and tostos fitted mo especially for parliamentary llfe,� and whoa my party came in I could havo Iirobably gone to Congress, and I am siu-o I should havo distingtiishod myself. But I   , had no money, and was obliged to refuse the olfers ot my friends. That was tlie career for mo. I havo no right to lay the tault; wliolly on the people aiid our institutions. 1 had my ohanco, and my want of means, which was my own fault, certainly not tha fault of tiio public, precluded me. In my youth I thotie'htlt aline thing to despise  , money, but I torgot that I needed and ought to havo the opportunities which cannot honestly bo had without money, and I learned, too late, that pecitniary anxieties , disable a man in iniddlo life more than ill-health, or sorrows, or overwork,"   Feel- ,. iiig so   deeply, yet   so unfairly, to his mind,   tho   limitations   of   his   power, how bitterly ho must havo sutTored his defeat in tho fifth Massachusetts district by Gon. Butler in 1800, and the .successful opposition of Gen. Butler to his nomination as minister to England, whioh grow out of the feeling ot that campaigu. Mr. Dana led a forlorn (lopo, uuderstandinBly,in liopos to rotrievo his political opportunity, through political justice, and wont to his political ruin. This canvass brought a blow to his   ; ambition, which was even worse; for it waa by moans of tho suit Lawrence vs. Dana, regarding  his   violation   of  tho copy-   : right of   Whoaton's International Law,"   , then in the hands ot Henry W. Paine as auditor, tliiit (ion. Butler defeated his nom-insition as minister. Turning away from this sad portrait there is anotlior of Dana, In his youth, as a , student and sailor, when tho future was promising, and, in his manhood, among hIS� literary and professional friends at home', and in his several jouriieyB abroad, whau tho present divested itself of anxiety and caro. At those times, tho beauty and force of his mind, the warmth ot his heart: and the rofinemont of his taste and culture rounded his nature to pleasing expressioa of a man groat ia luiy weU-considered purpose. In tho two volumes, "Richard Henry Dana," Mr. Adams has estimated justly tha qualities of character and work of his subject, making a man, who was little tmdor-stood in bis day, known and valued as romarliablo in gift, it not in tlio accomplishment by \vliich tho world wrongly oatimatos an individual's service: tor wo may wol say that Mr. Dana's life, although un-diat nguisliod by popular rewards, had an inrtuoiico that nuido society hotter for his presenoo. A man may bo great aud uplifting, and die with a forgotten name. But Mr. Dana should have had populau roward. In the anti - alavory movement, although ho was coiisorvativo; in tho growth of tho Free Soil party; iu tha Maaaacliusotta constitutional convention of IHfi.'l, as district attorney trying tho prize cases, andasa lawyer In t;he general callsof tho protessioii, ho iijauifeated remarkablo liowor. Mr. Adams bears thoso points to Kuouro appreciation, in mind, aud dwells uiKiii them at length. Ho is no less eager to pi'otect than to advance reputation, as the olaborato consideration ot Dana's conto.'it for Congress witli Gen. Butler, imd his rosponsibility in tho suit with Mr. Lawrence over ills book on international la.v, iiiid tho carefulness with which ho analyzes character, and comments upon acts of his career, will show. Mr. Adams' volumes havo other and pia-cuilar Intorost. They aro the most important yet published in their doscriirtlons of local loaders and events from 1841 to 1882, . which aro foiindod on dairies kept hy Mr. Diuia continuously from 1841 to 1859, and on bis lectures, writings and letters. Thoy afford moro intimate acquaiiitanco with Boston literary men, and its Saturday Club, its lawyers and politicians, and of Boston's Sonera! service to literature, law and poii-ca, in thought and coiulnct. Mr. Adams quotes freely from Mi-. Dana, but with noticeablo disregard of what Mr. Dana said und did in the war period. He includes; generously to friends, Mr. Dana's views luid couimonts upon men luid places in his jouriioys ut home,,and in threo,trips to I'iuropo and once lU'ouiid tho world. * Mr. Adams' own part, with its indispensable reininiscoiicoa tosnpploment his editor-Hhip of extracls. proves that tlio duty to set his subject aright could not have been given to jinothor with such bonotit to readers. 'I'lie voluruc't iiichulo portraits of Mr. Dana, in youth ami in unmliood. UoBlou: Houghton, illllUn ,1: Co.   

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