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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 22

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                2i5 TME BOSTON � 8tJKl)Af 'GLOBB--BIJNBAt> MOEMBJilii M, 18i)0~--TWEI^^'IY-EieM.l' .FAwiiS.- CHRISTMAS GIFTS FOR THIN POCKETBOOKS. TJicre are many thousand people who, because of the scarcity of money jUst at the present timcg arc obliged to maJiC $1 do the tvorJc of $l.ffO or $2 in selecting their Christmas presents. We have made this Thin, Poclcethooh Christmas Sale because tve desire to convince the people of New ]Snglan?l, once for all, that this store is the headquarters for those shoppers who desire to receive the largest value for the money they ex2)end. We havo just purohftsed from EokotBin & Wot-thoimor their entire assortment of widely diversified stook of Ladies' RoUed Gold Plate Neok Pins and Onft Buttons, a thousand stylos and good Talnes, at from BOo, to $1.00, but yre have marked the entire Essortmont at 25c. This is a represontatiTS Thin Fooketbook offering tn Jewelry, whioh is indioativo of the prices of our stock, which oomprisss everything Icaown totho Jewelry trade, PRANG'S CHRISTMAS CARDS, BOOKLETS HO NOVELTIES. We have just secured for a very little motley a complete line of Sample Booklets, Cards and Novelties, manufactured by the well-Icnown Mouse of X. Frang fC Co., for their Christmas trade. These goods ivill be placed on sale Monday morny ing at at least 80 per cent, discount from the prices charged for them by otJier dealers. They range in ptdce from Bo. up-ivards. Past Color Soft Finish Best Prints, in groat variety of styles, only 6c. per yard, Unbleached Tard Wide Oloth, A thrifty hcnaakoeper will be well plon'sed with a hill of now Silverware for her table,' For instanoei A full bottle caster, with sinare-abaped engraved bottles, and perfectly satisfactory oaster, made for real wear, costing $2.49. We havo n triple-plate, satin finish, hand engraved Cake Basket, whioh delights every lady's hoart, and only costs $2.49.' Then Eogore' well-known make of Dossert Spoons at SI.38 per set always comes in handy in bonsekoepiug, Give your namesake for a Ohrlstmas present one of onr now pattern silver plate, gold lined Child's.Mngs, whioh are band engraved, only costing 7So. The ohlldron are always delighted with oni Eogers' Knife, Fork and Spoon Set, .which are oi ToaJ Borvioo as well as ornamental, 46c.. 7i b. PER YARD. & EASELS. We, have a largo stook of enj_ for those families who dosiie to a< at a modorato ozpenso, Wo call especial attention to oni bamboo easels which are of novel designs oontrcllod by ns, Holiday Ties, in Took and pnff etylea, ia great voriety of patterns, 49c. Maids' Sweeping Caps, In fonoy prints and sattoens, only lOc. , Needle Oases, real old-fashioned needle books, with fancy covers, containing two papers of needlcoi lOC. 4 papers of Weodleo and 3 Spools of Thread, 25c. Sachet Oases of Ferfnmed Satin and Silk, in large variety of patterns and styles, 5c. to SI.87. _ STATIONERYDEPT. Out statlonexy department carries as large a Btook as any well ordered stationery store, having on its shelves a lull assortment of box stationery, writing papers, etc., In all varieties and at all pricosi We quote 20 different styles of box paper. In fanoybor, fine qmtUt? paper, at 26c. Portfolios, genuine leather, with look and key, good leather lining, screw oap ink, only 98c Among all the Shoulder Oapes offered there is none which is more serviceable than a Eussian Black Hare, finely flnished, with satin lining inside pockets, rolling collar, pointed front, costing only S4.50,withM:nff tomatoh, 75c. Would be a very sensible present. Every childls delighted with cur Spotted Tigor Bet, oonsiBting of muff and collar, finely finished with fancy lining, and very serviceable at $1.50 per set, Onr lines of Astraoban, Plush and other Fancy Furs arc very full at similar low down prices. A Ohristmas troe is not an ideal Ohrlstmas troe unless it is trimmed with the many fancy colored ornaments whioh can now be purchased for a vary little money. Ton will be surprised to sob how far $1.00 will go in decorating a tree with thoao goods. We havo at least, 1018 cf those Xmas tree ornaments in,every shape imaginable, A good musical instrument of real practical vajuein any homo, andbe it a Jowsharp or Organ, it is grsatly to the enjoyment of the entire family. . In Jewsharps we era parfeotly at homo, with a dandy harp at lOc. or a professional at 25c. THE "PEERLESS" BANJO is a unique production, having a real calfskin bead, 6 nickel brackots, 12 frets, with beautiful designed nook, makingitall in all a most graceful as well as practical in strumont, costing gSc. In Banjos we can suit you anywhere in price and quality. " Violins, O-uitars, Zylophones, blow and plain Aooordoons, Concertinas, Earmonioas, Music Stands, as well as a full line of Strings and Fittings for oil Toripties of instrumaats, soiling at out prices. For IB years this department has boon known as carrying a large stook of sheet musio at prices eminently suited for thin pocketbooksr B We defy any dealer to show so large an assortment of dolls of every, j' desoiiptlon. These dolls ora offered at prices whioh will make even a thin pookatbook father or mother realize what a largo value they are Boourlng for their mcnoy, These dolls were manufactured under cur own spooifloatiouB, and are costumed in modom dresses, patterned after the latest thought of Worth, Eodfern and Hollander, instead of being dressed, as is usually the case, in the peasantry garb of the old world. These costumes are original and exolusiva with ns.    �       � We do not quota detail prices, but can delight the heart of every, little one, as well as suit the pookotbook of every patent or friend. This department carries representative dolls of every description, snoh as kid body, indeBtracti-ble, nnbreakable, washable, wax, iqbhar, china limb, vag, worsted, etc., etc. OOLp'OraTS. Our Dolls' Suppy Department indlndas Sresss^ Hats and Caps, Botg and Shoes, StdakiagS) SoUa | 98c. andSI.SS.  � I Our stool comprises more thaU'SO differat patk terns of slates, adapted for all ages and poketf books, fron snch representative makers as prasjT & Berry, fto,, etc, j Onr lealer ie a nickel plated Olamp &t� o( soleotod Beel, finely finished, and .suits tt most exaoting|boy, 59c. I 28c.'buys a nlos pair of Boys' LeTeiiikdie^ while 83c. buys a pair of niokol-plfllj liSt lever Spates, woll.wbrthy of an expert. I For the ladies we have a oast Bt�el Stn Sbiti at 79o. V ] A'liodies' XiGvei Skate, oast steel Vmsi lad] strap of the �nest oak' tanned .leather, jpt nan footed patented fittings,inaking.all in sjalaea^ Ladies Skate which coBts only 98c> ' This Banquet Lamp is of finely pol-^ ished brass, 31 inches high, and has duplez unrnor, beautiful muslin silk-fringed shade, A real gem, coating only SI.93, that will give you splendid service for a lifetime. � This is one of those sanalblo presents that is of permanent benefit to the entire family, A particularly pleasing hanging lamp with 14-inoh satin-finiBh dome shade, costing $2.76. In Parlor Lamps we offer a melon shaped bisque lamp, with shade to match, finely-finished open work brass mountingB in several colors, wly �2.98. Another Parlor Lamp baa a delicately colored bisquo vase, with , beautiful tinted decorated shade, ' unbreakable chimney, and is one of those lamps whioh is a real nooesslty in the homo, and the prloo, $1,25, doos not stand in the way of your owning it. "Ohristmas without confectionery is 'Hamlet' with the ghost left out," and a box of candies you must therefore have. Our sales in this department oi'e so extensive that wa are obliged to ro- OPEH EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. Bsprtieiit Store, Globe Theatre, 615 Washington St., planish our stock from 4 tc 6 tiidea each day, aspeoially during the Ohrlstmas season. Parents have become convincad that this is the place to buy pare, first quality oonfeotionary, without paying.the fancy priooa � demanded at the regular confeotionersi Ohooolate Montavidocs, 45C. per lb. Ohocolato nongatines, 45c. per lb. Poi'a oream druggist mixture, in assorted fia-vors, 20c. perlb. Selected rook oandy crystals, 20c. par lb, Ohooola'ta cream drops, in assorted Havers, 20c. perlb. Pure Spanish linorioa, sold by druggists evory-whera nt lOo., our prioe 5o. Onr Ohina Eose Jars in their rioh decorations greatly ornament the mantel, and I4C. gives you a solootion of a largo variety of patterns, Tinted and Deoorated Broad and Oako Plato, 50c. Nobby Styles of Salad and Sauoe Bowls, lOc. Eoally Beautiful Fruit Plates, in manypat-tenii, are representative of our entire stock, at lOc. Dainty Bread and Milk Sets for the little ones, only 50c. Large variety of Newly Patterned Bisque Flgnras, ooeting only 25c. OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. & FOLSOM'S Deprtoeiit Store, S'p'o'i't^filolje Theatre, 615 Washington St., ^;^}    BOSTON. A really Good Shaving Mug, with tasty hand-painted decorations, 15c. A very large line of Fanoy Cups and Saucers, I Be. Fancy Patterned Cup, Saucer, and Plato Sets, in delicate colorings, at $I.OO. Those Splendid Large Size Child's China Mngs, both decorated and lettered, coating only 9c. Gonnino, Eaviland Pitchers, ia all the new shapesanddeooratlons, 25c. We have tho cream of the foraig-n market whioh ware personally salootad by our rasident buyer for our Ohristmas trade. They comprise a large showing cf the now creations of those Italian, German and French makers, whose unique productions are the rage in London and Paris. A really aonsible present for Ohristmas, which will be a daily Joy to its rocipient, is one of Turner's llZ-pieoa Dinner Sats, English ware, for only $6.98, era 56-pieoo French China Tea Bat, your choioe from all the latest designe, $6.98. Another serviceable present is a lO-piece Toilet Set, 10 stylos and daooratiouB to select from, at only $3.49.    _ OPEN EVERY EVENINQ UNTIL OHRISTMAS, FOLSORS'S BeprtiOttt Store, S'pS Globe Theatre, 615 Wasiilngton St, Our Gamo Department carries 379 distinct games, which oompriae all of the latest and most popular fads. Halma, 54c. Tiddledy WlnkB, (7c. Basilinda, 54c., ato., etc., etc. BLOOKS.-Pateiit Blocks, Embossed Blooks, Bailding Blocks and Nested Blocks, of every stylo, size and shape. Noah's Arks, Sail Boats, Targets, Guns, Drums, Stables, Warehouses, Wood Trains, etc., etc. Tin Toys, Iron Toys, Lead Toys and Wooden Toys in a great variety. CHILDREN'S OHAIES in a great variety. For instance, a 24inch Booking Chair, with plush padded seat, rattan back and arms, aaat^ and lags strongly finished with braided trimmings, for 98c. BlaokboardB of all daBcripticna. The "Favorite" Easel Blackboard, ewfng slate, hardwood frame, nicely finished, for 49c. is an indox to the ruling prioes in these goods, Desks, Tool Chests, Bureaus, Tables, Bedsteads and Cradles, Our Dexter Horses are finely painted, natural looking animals, with an uphclstored seat, making a eeaure, firm rocker, only 89c. This department includes Boya' Eiuress Wagons at 48c., 69c., g8c., SI.49.* Boys' Oarts, lOc, 25c. and 50c. Wheelbarrows, 24c. and 48c. OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. i'S Beprtient Store, SpS Globe Theatre, 615 Washington St., A Golden Deoorated Wine Sat, in a beautful vine pattern, coneistlng of salver, deoanter, and 6 glasses, $1.25.. Bustle patterned Wine Set, with fancy basiet, deoanter and 6 jjlassos, 75c, Included in this department are 4313 varieties of Standard and Fancy (glassware, covering every need and ideal, Wa have our own engravers, who will'out any initial or design upon any of this glassware that may ho desirad. Slippers have always bean a standard Christmas present. We have closed out the entire production of a largo slipper manufaoturor, at such a ridiculously lew figure that we shall place on sale Monday morning 3125 pairs of ladies', gents' and boys' slippers, eminently adapted for the Ohristmas trade, at the following pricasl Men's velvet opera ulippers, patent leather back, worth $1.B0, only $I.OO. Men's velvet plush opera slippers, worth $1.50, only 98c. Blue plush Everett slippery worth $1.25, only 87c. Black velvet slipper, worth $1.00, only 69c. Silk plush opera slipper, made after imported pattern, only a few doaon of these, worth $2.50, only SI.37.     ^_   � OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. &FQLSOWi'S ?p'^'i';5^ Globe Theatre, 615 Washington St., Ladies' silk plnsh slippors, all sizes, worth $1.50, only 99c. Ladies'French dcngola slippers, steel bended, worth $2.00, only Si.25. Ladies'plain kid slippers, 50c., 750. and $1.00. 100 pair of ladles' high, button arctics, sold elsewhere for $2.00, our price $1.25. We illustrate a 13-inch Glass Vase, hand paiutod, with beaded deo-cratlons, 49c. Importad GranolIaVase, basket shape. This is a unique vase, and is not offered elsewherB, only 49c. Gold Decorated Barba-. tina Vase, $1.00. Victoria Ware Vases, in those new and pleasing shapaa. Copied from Oriental patterns, $1.50. We have 3109 patterns of Eoyal Wcroestor Hungarian, Alabaster, Mottled, Zebra Euby, Barhatina, .Painted, Victoria Ware Vases in stook, covering the latest designs and shapes of the world's maikats, at prices ranging from 50. to $4.12.       _ OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. 'S !t o"'poffi Globe Theatre, 615 Washington St., SlT'if}-    BOSTON. The valne of a good book in a home is inastima-ble, and the wise parent is careful to .� provide his children with suitable reading, and even at Ohristmas time yon cannot go far astray in selecting ft good book for any one. We pride ciirselvaa on cur hook department, as we control very many of tho standard works at such pricea that we are conceded to hold the leading Position among both wholesalers and retailers. We have only room for a few sample pricosi "Bbn Hur," regular prioe $1j60, our price 83c. McAllister's "Society as I Found It," regular price $2.00, our prioe S(.20. Holiday edition of "Pilgrim's Progress," $1.00. Oomplate works of Shakespeare, 8 vols., bound in cloth, $6.50. Wavorley Novels, complete, 12 vols., bound in cloth, $3.87. Works of LouiseM, Aloott, 89c. For the children wa havo thousands of books of every prioe and stylo, illustrated in black and colors, on heavy paper and cloth, covering a wide range of subjaots and values, For tho older children we offeri "Babyland," new volume, S3c. "Springtime," 2|C. "Home Sunahine," 2Ic. "Shymes and Chimes for Ohristmas Times," 24c. A fine line of Bibles and prayer books now in stock at lower prices than they are usually offered. OPEN EVERY EVENING UNTIL CHRISTMAS. 'S Deprtiiieiit Store, ?^ro�^ll Globe Theatre, 615 Washingtonm, This year's "OhatterlDox, price, $1.00. Our price, 63 The suooess of this department ofii tipK lift; been phenomenal. Its steady growfrom'day ia day shows the appraoiatioq of ttppoptbook buyers. / Spaoial offer from our tea dopaian Ertr* fine Garden Flower Fqrmiisa Ooloii|a, Sold else, where at $1.00, our prioe only c. (3 pounds only to a customer), and tho boa^kbook pnb. lished, as a present, $1.60 tea, our price $1.00^;. [ 70c. tea, our price 50 c. 60c. tea, our price 40c> Best OH Gov. Java OofM, 31^ Best Mocha and Java Coffee,; Best citron, 22o. par lb. Perfection Washing PowdarjtiTranted Hur' boat, 2 pkea,, t5c. OPEN EVERY EVENING U 'S Depiiettt store, 615 shington St,, mm CLUB mm. Cassandra Has Something to Say. Working Girls' Club-Woman's Calendar for 1891-Bombay Sorosis. Olub Gossip of Various Sorts-Meetings of the Week, One of tlje editors of Far and Near, tho new orEau of tho Worlnng Girl's Clubs, writes thus in tUo Deoombor issue on "The Mission of Cassandra:" She flteins to licttd u whole tribe or cluBS whofifl duly It iB t.o ulwuya sfte the end vfttlior than the plijusaut, the diinger nilhor than tho good to be ao-compllshed, aud to prophesy a palHng do\TO rnthor thtin h!it"i-i!tig up. Some of us may havo seen pict.-tureB of licr, :i6 children, especially a rathor popular one Avhcre bUc 1b robed In whlU] and appctiiB to b� running throu^'h the stroetK of nncleut Troy, her hands uplifted, and a look of earnest entreatyon hev strong, tvv.iet Ineo. fihe does not look there at all disagreeable because she i� lUo beaicr of a soleiuu, urgent uieBfiage. ^Vb coiild never fiBsociato tho Cassnndra of the pluturc with the modern Cassandras whom wo In our limes, call ''proverbiill erintkers," yot her own brother called her mad. Has there been Justtcodone her, for -was not her mission, jifter all, an imporfant one, because she saw dangers others did not see and fertrlcsBly praclalmed them'/ J'f'obably no age hut our own hns c\er eeen so many organlzatloiifi-especially Tvomen'fl organizations and women's clubs. Men's clubs are not entirely new ihiags; they, in somo form or another' dale back many years befoio even tho secret societies of Gfceoe or Home, and in our owu day the term "club man," as applied hy a woman to a man ims oftenliraes anything but a complimentary meaning. Vi'c wonder If the term 'club woman' will ever be applied by a mim to a woman in nn tfjually uneomplliueutary way. Yea, the danger some ol us self-constiiulod CESBandras ^vould lioint om. Lies in the possibility of our ever being called -club women' sneeringly, with the hidden innuendo in the sneer that wo ore all for the club and very Utile lor tire home. It Ib very disagreeable to meet the real croakers, who do not seem 1.-, think tlio fcrmaiion or existence of a club is comjiatlble with ihp cuUU-atioii of any of the domestic *-ir:ues. but without btlDg CKtremlsts we can r(;cog.'.iL:c i;.e d-nnger of pultlnt; club liie hi the place of home liir, rather lhan in Ubiny our club and lit- many e.dvunuir.ts 10 advance us and train us to be more htlj.iul in r,ur hoiu.-Q. A woiuan's heart and life alv,-:,s.s cucle eillier tu uiemory or reality ILbout some licarllittone, anr\ )f v.t le,:! ihe lull Jorce of our million uii wumcu, cerlaiuly our Iratii-Ing for U cannot bc-Klu loo tarl>', for ii is not only lite-long, but influcncct �the Ilvei, ut geutratliiuB yut unborn." "Vt'c ahouid, therefore, have some dlsiluct niotive In our club liie other and bevf.nd mere solf-udvun-e-laenl, and should seek by happy asbaei-'Uioii vvllh olhers and through the f-la'iU-t, we take n\:, fer fresh I'.-lghluesE and for pnjctiea] hiiat, io trik.r bwck with as into the home life wli';re w^ nuiy put them Ui ImmtdlaU' use. 11'c vun! v.it l.eJn,T atbudaU-i logethfrl III *:lubs 10 niUk.' i;s br:i:htt7, ha;,;,!,.] itnd more heifitul v,ume;i, ubie an.l w!ll:n(; in help olliejb, and laur, wl..n iUi- wnn;;::i h.;i,'L has found    lis    ftwit    he.'.rlJ.^lonf,    im    hr];j    us to be lU'jlti ub.-;ful wiVfS nil'l ju'-re ,-j1;'ifiit mothers. i;uE ;,cju.',:-ma;jy of us lire e;.Uea to ii atf a home, tv.; liiite o;.r u.vn lUal hcuie Ic wlii,;ii ire o-.ve a duJJ-j:j wki':b Ihfcre is fulhrr una n:'-11;:-:, 1 rjlker ami tJbter. %\'e may f... auuy aiid marry, a:,d make a L'..me foj our husband and cblhiret:, but ve oun never have tkat I'.rii 1; .-ae of our viuldhoud fcjjd youth but Mice, and tiio happiness of ovir future, v.ben �fc fchali look back on iluit fuz-oiT tune of gfylden opportunliy, wiii bo largely dependent upt.n how far we made bomeliajipy and pieasaat J'.ir thube who formed the family circle lutlie Cays of long ago. J^elusbe-�ua.'e, t.bere'oit, thai we ue\fer give any of them OLCieion now to call us "club women" in any sense, but one 1 ery ai'pie'jialivo of all Miat ire bjtve dfc-riied and they hav,: derived thiough us, from our b-l'.'iigui^: to a .iub wbob'.- objert is gleattr seif-ii!;;.ioveuient "and the dettU'i.iii(nt of higher, n'tiel Unas." "The Fairy Needle;" an4 a second instalment of Miss Bsrrow'B interesting Borial, entitled "Housekeeping for Two," which tells how two girls munafrod in a way that 18 fitll or suggestions to other girls. The various dcpiirtments,"The World's Events," "Household Corner," "Tho Ifashions," "Book.s Old and New," etc., are a-Lso admirably maiiittiinerl. The working girls' clubs have reason to bo proud of tlieir magn'ilno, especially as many ol their number conti'ib-uto to its columns. We quote a portion of one of its editorials above. At the November meeting the Boston Aa-soniation admitted three oluba - the liYitindly'^Vorkors. the TUtirsday .Evening, Ijoth in Boston, and the Social Unioji of New Bedford, malrinii a total.of Ificlnbs. There is a now Working Girls'Club in Pittslleld, MiiSB., numbering ISO members at tho outset. New clubs havo boon formed also in. Stonohain, Charlostowii, Attleboro and Nq,w Bedford in Massachusetts, and in Providonco, R. 1. Tlie United Workers of Hartford, Oonn., are taking measures to form a State Assool-ation of Working Girls' Olubs. The convention will be held some time this month. \\'o:-hhi.K QirLs' Club. '1 :. : a hfc]i.>.fui iiai-er on 'The Art of Culti-'.aifctl o'ot.trvJii,j;j," ijv Awj!itnhH'>iiV!n; a chia-uiiiiB �w*y by Gi-uw JJeiiio lAWhtiirld, �Womaa'a   Educational  aad Industrial Union. Some of the "oharactetB" at the Dickons' carnival have been asked by their admir-' ing frleuds to have their pictures taken in. their costumes, the same to bo sold for tho further benefit of the Woinan'sEducatioual and Industrial Union fund. Mrs. Kounco-wcU, the housekeopcr nt Ohesnoy Would (Miss Helena Kichardsonl.aud MissLa Oroavy_ (her Bister) are among those favorite char-' actors. Tho hall was filled at tho opening of tho winter s entortainmtmts in the rooms of tho Union last Woduesday evening, and tho different performora were greeted most onthuslnstically as they appeared. The audience further made known Its appreciation by frequent encores, whioh were cheerfully given by the (irtists, who were: MiF.a Annie Belle Ilinolcley,mezzo soprano; Miss Clara Clark, reader; Miss Alice Lovett, pianist: Miss Lander, accompanist, and Mr. Waltrr Lowes Hcatli, basso. As next Wednesdriy will he tho Sad birthday of the poot Wliittier, tho occasion will bo romoniuered In tiio reciting n/ some of his poems by a well-known reader, with music of a high order. X'l'om Var Olf Jlantbay. The cycle department in the December Homo Maker gives a charming account of the first anniversary of the Sorosis Clnb of Bombay, India, vpliich was started a short time ago by Dr. Emma Brainerd Ryder, who is still its president. The latter says, in a letter to Mrs. Croly, -which is quoted: Keak Mes. Ceoiv-I tend by this mail the Times ol IiidlQ, and report of the first anniversary of IJom-ba.v Sorofiii. It w�b to me a very pleasant oeciieioii. The room was beau' ',i'n, bj'Jijraphieai falielciieb   has iu band a scheme to found a professorsHi;; in Ann Arbor University, to be filled ai?vnys byji woman. There are several large pfti,;|ge8 to start with, one gentleman offering Siv^OOO. The Woman's Charity Club is to haSe a fair in the spring to raise the necessary funds for the carrying on' of the excellent work done in their hospital. Mrs. Annie Jenness-lililler, the npostle ol artistic dross reform, is to give a course of three lectures iu a few weeks under the united auspices of the'N. E. AVoman's Press Club, the .Boston AA'oman's Charity Club, and tho New England Wheaton Seminarv Club, Jladame Alice D. La Plorgeon, the Yuca-tau explorer, will give a course of lectures in Boston in January, under tho auspices of the "Woman's Press Association . The Woman's Club of Worcester celebrated its 2lBt birthday last Tuesday. Club Meetings This 'Week. iugs from Whittlcr by Miss Webster; music by Miss Kli'/.ubeth Bliiislaiid, soprano; Master Carl Oakraun, violinist. Boston Woman's Cliarity Club meets Thursday, Dec. 18, iit p. m., iu Barnard Jil'.'inoi-ial Hull. N^'oirinii's Kducational and Industrial Union-The Bund;iy meeting, Dec. 1-1 (to-iay). at H n. m., v.'ill lie addressed by Mrs. Lotuse P. lloiikms, her subjoot being "The Uosiifl of Motlicrliood." Old and New, Muld'.-n, Mass., meets Titcs-dny, Dim'. l(r. at i!.'jr, p. 1)1. in hidies'pai'lor. First Parish clurcli, for busiui'.ss, with a paper on .Snniii.l:-! hy Miss M. L. Cliarles. Dorchester Brunch -Mor.il Educational As-snciutioii meets Tnesdiiy, Dec. ] C, 3 p. m. in tlio parlors of Jlrs. ^^'illiBm 1. Lawrence, Knglowood St., near Cedar G'ove station, Dorchester Ijowcr Mills; tho public are cordially invited to hear a paper by the Rev. Elizabeth M. Bruce of Maplcwood. on "What the lUtb cent\u-y iTOmau is and lyhat she might bo." Isew England Woman's Press Association has Its literary meeting at Parker House, Wednesday, Dec. 17, at ft p. in., iolloweu Oy "High Tea." Tho essayist will bo Itlrs. iS.ilhe Joy White, pro.'jideiit of tlie ossocir, lion, who will read a paper entitled "Look-iup B.tckward and Forward in Journalism." CastiUau Club ineets Wednesday, Deo. 17. Woman's Educatioual and Industjial Union, UK Boylstfin St. Free eiitertainnient ^\'l�dn.^sd^v evening; there will be readings froai %Vh)ltinr. a.s it is the poet's 83d birth-dav. tngetiicr with music, etc. Peiitai:o;i Club dines at the United States Hotel .'Saturday, 15eo. :.'0. at 4.!ia sharp. Now Uuitlaud Woman's Club meet at 5 Park St.. Monday. Dec. 15. at 4 p. m. Mies M. L. De5,ileus .will speak upon "Sloyd." Club tea at (kSo^__^_ "Poi-rncs" is the kijig of parlor games. Eistorio Hearths Wherein Firas are Still Burning. HE old weather-beaten and stained farmhousB in Tun-bridge, Vt., that was built by Capt. Benjamin Durkoe soon after tho close o� the revolutionary war has sheltered five generations of tho Durkoe family, and the farm on which it stands has fed a host of the descendants of the old patriot officer, whose great-grandson, S. Parker Durkoe, now owns it. Comfort and plenty reign inside the old house, and tho farm is one cf the most productivo in a town where good farms abound. Capt. Benjamin. Durkee was a descendant time you may from mg rooelvo, and you are to report your doings hereon as you may havo opportunity. Given undor my hand In New London, this twenty-second day of JiUy, In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-two. Samuel MoLellan, Colonei-Oommftndant. Oct. IS, 1783 is tho dato upon an old payroll signed by 72 soldiers of Capt. Boniamln Durkeo's company of inatrosses (artillerymen), at Fort Trumbull. Of those men, two were sons of Capt. Durlteo--Solomon and Asahol. In March, 178a, Capt. Durkoe presented a memorial to the governor and Council of Safety, stating that he had served as captain of the matrosses company at Fort Trumbull 18 mouths and that "tiie payaliowodhiih is iuadequtite to tho services rendered, and many other lu-oonveniencos attending tho service are such as he desires your honor would excuse him from any further service and permit hun to retire from said command. In place of permission to retire he ro-ooived tho following: To Benjamin Durkoe, Esq., Captain and Qommand-ant at this Forts of New London and Qrotou i �you will observe that you and your second lloii-tenauf; are rctalnod In tho command at tho forts, with 45 matrosses, and the roslduo to be dlocharged as you shall judgo most reasonable and proper to discharge, considering their particular olioumstaiices. 1'ou will take euro to prcsorvo tha publlo stores and tho safety of tho atate. You will lesson tho ma-trosflss to a number sufilclent for keeping guard. "Vou will 1180 your dlsnretion as to your own or your UoutoiHint's nbflonco at any time. That one of yon bo present in the 'command and that ilue oiiro be takon for tlio publlo security, and mako report to mo from time to time of your dolnas. Oivou under my lumd at Lebanon, 2nd July, 1783. JONATn.^n THUBimiLt., Govoiiior. Discharged at tho close of the year 1783, Capt. Durlcoe found himself without era-nloymont and in reduced ciroumstauces. His ooinitry was impovorishod, taxes were heavy and burdensome; if not paid, prop- IU-> ''��';:-.'�f;'i'., DUItKEE  llOllES'i'EAD,   TUXJiEIDGE.  VT. of a Btui'dy Scotch family that sottlod in Ipswich, JIass., as early as 16U3, and from thonoe migrated to AVindhain, Conn..where Deacon Williiitn Dui-koowas born Jan. ;10, 1700, and married, first, Snsannah Sahin, a descendant of an (.>ld Puritan family, March 8,17"2e; she died in I7,'l-1. Deacon Durkee married next, Uliz:ibeth Ford; B-.'n-.iamin. boi-n Oct. 18. 17-lM. wa.sn sou of Uie sni'ond wife. Hp was born in llriinpti.ii. Conn., wlioro in 1770 he m.-irried Ahii;:;!), fl.iurfhter of Cnl. Henry Durkee, hy whom he h/ifl .si.\ children, four son.s and iwo dnughter.s. In 177r, he enlisted under his fatlicr-in-Inw, "to servn dnrinst the nresent war. unless sooner discharged." He ivrts for a tune in Cnpt. Adam Sl\arple5''s cmmiany, and was adjutant or secretary for Col. Henrv Durkee for some time, but as R;irly n,"; ] 7S3 he had won "by fidelity and meritorious conduct" the rank of captain. In July, 1783, Capt. Durkee wns placed in command of the whale boat Ranger and given the following orders: Capt Hi njamln Burkce, couiinnnder cf the whale boat Ranger: You are hei-cby permitted and leriuircd. by vlrlr.e of authority from the governr,! and ettimeil of siifety of the State of Connecllcut, me !iH!lioil7iug llionlti, and enabling v.llb your 6.iid whaleluat Kanper. and the 10 hands on board said beat K.'inger, to cruise in said boat In the Long Island sound, river Tlismed, etc., against all British Uhcit and contraband goods, vessels concerned in said trade, etc., and with said boat Banger and hands on beard. by force of arms to take and seize the sanie, bring into some port In tliis Btfiie, t.^.at proCE�dlng8 may be had thereon tn courta CEtabliBhed for ll.e trial of captures. You are to attend to such orders as front time to erty was seized or boiiio.'; were taken to the gaols and nnjiriMOiuni. He drew up ii pi'ti-tion to tlie Goiii'ral A.sseiubly. ;i.'ik!i;.r;- for rctircss and relief fro.ii siit;li "ouiiro;,;sion" :iiid tlie "danger of linviiu,- oiii- pi;rsi;ii.s seized and iinpri.soiiecl, and our o.stale.s sold lor los.i lliau Hieir viiinc." Fidlinj;'lo t't't rclii'f and tlip times r.'row-ing woi-.'K! C.tpt. ihirki'i' diciUnl (oito to Vcmiont wlier,' his cli'n.'st son was ;ilre:i'ly lof'ai^'d. !Ui(i  r ilil'iii'iihit's wereciiuoiinli;ii!.i',iy tln.un. bi'.lihr.v lii!:uly reached tlu'ir �ii'stinaiion, and gtiitioil a lioaic ami a ('al,*l^'eu�:lc�^^ ailor some ye:iis of liunl ijibor. Tiiey liv,Ti to si'c tlieir country a si-.'joiitl time vicioiious over the s:u!ic I'oo, and died : Ciiiii. Diirlici', in laiiSi. agi'd .�:!(;; hi.s wileinlH;il, at-'eil iS". Tlieir yon:ipc.si son. ,li.ihn. served in the >var of 1 SI". and of Jolin's inandsnjis a luilf dozMi or iiioiv served in thi^ Union ariuv during the lusi war. The old house has never slielttjri.'d ;t traitor, and tlie Durkces arc not a little pioitd of tho patriotic record tho family Inw gained. 'The old lionso is'nieasnntly and pictur-csqui'ly loc.itcU upon a liih'h terrac i wtsi cf tlie rivor thai runs iliruuah Iho centre of tlie town. Tiic farm ie binre and is nearly .sun-oundci'l iw hills. Tv.'ice every day a;i '.tkt four-iior.se iiuiii coach rolls past it over till' old turnpike built when the totvii v.ns first (�ettied, and gives llie only excitcnuint that, comes to tho tiuiei valley. The old lo.g house to which apt. Durkee lirstcame stooil nearly opposite the site of tlio one ho built, but not a trace of it can be found now. One of the few "garrison houses" remaining in!New EnglaJtd stand.s in Exeter, Is. H., on its original locution, at the corner of Woter and ClifTord sts. The house is itn-aoiibtedly the oldest strtioture in town, and was built by Ooimcillor John Gilman, who came to Exetor about the year 1648, ana became a man of prominenoe in the town and State. As he was living in the house in 1070, there is ground for belief that it dates back to 1668. The original structure was 8ma]l,and constitutes tho main body of the hoUEO. It was oonstractod of square logs, the upper story proiooteu a foot or more 'beyond the lower, and the windows were scarcely more than loopholes, and was thus completely adapted for the defence of its inmates against the ttaoks of the savages. Iu this house Goimoillor Gilman lived C3AlimsO!f HOUSE, BXETKB, N. H. until his death in 1708. His son. Col. John Gilman, succeeded him in tho ownership of tho house. Ho was then about 32 years of age, with a wife and four children. Pie was an active and energetic man, and acquired firoperty and influonco. In 1710 and 1720 10 was licensed by the Provincial Assombly to koep a place of nublio ontertalntncnt in his "log house by the bridge." Col. Gilmtm was tho father ol 11 children, and died iu 1740. His oldest son �was Peter, born in 1703, and married seven da/s after reaching the age of 21, and in 1832 ho received from his father a deed of the old house. Plon. Peter Gili,nan was a man of note and .imong tha oifioe."i ho held �svas that of speaker of the Legislative Assombly from 175!) to 1771, After that he was councilloc for two years. He was much osteoined by his townSniun. Itis related that on one occasion a press gang camo from Portsmouth to Exetor to seize men to serve in his majesty's navy, but tlie brigadier warned tlie party that any whom they might capture would .snrely bo rescued before they reached Btratham, and they desisted. He was a man of strong religious views, and a groat admirer of the evangelist. White-field. An amusing story has been preserved of his being so deeply afTeotod hy �. discourse of tho great preacher that ho fairly rolled on the ground in an agony of pcni-tenoe. It was during Peter Gilman's occupation of the house that tho front wing was added to It. It was probably iniilt m 1772, when lio was comioilkr, John Wentworth was then the governor, and when he visited Exeter his ,'itopping place was witli Hon. Peter Gilmau Ju this house. The low-.'-.toried rroms of tb 0 old houEO .secinod hardly suiu able for the reception of tho highest dignitary of tlie ilrovinc.^ The ViriBiKlior, tliorc-foro, had tliis addition made to it. of two stories, so as to indge the governor. . The wholo was finished inside with ptmelled work. Hon. Peter Gilmjin �n-as married throe times, bis tliird wife being tiie Widow Prince. On a pane ol plass in one of the rooms, in very nice writing, is a record of Ills tliifd itiavria;:ii, with others, as ioIIov.-b: "Hon. Peicr Gilman. E.sti., and Jlr,s. Jane Prince, were uiiirriod Hept., 1701." "Tlionias (3ary :iiid Deborali Prince were miirritvl 8eiil., 1 TG.'l." Hautiali l!o'j ns' name is signed beneath witli l!ic ua\". km. '.i, 17SS. .Vf;rr tlie iii:Uli of Perer Gilman in 1 788 tlm hiKis � -.ViMii inio ti'c pof-si ssion of Llicn-czer t'iifi'c:,:. ^vllo cain..^ from i'^xclnr to h'ensii/i^ii.ii :i!i(iiii. that time. He was an inacisions ni'^cliaiiic. and siii'lit'tl architcCL-iii'i'. aii'i mail.' sc-i �ii:ili;- t/:<]icriiiietits oul-lid" oi IT's ri';Jular c ilhij'^-. ill- i.u:;niuii'::urc(i a diviiig-bi:!l, with w'iiU-ii lie ir.-,.t.:.;lit un i'rinn ilic .s-'a much Auluablc nrtii'.'rty ii-om �\vr,'h;ked vc-^sols. A i-flic of tli'j old  e iadiUged in when the thermometer bta at jCreBzinpf point, tho costumo of it^votoo3 mnsi of the warmest. J We advise lor this-sfer yaohtinar tjia thickest of cheviots ivMuantitios of ftuf for trimming. Tho foiling sketphes sxra a seed idea of otir m^a, in �which tia head gear is a novel f oato In the figrure to th^ght, the oap isa combination affair, all one piece �withtjio cape, and is made to o^' the JEorehoadand is meant by thai short yet pregnant phrase. For not only is two-tliirds of their time crowded witli tho in.inil'old functions'Which constitute the regular busines.i of society, but they are constantly taking up new lads and tryin.g novel diversions, each and ev'.;ry one of, which demauds its own di.sUiictive co.3fuiai'., thus nece,s.sitating fresh consultations -..vitli modiste, tailor and milliner, and extra huuvs of fitting and tryini.f on. .\mong those out of the ordinary rcisf lUes v,'iiioh tlui r,;cenr cold sna;> lia;, roniiei-cd possible, is the exhilarating ice yaelit;ii',' U]i tin; Hudson and upon otlief neighlioring streaius. mouth Bs �R'ell as tU head. It haa a tasilm val helmet and vpor effect whioh Ifl d� cidcdiy unique. ''J;/e gown is of darkhroTtW choviot with n.ariw wavy lines of dull gteen. and is trimilod with bands of seal t8 match the jackiV and cap. The longi diecked ulster onfho loft is trimmed witt grebc.as is the Ic^ tm'ban. 'This other ice iiaiden wears a gown anft reefer of navy hl/e camel's hair, withbordes liand and pockcfilaps of dark blue velvet, hcjtded with a fl/ipo of gold braid. Thehat has a NoapoHtal iislicr's ctowu of blue and fitripod velvet,/-ith brim of wolverine lik* the collar and hfl' bauds.        Rediteek. tall man, about Oleet 4 inches, and it is re-lato'l lii.1t tlioso who kept the house then used to place n cliair at the foot of the bod into wliicli Mr. Mason would extend his ieef. while Bleopiiig. The liousc is now owned and occupied hy Mr. Jlaiiluy Darling, tvho, the day Thu Gboei: correspoiKlent visited it, pointed out the holes thnnmh whicli tiie inmates used their inu.skets agaui.st: tlie IndiaiLS, showed t!ic different rooms above as we.ll.as below, and the dark reeosses wlicre tdd-timo occupants could secrete themselves. The rooms aio cood sized but low, there are wood panels in tv:ills, windows in re-ce.sse.K, iiiid lireiilaces snrroimdcd �ivir.h curved jiatiels, there are nuniborloss closets in place and out of place, marvellous iu design :nid niysteriotis in purjiose. i\lr. Darling has iu his possession a model of the old house wliicii he made as it looked before any addition was made. Bbonckitis. - Sudden changes of the weiitlier cause Bronchial troubles. "Bro-'nu'e lironcliial Trodiei" will give relief. Shoe B^okiuK and Oola Feet. "When the feather in yotu' shoes hecomoj old and bcgiJued with blacking, yoii vrtll ascertain tlifc tho feet will be cold," re, marked the Id-time shoe seller, according to tlio Shoo ,nd Leather Facts. ''Then itU time to castiside the shoos and use them to w-ear bcne.i/i arctics or for some other put-piite. I U^'o seen it referred to many times, but / you want to keep your shoe* iu good ttiidirion you should ttse vase-lino on i^ui often. The life will ba keptinthi' leather, and if rightly applied you can bllne llie footwear just asvrelias if till' piiparntiou liad never bden used, I'ut it on it night when taking off the shoos. Tiiero is wstor and like oil, also, that �wlU as well f-rvo the, purpose and keep you� .sljoos a.'/l boots in good shape, inipartina much l-iiater WRrmtli to tlie feet thauQ you ali/w ulacking and the like to eat nn all the He in the leather. W^hen blackine coinmaices to cake on the shoes irMii them �with liiin water, no soap. EvEjY child of gTanimatHMjlu(ol�g�Traa& a copyof "Politicfl." T 6   

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