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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 17

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                ',! ! St i THE BOSTON  SUNDAY GLOBE-SUlSfDAT, DECEMBER 14,' 1890--TWENTY-EIGHT (Successors to JOHN HARRINGTON & CO.) 17 & 18 TrGinQnt Row, 660 ^.062 Mlligton^St.,  1 & 3 Tremont St., Corner oS IPomtocrtou Square, Have ^.bouglit: from Messrs,; LEWIS PATTi3EEa & OO;, tW largest and best house in Amerioa in their line, all-their SAMPLES, at HALP PEIOE. Photograph Albums, Worth $1.50, for 75c. "   $2.00, " $1.00 i"   $2.50, " $1.25 $3.50, " $1.75 Plush Glove Boxes. Plush Handkerchief Boxes. ; Pliish Jewelry Boxes. Collar and Cuff Boxes. Pocket Books and Bags. Baskets of every kind. Toilet Cases, worth $9.00, for $5.00 "       " $10.00, " $5.50 "       "   $8.Q0, $4.00 "       "   ,$8.00, " $3.00 "       " $20.00, " $9.00 Manicure Sets, worth $7.50, " $3.50 "   $9.50, " $4.75 "       " $12.50, " $6.50 "       " $18.00, " $8.00 Combination Toilet and P^anioifre Sets, Worth $20.00, for dl 0.00 " $30.00, " $14.00 On sale at all our Stores Wednesday. "Eo such thing as competition on these. FOR, .^EDIMESDAY:,; 350 Glnria'ioioth UMBBELLAS, paragon frames, assorted English har-dles, assorted patterns, none like � them elsewhere in Boston, at Ssi.OO eaoh, worth $1.50. Also all the samples of JEWELRY from a Providence manufacturer. Our customers will rememher these lines of samples from the above mentioned house.; We have had them every year for the past six Holiday seasons. All have conceded that our prices were the LOWEST in Boston. I      ' """" 17 and 13 Tremont Row, 660 & 662 Washins^ton St. i and 3 Tremoiit St., Oornor Pemberton Squaro. BOSTON.' � Also n /otv Samples niid Odd Onr-ments at very low iii'icos. TrenoilEmer 65 Franklin St., Near flrch St. Perfect In Oonstrnotion. Artistio in Design, Matchless in its Light. Aljaolatoly safe oiid imbro�lcnblo| 60 simple & child con manoBO It. Itfl ligue, pnror and WiC'iitfir Uinn RiiB-UKht, oofter iliivn elcotilo light;, more ohooi-ful than olthor. A wrltton Bunrnntfio goes with ovory lump. AaU for the lamp una tho gimrau-teo, and InBlst ui-TOn noBlng; the atuniii of tho gonulno *'Tho Itochestor." SOOO vnrletlcs. MANtlFACTimEIl OKI,Y IIT___      __ EOOHESTEB LAMP 00. lEDW, MpLEH & 00,, ijewYorlc. I      Merldon, Ooun. Sold in all ffood Lamp Stores.    WFSuH^t nl9 Boston Broker, Man of Bead on tlie fery E?0 of His Weddimg. Detective Prince All in a Jacob Vernon's Startled. Guests Boston Grirl Goes Through the Ordeal. need nof'iv,',"?P�=�'J.''^'V"'''6y would, and it S-nm ?^4�^�"r.'"'9�'ierit somoof thorn fly whoifl'thLP''r^"^*"." to another wintry, wavthvftefS'iV their fortunes in a aoknmvi�rf,�5 society slionld he Sill?"       toafe dice W f hl^^V^'^'j^'","''^'"' 1J0"i of l>reju-a&te?!!^;;!'^ be rospoctod fortL in ^nS"?"f ^^''^ss ha^ done inuoh harm !s It Murder? Who Did It? W!iat Wast[i8iotlv8? Blace Piiotograph Panels in Artistic ^     Designs. rioture BVamLaB a specialty. Tho chandeliers poured �orth a hillliant light, orange blossoms filled the air, tho bridal rohos wore assumed, tho wedding least was in the raneo; to have mingled iu so polite a company was the gratitioation of the highest social aspiration; men laughed and women smiled; but without oarrlagea or cards, unnnnonnoed and unexpected, there came among them Jealousy, Fear and Deceit. Then came Death. Men started and women swooned, the orange blossoms were trampled beneath the feet of the frenzied guests, who wandered wildly and helplessly over the suddenly confused home of Jacob Vernon of Cambridge. The bridegroom was dead in hisobamber and the bride mad. A tragedy was tolled on the marriage bell, and ominous looking detectives ushered the frenzied (people out of the fateful mansion. But from among them suspicion came back to haunt the place and all its fearful and distracted people. Theories and clues became as thick as detectives about the scene, and even at this distance of time fi-om his death tho strange fate of Austin Craige is as open a question as it was at the moment of its sudden occurrence. This groat mystery, in all of its' many phases, will be the subject of A. ISenuirkable Story "by Scott Campbell, which will begin ia neit Satujrday's Glo'bb. The thrilling scenes that preceded and followed the death will be narrated and every imasrinablo clue to tho cause will bo followed out imintertupt-edly iu The Daily Globb. All- the ruling passions of human life will come within the scope of this wonderful story and be graphically and faithfully pictured by the author. Love and jealousy, honor and clishonor,unselfishnesB and plottingcupidity, fear and hatred are among the elements which Mr. Campbell will handle with uncommon skill. Every thread of the baffling mystery wUl be exposed to the reader's eye. and all may turn detective in a common pm-suit of the solution, the secret of which the author alone now knows. Wien all tho chapters of this moving tale, save the last, have been given to the public, 10 days or tivo weeks will be allowed to intervene before the conoluaion is published. This last chapter will contain the solution of the mystery, which will be reached on absolutely straight lines of logic and reasoning. Before this is published, however. The Globk hopes all the thousands who will be attracted to the Fascinatiitgr Komauco will forward their theories of what the outcome should be to tho office in Boston. Here these theories will bo carefully examined and the writer who may come the nearest to tho author m his reasoning will receive a reward of $200 as a substantial mark of Thb Gi-obe's appreciation of his or her nouteness of perception. The two others who shall come nearest the first in their theories vrill eaoh jeceive 550. The readers will iind that there \vill be no guess work about it. In fact, it will be sim. ply a test of Yankee smartness. The author will deal frankly with his audience and lay before tliem day after daV all tho circumstances of tho case, thus enabling tliem to enjoy tho same insight and employ the same instincts that'aloue bring success to tho professional detective in quest of a criminal,       � But this will be much njoro than a detective story. Quite apart from that phase of it Mr. Camnbell will give liis readers a novel of absorbing interest and high quality, permeated with the tender passion, and spiced with many varieties of our local life, the scenes of it all lying in the familiar neighborh'ood of Boston. No lover of good fiction, and no reader who suspects himself or herself of any degree of shrewdness can well afford to lose the very opening chapter of "Saved by Death; dr. The Strange Fate of Austin Craige," in next Saturday's Globd. Sffiotltci'fld Democratic Principles and Kissed Royalty's Maud. Several Ludiorons Rehearsals ITeoessai'y. "Were 0.1 84 Biomfield St. ART AND ARTISTS. Works of Aft In 3a!lery. and Studio- Closipg of th9 Vefestohagin Exhibition-Notes, Etc. The fourth exhibition of the Water Color Club at Chase's gallery is the best tliat has been shown. This club is composed entirely of women, whoso exhibitions tho past three seasons, at Doll & R|i,chards' gallery have been admired for their artistio qualities. Among the most noticeable pictures are those by Frances B. Towiisend, Susan H. Bradley, Alice M. Curtis, Mary M. Morse. Elizabeth F. Psirker, Laura C. -Hills, Helen BI. Hinds, The other exhibitors arc; Sarah W. Whitman, MaryMcG.Dalton.ICathoriue W. Lane. Mary K. Longfellow, Eleanor W. Motley, Annio 0, Nowell, Sarah C. Soars and Susan M. L. Wales. The Unity Art Club is a new organization formed for social and artistio purposes, and has opaned its first exhibition at 77 lioyl-stoii St., which will continue through December. Persons who are engaged iu artistio pursuits, such as painting, docorilting, modelling, carving, engraving, designing, etc., are eligible for membership. The ox-hlbitcoiisiats of oil paintings, w.itel'colors, drawings, decorated china, etchings. woo� carvings, etc. The list of exhibitors oom-prisos tlie names of J, J. Emieking, William F. Halsall, .T. P, Selingor, S. L, Gerry, Walter Gilman Page, Honrv M. Rico. F, Feuety, Helen M. Kuowlton, Alice M. Curtis, Harriet and Lylo Durgiu, C. Hooper, M. K. Baker, A. M. Silloway, Annie C. Nowell, Helen S. Farley, C. M. Carpentor, Adelaide Palmer, W. L. Challonov, C. H. Rimmor, Mrs. H. A, Grosby.L. S. Hilton, JI. W. Howard. Mrs. H. P. KraKor. Mrs. S. S.Bowdoii,MissNute, Mrs. Kasson, Emma E. Brown, Mary J. Pray, Clara'Robbnis, F. B. Whittemore, Harriot Hyatt, Mrs. S. E. Eaton, Carl A. Rydiugsv-oi'd and Anna M. Kydingsvard. The A''erestcliaglu exhibition closes tonight, it being the last opportunity to view this wonderful ooUootion of paintings. � The collection will be shipped to New York, and, for the present, stored there. In the spring it is expected that it will be sold at auction. This collection should be sold entire, and in one or two of cm- cities whore an interest is taken In art matters a movement is on foot to secure this wonderful life work of the artist. At the gallery of Doll & Richards can ho seen a modal bust of Edward Everett Halo, D. D., by William Ordway Partridge. The features are finely brought out, giving, a truthful representation of the characteristics of the subject. A choice collection of Braun's permanent carbon photogi-aphs, from the inasterpioces of the European gal-lories, in cabinet made frames, %vhich cannot fail to attract attention. Charles W. Sanderson has on exhibition at his studio, ao Beacon St., a fine collection of water colors. Tliey comprise sketches froin nature, being his summer's work. The reputation of this artist verilies tlie truthfulness of his work, and is noted for Its exquisite coloring and excellent drawing. A. H. iicknell of Maiden, is exhibiting a rare col eotion of etchings and paintings at his residence, 2B Parker st. The etchings were mostly taken from sbeiies aloui,- the seashore of Anuisquam, Cape Ann, and including sketches of country scenery in Maine and New Hampshire. Mr. Biofcnell is now eiutaged painting a lai'ge picture, entitled "The Salem Road to Woburn," a scene in whioh the sun is just setting as the moon is risinK', which bids well to be one of his best efforts. Wilbur H. Lansil has just completed two very fine sheep pictures, which for qualities of color and drawing is as good as anything he has done. One reproseiits an interior which is a charming bit of drawing and color, the other a pasture scone, witl> a flock of sheep, fall of sunshine and out-door 'effect. �  _ Gossip from Other Sotiroes. Lovado Taf t, the Chicago sculptor, whose statue of Gen. Grant is so highly spoken of, has been engaged to execute tho portrait bust of Miss Susan B. Anthony, a testimonial from women of the United States. Miss Anthony is to pose for the same. The Grand Army of tho Ropublio furnishes the fuel tor much artistio pot-boiling. What would our sculptors do it there were no soldier's monument to he erected bv fxateful hearts? No one will quarrel with hem for that, leivst of all the artist. But both the latter and the public are getting a surfeit of the conventional warrior, always cut out of the same cloth. The art collection of the late Henry J. Stoere of Providence, R. 1., was sold at auction last weak. The prices ran low-many of tho pictures sold for far less than their worth. About 30,000 was realized from the sale. The high est price bid was for ' 'La Bateau," by Corot, undoubtedly tho finest work placed on sale. The foreground, by the river, is in shadow all the way to the right, and on and bordering it are all the flowers and grasses whioh are found in such places. Near tlie right throe sturdy trees rear their trunks upward against the sky. The trunks are broken with fissures, and possess many hues. The spectator's attention is attracted by a rudely-mado boat, on the visible end of which sits a woman with wliite cape and yellow and black dress, another woman standing dressed in red, blue and black, asking the boatman a question, the latter prodding his long pole into the water vigorously, tho whole overtopped with one of tho most luminous of skies, in which troops of cloudlets mingle. M. Chanchard; once a clerk in the Maga-zindu Louvre and now the director of the great Paris shop, is now tho ov/ner of ' 1 ho Angelus." It was he who rocoiitly paid over $100,000 for Meiflsonier's "1S07.' William M. (Jhaso has found a series of charming subjects in Central Park. Now York, hoys sailing their miniature y.achts on the lake, bits of landsoapo with tamiliar figures and tho like, the picturesque qualities of which ho has recognized and transferred to canvas with rare skill and effect. The Society of British Artists has persuaded Burne^oneK and George F. Watts to become members of tho society. The latter has sent to their exhibition a portrait of Tennyson in his peer's robes, front face, with a background of greftuish tapestry. Whistler has not sentacontribution, though he is an cx-president. The only authentic portrait of Cleopatra that is known to aronasologists Is a bust � '            on a series of coins. It is on ' '-----     ' inscription in ONDON. Doc. 5.-"What would tliey say at lionto iii America," I thought, "if they knew I was going co be presented to tho Queen-I, Ruth Coolidge of Boston? AVoiild they consider that I had comprp-niisod tlio strict ro-publicaii principles of the family?" After all, being presented w.as only ft way of being introduced to Mrs. Vic toria Guelpli - tho way they do it in England. I felt pretty sure tho family principles could stand that much. So I .ab.indonod myself to tho joy of preparation, which Lady Torquilin decreed should begin the very next day. I tliought this, though pleasurable, rather unnecessary at first. "Dear Lady Torquilin," said I, in the discussion of our court dresses, "can't wo see about them next week? Wo planned so many other things for this one." "Cliild, child," rotiinied Lady Torquilin, Iniproasivoly, "in the coming fortnight wc have barely time 1 You must know that we don't do things liy steam and electricity in this country. Wo can't go to court by pressing tt button. Wo havon'tamoment to lose. And as to other arraiigoiiients, wo must just give evorythiiig up, so as to have ourminda free and comfortable till wo get the whole business over," And afterwards, about the seventh time I had niy court dress tried on, I became con viucod tliat Lady Torquilin was right. You Sua nO SUMMERVILLE HEIGHTS, Tills new and elegant hotel �will opea on Deceniher "0th, iiiidtr tha ^.tium jnuiingc-Bent as last season. Klcttric cars will iTUisfer pasBCiig-er.s autl bivjfgasro rlirect torn tlie depot to tlio hotel on arrival of bvcry train. For full particulars nnil lUusts-atcd book B-lth diagram of rooms, iiddrc-ss C. A. tins-Icy, HotiBi Iniiicrlal, yv\r Yuvlt City, until ttao, lotli, after that dato at Autrr" 'ii f,oSu7t nSO Dr. LA- _______ Tlic original I'.ud mily (,'t' )r. CATok'S UialAiU.E CO.Vinir.SI'for ADIJJH civ NiiW.rroiupi. Effccttml. 111:1 nml imlv fi'iiiUno Woiiiur.'s !Mil\i>, Tl.t-'.so liny C;ip:i:ilc.. uruitil In 4.1*1 liiHirH.wUiKmi Ijicunvt'lil'iici',/.L..rvv�l Uiudy uiffutl^iis in V. iildi I'opaiUa.tft^lJj CuufcUfl ami luJecLiuiu. Iiiil. ^ ' McAllister Bays It is Being Driven from America. There is even less reason for prejudice against society than for prejudice against fashion. Does any one imagine that the press or the pulpit has the power to prevent the evolution of fashion? Why, it would be absurd to claim that one part of the population had a right to dictate to another part as to the manner in ivhich it should live. Women will always dress, if they have the moans and the taste, in a way to enhance their charms of person, and the mon will admire thorn for it, while tho husbands and fathers ^nli pay the bills ail the more eagerly if tho enhancement is m proportion to the expenditure. Men and women in society arc just as human as otiier people. If tliey chooso to dress, act and iiinuso themselves ill (heir own way, why should thoy not? They do not presume to dictate to other people how thoy shall live, or act. or dross. They are content iu their sphere -why should they not bo let alone? They give to the poor, thtir money goes to pay wat'os of workers, and tliey receive, what? Well, a little enjoyment and a great deal of mimerited abuse. There is one social condition in .America that writers liave not touched upon, and it explains, in some measures, the narrowness of the social circle, in Now York especially. Evorv one realizes that the ono end and aim ill life here is to accumulate nuniey. There are a gj'cat iniiiiy men eugagr^d in trade, comuitrco or tlie practice of profession.'* who would he welcoino at tho best houso.h- luni brillianl of intellect and charming in which appears___________ _ the reverse, and hears the__________ Greek, "Queen Cleopatra, the Divine, the Younger,while on tho obverse is a portrait of Antony, Dictator for the Third Time, Triumvir.^' A memorial to Lippetti n teacher In the School of Fine Arts of St. Louis, was unveiled the other day. Mr. Lippott studied at tho Art School, went to Paris, and returned to talf.o a position ns loaolier. Ho lost liLs life while trying to save a friend from drowning, Tho memorial is a bronze bust by Kouert Briiighurst, standing on a black marble pedestal. In front stands a female figure, writing tho record of his deeds, 'i'he sales at the autumn exhibition ot the National Academy have been surprisingly good considering the uncomfortable feeling in financial matters. More pictm'es have boon sold during the first 10 days than the 10 opening days at tho spring exhibition this year. �\Vater colors by modern Dutch artists are to be seen at tho Wuiiderlich gallery, whore some of the pitstels of George Hitchcock are still on tho walls. The latter has sold about 2Cof his pastels of Holland scenes. The Hollanders represented in tho new batch of water colors include Broituer, Kovor and Kiu, The bronze group erected in Washington representing Gallaudet when a yoiiiii! man, surrounded by deaf and nmte children, to whom he in a measure (fnve speech and hear'ng, is .said to bo one ol the finest things Daniel Freneli ever did. and in this example is said tc equal St, Gauden's. At Philadelphia the exhjhiwon now open is one ot Japanese objects of art collected by 3r. Edward H. Williams in Japan, Mias Ulaucho Dillayo, whose etchings are well cnov.'n, is holding a week's exhibition of lej- own productions in oils, water colors, crayon and etcliod work at her studio. Two paintings by tho late John IjOwIs Brow^n (Bordeiui.\, ks2!l and Paris, 3 800) are in.the Liixcmbtuinf galleries. _One.ii,tlie course if you were not quite so particular, miss, about that toe, or if you 'ad come about them sooner wo could ave obliged you in less time," the shoemaker said. But should I have the train or tho petticoat of the brocade, or would I prof or a ben-galino train with a bodice and petticoat oi crepe do chine? Siiould tho train come from the .shoulder or bo "fulled" iu at the waist, and what did I really think .mysell about ostrich tips grouped down one side, or bunches of field flowers dispersed upon tho petticoat, or just a' suggestion ot silver cmbroldory, gloaming all through-or perhaps mademoisol'o might fancy an eniproa,s gown, which would bo thoroughly good style, they had miido thorn for the last drawing room? I had iiover boon so wrought up about a dross before. When I found out how much the lord chamberlain had to say iu tho matter, how he arranged the exact length of my train and cut of my bodice and wliat I wore In my hair, tho whole undertaking, while it grew in consequence, grew also in charm. 1 enjoyed his intorlorenoo. t One thing that surprised nio during that Tortnight ol preparation was tlioromarkaulo degree ol interest shown in our undertaking by all our friends. I should have TlioiiuUt it ou Old Stoi-y. In Ixmdon, but it seemed just as absorbing a topic to the ladies who came to see Lady Torquilin on her "day," and who had lived all their lives in England. If tho ladies had been presented themselves they gave graphic and varying accounts of tho occasion, to wliich wo listened with charmed interest J if not, they brought forth stories if anything more thrilling of vrhat had happened to other pooplo they knew or had heard of-the lady whose diamond necklace broke as she bent, the lady who forgot to take the silver paper out ol her train at home and lolt it In tho arms of the gentleman ol tho court as she sailed forward, tho lady who was' attacked by violent hysteria just as she passed the Duke of Edinburgh. One lady Iclt us, almost in tears, because' she had failed to persuade me to take a few lessons, at a guinea a lesson, from a French lady who niaSe a specialty of debutante .presentations. I think I should have taken them, tho occasion found me with so little self-reliance, if it had not been for Lady Torquilin. But Lady Torriullin said no, certainly not, it was a silly waste of money, and she could show me everything that was necessary for all-pracical purpo.ses as well as Mnio. Anybody, So several mornings we had little rohenrs lis, Lady Torquilin and I, after breakfast, in my room, by whioh I ^profited much. We did it ver.v simply, with a towel ojd whatever flowers woro left over from dinner tho night before. I would pin the towel to my dress behind and hold the flowers and advance from tho other end of the room to Lady Torquilin, who represented hot majesty and gave me her hand to k-'ss. I'.ouiid the curtsey dilU-cult Oii first, espicipily tho getting up part of i*., and Lady Torquilin was obliged to givo me a gi'eat deal of practice. "Hoirember one thing about the Oneen's hand absolutely, ohilu," she said, 'You're not, under any circumstances whatever, to help yourself up by it!" And then I would be 110 queen, and Lady Torquilin, just to get nto tho way of it again, would pin on the towel and carry tho IS.OSOS anil Onrtsey to Mo. At last the day came. It seems to me, looking back upon it, that wo began to go very early in the morning. I remember a vision of long white boxes piled up at the end ol the room through tho gray of dawn and a verv short nap altorwards, before tlio maid came knocking with Lady Torquilin's inqu ries as to how I had slept and did I remembor that the hairdresser was coming at 0 she-rp. It was a gentle knock, but it seemed to bristle with portent as I hoard it, and brought with it the swift realiz.'i,tioii that this was Friday at last-the Friday on which 1 should see (Jnoen Victoria. And yet of course, to bo quite candid, tliat was only hall the excitement tho knock brought, the other hall was that Queen A'icteria should see rao for an instant and as an individual. There was a very gratifying flutter in that. The liairdresser was prompt. "I'm glad to see you've been able to take a good breakfast, filias," she said, as slio puilod and curled mo. "Tliat's 'alf tho battle!" She was sorry that she had to come to us so early, "but not until 2 o'clock, Mias, do I expect to be for ono moment off my feet. What with Ontry ladies who don't wish to be done till they^re Just getting into their carriages, though for that I don't blamo them Miss, and nobody could, I'm afraid you'll find these lappets very wearing on tho nerves before the day Is out. But I'll just pin them up so. Miss-, :md of course you must do a.s best plea.ses you, .but my advice would be, don't lot them down for anybody, Miss, till you start. Perhaps you will find it difficult to understand the interest with which I watched my own dovelopiiieut into a lady dressed for court. Even the nio.st familiar detail of co.f liumo seemed to acquire a new ineanuig and import:ince, while those of special relevance had the charm that might arise from the mingling of a very august occasion with a fancy dress ball. When I was quite ready, it seemed to mo that I was a very different person, very pretty, very tall, with a tendency to look backward over my shoulder, wearing .as well US a beautiful sweeping goAvn, a lofty and complete set of monai'chical prejudices, which I thought ItccumliiK In Miisqwcriide. I was fascinated with my outward self. I could �have wished, for an instant, that the Declaration of Independence was hanging ahemt somewhere framed. Then tho advent of tlie big square wooden box iron tlio ilorists and tho gi-acioiis v.-oii-der ot w lite roses and grasse.s inside, with little buds droiipin.1,' and caught in its trailing tjbbon.s-there IB a great deal of the essence of a royal I'unctiini in a drir.ving-room banquet. And then Lady Torquilin, with a new gniciousiiess and dignity, quitj a long way off if I had not been coii.scioir.s of sharing her state for tho time. Lady Torquilin's appearance gave me more ideas about my own than the pier glass'did. "Dear me," I thought with a certain rupture, "do I really l.ifik niivlhhiP- lii,-i. tliiit.','-' look anything liice that" We went down in the elevator, one at a time, wii.'i Charlotte as train bearer, and the other maids furtively admiring from the end of the hall.  A suiall crowd had gath tho weather; we siu'voyed our trains, piled up on tho opjjosite scat, with complacency; wo took no thought ovon for tho curl ol our foatliCrs. Wo counted as we drovo post them to take our place, and there woro io carriages in lino ahead ol us.      ,   . .  , Ihon W( stopped behind tho last in the middle of a wide road heavily bordered' uiider the trees w th damn people and dripping umbrellas-thoro for tho spectacle! All kinds of people and all kinds of umbrellas I noticed with interest-ladies and gentlemen alid little seamstresses and X..oiifura and ItivcrmiifllJis, and applo-'wonien, and a largo proportion of your respectable "lower middlo-class." Wo sat lu state amongst them In the ram, being observed and liUhig it. I heard my roses .ipprovod, and tho nape of my nock, and Lady Torquilin's diamonds I also heard it made very unpleasant for an elderly young lady in the oarringo in Iront of ours, whoso appearance v/as not iipprovod by a pair of candid newsboys. Tho policemen koptthopeople off, however; they could only approach outsido a certain limit, and there tliey stood, or walked up and clown, huddled together in tho rain, and complaining of tho clouded carriage windows. I think there came to mo then, sitting in the carriage in the warmth and-pride and fragi'aiice and luxurliuioo of it all, one Bitpremo moniont of oxporionco, wlion I bent my head over my rosea and loolced out into the rain-one throb of exulting ploas-lu'o that seemed to hold tho whole moaning ot the thing I was doing, and to make ita covotablo nature plain. 1 find my thoughts centre, looking back,, upon that ono mninont. It was 3 o'clock before w;p moved again, In t!io hours that camo between we had nothing to do but smell our flowers, discuss tho pooplo who 'drove past to take places further down the lino, congratulated ourselves upon being forty-lii'st, and ate tiny sandwiches done up in tissue paper, \yith serious regard for the crumbs-yet tho time did not seem at all long. Presently, when wo wore not in tho least expecting it, thoro came a little sudden jolt that made us look at each other proolp-itatoly. At that moment wo nhglitod on the" wide, red-oarpotod steps, and whisked as rapidly as possible through groat corridors with knots of goiitlomon iu uniform in them, to tho cloakroom. "Hurry, (diild," whispered Lady,, Torquilin, handing oiu' wraps to tlio White-capped maid. "Don't lot thoso people got abend of u.s, and keep close to me!" And I observed .the aiiino spasmodic haste in everybody else. With our trains ovor our arms, 'ivo fled after tho others as rapidly As JJocon-uiu Would Admit through spacious halls and rooms that lapse into a rod contusion, in my recollection, leaving one of my presentation cards somo-whero on the way, and reaching tho limit of permitted progress at last with a strong sense of security and comfort. We found it in.a largo pillared room, full of regularly curving linos of chairs, occupied by tho ladies of tho (to carriages that were before us. Every head woro its throe white feathers .and its tulle extension, and tho nggregatioii of pluuies and lappets and gentle ino\'�nionts, made ono in tho roar think ot a flock ol tamo pigeons nodding and pockinij-itwas very 'quaint," as Lady Torquilin said, when 1 pointed it out. Tho drosses ol these ladies immediately became a source ol the liveliest interest to us, as oura woro apparently to thoso who sut near us. In fact, 1 had never soon such tin-clLsgulsod curiosity of a polite kind before. But then I did not know that I had ovor been in tho same room with so many jewels and brocades and rare orchids, and drooping featlier.s, .and patrician features bolero, so perhaps this is not surprising. A I'ovv gentlenioii were standing about tlic room holding fans and bouquet's, leaning over tho hacks of tho ladies' chairs and looking rather distraught, in very hooom-ing costumes of black volvot and silk stockings and shoe-buckles, and ofllcors in uniform woro Bcattorod through the room looking a.s if they felt rather more important than tho mon in black, as I dare say thoy did, representing that most glorious and impressive institution, the army, while the others �svero only private gentlemen, their own property, and not connected \vith her majesty in any personal way whatever. As wo criticised and chalfod and chatted a door opened at the further end ot the room, and all the ladles rose precipitately and swept forward. i It was like a great shimmering wave, radiant in color, breaking in a lundrod places into tlio foam ot thoso dimpling feathers and streaming lappets, and it rushed with unanimity to tho open door, stopping there, chafing, on TUis Side of a Silk Ropo and a gentleman of the eoiu't. Wo hurried on with the wave, and presently wo were inextricably, massed about half way from its despairing outer edge, in an encounter of elbows which was only less than, furious. Everybody gathered her train over hor loft arm-it made one think ot the ladies of Nopaul, who wear tlioirs'in front, it is said -and clung with one hand to her prodigious bouqnist, protecting her pendant headdress with tho other. A sudden ihovonicnt among tho ladies nearest; tho silken b.irrier-a sudden coii-ceiitrntion ot energy that camo with tho kiiowlodge that there Avas progress to be made, progress to royalty! A quick, lieav-iug rush through and beyond into another apartment lull ol emptiness and iiuirblo pillars, and we were once more at a standstill,, having conquered a lew places, brought to a masterly iiiaotivity by another silken cord and another gontlomau ol tho court, polite but linn. In the room beyond we could see oerfcaiu figures moving about at their ease, with no crush and no struggle-tlie ladies and gentlemen of tho private ontree. With what lofty superiority we Invested thcml Thoy seemed, for the time, to belong to some other pl.anet where royal beings grow and smiled at every street corner, and to bo, on the other side of that silken barrier, an immeasurable distance oil. It ivas a distinct shock to hear an elderly lady beside nio, done up in amethysts, rocognizo a cousin among them. It seemed to be self-evident that she had no right to have a cousin there. About 20 of us v.'cro let in at once. Tho last ol tho ju'eocding 'M were slowly and singly pacing after one another's trains round two sides of this third big room towards a door at tho further comer. There was a most impressive silence. As we got into file. I felt that the supreme moment was at hand, and it was not a comfortable feeling. Lady Torquilin, in front of mo, put a question to a gentleman in a uniform she ought toahavo been .alraid of-only that nothing ever ten'iliod Lady Torquilin, wliicli made it r-iOSH Conifortablo Still. "Oh, Lord MafTortou," said she-I hadn't rocofjnized liiiii in ray nervouaricHS and his gold laco-"how many curt,seys are tncro to make?" "Nine, dear lady," replied this peer, with evident enjoyment, "It's the most brilliant drawing room ol tlio season. ICvory royalty who could possibly attend is here, Nino, at tho least!" Lady Torquilin's reply utterly terrified me. It was confidential and delivered in an undortoile, but it was full of severe moaning. "I'm full of rheumatism," said she, "and I can't do iti" The question as to what Lady Tornullln would do, if not what was required ol her, rose vividly before mo ond kept mo company at every step ol that interminable round. "Am I all right?" she whispered over hor shoulder from the other ond of that trailing length of pansy-colorod velvet. "Perfectly." I said. But there was nobody to tell me that I was all right-I might havo been a thing ot slirods .nnd patches, Soiiieliody's roses had ilroppcd;! was walking on pink petals. What a pity! And I had forgotten to take oil niy glove; would it c\-er come unbuttoned? How deliberately wo were nearing that door nt the further end. And how could I possibly have supposed thai iiiy heart would beat like this. It was all vcrj- well to allow one's self a little excitement in preparation, hut when it came to tho actual event 1 re-inindod . myself that I had not iiad tho slightest intention of being nervous. I called all my democrntic principles 1,0 my asaist-ance-none ol them would come. "Remember, KuthCoolidse," .said Ito mysell. "you don't believe in 'queens.'" But at that moment I saw three geiitleineii of tho household bending ovor and stretching out Lady Torquilin's train into aiiilllniit-iihle exoanse. 1 looked beymul. and there, in the midst of .ill lier iJa;'.;;lijij,' court, stood Queen Victoria. And Liidy lurquiliii was betiding over lier liiinri. ,'ind ih another moment it %vould ho-it wns my turn. I lolt tho touches on mv own train. _ honrd somebody cull a iiairie 1 had a vagiio familiarity wiili-"i1i:fis Ruth Coolidge." I was launched at la.st tuv.ards that little black figure of royalty with ihe blue ribbon crossing her breast and tho koh-i-nor sparkling there. And all that I remember after was gcing down very unsteadily before her, and just daring the sliiflitcst touch of my lips iipou the gracious liitlo hund slio laid on mine. And then, not getting nearly tune enough to inaka all of those nine curtseys to tho We must call your attention to our Holiday Certificate, is-stiedin any amount from $1.00 to $100.00, Wo allow a discount of 6 per cent, on .amounts exceeding $20.00. In presenting ono Of our Certificates yon avoid any possibility of not giving the recipient of same absolute pleasure, as it gives the owner tho privilege of selecting the colors desired, the stylo, length and qn.ality needed, and can bo used from week to week, until tho amount is taken up; .also relieving the giver of all perplexity as to The interesting questions: Have I selected snitable colors? Is tho size right? Wo have cleared the path of trouble to .all who intend giving their loved ones Simpson's Fine Gloves, Hosiery and Underwear, what could be nicer than a Certificate from Simpson's for Christmas and New Year's Gifts. 25 (loz. ladies' All-wool Mittens at 50 (loz. Ladios' tens at    � 15 (loz. Ladies' Silli Mittens at 25c. nu'O SIlIcMlt-�    "    �    50c. Extra Heavy  SI.00 ^mm km urn 20 (loz. Fur Top Ladies' Gloves ivorth .1(1.50, for - - 75c. CO doz. �-lJutton Mouaq. Saode, tan and a;raj',M'ort!i ,$1.50. for 75c. 20 doz. 2.]?iitton Gents' Street Gloves lor - - - 75c. 100 doz. l-lloolc Lacing Gloves for.....S5.00 200 doz. '{.Hook Lacing Sacdes for .... . S1I.25 lift doz. I-Hoolt Extra Bon Marclic for    -    -    -  $1.50 100 doz. Gents' Fleeced Lined Stylish Warm Winter Gloves, reduced from .'^2.00, for - $S,00 Ladles' and Gents' Fur Gloves, S2.5Q ""d S3.00 Misses' Evening   and  Street Gloves for     -    -    �  Si.00 Long Evening Gloves, In Snedes, .lust arrived from Europe, linest quality � S1.50 to S4.00 A box of Simpson's Gloves will malce a very nice gift. Wc present caci) customer wlio purclinscs �i pairs of gloves wltli a very neat box. Call as early in tlio week as possible, as it is well to avoid the dlscom-' forts of the holiday rush. All Gloves exchanged and lltted alter tho holidays. lieautiful line of heavy Craven Tan Gloves for ladles and gents, in 2 and 1 button, also Mousq. aud Guuiitlets. Orders by mall will receive especial attention. p,n-.somaity. biit they have no.time for the : j Honor in ISTo!" pursuit oi' nirasure All their endeavors Universal in iVs'J. are direrted toward tho accuniulatioii of wealth. I\'ot nil hour, not needed for rest, is, or c:iU he, used for social recreation or divtision. Such men hold aloof from the society that would gladly reeeifo them on llieplea that t hey have no time to become sociaJ factors. Well, ill time tlio.se men secure their tor-liEU'j.s, hut at the end they are so wcar.v atier their lung struggle that they flo longer have any inclination for tho aniusements that thoy would keenly have enjoyed iu earlier years. Supposs, after nil, those men 70, and a gold medal at the The Jjcigical Outcome. [Clothier and Fiimlslier.] Son-Father. I am 21, and I want a silk hat. Katlier-But you haven't a dress suit yet. Son-No. but I would have to have one if I had a silk hat. BVEBYBOHY is playlnsr "Politics." , make theiii. j Inaddllkm they woro remarkable jlornl j designs about the jOze and Khajie of a er.b-ba-Te leaf upon ilieir brcasls iniin.-diatnly under their eliiiis. That was another iliin,.: that could notliave been done with dignity in Ameriea. The weather looked threatening as we drove off, proei-fely at 12 o'cloeU, and presently it began to rain with great inilustry and deUjrmination. The drops came streaming down outsido tho carnago windows; fewer people as we jiassed leaned out ol hansoms to look at us. Inside the carriago we were secwe troni 118 Tremont Street. 48 and 50 Tempts Place. 48 and 50 Temple Piace, Branch, 118 Tremont Street. HOf TO SM8E BIRDS And Cunningly Trap Beasts and Fishes. Tho Plucky Yankee Boy's Snre Method of Captnriiig Snipe. Excellent Ingenuity of Trappers, EstiTilmanx T does not speak well for the intelligence ol some animals that they are caught with such absurdly simple traps as the hunter sots for them. Ono reason why many traps oro simple is because the habits ol the animals are found out and tho trap suited to thoso habits, so that stupid birds and fishes are easily gulled, while, on tho other hand, tho cunning ol others must be catered to. Tlio knowledge ol tho doniznns of tho forest and stream means to tho savage hunter his daily food. He must know many tilings not down in hooks, and ho iniiat know liow, when and whore to search for his prey ' It is a, proverb that the way to a man's heart is through his stomach, and It holds pood with animals in a greater degree. With suitable bait they are thrown off their English sparrows may bo oaiight by a running noose of horse hair, hung on a tree or window-sill, Horse hair is gold lace to a sparrow for nest-building, and thoy will pull at tho noose until thoy got it around tho leg or worthless nook, . In ilapiin they have a novel wny ot catching ducks by "needles," A long string is fastened to tho middle of a thin piece of bono. Tins bono is baited and throw-n out iipon Uly leaves, while ono ond ol tho line is made last to a yielding branch. The duclt, Bwallows tho bait, hut when he attempts to fly away tho lino pulls the needle crosswise Largest stock of Genuine Eoe;erB SU-ver-Plated Knives, Porks and Spoons in Boston at Lowest Prices. Genuine Kogers Saltspoons .  So. Gonnine Rogers Mustard Spoons, lOc. Genuine Eogers Sugar Shells . 15c. Genuine Eogers Butter Zuives'. 26c. Genuine Eogers Gravy Ladles . 25c. Genuine Eogers Teaspoons . 75c. set Genuine Eogers Bessert Spoons, SI set Genuine Eogers Tablespoons, 25c. ea. Genuine Eogers Dessert Porks, $1 set Genuine Eogers Medium Porks, Si set Genuine Eogers Oyster Ladles, 81.00 Eegular price $1,60, Genuine Eogers Berry Spoons . SGc. Genuine Eogors Borry Spoons, oxidized handle . . /......SC.GO Genuine Eogers Pie Knives, in satin-lined box .......SB.OO Genuine Eogors Child's Knife, Pork and Spoon, marking included . SS.OO Extra Triple-Plated Ohildren's Mngs, hand engraved  .  ...  .  75c. Oake Baskets, triple plate, regular price $3,00........$1.93 Triple Plate loe-Wator Tilters, Bright Out, Gold-Lined Goblst, regular price $12,00.......S9.48 Triple Plate Gold-Lined Bright Out Bon Bon Dishes, latest style, reernlar price $2.25.....,. $1.50. Triple Plata Bright Out.Susrar, Orea;n. and Spoon Holders, regular price $2,00........S1.2S 75 doz. Silver-Plated Sugar Shells, Sc. 75 doz.Silver-Plated Butter Enives,5c. 250 doz. Silver-Plate^Pruit Knives, 50c. set 50 doz. Silver-Plated Napkin Sings, 5c. each Silver-Plated Nut Pick Sets, 6 pioks and 1 oraok, a very nice set, regular prioa $1,60.....SLOO DECOV. in his interior, and "togrglos," as tho sailors ^'""fiiaokbirds are otteii caught in cones ol Eaper, made sticlcy mtli birdlime.   The l.sldmo has also thought this out. Ho makes a Clip ol wood, and as lio has no liirdlime.ho fi.x-es a slin-nooso made lit spilt nuiU at tho mouth. Tho AinoH. of .Tiipan, also make a cono fox trap lillod with sliarp spines pointing inward, so that the animal pots his head in and cannot draw it back, like an insect oauu'ht in a flowor trap of tho sanio kind. "Mv father caught iir. wild turkeys in a trap like thi.".," salil a friend of mine. "lio made a pen ol roils and dug an inclined way under it. For several days previously guard and become etiay victims, lor tho Idea of setting something to eat is so large that it sluitB out all others tor tho time. For in-Btaiice, Alaskan fish-hooks are often mere curved pieces of hone, with no barb .'uid not oven sharp at tho point. Tney are only hooks to hold the biiit; when tho fish shuts his jaws ou tho prospective food, he seems beautiful, sparkling people that stood at tha Queen's left hand, before two more gentlemen of the court gathered up niy draperies from behind my feet, and threw- tlieiu iner-eifiilly oV(^r my arm for me. And one awful numient, when I couldn't imito tei) whether f bad b.-ieked out of all tho roval i)resi.iiee,s or not, made uii my mind tiirit 1 had. tlien iiiiiiiadu it, and in agony of .';pirit lunied and briclc"! nt'aiii. It wa."; over ot la.sl. I had kissed tlio lianil of tho Queen of Great Britain and Ireland. ____ liUTU. Stop at t;lie Hollenden, m Clovoland; 'American'uud European plans. Buy "Politics;" SlOO in cash prizes ofEored with every cwne (iold. At all toy stores. Price n. to forget how to open them, and Is drawn out. Animals luive been left very little chance to en.ioy life. llb>,rl> and the imi.suit of happme.^-s by e.ver-liunjri'y uian. They iii'.ve hcen Jiiiiileil .-uid liarried' lioni time miuie-iniirial. until th.'.v i;mi iiiateh cunning with cunning, and ileiii.ry daiiner by the iim.st dedicati,' senses uf heiirin!.r and smell. AVhut man with leaded gun ever gi.t in range et an experienced old crow'.' "Tliev .sinell powder," old liuiiters taiy, and it is (luite reasonable that "they lui-.iw the diU'ereneo heiweeu iigiin and a walkaig-eamih.v sight." Hirds are u.sually caught wiih nets and nooses. In Alaska ptariuigaii urc driven toward a long lino of shp-nooscs fastened Slosely   toKotlier;   partridges   axa easily riven into neti by n man on horsebaolt- a thins ic bo resTreticd by :eul sportamen. ho scattered com near the pen to lamlllar-l7,o tho turkeys with the spot, then he threw com along tho inclined way and In tho pen and caught the wliolo flock. You see, a turkey won t stoop its head to go out by the way It came In, liut tries to get out by thrusting its nock between the rails." How to catch snipe with a rope would he too dilHcult for .\merlcaii country hoys well lip in tho mysteries of ligure-foiir traps and double falls. Aiiio boys solve It thus: Tivo boys strotcli a rope across a narrow stream and hold each an end, while a third drives the birds toward them. At the proper lime the boys give tlie rope a sharp snap upward, somcllmos knockhig down sovcraf birds. There .iro ttlmo.st as many kinds of traps as there are kinds ol animals. Tho African makes pit traps lor the elephant andgiraiVo. while the mighty hippopotamus brushes aside a cobweb from his jittth and sends n.n arrow hito his heart. In Brazil tho monkey puts his hand into a cocoaiiut. grasps the good things placed tliereih and liecemoB a victim because ho will not relinquish his hold, for a monkey cannot climb a tree with a cocoaiiut on his hand any more than a cat can walk gracefully with English walnut shells wu-xed to its paws, as bad boys know. There are funnel traps, labyrinth traps, pocket traps, set nets, lish pots, lobster pots and lish slides lor tho denizens of tho iviitors, while! there are spring traps, dead-fulls, pill'all.':, snares, spring guns, etc.. in wait for land animals. Then tliere are decoys. T'lie .Samoan live pig^eon decoys are admirably iraiiied. The native, provided with a net with a long handle, ,sits behind a blind and sends out a tethered trained piseon whioh has boon taught at the jerk of a .itriiig to hover arouiiu as though do-Bcending upon food. This action Iiring'S down tho Willi pigeon from tho trees, and when it is ciik,';v!.vod with the decoy the nulivo ".KCDOiw bin! in" with the net. For ingenuity-one isalina.>it tempted to suy (liahaiii'al-lii trapping the Ebtiunnaux: e.X'M'ls. Thev bend up .sharneuod t^lipa tvl whaiebeiie, friei-etheui into Ilall,^ of fat aud t.hinw theiu nut for hears. The bear swallows the lal w hicii melt.s ill his stoiuaeh, setting free the whalebones, ivhieh expand and pie.'ce hi,^ iiiwiu-d,-'. This device is anpnipriatlely called "sleep a night aud die," Another ruse of theEajuiinaui: is to grease a sliarp knife blade .ind set it up for the wolves to lick. Thoso unimuls �n'ill lick tho knives until tlie'r tongues lu-o in ribbons anil they blond to dcutli. This is hardly � trap, but it is a shrewd way to rid tiie world of ruvonoRs wolves. "WTjurwia Hopoau 1847 EOGEES BEOS. TEIPLE PLATE (Warranted 12 dwt,), 1.25 S9t. Lowest prioe ever known. 1 lot Solitaire Diamond Studs, 14k. gold mounting , , . . SS,ciQ 1 lot Solitaire Diamond Pins, 14k. gold mounting   ...... S55.00 1 lot Solitaire Diamond Einga and Studs   ....... SiO,.00 1 lot Solitaire Diamond Earrings, SBO.OO Also some special bargains in Eir.gs and Drops, from S25'.00 to ffiSO.OO Guaranteed 25 per cent, cheaper than, they oau be bought elsewhere, or money refunded. 1 lot Ladies' 141r. Gold-Pilled Waltham Watches......  S85.C30 1 lot Ladies' Solid Gold Hunting Oase Stem Wind Waltham Watches;, S20-00 1 lot Ladies' Solid Gold Hunting Oase Smallest Size Elgin Watchois, $20.00 1 lot Gents' Heavy Solid 14k. Gold Hunting Oase Stem Wind P, S, Bart-lott Waltham Watches , c40.00 1 lot Gents' Heavy Solid 14k. Gold Hunting Oase Stem Wind Appleton, Traoy & Oo. Waltham Watches, sso.oo 1 lot Ladies' Solid Silver Open Pace Stem Wind Chatelaine Watohes, S4.75 1 lot Ladies' Open Pace Stem Wind Nickel Chatelaine Watches, SS.OO A watch chain presented to eaoh customer buying a watch. 1 lot Pine Solid Gold Thimbles, S2.60 Eegular prioe $4.00. 1 lot Fine Solid Silver Thimbles, 25b. 1 lot Gents'Pine EoUed Plate Chains, regular prioe,$3.00 .  .  . $2.00 1 lot Ladies' Eolled Plate Fob Chains, regular prioe $1,50 . . . $1.00 1 lot Misses' Solid Gold Chased Eings, regular prioe 50o.....25c. 1 lot Solid Gold Friendship EingSi^Sc. 1 lot Ladies' Solid Gold Moonstone, Emerald and Garnet Eings . $1.00 Hot Extra Heavy Solid Gold Moonstone Eini^B.....$2.00 1 lot Extra Fine Solid Gold Moonstone aud Diamond, Emerald and Diamond, Garnet and Diamond Einjrs, $5.00 1 lot Fine KoUed Plate Bar and Breast Pins .... 25c. and 50o. SPECIAL. 1 lot Gents' Solid Gold Initial Einga, SS.OO.  Eegular price $5.00. 1 lot Black and Gilt Opera Glasses, S2.00 A bargain, regular prioe $3.00. 1 lot LemaireJBlaok Opera Glasses, regular price $4,50   .   .   S3.50 1 lot Pearl Opera Glasses  . $4.50 A great bargain, regular price $6.00. 1 lot Extra Fine Lemaire Pearl Opera Glasses.......87.50 Eegular prioo $10.00. You do not run any risk in buying i your Holiday Presents of us, as wa j guarantee our prices the lowest, or money refimded. M   B H �'!*' B s M Baa H &y 45 WINTER ST. .1   

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