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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 16, 1890 - Page 4

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SIINDAT, NOVEMBER 16, 1890^-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 98 Tremont St. DOZEN Piein Felts Emlireiieredj TriiUfneil ALU AT EACH. It cost the manufacturer $4,00 a dozen to embroider the hats, so it can readily - be seen that at- 25 cents it is the cheapest lot of hats ever offered in Boston. The Napped Beaver Brims are in Assorted Oolors, Blacks included, The Embroidered Brims are in Black only, The Trimmed Sailors in All Oolors. The above will be on sale at 8.15 o'clock Monday morning. Special MftMday Mika. The Tory liirgo patronage accorded nc during the short period we have boon in htisinens has rendered noeesEary the enlargemoat of our facilities to almost donhle that of hoi'etoforc, Progressive, enterprising, originality, hect work, courteous treatment, quick delivery of orders, have easily aooomplishod for ns in the hricf space of two years what many have "lahorod" for a dozen or more years. We have boon iu the very front rnnks of photography from tjio heginning, The unique and hiclily artistic effects in all kinds of picture taking that wo are constantly showing have been equalled rarely and never cicelled, We propose, for a short time, to make a Wlost Liberal Offer, in order that the raooUenco of our productions may he more generally known, md present to every person a coupon which explains itself. Uador no oonEidoration will the price he less than S7 per dozen, unless coupon is presouted, Tliis in a most rare opportunity to secure superb v;ork for holiday gifts, at loss than half rates. Horetcfore special rate cards have been sold by phoiogrnpher,! at $3.501 60 cents being the iigeut's fee, Wo make the price at S3 only. �.............................. : CLOBE COyPOW. i ; G. WALDON SMITH, Plioiographer. ! :      Studio 145 Treinoni Strodt.      : ' I*pon tlif p^yMK.'ii: cil f:^.00 :a IlK- tlnipof ; ' sUiin^', till' liolilcr of DiiH i'onpon is ciiililcil * tu one flozf'ii of fnir i.u;Hrior f'MbiiU'l IMio- '. � to,i;raplifi. Iti-t^iiliiit; v.'ithout o::lr;i i'usL iiii- . ; UiB'.iUpil.   Mo cxfru cJKirtri'for til'.* bablra. : ;     Goud oM/i until .ia:i. 1, 18!>1. '. *....................................'w The above ia printed in all the leadiuc; pnperu, and we sliall caii thin toiit, making it public, too, whioli pftper retiirna ub the most ti'nde, UzLtil Doc. 10, wt v.'ill present with every dozen cabinets one of our uzquieittiJy colored photosp for wMcb ve xir-iially charge $2.00 each. 145 Tremotit Street. Ketweeii TfinpU* I*lacc auti West St. 8 iifeu OFEHIHG OF GBAWLEY'S EW ByiLW, i^'O. 171 TME5iC)XT ST., COE.   MASON   ST., MONDAY, Nov. 17, at 8.30 A. M. EusselFs Political Epigrams. Persoil Stetclies 13 Democrats Alert for Next Year. How Republicans Look Upon ii^oody WmW for Mayor. v.-uh'-ul further fifliiy. [ V.'t- Jiiivc It \'ery hirv;(! Mtcl rlinl,..     t i; (,j l'lj'.lis !'> i b^U.aiirj hiiv,'u        tliur: lijii'-)ii v. :i: v jiricffi, ;u U'ltjpt ilii-iiiff.t luu'^.n: tm>*r. t ri'iKit \vUir.ii hi'Vu ili'ver Ijct'ti        n 1'. l(uc 111 iliii) i jiuitry.  fiur y.LW (i'iuili; 1� \iU::^:.i:\'.y il;v.d.(i into Uiirt; if;rg,' Iluurfc utkj u lui-l ii j swi'i j...y our irltiuiK i.:uliit. arty whieli !o,,K.-, fi Uie neeris of th . ,;;iiniii!iig e.-iperience. Coii-jrre,-..Mnun-lert CuolhiKi- and Seiiaic.r-elcrt. John K. Tiiayer iiKei.- brb-f and ringing ad-dri-i5>e.-., witiJe -vuditor-ekcl Tielry, wLohC name has somcthintr about it of tho broad, maritime my.story of Marblohead, gavo tho Doraooracy ot the State a winding-itp exhortation to be true to tho prmciplos upon which it was founded. TIio Koxt Auaitni-. Tho individuality of the next auditor is in many ways clearly defined. 'I'herc is reason to beliovo that ho would novoi- liavo agreed to bo a candidate if his election had been among the original probabilities. Ho stood at tho table, yesterday, in an easy attitude, and .spoke with a clear, deliborato utterance. A elosely-triminod reddish board and moustache, an oval counteiianco and a slender, blaek-siiitod figure were llio broad otcliliigs of his outward personality. There is a well-authorized tradition that wdien Auditor Trefry's name is properly pronounced asalty flavor, as of the outer octan, will come unbidden into the inoiitli. But there are few who know tho socret, and most of these are fisheriiieu of Marble-head. . Leon. JOHNSOffS PRICE, $25,000. Spalding Playing a Bold Game. Kelly Denies Having Signed a leagne Contract. irOMrNATIOKr of MEKBILTj. of Gpinicns of  Leading   Kepublioans Bo.ston, A GloM! reporter went among some of theleading Ilopublicans of Bo.stoii yesterday in search of their opinions oonconiing the Kepublican nomination for mayor. Lawyer Andreas Blumo, formerly a leader of the Ilopublicans in the Common Council, said: "AVith the recent victory for the Domo-oraticparty in tliis city, it look.s as though it makes no difrerenco who is nominated, though I think Mr. Hart would have been tho stronger candidate of the two. I won't go so far as to say that Mr. Morrill will be defeated, though, con.sidering tho result of the recent election, such a thing would not at .all surprise mo." Hon. A. A. Baiinoy said: "I don't wish to express any opinion at all on the subject." Augu.stiis Euss said; "Idoii'twish to bo quoted as having any opinion about tho matter. 1 am ciigaffed in a ciwe, and cannot.say anything." Roger Wolcottsaid: "I have no opinion on tlio matter, so you must excuse nie. It is very well known that I voted for Mr. Hart, liut I don't want to say anything as between Mr. Hart and Mr. Merrill, or between Mr. Merrill and tho Democratic candidate. K. W. ICittredgo said; I regaril Mr. Merrill's nomination as a strong one. Ho-is a prudent, levol-lioadcd, well-informed business man. Besides heing a man of unusual legal ability.lie is fearless, energetic, capable and lioiiost. Ho has a most thorougli ao-quaintanco with all tho departments of the city, as well as a complete knowledge of its many rootiiremonts. Therefore.it is that I regard liini as a man who could aiid would give to Boston, if elected itsnjayor, one of the best administrations the city has over seen since tho days of Mr. Quinoy," ilamesM. Olm.stead, chairman of tho Republican city committee, said; "It is a strong nomination, and wo aro going to enter on a most aggressive campaign. I believe wo Shall win. I have never seen so much onthusiasm In tho committee as there is this vear." HerbortB. Harding-I do not caro to express my opinion for publication. William R. Richards-I am not prepared to give an opinion. Francis Emery, 100 Pearl St.-I don't believe that Moody Merrill is the strongest caiididato tho Republicans could have noniiuittod. Ho Is too closely identified with rings, and was formerly concerned with the cmostionable Andrew J. Hall crowd at City Hall. In my o linion, he doesn't stand a ghost of a c miice of being eloototi, unless the corrupt o cments of the Democratic and liepublican parties both comuino for him, and I do.not believe even they would prove strong enough to elect him. The men who fonnorfy hrid their hands in the treasury aro anxious to got thoui iu again, and tliey naturally rally around suoh a man iis Mr. Morrill. , Mivyor Hart kept t lom out pretty effectually during his adm nis-tration. It wais no great .surprise to mo to learn of Morrill's nomination, for it was known that ho has been steadily at work fixing caucuses. Steiihcn N. Crosby-I know Mr. Merrill very well during his legislative career, and regard him as a bright, active man. A gentleman who Imows as much about city politics as any who could well be named, but did not desire his name used, said; "I am as yot undecided wdiat to think of the nominatloil, although it does not usually take mo long to makeup my mind on such matters, I am rather oui-nrLsod at tho oittcomo of the convention, and don't know yot why JIayor Hurt waa shelved. I have cause to believe, however, tliat the man who wants to make personal success In that offioo must do absolutely nothing. If he does anything, good or bad, ho is sure to get kicked for it. Tho only thing 1 have against Mayor Hart is his aiipoiutmont of Mr. Moehan ns .snperliitendont of streets in order to conciliate a certain faction. I must admit, at tho Siiine time, however, that Mr. Meehan's administration of tho department with the funds ho had at his disposal, has been an oxcollont one." Another Kepublican, a well-known business man, who did not caro to have his name used, on account of his bu.sincss relations with the nominee, said; "I don't believe that Mr. Morrill can be elected in the face of the l.'iOOO Democratic plurality at the last elei!tion. JWayor Hart would have been a much stronger man. If itwillbeany satisfaction to Mr. Merrill to get the honor of being put up simply to bo knocked down, then ho is in a lair way of getting that satisfaction. btow s-or ELECTION. Rcpublloana of Woburn Select Their Candidates for Aldermen. "WonuuN, Nov, IC.-The Republicans held caucuses this ovoning to noniinato candidates for aldermen and councilmen and choose delegates to the mayoralty and school commitloo conventions. They Avere all largely attended and great interest was inanifested. particularly iu the matter of delegates to tlie mayoralty convention. Tlie following was the result: >Viiril l-.VlilenuMTi, 'I'lioiiiiiH (.:. Bepga; councU-men, Piitrlolt Mrtiowail, KUwnrd J. VhUUpa; tlele-Ktitc.'*, Kiluuril D. lluytk'ii, Wlllluiii T. Crammer, lleiijamtii IliiioUley, .rotiepU IJai:!:, Klyii U. Prt-Blon, Jo.si'plf I''. IHiI.cirleH. \\'iiril i~Al(leniina. Illarciis Slin\\'; coancU-liir'ii, (It'iir^'ii A. l^liiiiiluls, WUllum 11. llowors; di.'lf-iralt'.s, tliioi-gc, A. Day, AVilllaiii 1\ Ctul�r, l-Idiauntt C. CcjUUi, ClliulcK iM. Strout, llcvlinrt llilcy, WllUalu JI. Ward, Cdorttti     I'owU', Albtirt.T. llnync-a. AVavil Ii-AldiM-mnn, Aliixatuter ("Jraul; eonacll-TMcii, ri-ank C. Nli'liolH, .laittoa t'. MiiCovltii ; dclo-;,'iUi'6, Wllllain It. I'lllaam, .SoUi V. Kiilley, Fred H. J^i.'wte, I'rimcis A. Jiiiokinaa, Harry 11. Marlon, I'hlUi) K. Illiiliardoun, Wlll.iin Jloorc. Wanl 4-Aldei'imui, "\\'. Kriuil: Fowlo; onancll-inoii, .Sliiinna j;. Koiidriiik, lUinjamtii K. WJildron; di'lcjriiten, Dr. .loliii M. Harlow, lULslm F. IlaywiirU, .iciliii It. Carli'r. .1. Fred I-csUt:, .lanics L. J'lultliain, Henry C. Hall, Man'i'Uus It. Allen, Kdward Ii, 'nioin])6i)ii, .Sa!imel 11. I'atutn. Ward 0~.Vldcrniaii, David T. Strniige; councU-intui. (leiifKo F. Hosiner; delecutcri, ,kilin L. Kowie, ilanieii it. Wood. W'ivrd 7-Aldarnmn, Frank .11. Pnsheo; cottncll-iimii, riiliiea^ li. HiniRon; iloleiialeii, tleorge Kussell, .laiiieii (liven, Alvali 11. Hcald. MEBHAW  MEN AT  WO.RIC. May Nominate an Independent Cp-ndi-date for Mayor. The followers of Micljael Meehan, assistant suiH'rintendenl of streets, have secured headquarters at 178 Tremont st. 'f'hero wa.s a short mectin'j of the executive coinmitteo yesterday afternoon. No actUni was taken upon cither of tho mayoralty nominations, and the couuiiittco tidjourned until next ^^'ellnesd:ly evi-ning. Prcflident James F. Mnrley says that the oj>iHMients of the iiuU-pendeiit Democratic ciiy iiimmittei! cltum that it cannot pull over iridii A'tites. but that be feels contitient that tiny have a billowing ot niiOO. He tur-tlier says that the conuuittee is likely to make an indepcndi.'nt nomination for the mayoialty, anil that if ibey succeeil in tioll-ing nwio votes they will be given a representation like tho throe other parties. Aldermonlo Delegates, Ward 22. Tho wrong list of aldoriniinie delegates was publisitcd in Title Gmnic yesterday from ward 'J'he following is the regularly elected list: At l:iri;v, Ku-li.ird SulUyaiv, I'raak 11. tCelley, .Itiitii F. Khuiry, Jaeuh SelialTer, Cei.rije ^ew-beriier, .loliii Fejielu', Cllislave ^Verier, Patrick Falloa, JI. D. CroKliy, A..l.Woudt. J. ('. Sjilllam: W. 11. Twoinliliy, .l.f. llfurdeii. M. J. O'liriini was chairman, and C. A. Stoddard acted as secretary. Recount in Eleventh Gr.KKXFiKi.D, Mass., Nov ri-i'ount in tlic tleventli lii.vlrlrt (.'ijo!id,;ii gaiui'il i tiiid two in CoiiMay one in -^Iclnt:lgne tun] niont. iSliii'ildiiiK gained U\ "'.i in Noribainjiton. two iu six in Chaih-inom tmd 10 in lu.stone in Uijerliehl und tine Theni-tuain for Spaulding Coolidge, -Hi. Diatriot. . l.l.-By  the congressiontil 1  in Holy eke antl     lost :ix  in  (."liarle-I'o in Gartiner, Williiiinsburg, .Mtmtague.  lie in Sunderland. is -17, and for EespcotfuUy Decline. Jertvniiah A. Murniy and Mathew Dol.au state that thoir names were priscnted at tin- l'i-niiK'r;tti(' taufus in ivttrd '.i Friday iiij-'bt as; (^iiniidiites fur the Coninion Omn-til v.'iihniit titi'ir consent, and that they rc-^lllH�^fn!ly dteline. li is statid that the nnminations \\ t.Tt'to bavc bi eit left for the wtuii committee and oUicert of the caucus to niiiku. Lieut, Hall Winner of a Fine Medal at "Walnut Hill, Nicw York, Nov. 15.-The clouds soom to brighten up over tho long base ball war. Tonight ends a week 6f the groatest diplo-matio work over known In baseball history. Tho league moetlng adjourned early in tho afternoon, leaving the work of completing tho picture of peace to a committee consisting of A. G, Spalding, Gharloy Bymo and John B. Day. The players' league people were completing arrangomonts to go on with tho fight. President Chorles F. Prince of Boston had put new life into tho saiiio by bracing up Brooklyn, and Al ilohnson soomod to bo the only man who was willing to talk sell out. At ih.'iO Messrs. Spalding and Prince met and adiournod to tho University Club, of which Mr. Prince is a mornbor. It was near e o'clock when tho gentlemen returned. J. Earl Wagner of Philadelphia and Spalding tlion mot for half an hour at the Hoffman House. Mr. Spalding showed the Phil-adelnhhi man a plan that was satisfactory. Wagner and Prince got together at tlio St. James Hotel, and talked the matter over for half an hour with Al Johnson, after which Wagner mot Spalding for tho second time. ' Mr. Spalding's plan waa about as follows; Make aloaguo ot Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington iu tho East, Chicago, St. IjOttis, ColuiinbusandLotii.sviUe in the West. Tliis meant two olubs in Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago, Spalding handling two clubs in tho Lake City, the players of the Boston ond Pliiladclphia olubs to remain intact. This slato looked rather satisfactory, but the Boston and Philadelphia raon would not listen to anyplan that would not be satisfactory to Brooklyn and Al Johnson. Johnson whs askod what he would take and flrop out, and the cbancos are that he will got his price-.?25,000. Spalding for tho league and tho Boston and Philadelphia clubs will no doubt put up the money. Spalding may be playing a bold game m this matter. The league this afternoon suspended business to allow ilohnson to mate a speooh, which went as follows, as near as he could give it to me a fow moments later;  GnKTLEMBN-I cam6 hdre >vith no regrets and no tears. I have entered into tho light and lost money (magnate,s smilo and nudge each other). .Iwas willing to stick, but find my partnor.s leavinj? me at every turn. I acknowledge that with a figjiting chance I would stick, hut now I am willing to turn over my interest in the Cincinnati cluii and sell out in Cleveland. "I want to say that had I come to you a few short months ago and said, 'I will overthrow tho players' league for S100,OOOJ you would liave Jumped at the chance. Now I am willing to take much loss and quit tho business." At 0 o'clock Johnson was informed that tho Cleveland people would not put up a cent, and ho was Once more at the mercy of tho players' league.      .      ' It now looks as if he would get $25,000 and ^et out. This would give Cincinnati to the league and by making satisfactory arrangements with Boston and Plilladelphia a now league would bo formed whore witli spiinsr exhibition games and non-conflictinff dates,'the old interest would bo revived. Mr. Spalding said today that if Boston would like to, no doubt the triumvirs would buy them oufe Mr. Prince roplieii that the club would not sellout, but would prefer to remain president in the business. The players' league made a favorable impression with the league people. In the morning he had tolographod Secretary' Bru-nell to draw on him for $25,000 to retain a players' league club in Chicago. Money was sent to pay up tho Cincinnati debts, and Brooklyn had two wealthy gentlemen, Chauucey and Linton, pledged to buy up all tho stock of tho Brooklyn club and remain in the players' league. Mike Kelly called on mo today and said; "The story that I signed a league contract is not so. I was informed by Spalding and Coiiant that our team In Boston would be a member of the American association next year jand asked by those men if '. would romain, I informed them then ant thero that I would be willing to sign with tho Boston league team rather than play with the American aesoolation. Now that's tho whole of it. ... "I never said that I had to pay S180 to Evans & Hooy for their appearance at our bonolit, and would like to have Thb Globi! coiitratUot it." T, H. Mubnanib. LIEUT.  HALL THB WINNER. Bronze arid Silver Military MeiJal Shot foil' at Walnut Hill. AValnut HjjjL, Nov. IC.-Tho Massachusetts Rifle Association held its regular weekly (Shoot, today,with a good, attendance of riflemen. Lieut. G. F, Hall won the bronze and silver military medal. Next Wednesday thorango will bo open at 12.30 p. m, for rifle and pistol shooting in the prize and practice matches. Below are tho best scores made today, distanoo 200 yards, standard American target: titiioouu orr-iiAND match. S. 0, Sytlntiy.....8 10 8 10 1010 7  B 6 8-81 IV. Clinrles......U 7 II 11 5 !) 10 n 7  0-80 C. 11. Uttstiniln. . . 8 10  0  0  7  8  (J  !l 10  6-78 tUKCemi iikst JIATCH. \Y. P. ThomiiBon.lO 10 11 il 10 10 IS 12 10 12-108 M. K. Darter..............................101 tKi;i;ouii I'lSToi. ^tATCH-GO VAiiiis. H. Seyeraiiec..............................80 "cHAJifiox orr-iiAsi) match. n. L. I.co.......0 8 0 8 10 7  8 0 7 0-84 CllAMlMON JtESIT MATCH. M. It. liaitor...............................84 (11) VlCTOItf MlvUAl, MATCH. W. 51. Fo.ller.. . �  0  8 10 10 30  (!  o  (110-83 C. II. Eastliiail. 7 10 10  8  (110  7   0  8  7- 82 F. F. LiHVell. . .10  8 10111  8  8  �  0  (1  -1-82 ,11.    Day............................... 71) 1). .IliirtUi............................... 70 (11) miiAtauv MiaiAi, m.ncu. .1. II. Keoni!li....il  -1 B  -1  t>  -i   B  f,  4  B- �!,'> .1.].. Fowle.....-1  -1  �!  0  r,  0  i  B  i  6_ -to A. S. limit............................... .t.( id. 'I'. Day............................... .i;i (1. F. Hall............................... .12 E. K. I'artrldKO........................... .il K. rarflon................................ 41 C. 11.1'lntt.............................. ,10 D. Marllli............................... ;!� ,1.11. iiiibus............................. au Uruitze ami rdlyer medal won on the following 10 seiirt'S of -10, or better, Iiy Uout. G, F, llim. .4'.' 41 40 41 41 -10 40 11 40 -12 (It.) ALL CO.MKllh' Oll-IIAMI .MATCH. .1. B. Fellows.. .. KKI in 10  (110  (1  8  0  7-84 II. h. l.ee......-.  7  �  H- H  7  8 � (i  8  7 10-78 -M.T. Hay...... �  U  8 10 (1  ti  7 10  8  0-78 1). .Miirlln...............................   73 I. 11. 'llHiniaii............................   7:t ?;];:!f;;;il!^?:;::;::-:::;;;::::;:;::::: ?} A. L. Sn-velis............................   (iS J.ll. Hublis.............................   (11 (It) ali-.i.IOMnUR IlK.sT MAICII. .1. Fran�e�.....12 U 12 11 12 11 1112 10 31-li;i W. I'.TlMiinii8onl2 12 Jl 12 10 12 10 11 11  l)-no T. Warren...............................Kiii 1 . \V. t'lieHler............................105 :.l. T. Il.iy...............................104 ,1. 11. lU.liliB..............................\ia S. w: I'liir...............................1(11 M. H. Hurler.............................100 .1.. S. Hunt...............................Itio 11. .Martin............................... !,.', .1. I'rem-li................................ iU '1'. Oliver................................ 11(1 F. D. Hurt............................... H(l AM,-C(l.Mi;i;s' JillMTAltV MATin. t'. E. iiortou...........c n 4 4 0   r, f, r, n- 48 .1. A. Frye.............0 D 1, il fi J5 4 4 4 4- 40 M.T.Day............................... 40 ,1. li. llobliu.............................. 4+ A. S. llnilt............................... 43 1). Martin............................... 41 J. S. Mllla............................... 41 II. F. Gray............................... 40 +Oiily one entry allowed (iiieh v.-eeU. Only one entry allov,-eil each hhool tiny. (It)ite-entrleB tUlowed. GUNNERS  AT  WELLINGTON. Team from Harvard Defeated by Picked WeUlngton Team. Wem.incton, Nov. 1,1.-Tho attnndance was larger than usual at the grounds of tlie Yt'ellington tiitn Club today. The v.oalbrr conditions wt-re nut good, the lu.'a\'y c-lcunls making it tuo darit to idainly .m'c t!ie liinls. Itloiire was lir.^l in the iiionbandi^e inntcii liuiay with a score oi 'J."", out of a possible lit). Tbc other scores were: Hale antl 1 lill, 24; Bradstreet, 'J-i; Gore, '-'2; Bond. 21; Cowee and Barrett, 20; Hooper, 18. The winners in llio several sweepstake matclK'.'i follow: six taandurdii-(jaie iiiul liarrett lirst, Gore bet'.-Clid, .Miiore and Itiadslreet third, .*-lx htalidaids -Ilarrelt lltht. ilooreaiul lliadfilieet herolui, tilde tlillil. ."^Ix i-liiiidiirde-Ciiieii' (lrt.l, .^^lnre, Jlarretl and llnulHlree-l heciUHl, Sawyer, �lale and tltiri' llilid, SIX ihiv.%-Ivurrei:. (bTe i'lid tiale ili&l, Mooro fceeoiid, Siii'W, llraiiirtrrel and Fo\-.,>e third. �lhi,>e jijiir t.nind.'-.rdd �� llrauhtie.d urst, Covvi-e (.eeiaid, tlal, , Farittl anil .\b,i,re third, his; eliiys- -alooie and liradslierl ili hi, Hawver and luirretl ht^ooud, (jure third. Nine bl-ndurds- ntauplreet and Gore tirfcl, Guiu i;v,d Wall, tl Noi -nvil. MX ,la\h - ilui" a:i>l t;ore Jiist, llurtett, IJiaUiilictt nnj J-K'tiu tt';'.'iul, saow ttdld. Six afjinilardB-Hoonor first, Bradstroot, Goro and DlUscoon(t,Uarrott, Moore and Bond tlilnl. Six Btundards-rratt and Bond flrBt., OnlD, Moore anil Hoopor aoooad, Goro, Baoon nnd Mnckay third, Bnrrott fotirl*. Ton fltaudards, merchandlso match-Brftdstveet nnd Jfoore tlrst, Cowoe, Hnooer and Bond Booond. Bnrrott nnd Goro ttilrd, I'rntt fourth, FlTo iiiur Kinndnids, morolinntuso mnioh-Brntl-Btreot, lioiid mid S.wyor flrst, Coweo, Onlo and Barrett floeontl. rrntt nnd IMU third. Ten olayB, nicrclmadlse inntch-Moore, Bond nnd Dill tirat, GftlQ second, I'lpor nnd Dnvenport third, Hooper, jlrarlstreet nnd Bnrrett fourth. Ten koyatonea-Mooro first, Bond nnd Bnrrott BGOond, Gale ii,nd Brown third. Six stnndnnlfl-Bnrrott Ih-st, Gore aeoond, Gnlo third, Coweo fourth. Six Bttindnrds-Gale llrst.Gore nnd Hoopersncond. A friendly contest was shot between a team from Harvard College and a team from the Wellington Club. Tho conditions wore seven men to a team and 20 birds per man-10 clay pigeons and 10 keystones, keystone systen . The Wellington team wonby ascoroo�105to70. Following aro the scores made n this match. WliLLIKfJTON Cliint. Sawyor.. .OOOlllOlOlQllinOllI. 1-12 Warron...10111111010110101011-14 rratt.....0011011 mill 1100010-13 Braelcctt. .00111111111101110111-10 Cowee____10110011111111010111-15 Mooro.. ..llllimillOlllllll 0-18 DUl......1111111101110111111 0-17 Total................................106 lIAllVAni) TEAM. Bacon.....0111101100100110111 0-13 Lilinh.....0 1001000000111100 011- S Mnsaey. ...0 1101101010 010111011-12 Kvorett. ..0010111101010110101 0-11 I'lico......0 1110001101111111111-in Ilnstyo.. ..01 11011100010110100 0-10 Dodgu____1111111011100000010 0-11 Total.................................70 CLERKS LOOIEE AT BOOKS. HARVARD OYOLING RACES. Scratch Men Could Not Overrun the Hanclioaps. Tho annual fall handicap road race of the Harvard University Cycling Association was run yesterday aftomoon on the Chestnut Hill course. The diatauce was 10 miles. TliB entrioa were: li. It. Dnvla, '01, (}. F. Tnylor, '02, ^V. B. Orcenlenf, 'OS, soratolii 0, B. Hnwea, '03, (2in.)i Philip Dnvla, '03, (2in. 208.) i Tlioinns Biirroa, '01, (3ln.) I F. S. Oltnateud.'Oi, (3in. 308.); r.II. Ilook-atadtor, '03 (Bm. 30s.); C. T. Keller, '94; P. S, Pratt, '04; C. T. H, HntcB,'02  .-There is little prospect that Charles J. Loring, tho Boston electrician, wlio has been in jail several mouths on two cbargos of bigamy, will sutler any punishment. His real wife is tho ' pretty Jewess who married'Loring in England in 188d, and canto to America, only to bo deserted a year later, Tiie iinlirtment cliarging bigamy with Aiiretia Anderson was iiuashed because of a clerical errtir. On the indictment charging bigamy with Florence Winllelil, the tally witness named in the indicliuent was iMrs. Loring, and as she could not testify aiiitinst her liusbaiid in court it was held that the indictment was illegal. .Iiulge Tuley practically ruled that tho point w.ts good, but continued tho hearing till Monday. It is ihiubtful if a conviction can be secured, as Miss "Wintield has returned to England and Miss Anderson is in \s'bviv.ska. It will be dilliiniltttisccuroindictiitciitsthat will stand without tlieir evidence. TIUF.LIMG WITH UNCLE SAM. Attitude of the Sioux Indians Regarded os Serioito. Washington, Nov. ir,.-Tho War Department is very reticent about tho threateued uprising among tlie .Sioux Indians in Dakota. Tho fact that Liout.-Col. Sumner of tho 8th cavalry, who canin toAVa,'ibinglon a few days ago to discuss ollicial matters with the departineiit, ha.s been ordered to the West at a moment's notice-Col. Sunnier having been iirdcri'il to hi.s cummand at the spcfinl reiiuesl of Gen. Miles-shows that Miles anticipates seritms work. It Is tli(^ opini(ni of the host informed Indian tighters here that if, tb(s war depart-iiud'it lualcesadonionstriition in force agjttn.st the Indiana there will be no fightiin;, as the icifskins ^vill be overawed and untU'r.stanil very plainly tlittt tlu'gnvi.rnmenl tioci not propose lobe trilled with, Pujnp for Boston Navy Yard. Washington, Nov. l.*!.-Tlio contract for tho pumping machinery for the dry dock at the Boston navy yard Inus been awarded, on tliii locoininendation of aboardof onglneers, til the Soiithwick Iron and Machine Coin-jiany "if Fhihidelphia. Tlie ctintract iirieo IS ,�.47,OiiO, and the work ituist lie ctmipletod within, nine iiiontlifi. Work will be coin-iliciK'td at once. Turkey for Eoot blacks. Mrs. Dr. Aiarusla Solomon will   again make liie liule boulblacks of this city hapjiy on Tliaiikfiriving day by gi\'ing ihuut a turkey dinner nt the i.ra\\/ord Uoui-e, Providence Bank Teller in Trouble.' Cliargcd with EiiikMliiig $5000 fr.�]i Employer. Alleged to Have Made False Entries on Books. PiioviDKNCis, B, I., Nov. 16.-Harrison H. Weiitworth.teller in theLimcRook National Bank, Woybossot St., was arrested by Detective Murray, this oveuiug, oil a charge of cmhozzlemont. Weutwortli, it is alleged, embezzled ,?5000 from tho bank, and it is further charged that the sum has been taken in small amounts, during a period covering tho past six years.  At noon- today Wontworth wont out to dinner, and the clorks iu the meantime looked over the books and found, if is alleged, that $5200 had been abstracted. It is alleged that Wentworth would enter tho proper amount on tho depositors' book and make a wrong entry on tho bank's hook, keeping the differenop. When one of the depositors brought in tho books the failure to correspond was discovered. Wentworthwas calledboforetho directors of tho bank at 4 o'clock, and confessed to having robbed tho institution, ivnd explained how he did it. Ho was placed under ,$8000 bail, which was given before Judge Cooke tonight. Wentworth \\B.s a member of the Talma Dramatic and Narragansott Boatolubs. He had the highest social connootions, aud was a favorite m swell society okolos. THEIR WORD WAS GOOD, So Called Spotter Testimony Convicts a Lowell Liquor Dealer. LowBiA, Nov. 16.-The cross-examination of Henry Lempke, the witness employed by the Law Enforcement association in the case of Patrick Dolau, charged with maintaining a liquor nuisance, was resumed by Nathan 'D. Pratt and continued for two hours this afternoon. It related prin oipally to the number of saloons Lempke and Holly, the other witness, visited when they claimed to liave detected Dolan violoting the liquor law. At the close of the testimony of Lempke Inspector Donaldson was called by William H. Anderson, counsol for the government, to show that a liciuor seizure had been made at Dolan's saloon this year. Messrs. 'Pratt and Cotirtuoy. counsol for tho defence, presented the following for tho consideration of the judge, and the points submitted were overruled: And liow comes the dofeudant and moves that tho complaint be qunahtd for tho following roasona, viz.: First, That tho complnlnt doean't flufliolently allege any offence against any.law or laws of this Commonwealth. Second, That the complnlnt does not allege thnt the tenement kept nnd iimlntnlnod hy tho defendant was used for tho keeping or sale of intoxiontlng liquors not In tlie orlglnnl package. Third, Thnt it does not attfllclently appear In aald compliUnt that tho tenement itfipt hy tho dofendnnt �wna used for tho keeping for snlo of. Intoxicating Uqttora not in tho origbial packages. Fourth, That the complaint'does not nllego the otronoo Intended, to bo ohiirgod with the certainty and precision that the law reqttlres. Before pronoimcing judgment in the case, So arguments being; made by counsel. Judge [adley said in his opinion there was as much necessity for tho, formation of a Oitizons' Law Enforcement Society to aid in the enforcement of the liquor law as thero -wos for . an association of bankers to aid in suppressing the circulation of counterfeit money, or of sooietio-s for the prevention of cruelty to children or cruelty to animals. With Judge : Jevens l(e believed that where a citizen lonestly intends to aid in enforcing any aw his tostimony should be credited. This s particularly the case iii enforcing the liquor law. as the repular poUce officers are w*oll known, and it la impossible to detect tho violation of the liqtior law iu many instances without the aid of citizens. 'The testimony of private detectives, employed to detect employes of railroad companies Buspeoted of stealing, is credited in tho courts, and the methods employed by detectives in rficovoring stolon property and arresting violators of tiio law are not condemned by the public. Dolan was then fined SlOO and cost.i. Appealing lie furnished S300 security for his appearance in the Superior Court. George W. Enwright, Henry J. Kibboii, Thomas McLaughlin, Francis E. Shaw and Albert W. Partridge, charged with maintaining liquor nmsanocs, were ordered to next Saturday. THOUSANDS OP IDLE GIRLS. How the Danbury Hatters' Trouble May Terminate. Danbury, Conn., Nov. IB,-The hat man-ufacturors held a meeting this afternoon to d'poido upon what action to take in regard to the Hat Trimmers' Association, whose members at a meeting last night decided to abolish articles of agreement which have existed between the manufacturers aud tho association for five years. The manufacturers decided to lock out the 2000 girls employed in the trimming departmohts Monday, and allow the other departments to operate. If tho trimmers stand by their demands for only a few days,, however, it will necessitate tlio shutting down of all the departments of tho 20 factories in the city, and thus throw out of employment 11,000 liat-ters,and paralyse the hatting industry, temporarily at least. Death of Rev. Thomas G. Volpey. Lawkknce, Nov. 15.-Rev. Thomas G. Valpey diod of heart disoaso at the residence of his brother, Daniel Valpey.at South Lawrence, early this morning. Deceased was born in Andovor, July 10, 1832. Ho camo to Lawrenco and graduated    from    tho   public   schools was afterwards professor of Greek and Latin at St. Paul's school, Concord. He was also at one time principal of the high scliool hero. While at Concord he formed the Mission church, and preached there. Ho leaves a family. Funeral Tuesday at Grace church, Lawrence,      ___ Natharuol Holmes Morrison Dead. Baltihoiie, Md!. Nov,15.-IMr. Nathaniel Holmes Morrison, provost of the Peabody Institute, is dead. Mr. Morrison was born in Peterbtiro, N. H., Dec. 14, 1815. His ancestors, of .Scotch-Irish doscent,came to this (ountiry 1718 and settled iu Now Hampshire. He was prepared for college at Pliillips Academy, E.xetor, N. H.. and was graduated third in his ckuss, at Harvard, in 1839, Still an Extra Socsioii. Nashua, N. H., Nov, 1,1.-When Stuiator Blair w!is in the city Tliursilay. he ilisciLsscd the iiroposed iilau to call an extra session ol the .State Lpgislalure. He said: "I am not taking much interest in it at present. I said my say before the cinumittee. I have no doubt but that Ihe se.s.sitin will bo held. If I hatl I should do more.It wou't bo called until alter Thanksgiving. Yale Professor Goes to Cluoago. CH!t\A(;o, Nov, 15.-l^rof, Edward Harper of Yale College has finally, it is said, decided to ,accepttlie presideiu^y of tho new Cli!<-ago Univcfiiity. It wits learned today from the best of autliority that Prof. Harper has made up his mind and tliat he h.as concluded to accept the position of head of the new institution. Killed by an "Unloaded" Gim. Ci.Ani:Mt.i;;t, N. H., Nov. 15.-Frank Pike wiKs accidcnlally shot by Horace Peno last evening. They had boon phiyiiig card.s, and I'eno artxse and playfully puinleil the (luii at I'ikti, not knowing it wa,., luadi'd. rite charge ent'ired Pike's face, causing lii.s ileiith in three liours, Pciiois 13 years old and I'iko 14. Killed by His Own Gun. PitoviiiENCE, K. I., Nov. 15.-Walter S. Tyler.l 5 yeiu:� old, -went huiiting this morning at Kivertlalo. In getting over a wtill his gun exploded, and the charge went through the boy'.s heart, killing hint aliii(i,stiiu_.tttntly. Theeo Men Eiicourasre Panning. 'I',\unton. Nov. 1 .'.-Al tlie regular annual mv'etiiig of the Krisiol C.iiuiity .Vgriculturitl Society tflday these olhcers for the on.'iuing year were chost'ii; Frank I., Fish,Taunton, president; D, L. Mitchell, Tauulon, secre- tary; Joseph ,E, Tallman, Taunton, treasurer: William Ai Lane,.Norton, auditor, /j. Shorinaii, Taiintoii, and N. W. Sliaw, Raynham, wore added to the list of vice-presidents. J. H. Arnold takes tho placo of William A. Lane on the hoard of directors, J.E. Preshoinplace of N. W. Slmw, William P. Hood in place of .losenh Gibbs, W, C; Baylies in pliioo of Z. Sherman, Leroy R. King 111 place of David Hairding, and Daniel 35a3toii, aro added. Otliorwi.se there are no changcs'in tho board of directors. - DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT MILK.' Earmer Sa.i'le Could Not, Tell Hew Much His Cows Produced. Providence, R.. I.,' Nov, 15.-Ex-Assemblyman O. P. Sarle of the to'vvn of Warwick in Kent county, refused to 'ansvfor the questions of the Porter census last June and toda;y his cistse was before the United States grand jury. It was shown oy the United States district attorney that Sarle had not found it oon-voiiient to tell the oensiis enumerator just how much milk he prodviood on his broad acres in Kent, and said that the enumerator could guess just as well as himself about the matter, Sarle said ho could not swear to tho answer within 6000 quarts. After his refusiil to comply with the orders of the i3eusu8 commissioner, he was sent for by the Wnited States district attorney, and given some additional papers, which, it was understood at the time, the Warwiokite would flU out. This Sarle also neglected to do, and he was later placed under .arrest at the instance of the government ofuoials. Under tho provisions of the census enumeration act fixing afineof not more than (flOO Sarle will be arraigned some time next week. His case attracts attention, as he was tho single Rhode Islander to refuse information to the offioial agent of census, Supervisor Williams of this State. It Grows Every Week. The ninth week of the run of "The Soudan" closed at the Boston Theatre last night, and the great auditorium wits filled to repletion, hundreds hein^ content with standin^r room. This faot best attests the popularity of the great play, for the disagreeable storm whic i prevailed kept lai numbers from vehtiu' ng out of doors. H__ tlio weather been favoroble the entire house would have boon sold long before the doors opened. It looks as if "The Soudan" could run until the June roses bloom, but positive engagements made for other attractions will limit the performanties in this city. The surplus stock is ^oing -how can it help going-such ridiculous prices-16, 18, 20 & ^22 tailor made kersey overcoats all shades, go at $15, only about 300, left. 18 20 & ^22 tailor made suits-all handsome patterns -choice ^15.   About 300 12, 14 & ^15 cassimere and cheviot suits including ^15 black cheviot suits, ^10. About 200. . These are surplus lots that should have been sold last month; we name these prices to close at once. Don't delay making your selection, the goods won't be here long. Such beautiful clothing for boys as we are showing-knee trousers suits,sizes 4 to i'6 years, $5 to $iB; boys' top coats, ^12.50 and $15; boys' cape coats, $5 to J15; boys' imported Shetland reefers in stylish plaids, all tailor made, ^14 and $16. Lads' top coats, box coats, cape coat^, ulsters and suits, as good in style and fabric and as well made as their big brothers can buy. If you are a judge of clothing, come in; if you are not a judge, come in, for it's safeto trade whfere they pay back money. Can we expect you, Monday.? We have some special bargains for you. R. T. Almy & Co. 622 Washington street, corner Essex, "Whiit wo aro doing, a groat many people tlo not tako advantage of our  ry Goods, ruts, eto., etc., we send our cuBtom-ers to tho heat caeh atorea In the cUy, wlioro thoy can buy whatever they wish ami settlo at our olllco by woekly or monthly payufienta. The combined stonUof all tho stores wo deal -Hith rep-resents iiuiny mlUloiis of iloUurs.coufltiquenllyyou iviil liuvo no dlrtloulty in nndlrig just what you aro looking for. AVe do not ooiialdur it any trouble to answer quea-ttouB and cxxilaln our credit Byotem. Mi kmnl Ss Eaclh Lamp Guaranteed M give perfect satisfaction o�� money refunded. Handsomely Decorated Parlor Vase Lamp, and sliade to match, fitted with the oele* brated day*!, light central draughtburn-er, worth $|.. for � � i' Polished Brass Vase Lamp, fitted with daylight central draught burner, 10-inoh ribbed doimfi shade, for We Aro Oj>e� BveiiliiBS. ./. UltOniE, Manager. \\\\\ mil lip II18I IliliiK lur buys eta iiiiulf. �i .WO x;!icSi. 31 Boylston Street, Metwtit'H Wiii>lii�is*o� uiitl Tremont. StnU for c.itnlojiHf, lanllea fpjc. Banquet Lamp, antique brass finish, fitted with daylight central draught burner, large linen shade^ any color r t Dolls and Cards. "Papa and Mamma" Dolls, kid bodies, 13 inolies long, moving eyes, worth. 76o., for , , , . I . . . 29o. Kid Dolls, fine bisque heads, moving eyes, shoes and stockings, 19 inohes long, worth $1,60, for  ,  ,  87c. Also �1, large assortment of jointed and kid dolls, dressed and undressed. Playing Cards, special bargain at _        lOo. Leaier Oeeds. Oustomers who desire to anticipate Christmas and make purchases before the rush commences are invited to inspect our extensive assortment of imported novelties in leather goods. One lot of Manufacturer's Samples, containing nearly one hundred styles of Oigar and Cigarette Oases, Prices from   . . . ,   50c.to$4.00 One lot Steel Beaded Chatelaine Bags, various designs, price   .   S6.50 One lot Card Oases and Ladies' Pocket-books, in seal, morocco aud kangaroo, with the latest designs of sterling silver mountings, prices S2.25to 83.00. Ladies' Genuine Seal Chatelaine Bags of domestic manufacture, .kid lined, gusset bottomed and   handsomely mounted, price ,  . . . , SLSO Grain Leather Club Travelling Bags with leathoi'-oovered frames aud inlays and kid linings. Sizes, .   10     11      12 inohes. Prices, S2T25 S2.50 S3.00 13     M     15     18 in. Prices, $3.25 $3.50 S3.75 S4.25 It Breaks up Immediately a very bad Cold, HILTON'S SPECIFIC, NO. 1, IS A  POSITIVE These Remedies are Cuaranteed by us. Finest Quality. All Odors. bity      now       fok,     TOtnt ciiJseisTsrAS pamcy work. AND CHABViOiS VESTS. THE liAJteKST VAKIETY IS ItOSTOIV. _ ABSOE'UTEI.Y XME MWEST I>RICES. For Perfume,    20c. For the Throat, to For the Nose, $2.00. HOT WATER   BOTTLES, ti Sizes. -Don't Fail to Own One- -8t May Save Your Life-$1.00 and upwards. FINE TOILET SOAPS, FIKEIMPORTEB PERFUMES, THE   nhw tt-KKH AX i.ww  I'KICEK. VEKY PirescrijJtions Prepared by Competent, Careful Men at Very Low Prices. [leio yt,, Very near Tremont. 06 18 1   

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