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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 14, 1890 - Page 13

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 14, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE. BOSTON; SUNDAY GLOBE-SlMiDAT, /DECEMBER 14, 1890-T\?ENTY-EIGHT PAGEfS. 13 Benls' Fancy Slippers, 60o, 75o, 85o., $1.00,$1.2G and $1.50 Ladles' Beavar Slippers, wool lined, 37o.,60o.,GOo.,75o., $1.00 and $1.25 Ladles' Goafor Wool Lined Boots, 7So., 92o., $1.00 and $1.25 Ladles' Kid Patent Top Front Laoe Boots, $1.25 and $1.60 Ladles' Straight Goat Laoo Boots, $V;75 and $2.00. Former prioe $2.50 J.adles' Goat and Kid Button, $1.60 and $1.76. Former prioe $2.60 lies' Straight Goat Button, $2.00. Regular, prioe $3.00 len'sBuokle Arotlos. . ., . ; . 76o. Men's Rubbor Boots .     . '. . . $1.87 I Jen's Heav) Hip Rubber Boots. . . $2.00 I Men's Light Thigh Rubber Boots . . $3.00 ^ Boys' Rubber Boots ..... $1.60 Youths'Rubber Boots   ....... $1.00. icon's Rubber Shoe^. . '. ... 60o. Women's Rubber Shoes ..... 25o. Men's Heavy Tap Sole Wording Shoes. $1.00 Men's Dress Laoe and Congress, Sewed, $1.50 Men's Extra Fine Congress and Laoe . $2.00 Men'sGraIn Shoos . $1.60, $2.00 and $2.50 Children's Grain Spring Heel Button, sizes S to 10^....... 66o. Children's Grain Hand Button, sizes , StolOi....... . 650. Ghlldrsn's Kid Spring Heel Button, sizes 8 to lOi...... , 65o. Children's Goat Spring Heel Button, sizes 8 to lOi . . , . . . . 65o. Misses' and Boys' Goods at equally low prices. Memember, the place to hwy Christmas Presents is at ffiia store. Sei-iously Scalded. A serious BCttldlnff accident happened at the Johnston Electric Train Signal Company's ivories in Woburn, yesterday mom ing. While a number of tlio employes were �worklus: on a Uoilor the Iioad flew ftlit.soald-ins a half dozen of them about the face and nock, the most severely burned beiDR J. H. Smith, superintendent. C. H. Delano and D. C. Noroross. Work will be resumed at the factory early in the week. Wetted $500 by the B"alr. The Universalist Society of Everett closed a very successful, three days' fair lost Fri-diiy night. The net profits from tl>e various gales amounted to about $500. The gold-headed oane was voted to Mr. Currier, as the most popular man in the society, and the piano lamp to Mrs. P. Perry Bush, the most popular woman. Ona Broke His Baok. PrrrsFiBLD, Deo. 18.-"Walter H. Kelsey and, John Hoaly fell 26 feet by the breaking of a scaffold, this afternoon, on a new house beinpT built on Seymour st, by Charles Boofh. Kelsey struck in such a way as to break hie back, and must die. Hoaly broke Ills loE. Thoscaffold was improperly secured. .Weiss' Body Found and Buried. Nbw Havbk. Conn., Deo. 18.-Word has boon received in this city that the body of Ewald Weiss, tho New Haven musician who was lost in the Wliite mountains last summer, has been found and burled. And a large Une of Fancy aoods cBpeclsIIr adRpted for tbo Holiday Trndo. BENTS' linen Hemstltehea INITIAL Hand korcblofs at 26c. each. Also one lot extra tine quality at COc. cuch. UUIES' Linen HemsMtchicd INITIAL Hand. Kerchlellsnt 12M!c, Also extra line quality At 2SC., put up In Itandsome fancy boxes. BPKOIAl In LADIES'7-nook Footer Lecln^, Prln$ Lemb.ikln. st $1.00. EVERY PAIR WAllBANIED WORTH 81.DO. BFEOIALln LADIES' 4-Ilntton Dogskin at 7tic. a pair, worth 81.2S. SPECIAL In Biarritz loose Wrists, la Tans snd Grays, at 08c., a barsain. Onr Une of Ini�s Aprons Is conplete. fioods MpcelBlIy adspted for Holiday Gifts. If m tront an Imas Bmbrella, don't fWl to eiamlBC our line and our lo? prices. We can sare yon money. BPECIAl In ao.lnch Gloria Bmbrellai, inedo on Paragon frame, handsome eticks, at 81.00 eacb. Don't fall to take a look st onr ilorable Bhow Windows, In operation from 8 c'clock a. m. until closing time. 22 and 24 Tempie Place. iffl 01 THE TIBS. Composite Pictiu'e of Some Mayors-Elect. They Dine Witli Present and Past City Magistrates. VTheaton Seminary OIuTd Emulates the Stonier Sez. The Mayor's Oluh dined atTotme'a yoster-day afternoon. * It was tho first mooting since the municipal elections in tho cities the Oommouwoalth, and it afforded the ex-mayors and tho present chief magistrates of the city an opportunity to meet the men who on Jan. 1 will stop into the places once occupied by thomselvos. There wore 21 new mayors elected at tho recent elections. To all of them invitations to tho dinner were sent, but only nine responded. Mayor Hart of Boston had invited his suo-oossor, Mr. Matthews, but the latter has been in New York since the election and WM unable to attend. President Fisher was kept away on ao-oount of the death oil his mother. Hiu place was filled by the vice-president, Mayor Palmer of Lowell. At his right sat the govemor-eloot of the Commonwealth, ex-Mayor William B, Russell of Cambridge, who attended simply as a guest of the olnb. At Mr. Russell's right sat Mayor Hart, and at tho chairman's left was the venerable ex-Mayor Winslow of Worcester. As a guest of Mayor Nowhall of Lynn oame Mayor-eleot.Fogc: of the City of Shoes. The latter is a short, fairly stout man, with gray chin whiskers. He is nearly bald and wears eyeglasses. The majority of the new mayors aie young men. Most of them affect full boards, hut tho youngest-appearing of them all was Mayor-oleot Bean of Woburn, who accompanied the also young-looking, bright and popular Mayor Johnson of the Baby City of the Commonwealth. Mr, Beau is a smooth-faced man, who looks almost a boy. He wears a well-kept pompadour, and looks ever on the alert and somewhat nei ous. Mayor-elect Alger of Cambridge In his long career of political seryioe uas made himself too familiar to need description. His pleasant smile, bis aquiline nose, hair tinged mth gray, and 'fair faoe were well-known to mayors both young and old. Mayor Porter of Qulncy and Mayor-elect Fairbanks were present together. The latter is young, and the possessor of black hair and moustache. His features are clean-cut and his chin denotes firmness of purposes. Mayor-elect Mayberry of Walthamoame unattended by the man whom he is to succeed. Mr. Mayberry is a quiet, yomig man with a keen eyo. He hoasta a small olaok moustaohu. Mayor-elect Bosson of Chelsea Is the first Democrat to break the long line of Republican mayors who have reigned over that Republican city for 83 years. His hair grows thinly on his well-developed head. He allows a sparse moustache and thin side whiskers to elude tho razor. His com- Sexion is ruddy, and he appears very much CO a typical Englishman of business. Ex-Mayor Mtohell of Chelsea was also present. Dr. Coughlin, mayor-elect of Fall Rivor, is also young. He wears a short, full beard, and his cheelcs are full and frosh. He is tho picture of health. In speaking he has a 'Clear, deliberate utterance, and has a graceful way of expressing himself. He is proud to hail from the City of Spindles. His trim, well-lmit figure will sit easily in the mayor's chair. Mayor-elect Ashley, Mayor Clifford and ex-Mayor Rotoh represented New Bedford. Mr. Ashley, like JBean of Woburn, sports a pompadour, and besides, possesses a thriving board of black, and a moustache. From Lawrence came Mayor-eloot Collins in the train of Mayor Maok .and ex-Mayor Bruce. He caressed a full beard, olose-trimmed.and his head is crowned with black, our y looks. His cheek bones are somewhat high. He ato his dinner in perfect silence, but has the mein of a man of latent energy. Among the other mayors elected was Harrington of Worcester. He was his own guest, as he succeeds himself. _ Of the old members were ox-Mayor Whipple of Brockton, ex-Mayor Burns of Somor- Abbott of Lowell. Ex-Mayor O'Brien'of Boston, who is ono of the pillars of ttxe club. vlile.the s_eoretaiT of tho^qlub,and ox-Mayor ell. ion.whois oi____      __________ - - - - - . was absent, for tho first time in manylmoet- "Siformal speeches were made by Gov.-eloot Ruasell, Mayor Hart.the newly-elected mayors and others. WHEATON SBMINABY CXiXTB. December Meeting Largely Attended and Enthuaiastio. The New England Wneaton Seminary Club held its December moetlng at tho Thorndlke yesterday afternoon, over 100 being in attendance. Miss Susie M. Plimpton, chairman, reported for the committee to which had been given the consideration of a possible gift from the club to Alumnm Hall at the seminai-y. It could not bo decided definitely for some time, as to whether a picture or r statue will bo presented to fill the desireu niche, but various points connected with the project wore presented and discussed. The committee was discharged with thanks for the work done, and a new committee appointed, which will probably have charge of selecting the gift. This consisted of Miss Clara E.Webster of 160 Newbury St., chairman; Mrs. Gardner Elandin of Providence, Miss Augusta B. Wales of Randolph, Miss A. E. Stanton nnd Mrs. Julia C. Hopkins, principal and inBtniotor in art at Whoaton Seminary; Miss Annie E. Emerson of Dorchester and Miss Lydia May Baker of Roslindale. Tho proposition that the club should Join with tho New England Woman's Press Association and the Boston Woman's Charity Club in having, a course of three lectures from Mrs. Annie JonnoBS-Miller under the united auspices of the three clubs, was accepted with great favor, and a committee was ajipoinlod to confer with comniittoes from tho otlior clubs, consisting of Mrs. Samuel Merrill, president of tl^o Wheaton Seminary Club, chairman, Mrs. M. C. B. Chase, secrotai'y of the club, and Mrs. F. H. Rugglos of Dorchester. The luncheon was as pleasant as it always is, and at the roll-call wlilch followed, it was found that a number of new meuibers were present, six from the olasa of '42 being a notable feature of the occasion. Tho guests prosent were Mrs. Everett E. Holbrook of Holbrook, formerly of Milwaukee and a mombor of tlie well-known Wisconsin Woman's Club; Mrs. John MoMurray of Worcester and Miss Emily A. Moulton, Now York, both members of - tho Wheaton Seminary Alumnaa Association of New York; Mrs. C. S. Hatch of Cambridge,^Miss Etta H. Glidden of Cliarlestown, Miss Kitty Peabody of Hyde Park, Miss Mary B. At-kinsoil of Saupatuck, Conn.; Miss Squire of Westfield. JIi-s. Greenleaf of Maiden, Mrs. Allio E. Whitaker of tho New England Farmer. Mrs. B. N. Galnln of the SomervUle Journal, Miss Ed th E. Chase 'of Dorchester, Miss Anna Gulbraueon of tho New Bedford Evening Journal, Miss Croswcll of Boston, and Miss Helen M. Smith of the Boston Homo Journal. Miss Moulton of tho New York association and Mrs. Holbrook for tho Wisconsin Woman's Club, spoke most gracefully when mlroducod by the president, and askod to greet tho club. Tho topic for tho afternoon was, "The House and Homo," and the following papers were (riven: On "The DomesticTralnmgof QnrDaugh-tPi'S," a very .ibio and thoughtful essay, oy Mrs. Alfred I imer-son of Dorchester, a former principal and an honorary member of the club. As JlrE. Emerson was not able to bo present liorFolf, tho paper was road by her daughter. Miss Annie A. Emerson. "Glimpses of Hospital Life" wa.s the second, a very clever paper, given by Jliss S. Jennie Dudley of AAliitlnsvillo. "Tiio New England Diet Kitohen" was described in a mo.jt interesting fashion by Mi.sE Julia M. Howard of Boston, and "The Cooliing School and Its Influonces" was tho subject of a brief paper by Miss Carrie M. Pulsiferof tho Nouontum Cooking school of Newton, Mass. Most delightful music varied tho afternoon's exercises, Mrs. George B. Rice of Wollaston (nee Jennie Walker) singing several songs, accompanied on the piano by Miss Florence Olney. JJ.rn. Klco sang "Lieb, Leibchen," by Scbone; "If I were a bird of air," by Hiller; and Novins' beautiful "Minster Song," all of which won warm applause from her audience and a vote of thanks at the end. Among those present wore: Mrs. II. D. Evreet, Mrs. Gertrude Tucker tVllooi. UlssUary E. F. Ilrovvn, lllsB Annlo L. ThoniM, Jlrs. Q. A. Bondersoii, JIr�. Georgu O. JenklnB, Mli� Sunili IlDdgcs, Miss L. Moy Baker, Ml83 E. B. Sharp, Mrs. r. n. Kucslfs. Miss Llla V, McConnlck, Mrii. K. M. AlUl, Mrs. Ilerbert l. Carter and Mrs. Jamea CiifiliinfiOf lioatou; MIs8 Llizabeth IClnj^lnan, Mrs. W. H. t:oiiaiir., Mrt. John I. SlDinioTis, Mis. llUcn A. CoweU, MlBS Kuuii.'i Dcxtf>r KUla, Miss Lai'iim tl. Hatch, J1165 Clara E. Welistcr, Jlre. Jt. E. I'erkliie, JUb. F.verstt II. Sharp, Mrs. II. M. Pierce and -Mrs. r. M. Carpenter of lirooUine, Miss JInrle V-Itogcrs, Ml59 Miittle C. Alvord of Cambridge, Miss Aimie II. Buy "Politics;"5100 hi cash prizes offered with ever}' gamt> sold, At all toy stores. Pric-o?l. Gllman, Mrs. WUUam 0. Dates, Mrs. H. I/. Bandor-Bon, Mlfls Dolla Sanderson, Mrs., Edwhi I'lorco and Mrs. Josiah E. Bacon of Kowton, Mrs. Ilonry fe. Turnor of Anbumdalo, Mrs. DoWltt 8. Clark, Mrs. Richard Oshorno and Nn. 11. 3.1'erUno of Salom, Ml83 K. J. Abbott of AndoTcr, Mrs. David A, Lincoln, Mrs. Annlo A. Lincoln, Mrs. D. B. Lincoln and Miss U. w. Lincoln of WoUflstoni Miss n. L. Crane of Hydo Park; Mrs. Emollna w. Cabot, Mrs. EUJnh Copcland and Miss Florence E. Oopolaiid of Mnnsflcldj Miss Maboi E. Blandlng, Miss Hellft J. Crane, Mrs. Emma A. Sweet, Hlsa Susie M. riympton. Miss Laura P. Barker, Miss Ella M, Barker, Miss Mary A. Barker, Mrs. W. S. NoycB and Mlas Mary E. Woolley of Nortonj Mrs. A. B. Carpenter and Mm. H. H. Curtis of Attlohoroj Mrs. Alden P. VToodward, Miss Mary E. AUcn nnd Mrs.WUllam F. Deane of Taunton; Miss Erally AUon of New Bedford and Miss Emma P. Earlo of Fall River; Mrs. Abble Fisko Eaton, of Neodhora, Mrs. nonry M. Jones' of Kingston, Mrs. James A. Dodge of Grafton, Miss Mary b. Biggs and Mrs. Freeman FljBher of Dndhnin, Miss Carrie w. Raymond of Royalslon, Mrs. E. M. Thnyor of nolbrook, Miss Etlzaboth tvlngman, Mlas Sarah J. Potteo, Mrs. Charles H. Jones of Whitman, Mrs. F. E. Lend and her danghtor, Miss M o � F. Loud, of Weyroouthj Miss Anna L. Cushmnn of Lako-TlUe, Mrs. C. K. Clark of Lynn, Miss Mary D. Carder of Maiden, Miss Mary C. Keith and Mrs. Davis Copeland of Camriello, Jlrs. A. L. Fisher of FIsherrtllo, Miss Ornce Iladley and slBtor of Lowell, Miss Augusta B. Wales and Mrs. Mary French l*or-tcr of Randolph, Mrs. Oeorgo Mcacom of Chelsea. Sirs. r.L. KnlgUt of Everett, Mrs. Lydla Molcalf Billiard of CaryvlUo, Mrs. Frank F. Avery of South Frnmlnghom, Mrs. H. C. Waters, Miss Ellen P. Holt, MlBS Mary H. OldDeld and Mrs. Zophanlah WlUlaraa of ProTldenco, Miss Evelyn W. I'ftino of Woonsocket, Mrs. Elvira Pierce Nichols of Allen-town, R.I. i Miss Carrie w. Bailey and MlssMmul E. Palmer of Nashua, Mrs. S.Almlra Olden of Porte-mouth, N. H.        _ Sat Arotmd the Tables. The meeting of the Now England Oil Trade Association, held at Younst's yesterday, was followed by a dinner at which WilUam J. Goulding presided. Thocuost was Charles E. Adams of Lowell, who explained the objects of tho State board of trade. The Clover Club, at its Dooombor dinner at the Rovoro House last evening, had amongits guests Col. William M. Olin and Hon. W. W. Dohfirty. Thomas Fay, Jr., presided and the "Waste Basket" was read by Thomas A. Mullen. Thirty members were present to enjoy the bright ond witty things it contained. Tho Boston Club mot at Parker's with SO members in attendance and Com.-C, V. Whitton in the chair. William Harris was the guest of the day and the after dinner speakers were R. A. Brown of Poabody, Maj. Follett, Col. Rockwell and Mr. Harris. Counoilman-eleot Charles W. Ilolstrom of ward 11 was the special guest at the weekly dinner of the New England Club at Young's Sosterday: 26 members were present, with [arriaon Hume presiding. Tho English high school class of 1872 held its annual reunion last evening at Parker's. Robert E. Babson, master of the school, was present as guest, O. H. Ramsay was toastmaster, and toasts were responded to by Master Babson and A. L. Woodman. Paint and Oil Dealora Dine. The dinner of tho Paint and Oil Olnb of New England at Parker's yesterday afternoon was marked by a lorge attendance. President William Aggo presided, and at the close of tho banquet Daniel 6. Tyler made an Interesting report for the delegates to the recent annual convention of the National Paint, Oil und Varnish Assooiation at Cincinnati, O. Isaac H. Wylio was chosen a member of tho printing committee. The after-dinner speakers were Wi Ham H. Sayward, secretary of the Boston Executive Business Assooiation and tho Master Builders' Association, and Rev. Charles FoUen Lee. Dinner Middlesex Sohoolmojsters. At the dinner of the Middlesex County Schoolmasters' Olnb at the Qulncy, yesterday, the subject for discussion was, "The marking system-To what extent should it boused; or should It be used at all." B. F. Morrison of Medford sect a letter stating that he was opposed to the marlring system branch and tree." William F, Bradbury of Cambridge read a paper in favor of tho system, and then sovJ era! members discussed the subject pro and con. Vico-Presidout F. W. Shattuok presided.      _ DEMOCRATSJAKE MERRY. Friends of Mr. George M, Nash Celebrate tho Recent VIotory by a Whist Supper. At Everett, Monday evening, a complimentary "whist supper" was given at the residence of Mr. Vin P. Harklns, Mead St., complimentary to Mr. George M. Nash, Demooratio candidate for representative, and his excellent wife, by Mrs. Vin P. Harklns, Mrs. Charles F. Atwood, Mrs. J. E. Freeman, Mrs. George S. Mansfield and Mrs. 0, 0. Nichols. Themenu was elaborate, tho music choice, and eloquent responses to toasts were made as follows: "The late Demooratio victory." by Mr. George M. Nash; who also rendered with fine effect, "The Mugwump Bird." The "Q. O. P.," called forth in response "Farewell forever." . Whist followed, prizes being awarded as follows: Ladies' first, Mrs. George M. Nnsh; second Mrs. George 8. Mansfield. Gentlo-nien's first, Mr. C. 0.- Nichols., Booby prize, Yin P. Harkins. MUST BAT THB ROXAIiTIKa Dscres In a Suit Involving the Payment of Over $3,000,000. A decree was entered yesterday In the United States Circuit Court for tho district of Massaohnsetta in an Important test case, involving a very largo sum of money. The nlaintiff was the Hat Swe.at Manufacturing Company of New York city. Tho defendants wore J. B. Gilman's Sons, the well-known hat manufacturers of Haverhill, Mass. The plaintiffs control the patents on all kinds of leather hat sweats, and the defendants, who wore their lloonseea, contested tho plaintiff's claim, on the ground that false representations had been made when the licenses were taken out,'July 1,1880, to run 17  years. The defendants slopped Eaying royalties, and tho plaintiffs rought the present sui t to restr.ain tho defendant from making and using hat sweats. The defendant gave a heavy bond, and the injudction was suspendod, evidence being taken in the moanv.'hilo. Tlie defendants, after tho proofs were all in. oame forward and ngreed to the entry of thodecroo for tho plaintiffs for tho full amount of royalties claimed, together with costs, amounting to nearly SOOO, and agreed to pay royalties lioreatter monthly. Tho importance of the decision will be appreciated when it is stated that tho plaintiff lias 165 licenses throughout the country, from whom it receives annually royalties amounting to over $500,000, and as the plaintiff's patents have six more years to run, the decision is worth over ?8,000,000totho company. Tho plaintifls were represented by John R. Bennett of Now York and W. B. H. Dowse of Boston. The defendants had as their attorneys Wetmoro & Jenner of New York. The decree also has the effect of ostnblisliing tho fact that the plaintiffs, in dealing with their licensees, acted in perfect good faith. The decision is especially interesting to the hat manufacturers of the country, nearly every one of \vliich is a licensee of the plaintiff, and had the defendants prevailed, each of these manufacturers would have declined to pay more royalties. Had a String to His Wiokol. A Louisville judge has been mentally struggling vrith a drop-anickel-m-tho-slot problem. An ingenious and impecunious lover of tobacco road an invitation on ono of the machines to drop a nickel in tho slot and draw out a cigar. He accepted the invitation, but used a nickel which had a string attached to it. He pulled up tho nickel after he bad obtained a cigar and dropped it in again and again -vvitliarew it. By this device ho secured a pocketful of cigars, but was soon arrested. Tho judge, however, could not make up his mind as to any provision of the law to meet this case. The man had not committed bui^lary, and apparently not larceny. He had simply acted according to instructions and had mot no resistance from the niaohine or its owner in tho attempt to buy cigars at a very low rate.   _ No More Running at Pimlloo. Baltimore, Md., Dec. 13.-The famous old Pimlico racing track is about to change hands again. Col. Robert Hough and several other prominent men in trotting circles have completed an arrangement -nith the agricultural society to establish a new trotting course, which, it is understood, will bo in the grand circuit. Skating Lively at Winslow'B Blnk. Roller skating was lively at Winslow'g Bark Bay rink last night. There was a l.T-rga attendance, and all seemed to enjoy thomselves. The rink is growing very poj)-ular among the Harv.ard boys, and several well-^nown athletes aro seen there nightly. Doh't read Osgood'a ad. on 2eth page. Muffs in seal, marten, monkey, French seal, opoBsnm, coney, hare, at prioos to meet every competition. Greoian Ohinohilla sets, Gray Ooney sets. Angora sots, at the uniform prices. The very best quality of Thihets sets, 100 of the finest Seal Plnsh Oapoa, Former prioe $10, just half price. All must be sold before Ohristmas. Ohoioe designs in Jewel Oases, Handkerchief and Glove Mouohoirs at prices to suit every purchaser. 1000 Art Boxes at Worth double the price. Previous to the Book trust, wliicli went into effect July 1, we CONSUMMATED AN IMMENSE PURCHASE OF STANDARD PUBLICATIONS. We were the only house in Boston to avail themselves of this great op-portmiity, which places us in position to dictate prices on Books, v/hich we propose to do, as the following quotations will demonstrate: Dickens, 15 vols,, large type, half Eussia, Publisher's price $ie.00 . Thackeray, 10 vols., illustrated by . the author, printed on English paper. Publisher's price $10,00. Bulwor, 13 vols,, handsomely bound, publisher's prioe $19.50 .... Oooper, 16 vols., handsomely bound, publisher's prioe $16.00 . . � Maoaulay's History of England, 6 vols,, publisher's price $5.00 . � . . .. George Eliot, 6 vols., nicely bound, publisher's "prioe $10.00 . . . . . . Soott, 12 vols., bound in cloth, publisher's prioe $15,00...... Our Price Our Price Our Prioe Our Prioe $1.23 Our Price Our Prioe Temple Place, Washington and West Streets. Temple Place, Washington and , West Streets. Our Price, For this Sale, fiOOO Boolcs for Koys and Gh'Ls, bound in cloth, over 500 titles among thcin. Orlmm's and An-dcrscn's Fairy Tales, Swis.s Family Uolilnson, Koljlnson Crusoe, Enc,v-clopcdla of Natural His-tor,y, Etc. 8000 Popular I2mos., ciotli bound with ijllt. Wreat variety of titles. Kot snore than five to one customer. 0000 Library Kditlon of Standard Works, Handsomely bound in half-Russia style. Largo va-rlety of titles. Not over live to one oustonior. Immense variety of Juvenile Books with handsome illuminated covers, Sc., SCc, !5c., ISc, ^Sc, 39c. to SB.43. Cards, Booklets, Calendars and Games In endless variety. We can furnish any boolc pnbllshcd. Orders by mall solicited. Books for tho young and old, for the million and the mllllonnalre. 3tC. BRIC-A-BRAC. Ymii mmimm. Of Bric-a-Brac which were due in September have Just arrived. Owing to the lateness of the season we shall sen to dose It at Just half price. In our Kitchen and Housofurnlsli-Ing Department many useful Holiday Gifts will bo found at Wo call attention to fancy shapes for patties and Crockettcs to beautify the Christmas table. Temple Place, Washington and West Streets. Sificial Wias Sale. UfllcR' Voater laclnB Kla Olovos, block ana all the newest shailcs, glaco niid suoflo.... 98c., $1.25, SI.48, SI.59 Honiqiietalpc Kid OIotcs, black and tho latest ithndM............98c., $1.25, $1.48 lafllcs' ^-Itullon Uogslili; Ion-don Tan, Klffcl UciI, Aecnjon (uciT) nroiins.................. ladles' I.liiert Dns-skln moves and .Mllteiis, orerscamcd and BiirliiK Hi'lst................... larso variety of lined floods at Popular Prices. Unapproachable Value. LADIES' 50c., 5Sc., 73g, 86c., 88g., $2.25. IVi!SSES', 50c., 73g. GIFTS SPEOiALTY. 24g ladles' seamless all-wool Hose, heavy winter weight.............. Indies' stainless black, extra long and bcary, double fldtced line nose, with spliced heels and toes. These two wonderfnl bargains will bo found on our centre counter. Special Holiday Bargains In Silk Hosiery, Just the Thing for a Christmas Present. Standard Lines of English Cashmere Hosiery, Men's, Women's and Children's, at I^ojnilar Prices. 5 Great Bargains. 19c., 20Gi WORTH DOUBLE. lot of Gilt Edsfo PlaylBg Cards, In Plnsh and Velvet Cases, only..................39o. Best quality Tip Top Playing Oards, plain cdse, 2 packs for....................25c. lot of Very Vino Ktching Paper, In boxes, 8 designs, only........................49c. Lot of National FIowcrs,papcr,ln boxes, only................................62c. Lot of Ladics'Uold Pens with Pearl Hold, er....................................98c. lot of Solid Wood Writing Desks.......98c. Our assortment of lap T.iblels. from.... 62c. to $4.98. Is unexcelled In Ito.ilon. we are hoadauartors for Writing Paper by tho pound. Temple Place, Washington and West Streets. . 39g. Look for them on our counters Hondar morning. Can't talk mucli �boat tbenai ws are too busy.    _ Men's Furnishing Goods flennlne Scotch Wool Sloves, Bold Every whore at T5o............... Scotch Wool fllDves at 45g., 69g., SIIU Mufflers, large size, 'rlght.JQjJ lustrous qanllly, a bargain rarolyirjollg scfn, beautiful Christmas gift.... j Suspenders, baud embroidered, In tlngia boSkC.?, great variety of exquisite styles, from $1.39 to $3.43 Special holiday offering of the pppnln Stanley Omfirella, For which we are sole agents. largoTariety of new handles. A wide range of values In 20 aud 2S Inches. MuUor's Sowing Machines, useful Ohristmas presents, at . . SI.73 Ladies'   fancy   silk Garters at 50c. and $1.25 per pair. Large assortment of fancy Soissora Oasos and Hair-curling Sots. Temple Place, Washington and West Streets. GOSSrP FEOM THE WEST. Members of Players' LeaRue Heady to Take Olionoos in 1891, OLnvBLANE, O., Doo. is. - The National league's position In Cincinnati, 0., wns rather rudely exposed a day ortwongoby tho declaration of President John Kilgour of the Cinoinnatl Street Railway Company, that he wasn't interested in base hall or the new "club," but thatF. Eohison of Clove-land and a "man named Brush" had been to see hini. "But I didu't hind myself in any way," said Mr. Kilfrour. That shows tho depth of the Si5,OOG,000 street railroad syndicato behind the paper club, which Mr. Brush alloKOB he owns in Cincinnoti, O. The stability of this club may bo further questioned sliould A. L. ./olinson as president of the Clnciiiiuvti Club enjoin tho national league from mal;iiie up an 1801 schodulo witliout includinu liis club. There's a decisfon on the books-tlie old Erastus Wimau case-in direct support of such an injunction. So far tho national len�ruo'B Cincinnati move is a very thin bluff. If any local support is to bo behind it. that support is yet to bo secured. The only way Iilr. Brush can get in there, in shape to do husineas, is to devote some of the SOC.OOO ho got from tho league toward buying out the present owners. There are no other prouuds worthy of tlie name in Cincinnati but those owned by tho Cincinnati club. The talk about Aaron Stern or Harry Sterno soektnR to get back into tho league is all bosh. Both have signed a guarantee not to go into base ball In Cincinnati except with, tlio consent of tho men who bought them out. The players' league has bought and paid for the Cincinnati club, and tho stock, contracts and leases are now in the hands of Vice-President Johnson and Secretary Brunell. The property was sold to Johnson, Brunell, J. M. Ward and E. B. Talcott, and so far it has coat 84-1,700, contribuiod as follows; Boston. Prince, Hart, ll.aynos and Dixwell, |8200, Dixwell, .5600. Brooklyn, Ohauncy, Wallace and Goodwin, .IfTCOO; E. F. Linton, $600, George "VVagner, g-llpO; A. L. Johnson, $8100.   Chicafto,,. Addison, Wei_clon- and but for the slump saooo wortli of priv lieges, usually sold in November, would have cleared ofO all debts and loft a balance in the treasury. There is no doubt; but that tho leaders of the rejuvenated major leagues �ro liyuring hard upon a plan for a systeiiiatie reiluction of salaries next season. It is to be as broad and regular tis possible. Only the indispensable men on iron-clad long-term con-tTaotswiii escape tiio cut. The balance of the players who slnyod with tlio national league last season will suiTor flnanoially for polioy's sake. No such a iogislativo lolly as a named salarj' limit will be repeated, but tho higli figure in ail major league clubs will be �2000. The plan under discussion is to llx team salaries about this way: National league, from 820,000 to 825,000; American association, from Slfi,000 to,$20,000; International and Western. $12,000 to Sin.ooo. Side by side with this plan of salary reduction stands another economical feature likely to ho put into xiractice. It is the inauguration of a championship foot ball, to begin at the close of tho base ball season and last for six weeks or two months. Tho teams, towns and players will bo the same as In. the base ball leagues, the contracts to run a monih or so longer. It should bo remembered that tho first-cla.'is English foot ball player is paid .51000 per season and Sic or $20 a week for liis services. And this last feature is Knglisli. It grew out of A. G. Spalding's recent visit to England, and tho iinanelal possibilities that hit his eyo while gazing at the immense crowds at Preston and other English foot ball centres. The plan is feasible enough, and now is tho time to put it into successful practice, because, should there be no players' league, tho men will bo in. a more plastic condition than they ever will bo ag.-iin. If successful, the magnates will have solvea one of the tougliost of problems ever presented to them. It is: How can wo make money, under ordmai-y conditions, after August? Itmay have been noticed that since Mr. Braiding's rotui-n from England tho national league clubs have taken a strong stand in favor of foot ball and in one or two cities, notably Cleveland, have succeededin creating a strong feeling for foot ball. Tho Cleveland natioual league people have already begun to sod tho 1 eld whicli is to beenclcsed for their new ba 1 pork. It is a Kinttli lot, but excuDently located. The chances now are that tlio new league park will bo built. If it is tho Cleveland club will have between 865,000 and 870,000 in baso ball next Acri). Al Joiinson is now exclusively in tho street railroad business, and is frank in de-clarmg that lie expects to get tho worst of any sottloment between tho national league's conference conimittee and liimself. it is certain that had ho chosen to settle with A. G. Spalding when lie went to Chicago early in November he could have done so at any price. But he refused to settle except tho scMlement included Boston and Philadelphia.  lie declares most carne.stly that the BO-ciil!ed S2li,000 offer from the national league was never mad-j in form or earnest. In one of his talks ^lith Jlessrs. Spalding, Iloliison aud Brusli S26,-000 cash and tho assurautlou of tlie Cinein. nati note of .?-iO00. due June 1 next, was mentioned as the league's terms of settlement. "But there wou no method or time of payment enumerated, and I had been Urst told that the league had no money," says Johnson. "It was no offer in any sense as allfciied byth^lcasue people, and was part of their plan Zi 'throw down' put in such a tricky way as to niako tho public boliovo that my own exorbitant demands prevented a sottloment of my affairs. Had iuoh a sum been olfored mo in good faith and form I should hove accepted it at a loss of nearly S7000. It is oortaiu that quite a number of thp players' league men. fearing national league economy to come, are now ready to do business at a largely reduced rate c{ salary. Vice-President JohiiBon and myscU have received some 17 letters from as many players within tho past 10 days asking fov information and oilorinK to go on for tho season of 1801 and takn cliunoos. Four of the Oleyelands of 1800, tliroo of the Chleagos, two of tho Plttsliurgs and ono Philadelphia man, two New Yorkers, two Brooklyn players and three from tho cliampioii Bostons havo written in tills strain. Tliroo of the men declare that they will play for thoii' board rather than return to the old condition of things. In every instance the writers havo been askod to wait a few days and to do nothing. Tiioro is now a chance that the old iiglit may bo renewed. Had Chicago stayed In its place the renewal would havo been a certainty. F. H. BlltTNltLL. Stomp Saving Boolety. A.'Shuraan&Oo. haveosfciblished In their store for the benefit of thoir employes who want to save money a station of tho Stami) Savings Society. Thoro are now lA stations In this city, whore two months ago there wa.s not one. Tlie Btainps aro issuod by the society, ond aro bought by the saver, They are worth from one to 60 cents, and are pasted on a card kept for the purposo. They serve simply as receipts for tho money. When Sfi worth havo been bougiit tho card is redeemed and doatroyod, .and the saver is urged to put his or her 85 In a savings bank. Died Whoro He Sank Dovni. Danbubt, Conn., Doo. 18.-Tho body of Ezra Mead, aged 65, an old resident, was found frozen stiff this morning in front of Joseph Cable's door on tho Brushy Hill road, onorailo from Danbury. Mead, while on his way home la.sf night, was ovorcomo by cold and sank whoro he lay till this morning.  _ Marino Notes. Bark Hancock of Boston, Palmer, arrived yesterday at Domorara from St. Thomas. Steamer Etholwold, Freeman, sailed from Port Antonio, Jam., for Boston, Doc. 12. Steamer Grimm, from Hamburg and Antwerp for Boston, sailed yesterday from Hall-fax, N. S.  ^^^^^^^^^ m liElADING MAEKETS. Quotations on Staple Produots nt Wow York, Chicago and St. Louis. New Yonic, Doc. 1,3.-Cotton, spots dull, easy; sales, 88 bales; ordinary uplands, e'14c; do gulf. 7 1-160; good ordinary stained, OVsc; middling uplands, i)%oi do gulf, 0 11-1 Oo; do stained, 8 iS-lOo. Fioiu^, receipts, 22,80;t pkgs; exports. 0146 bbls, 4570 sacks; good demand; firm; sales, 20,260 bbls; low oxlra.?, 3.4.04^.3.000; city mill, 5.10{ft5..'tCoi city mill patent, 5.]OSi.5.7Cc; winter wheat, low grades, 3.<10i(,r-l.fj0c; fair to fancy, .�.i.oOSCo: patent, 4.40g5.40o; Minnesota clear, 4.10ii) 4.85c; straigiits, 4.86&5.10c; do patents. 6.05(sfi.50c; rye mixtures, 4il'4.C0n; supor-f nos, lit7i3.7Cc; fine, 2.G0:�';!.35e. Southern tour firm, fairly active. Rye llour firm. Buckwheat flour, 2.10S2.25o. Corn meal steady, quiet. W heat -Keceipts, 30,000 liH.?h; exports. 19.169 bush; sales, (tU,0U0 bush ; market Vzc higher: moderate demand; No. 2 red, $1.06% elevator, S1.0�% aflo.at, Sl,p6%(fft.07% f. o. b.; No. red, Slft.l.OOVu j No. I Northern, .�1.08% ; jNo. 2 Miiwaulceo, Bua�-o; ungriiuuu wvin-ern, 7C&87C; Canada, No. 1, 0flt"l�0a; No.2, 87t''8Sc; No. 2, extra, UOiinic. Barley malt quiet, easy; Canada, country made, .il.pOVJ 1.18; city do, ?1.10al.20. Corn, receipts. 27,950 bush; exports, 61,130 bush; sales, SS.OOO biUsh; ' spot market stiiiuiy, dull: No. 2, G4o elevator, (J6Viic alloat. Oats, receipts. 67,000 bush; no exports: saleR, 1)1,000 bush; mar quiet, weaker; No. .18'/.c; do wli iri'Ac; No. 2,40Vi (lUiet.^ steady; refined quiet, steiidv; C, 5.a5^/�c; extra C, 5 ;j-lGtt5 C-l(!c; white extra C, 5�/ii;o:6 7-lOc; yellow, 4 16�5c: off A. 5 5-l�'' ::c; Japan, CiigOo. Pcnulcuiu quiet, steady. 6Cc. T^ailow dull, clly {?:) lor pkgs), 4 0-lCc; country (pkg.-i free;, -1 '.i-lcs �IvdC as to quality. Itosin dull, KU:,-idy strained, common togoorl, ;1 .-ir,. I-'niatf.es good deuCnd. linn; Alaim' ; L'.sT";-:; L'nig Island, S;r.!i3.25; State. f2.7.^,i':i; .Icnify. I"'-'.75; sweets, S1.60:iiy,rri, 'J'lirj'omiue dull, weak. SSWasVac. i'ork ciuibl; old mess, SlO≪ new muss. 3 r  copy of''Polltics.,'     [' mess. 81D@1C.60. Cut moats quiet, easy; picklecl bolllos, 5V*r5%o; do .shoulders, 4%o; do haras, 7Mic; middles quiet, ilrm; short clear, C.OOo. Lard dull; Western Btoam, 6.100; sales, 1000 tierces; city, fi.CGc; tofinod dull; oonttnont, 0.1B(ti6.n5c; S. A., 7.100. Butter quiet, firm; State dairy, 14 r 200; do crcamory, 20 @ 270i Western dairy, 12Ss21q; do creamery, 21@29%'ci do factory, 8(�22o; Elgin, ;iOc. Cheese quiot; State, 7C''ii'%o; fancy, 9% o; light okims,4V!!(g;0%(!; sklmB,2r3Vac; Ohio fiats, O&Vio. Freights to Liverpool, market steady, quIot; cotton per Bteam, Van; grain per steam, l%o; pig iron nominol; Sootoh, ,?25; Aniorloan, 810i|i)ia; no market for copper, lead, tin or spelter. ^ C'mcAQo, Dec. 13.-Flour unchanged. Wheat firmer; No. 2 spring, !)l%o; No. 3 red, oaVaO. Corn easier; No. 3, 61c. Oats easier; No. 2, 41"/8(n41%c. No. 3 rye, 08n. No. 3 barley, G8ta7t;C. Moss pork dull; .�fi.37Va. Lard easier; $6.76! Short ribs sides easier; 4.no'",4.95o. Dry salted shoulders, 4.50"H.fl0c; short clear sides, 6.30g5.35c. Kcc.iiipts-Flour, 23,000 bblB; wheat, 4H.0;)0 bush; corn, 70,000 bush: oats, 229,000 bush; rye, 22,000 l.msl\: barley, 105,000 bush. Shipments-Flour, 28,000 bols; wli^at, 27,000 bush; corn, 08,000 bush; oats, 15!l.000 bush; ryo, 0000 busli; barley, 2B,000 bnsli. St. Loujs, Dec. 13.-Flour stoadv, un-oliangod. Wheat. WifMa lower, quiet: No. 2, 95y8r05Vto. Corn quiot; No. 2, 50Vio. Oats weak and lower; No. 2, 43v2c. Rye, nothing done. Barley quiet; Minnesota, 00c. Whi.skoy, .$1.14. Provision.s, the markot was very dull, but thoro was no oasoutial change in prions. Pork, S10.20. Lard, 6.'t.6*!6.60c. Dry salt mcatis. 20r;30 dnys. shoulder.i, 4,26c; longs and ribs, 6.12'/bc; elo.eak uijon ".lesiilUcal I'.omuiiiani ami American Kdiicatlonal InalltuHons." Dr. Armstrong, though Btlll a young luan, is ladebralcd as an orator, brilliant aud eUiniieul. fine nolo and cuiigveija. tional singing; Jamea C. Ilarllott. Urst leiiiir; llcoigo M. Taylor,aoonndienor; Walter L. ilealli, (Imt bass; D. M. ilabcock, second liasa. Doors open 1.30, sorvlee jiromptly li.liOii, m.; contribution as you enter toaa\'o time. IIUFOIIMEI) CATHOLIC SUliVICES, Sunday evening, 7.,'>0 at flic Iteforinnd church, Perdliiaiul at., near Columbus av.-|ilHeourso liy Evangeilat Leydeui subject, "Take heed, therefore, how yo hear;" do not fall to altcnd these interestingservloea conducted by converted itouian Catliolics wlio accept Chrlat as tlieir only prioat ami mediator. Friends or triilli and intelllgoiit Komaii ('atbollcn cordially lli\'lled. Union goapel sorvlcca Wednea.lay evening, led by EvaiigcltBt Leydeii. Seats free. Thuraif-iy and iVlday evening, Dec. 18 and 19, Mr. U.-jAan will sneak at Lyi^cuiu Hall, SiiJein. DIt. LANDIS' NCIKNTISIC (YOUNG MEN'S) ClU'ItCll, Bed Men's Hall, 61-1 Treinont at.-Dec. 14. !l short lilusiiaieil sermons 10 both sexes; brilliant solo Blnglng boiore, biUwenii and after, by Lil-Uan Landla, the youiii; prima donna, who cluiriii,i everybody. Subjeelsl 1. "Adiiile Anatomvi" ::. "I'hyBlohiglcal 'iemiierance;" 3. "How ;Jcicnco Strikes lletwoeu Atiielsiii ami .SectarUin Bigotry." All welcome who riuiialii iintll dismissed; Boatii free; go early; crowded houses. BAl'TlHTTABKK.VACl.K, I'.owdoln ati.-liev. M. R. Dealing pastor. Ilellnveia' meeting at ll.;iO. Sermon by the luislor at lO.aO; subject, Parable of the Sower." Bible miliool in 111 m, Voiiiig iiion'a mass liieelliiK at 4.;i(), addrciseil by liev. l:dwaril Judson, 1). D., of New York, Praise service at 7. Address at 7.;iO by liev. Joiialhaii llaatow; anb|eet, the stiuv of Ills life. "From Coal Mine to I'ulpll.'' Tho public 11111 cordially lurlled. THE CllItlSTADELI'lUANS removed from Chandler Hall, III Ksaex St., to friendship liali, l^J Kneelaiid St.. cor. Wasldngloii and ICiieuiaiid als.. where our Bible lectures will be foiitliiued every Smiiay morning at lO.lG a. ni. Subject for Dec. "Tlie Word ilade Flesh." Scats Irec. No col-leellon.  All welcome. PEOPLE'S (MU'IIOH-I'reaohlng by the pastor, Bev. n. L. (ireene, ii. 1)., 10.30, Crnakliig Joidnu; 7.30, A Canienter's Son; .S. S. and Prof. lUlell's Bible ciaas at I'J.IO; V. P. S. C. E., 0.16; 3 li. m.. tenipeianee nieerlng. Ceoig.i lildweil, iho famous tlckel-of-ieave man, speaUs; good music. FIll.ST KEFOILMEI) EI'ISI'OI'AL C'llL'KCH, cor. Darln.outli and Harwich stu,, Bov. James .M. (,rav, rector-10.30, aubjcel, I'rophecy ill., "Tlie Kiilure of the Jew;" 7.80, liev. William iimraham Haven, "Perils from Our Increasing Wealth."  .Seats free. BEIfOBMED PItESlU'TEUIA.N- CllUBCH. cor. Ferdinand and Isabella sta., Ilev. WUllam tlraliain, pastor-I'rettciiliig by the pastor Sabbath morning, nt 10.30 and afternoon at ^ p. m.; Sabbath achool. 1.46 p. in.  SeatBfree.  SIraiigcrn welcome. BKOJtFIELD STBEET id. E, CilllBCH-Kov. Oeorgo A. Crawford, pastor. Clasanieetliignt O.SO. Yeaeldiig al 10.30 by Itev. J. C:. Ilarizell, 1). Ii., of SUNDAY   BEKVICBS. Cincinnati.  Siimlav s'cliool at noon.  L'.Tigue prayer at 0.30.  Kevlval service at 7.40 p. Ail meeiiiig at are welcome. CllUBCIl OF THE TII.SPU'LKS. Weal Brook-line St. and Warren av., Charles ti. Anus, inlnlster- All beata are free. Subjecta: at 10.30, �Some Modern Dillleullira hi Bellgiou"; at 7.3U. Physical Slanilna" (Beveiitli lecture to young people.) SOCIAUfl.M. UraiiQ Army Hall, Old Washington at., 7.30 o'ci.ick-I.octnre liy -Manila M. Avery; Buojoct, "The practical, 'I'lioon ileal and th,! I'liilosopbical SoclalUt," followed by discussion. Seatfi tree.  All are weleoiiic. CHUBCH OF OL'I! ItEDEIC.MER (Refonned Episcopal)-O.Hborn Hail, 3.'ir� Waalitngton st.. Brighton. Itev. J. H. Somerset CJardiier of London. England, will preach at 10.3U a. iiu. on Ins "Conversion from Itltualism." All scats free. OnAI.'E CHUr.Cll i First M. E.), Temple at., Itev. W. 1, Haven, pastor; preacliitig by pastor at 10.30; Sunday selioul al'.1; leairue luayer meeliiig al 0.30; at 7.30, preaciiiiig by Bev. Jamea M. Uray of tho Beformed Epbicopal elmreh. WlNTIlKtlP STREET .M. E. CllUBCH-The paBlor, Rev. Charlca L. Coodcli, will preach at 10.30 a. m. and 7.30 p. III.; evening, sec.aid In tlie series on Christian atliletics; tlie conditions of ttio race. Public cordially lavlb'd. CLARENDON .STREKT BAl'TLST CIICBCH. oor. Of Montgomery-Preaching by Bev. \. J. t:ordoii, D. 1).. at 10.30 a. ni. and at 7.;!0 p.m.; fhlucse Sim. day school al 1- ni. and at ti p. m.; regular Sunday aeiiool at H.IIO p. in. LENCV STREET CHAPEL-Lenox free church BfirvlccB. .Sunday school at " p. m. Preaching. J. H. Hughes liaslor. 3.1.'> p. m. Cospei song serxiee. wlih short address on "Moses the I'alrlut." 7.30 p.m. All welcome. BAlt.^Ann MEMORIAL, 10 Warrenton it.-The Social Science Club wiU have a public debate on tho land question on Saturday niglit; tlie .'�uiiday school and cfiUdreu'a service from 2 to 4 o'clock. Ail are weicoiue. ST, JOHK'S M. E. CHlTRCIt. Broadway, South Bpstoii, pastor. Rev. Louis .Vlbert Banlis. I�. D.- 10.30 a. m..'Chrlsllanlly ,ilid Dally I.ite;" 7,30 p. m., "Chrlat and the Immigrant." Stiungera welcome. THE KiniTIl END lIELI'INa HA^D TflTAL AI1.STIXI:M.-E SOCIETVuircis overs Suiidav cveu-biual 7.30 in Arlington liiUl. 113.^ NVasblugton �t. Cluirles Strickland, secretary; J. C. Baylls.-*. liresl-ileiil. Fi:��E)tXlTr I'HAi'ICL. I'armentor B!.--;;eU.;-lous M. rvlccs at 7.30 p. m.. when the pa.stor. hei-. ,1. B. tireeii. will deliver a brief address; g-.'od singlii;^ by a iinartct choir; the inibllc cordliUly luvltea. BETHANY SUNDAY SCHOOL. Washington and ficJiool sts.. Brooklliie-Sabbath at S.lti p. m., ".\nd all thy ehlldi-eu Bluill las taught of the L^rd, and preftt (hall tia tlie iieace ot %Sy clUJdren." "CULTIVATION of Soul to a Greater ReoepttvltT of the Spirit of Eternal Life." Lecture by Br. Slreet, caoterlo leoturo rooms, 478 Shawmnt �t., Sunday, 7.'15 p. in.  All welcome. \VELLS MEMtiRIAL IIALL-Sen-loos for *li8 people, Sunday evening. 7.30; popular hymns: good ' preaching; Bennett's Marine band from Boston navy .yard; everylioily welconio. INOERSOLL SECULAR SOCIETY, Talne Me. inorlni. Appletou St.-At 2.40, Mr. L. K. Washburn will give Ills great lecture on "Tho Sunday Quo�-lloii."  Don't iiilaa it. UNION CONdUEOATIONA.L CIItTRCH, Coliun-hiis av.. Rev. N. Boynton. pastor-SprvlcOB at 10.30 a. III. and 7.30 p. m.; pastor will nreaoh; vesper aor* vice nt 7.30 p. 111. criltiSTA DELnilAN BIBLE LKOTTOE, Chandler iiall. IH Kfi80.v St., at 10.45 a.m.; subjeot, "Is Ileiiven iToiiilBed to tiio Itighteooa';" AU woloome; no collection. FREE Ciirlstlan aclenco looturea In tho Women's Journal p.irlora, No. 3 Park BC, Beaton, Mass, every Tliuradav, at 3 o'clock SSu* HOSPITALLER, 7'J4 W-isIilngtou sC.-DUoua�ion at 7.311; �la Boiuan Catholicism oonsUteat wltb file Bible?" SP.TEITDALISTIO MEEa?r!SrGS. FACTS .�SEANCE AND CONFERENCE MEET-INflS, 2.30 and 7.30 p.m., tree, at Commercial Hall, fl'.il Washlngion Bt.,^ cor, of Eliot, ono of tin lliiest furnished in Boston; these meeUngs ate liv tended for tlic study of psyehlo or aoul forces; allln-lerealed aro Invited to assist in making Uleso conferences iijatructivo: they aro not Intended for any ap�. clal class-tlie maieriailat who bcUeTcs "that death ends nil," tlio Ciirlattaii who thinks "tliat the day of nUracictf has padsod," the Spiritualist who eees tho same pheiiomena In appearance today as la recorded from tli'iiosis to Revelation, aro Invited to ask guos-lions and exprtaa llielr views; flonK aervloe. a.SU: aeaiieo at 3 p.m., followed by qucallons and an-Bwers; Jlrs. J. E. Davis will give payohomfltrlo ra�a. lugs under control at 2.31); Mr. F. W. Strleklaiid will demonstrate In songs and tests his mediumshlp at lioth fleflelons; ,^lr. Hunt, Dr. Ewell, Mr. Gloason id olliora aro expected; Mrs. French, allnd lulolst, v/ili sing, and J\llss cary will preside at the piano; put aside your prejiidlcea and lama and hf'- -'" tiiese meedngs liiairnciivo and intoreflting. 'I'HK ECHOSl'lRITirALIST-l meeting, America Hall, 724 Wasliiiigton St., at 2.30 and 7.30 p. m. Mrn. I. E. Downing. :Mrs. M. A. Chandler, Mrs. A. Wllkinfl, Mra. A. Smith, Dr. Etunea, Mrs. Chandler* Bailey, ivira. M. A. ilr-nvn. Dr. J'. C. Drlako, Mrs. M, E. I'ieree, Mrs. J, E, Wilson, Miss Nettle .\l. Holt, Dr. C. II. Harding, -Airs, charter, Mr. Htrloklaml, Mrs. B. F. WlUaril, .Mr.s. Dr. Httll, Mr. P. McKeu-zie, Mr�. \Y. A. Stilloway, Mr. W. A. StlUowuy, .Mrs. Dr. Bell, Mr. Blackilen, Father Locke. C, JB, Fuller, Jllss C. W. linox, .ilr�. D. WUkina, Mra. M. K. '1 homiison, Mr. i:. Tultlo and others. Superior niiislc, Mlas E. Canipbcli, pianlflti F. F. Hardlnpr, coi'iieilji; .Miss lirace Holton, sololat^ Servloea �ninasilays at 3 p. m. Dr. "VV. A. llaio, chairman. Public invited. MRS. LIZZIE M. KELLET, pByohometrlrt, proiiliesler, business, test and traneo medium, ba� I'ikoii liurlori 4 and 5 at 8:^3 Waahlngton st., wher� she will give private sittings dally fur buaineBS and test; public lest eircleo every Sunday aud Thursday evening ai 8, where each will receive a commimlctt-tlon or lest. The piihlic are cordially Invited to pl-vt It a tlioruiigli inveatlgatlon. Asslatod by Prof J*. L. Howe. THE CllILDRr.N"S PROGRESSIVE LYCEUM, Ameilca Hall, 72-1 Waaluiigloii Bt.-.Sen-loo at 10.30 a. III. Bliaro. iiiterestdig aud Inatructtvo for ths eblldreu. Lessons inleiopersed with cullatheulos, gvaioi march, recllaltona, etc. .Muale. Pool's orches-ira. Prof. ^Viilia .Mllllgan, dircotor. Dt. W. A, Hale, conductor.  Public invited. Seals free. TWILIGHT HALL, spiritual meetings, 788 'Waih-lugioii St., 10.30, 2.30, 7.30; Airs. A. E. King. Sirs. ChiiiKller, Aille I'oabody. illas Webster, llattlB ,\lasim. Mra. Forrester. NelUe Thomaa, Mrs. Thom-aoii. Mrs. ^Vllblrd, .lira. Brown, Mra. Steiang, Mrs. vJrdway, Dr. Harding, Beetle Brewster, Mr. MoKen. zie. Mr. stilca, Fr. Loefco.  Eben Cobb, conductor. DWICHT HALL. 614 Treniont st-Splrltual meetings at 2.:)0 and 7.30; we have some of the beel iiieilluina and speakers In the city; all wolcomef .Mrs. Dr, Ileaiii. conductor. Otnce, Hotel Slraondf, 207 Shawmnt ar.; niagnottc treatments; buslnesi and medical sittings dally; circle, Tuesday, 8 p. m. EACi.E HALL, �10 Washington �t.-SplrtttuU met tings. Iieveloplng and healing clrelo at 11 a, III.,-.30, 7.;;it, usual services. Dra. Fuller, Blaclt-deii, Tuothiikar, Jlesars. Davis. Wllaon, BtlL Wll-kliison, Sieliiiig, Mrs. Chandler Bajloy. F. W. Malthews, conductor. THE BOSTON SPIRITUAL TEMPLE 60CIETT, Berkeley Hull, corner'I'remont and Berkeley fits.-* .Mri. R. S. I.tllie will speak both morning and even* lag.  .Services 10.30 a. jn., 7 p. m. Muslo by out *   "   "5 free ----- _____ . ___. _ .      sloping circle at 11 a. m. Admission 10 ots. "BlaoMoot" regular imale quartet.  Seiits free.  PubUo cOrdloUj Invlied. DWUllIT HALL, 614 Tremont St., Develop Bends greelliig to all aud a cordial invitaUon to Join us. Excellent music. Beautiful tiowera. 'Xnily as "Hour of Rest." Mrs. Dr. Heath, conduotor, DR. F. H. TKII'P, proniietlc and teat medlam.wiB hold circles Suiidav and Tuesday evenings at 7.80, and 'Ihursdayatiernoon at 2.30; also privateslttlnirt dally, at 8 Dwlght el., Boston, Ist floor, SSd doox from Shawmnt av. RATHliUN HALL, C04 �n-ashhiston �L. eomer Kiu-eh-.nd-�lest and iisyehonietry Sunday nt �.30 and 7.30 p. ni. 31;a. J. E. Wilson, the youna phenomenal nieuiuni, Mr. Kldell, seer. Miss Bessie, Dr. Eaiiiea. TEST CIRCLES. Sunday evening,7.45; Thni�d�t afternoon. 2.;:'.>.--ilrs. f. Mayo Stceis, 8 Cottagi pi., off 1*J4'J \\'asbliiL'ton s;., aliove Dover; �ictlnes dully.   Teiit ami .Medical .Aledimn. .MISS S.MITH will hold a test circle Sunday at 2.30, Tuesday and Fiiday evenings at 8, T\'odnfta. da>-. 3 p. ill. I'rlvate sittings from 10 to 4. Sliawniut av. MR. E. A. TISIHI.E, the blind medium, �wKL BlHiak al Odd Fellows' Hall, 648 Main St.. C�Jn-brldceporl. Sunday evening, nt 7.30. All Invited. tlood lUIISlC. FIR.ST Sl'IIllTUAL TEMPLE, Newlmiy andE*-eler sts.; .sciiool at 11 a. i:i.; at 2.45 p. m.. lecture by .V. C. Tisd;;le, liii.'ilr.itlonal siicaker; publlo Luvit�dt seals free. .MRS. c. 1!. LOOMIS HALL, bmlness, psycho-metiltt and teat circle everv Sunday evenlns mt7.H0 at her I'arloi!,. 12S W. Biiiokllne st.. suite 2. snuiTUAI. MEETlMi at Iladley Hall. Bmt Somerville. T.l'O Sunday eveiiliii;: good lalonttix* [u'cle.t   ^irs. E. �i\'Wii.i;nd, eoiuiuctor. :^l]:s. BCiri'l^I.LF.'S devcltn'iu,^ x-lrclcs SuwdaTBi S, at p:-.rlors Treiuoni ht. Teat, btts^csa and niedi' al ;illt;ii(;.-. lIiv.iiinLoul Uei week. MBS. .�Vl. K. .tiillNSOS Will hold a test droj* Sund.iy e\eutng. at 7..�>:). Circles Thursdar eveik-lliget7.!Kl.  -SI Winter St., roiun 0.        . DAV!i> BROWN, Coullnen'.al Mock, 1800 �����!>. Iligl^oi St.. suite     oppoBite itoUlM si__Otrcl* ttm evening at 7.30 o'clo-^k. MISSJ.IUilND win liavAva MaBo* ep Smutar tvsiUag la lierpatlots. Si Cotton m UtAoT^   

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