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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 16, 1890 - Page 28

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                A New, Square - Shape Russia-Iron Body PABLOB STOVE, with ornamenlal oast-iron corners. Hone like it In Boston, We are Kew England agents. Come and see them. Others ask jou tor a stove not as good, $20.i ONLY ONE TO A CUSTOMER. Chamber Stoves (flnti-Cllnker)   . S5.00 Chamber Stoves {Anti-Cilnkor)   . S6-00 Parlor Stoves, with ovens, niokelled rails, vase and urn .... Si2.00 Parlor Stoves, large sizos (to heat two rooms), niokellod rails, vase afld urn.......$15.00 Small Cooking Rangos, without ware, S6.50,S8.50, $9.50, $lj.50 Double Oven No. 7 Ranges Cabinet Base No. 7 Ranges $!5.00 10-4 White Blankets, per pair 11-4 White Blankets, per pair Extra Large Comforters . . Satin-Finish Comforters  . $3.00 $i.50 S2.50 Plush Parlor Sets .... $22.-Sultan Plush Parlor Sets , . $33.00 Plush Sofa Beds , . . . $3i Plush Sofa Beds .... 825.00 We mil guarantee that when the quality of the goods are considered we oannot lie undersold in this oltj.___ The Time to buy is Now.   The Place Is Ours, The Opportunity is Vours, CASH OR EASY TERMS. No. 49 UNION STREET, SDCCESSTHROD&HWim Men Wliose Happy Unions Led to Fortune. THE BOSTON SimPAT GLOBE-SUMDAY, WOTEMBEB ^Iml PLAIDS Lucky Wooliigs of Gcorgo William Curtis and Edward Burgess. Baroness Burdett-Ooutts and Her Boy Husloand, 757 Washington St., Boston. 4 TUADli JlAl;li. 305 Fill fcoeJIewYarlc. For RECAMIER CREAiVI. RECAMIER LOTION, REOAMIER BALM, RjCArglEn,PQl(D�R. RECAM[ERJOAP. I'"amr)n8 nil over the world as tho best nnd most odi-cucinns CDUii^ouiKlH ever inaimlitctiued for s:il.'; used ali li  cniivi;;,!/! tma; Ui i-..-.ri-y 111 li.e \t-i.t j)Dl',>:I. a lji.():ai;t, or 6 for t.?. packi-jjc. ciiic:-v.oihi otfcc.fi. freril by lliaii to any r.d;lr,;H6. CircuhiTt free. Mention tliifc jiaper.  A'ddrtbH V. ij. Aitcutr. Madrid ChetiiiKlCc.,'H7Dcr.rb(jinSt.,Chica;'c-, 111, roli e!.i!.e in iio,-it):;. .m.v.'^.s , i;v WftekE &. i-'otier. 3C'J V,'i-.viiuiin'jri i:iicfi Georee C. Goodivm, SC and 3'J Haaov.,r '�-iH WSi:;f Siillivantot Columbus, O., the daughter of William Starling .Sulliviint, a meniberof an old and aristocratic Virginia family. It was through tho small hut comfortable fortune of his wUcf that he was enabled to devote a portion of liis timo to mathematics, which had, among other pursuits, been a favorite with Mr. Burgess, and his devotion to this art led him to mentally apply his mathematical conclusions to naval architecture. The result was his construction of tlio famous Puritan, the Mayflower, tmd scores of equally good but less prominent boats. Grovor Clovelaud can scarcely be said to have achieved political success through liis marriage to his charming wife, but it is a fact beyond all dispute that hergraciousness disarmed many blows that would have caused her husband much pain. She, even more than his free trade hobby, was the great factor in his renomination, and by hor tact made friends who at least were not active against the husband because ot respect fo.- tiie wife. She cast a lustTe upon his name and threw a charm about tho administration that made its social foatttreK to a large extent atone for what its opnunents conceived to bo blunders. Abrain S. Hewitt affords anotlier oxample ot the value of profitiihio marriages. NuluriiUy a man ot great force ot cliaractar ,aii  to hi.s nhann-inij htlpmate. Ot.aii  .l.s wliich be constructed were cclipsi'd bv the fact of his lovely wife and lier charming fetes wliich made his name famous. iieiK was th<: liaiifl tlinl guided Mrs. Clovclaiul and gained for licr such widc- the Scotcli The HE tartan plaid is just tho thing this season. It makes no difference what is one's age, shape or previous condition of servitude to quiet colors and inconspiouous designs. Tho tartans aro an infectious dis-easB contracted through the eyo. No sooner does ono see tho gay colors in their striking: combinations than one wants a Kown from one of thorn at once. If one goes a stop farther and bantilos the soft silk, or tests with the .finger tips -- soft, firm quality of tha regular .Scotch wool goods, she may as well give herself up for lost at once. A tartan plaid gown slio is bound to have. It seems like a revival of a rather old fashion when wo reflect that for ages unknown tho Hichland costume has been peculiar to that people. A fi'agmont.of sculpture dug from the ruin.'S ot Autonino's wall (built in 140 A. D.), and now preserved at Croy, represents throe figures, whioh are doubtless meant for Caledonians, whose dress is in strict resemblance to tho national garb, and is similarto that of tho ancient Celts. On the remarkable obelisk at Forres, in Morayshire, tho Soots ore represented in tunics fastened around tho waist, precisely the little kilt of modern times as worn separate from the shoulder plaid. 16, 1890-TWENTT-EIGHT PAGES. BMRS BREAK UP A DANCE, blaok. ffreen. a lino of white and another of yellow. "Prlnco Oharlio" had a plaid of his own 01 tho same oolors as the above, but made , much dorkor by having wider BtrlpoB or all tho other colors save the re''., and thus reducing the blocks of the KtiMet hne to half their former size. The "Old" Stewart plaid, which antedates tho "royal" plaid, is much unlike any of the above, bolng, a dark and sober plaid, in which green is tho predominating hue, with daric blue next, and narrower bands of rod and black, the who e divided into a rather l^.y ^eing in narrow linos, Ihtj 'hunting"plaid of the Stewarts makes still another vtinety. in which black and a handsome dark green, predominate, the green in rather large blocks, with a iessor stripe of dark blue, the whole enlivened by narrow lines of yellow and rod, each dlvid^ ing tho pattern off into very large plaids. Not Tame Ones, Either, but the Real Stuff. Tlioy larcli in and Take Possession, While tho Girls Scream. A Quick-Witted PidcUer Oharms Tliem TilltKe Eifles Oome. T was a real ch.apter of accidents was our adventure with a couple of bears on theso vory wotora, three years ago. There was a comical side to it, too. Thoy say that truth is stranger than fiction, and when you hoar this story you will say ' it is." The speaker was a man  from  Boston, well known to the ETUides and hunters of eastern Maine. How an Expert Treated a Pet With Bold Head. Ono of tho curioxis things about canaries is the effect certain kinds of ailments have on them, says the New York Ilorald. Tliere is a sfrimgo looking bird in a Brooklyn household at the present time. Either from a cold contracted iu a draughty place from overheating of tlie blood this little Gorman canaiy has become bald headed. About a month ago two rod lumps began to grow 3ust above the bill. No special tentiou was paid to them at first, but when tho feathers began to como oil' tho head, back of the lumps, it beg.an to dawn on the family that something was wrong. In three weeks' time the bird was bald all the way down to his shoulders, with the exception of a tuft ill the centre of the head and a few tufts on the sides, which suggested feathered side whiskers. A bird dealer attributed this phenomenon to a cold, and suggested tlio following troat ment, which may bo of service to readers who have birds liable to be similarly afflicted: This export directed that the bird should be taken from the cage and held firmly to prevent his straggling, while a generous coating of vaseline was rubbed on his head, Tho next operation should be an application of warm water tlie next morning and a repetition of the vaseline treatment. The funny loolcing bird soon became accustomed to his daily greasing, but it made his head itch, and lie spent hours uvery wiiek rubbing his smooth and tender head against his pcM'cli to allay tho irritatiion. in cases of this kind the bird gonerally stops fiiiiging, and dealers say that this piu'-ticuUir one will probably not .sing until his bond teiithcrs come out again. His amiotion 'ills iiiaile him quite a lion iu the neighbor--lood.niid a member of tho family has named him Kill Nyo. ,Diodorus Siculus states that thenatives of Gaul, whence, no doubt, the Gael of Alban came, wore a sort of tartan, or clothing of various colors. Elsewhere the same writer speaks of their tunics ol all manner ol colors. The Iceland Sagas contain some ol the earliest allusions to the distinctive character of the Highland dress, and they relate how Magnus Olafson, king of Nom'ay, and his followers, when they returned from ravaging the west of Scotland, "went about barodogged, having short klrtles and upper wraps." This was m 1093. ' " '  says 5fore - ....----, ____ _____ _________ tartan was woven of ono or two oolors for the poor, but of more varied colors for the rich. The dlll'erent isles in the west had diflferont nat-terns of tartan. The particular "setts" or natterns appropriated to each clan was fixed long, long ago, and the plaids became k kind ot coat armor by whicli a man's namjB and clan were at once recognized. The Highlanders had neither cochineal, foreign woods, nor the many brilliant hues wo can now produce witli aniline dyes; but from the plants of their native hills, tlie lichens of their rooks and other simple sources, thoy found the means to dyo permanent and pleasing colors. Every housewife was competent to dye red, blue, green', yellow, black and brown with their various compounds; and modern art imitates but does not excel their handiwork. So much for the past. But the modern tartans aro as gay in color, as striking in I combination and as warm and indestruot-iblo in quality, when made by machinery in great manufactories, as when dyed and woven in the cottages of the peasants. Through the courtesy of Messrs. Shenard, Norwell & Co., who aro making a special feature of tartan plaids this season, the writer had the privilege recently of examining a largo and vory expensive work by Jamos Grant, published in Bdlnburg, whioh gives an exhaustive account of many things of interest to tlie Highland Scots, &-eluding their earliest history, the origin ol the clans, their dress, manners and customs; together with nearly a hundred large ulatas In which the tartan plaids, thread for thread and color for color, are faithfully reproduced each In its exact "sett" or pattern. It will bo remembered that there ate at least four ways ol spelling the name of Stewart,, that given abo^e beins'the ancient and original name, as spelled By the royal family. The progenitor ol the family was one Alan, a Norman, who hold the very im-portaiit and honorable office of lord high steward in tho royalhousehold. The offloa was made hereditary, and, when surnames became, fashionabla, this title furnishod a proud family cognomen. This spelling remained uniform t�U poor Mary Stewart went to France, when the French, having no w in their alphabet, transformed her into "Mario Stuart." The spelling has been demoralized over since. The Buchanans' plaid Is very gay, having prominent bands of rod ami yellow, with large blocks of greon, each picked out with nine smaller checks ol blue, the whole crossed by a line of white. Other colors ore, produced m this, as in nearly all the plaids, by the intersection, of bands ol. the primary hues. Thus, in the above there is purple, produced by the tmion ol rod and Dluo,orange where yellow and red cross, etc. The Camerona have two 'plaids, one lor those of Erracht and another lor the liocliiel family. The first is a much broken plaid of red, greon, blue and black, set off with a narrow line of yeliow, while the second IB a very largo, bold plaid of red and blue in lai'ge blocks, a little blaok, and still lesstyhite. There are three or four branches of the Campbell family, each with its plaid, biit they resemble each other closely, all boin very dark, of blue, green and blaok, set oi.. into huge squares by a narrow lineol white, yellow pt red. Tho clergy in the old days had a plaid of their own, which was, prophetically perhaps, of black ,and 'Presbyterian true blue." The clan of Di-ummond is gay and bold, mostly scarlet, ivith inch blocks ol green and a bit of blue. The Farquharsons, Fergussonsand Forbes all have handsome plaids, the latter being notably striking, with Its broad bands or greon, blue and blaok marked into large squares by a narrow Una of white. Tho Frazers are 'bright with the nredom. inatinf scarl6t ol their tartan; the Gordons sober m black, dark greeni and blue, vrith only a relieving line of yellow. i The Grahams wear a plaid in which brue predominates, tyro shades ol that color ap- gearing with graen and blaok. The Grants ave a bright plaid of scarlet, small blocks of green and a littlo blue and black. The Leslies have a very handsome tartan, black, greon and blue, marked off into small checks by lines of whita, and into larBor ""uares by red bands. The MaoAlisters have one of the most complicated plaids, the scarlet groundbeing almost covered with the narrow, Interseot-ine lines ol blue, black, green and white. The Macaulays ihave a plaid in which a broad stripe of scarlet alternates with green ol the same width, giving large blocks ol each color, broken slightly with narrower linos of wliite .and blaolt. In the MacDonald tartan, large blocks of green and blue are separated by a narrower band ol blaok, and the whole is finely plaided with many narrow linos ol red. The MaoDonalds ol Olan-rauald have a tiny thread ol white in a plaid very much like the other. Those of Glengarry have tho ' in a littlo _different same colors as the last_ . -------- "sett,Willie Macdonald of tho Isles and slate makes a bold departure In a plaid of huge scarlet blocks, barred off m a simple pattern with green and blaok, and bo oi Btaffa has tho above colors, with a little " � '      m plaid. white, in a largo much-brokou ,_____ Ino MaoDougals, MaoFarlanes, the Mao. Gregors and MiioIntosUes oaoh has its own combination, that of the chief in tha latter family being ijuita unusual, ol red and yellow mostly, with black, white and gray; the Morgans or McKays wear a very dark plaid of green, with leas blue and still less black; the Sutherlandshaveamoro broken pattern of the same oolors; tha Sinclairs are gorgeous m rod and blue; Bosses and Robertsons are mostly red; the Ogilviea have the most complicated pattern, all fine lines ol blue, yellow, white, etc, on a red ground; the Murrays are sober or gay, nocording as thoy como, from Athole or Tullibardine; the Menzies are all in scarlet and white; and so on, almost indefinitely. One is amazed at the marked distinctions between these plaids, though so low colors are used, till ono remembers one's arithmetic and the possibilities ol permutation. Two ol the most unusual, as well as the handsomest ol tlie tartans, are the hunting plaid ol the MoPhersons, a really beautiful combination ol blaok and gray, enlivened with narrow stripes ol red and blue; and the HUBBAIMD COST HEB A MXIiIilOKr. volt  MKBK I.".Ai,  tfiJJ. OT.Di CKOW, (ii.tr, iH-r oi-l� AEcrAie iti'i:, .'S;:j..'-, . OXM aro\-ofiiCA.'V5. f.t�.oo. K.E.�.'rUCK S' �Ot f�UO.V, R1.4 0. KEW EX�I.A.VJU KL'AI, liil.-H*. Old Med. Ildia, F2j I'lire Hoi.'..lis, i?,; r;-.H:i.rma IVlin-t, ^1; lin[.*jrtta Winea, ^'J. ht> and �4 .cr ij;a. p.i'dt war.'-.;iitt,d :;a rei-r-.-SL-uL-.-d or i::^'ncy u- J, E, DOKERTY & CO., �Bi� FKWViKAX^ K'X'.    *   .   .   .   U'jHtou.. bulf JaG |ir. 1 ,r,.s-s K'r,l!?^?t!r'C'OMroU.Ki;^r l.AJill.-. ai.-Wlilc. i'ro!..!.!. Jbfl�u:tuia, T>ib o' :.i. 1 oiilv /.:na!:ic VVoiftiO*'* SiaJTU- tiou: ��>'� fU 'in-.K.abt, oraenl dirtot, lOMnitou. cb�,ru.l...:i, ..a i,- fco. van .', ;iO Huao Ti- ale; i ,, _____  -  Go'.d- , IVi-eMh i l-otUJ, SOO �uiiui'i, 'Ji Trulnout t.!., , i,MiivS, Saw. bau ll.'l^�e r:aptivalcd so many. IVo one can think of Mr. Whitney without associating ivilh it thi^ social triumjihs of the lady to whom he oives so much. State Heiiator Fassett of New York is likewise the hero ol a romantic and wca.Hhy tnarria^re. From a countn' lawyer witli cij'iinaratively little, save indoiiiitalilc pluck, lii.s marriage with ono of Calilorriia's richest (iaughlcr.'i raised hiin to a position of ea.sy aillui-noe, from wliich he can afl'ord 10 looK down on Wdre Jilcrceiiisiry Mutters and aim much higher than ordinary politi-ciuMb do. !lislohi.s credit that he has embraced ilio ovporiiinity allorded him. His mar-ritige was fortunate for hims^jlf, inasmuch u' by ii he gained for himself a mo.st lova-hU: c'oinpauion in life; foriuriate for her, in that siic won i)jc) love of a man steadfast in tlii those quuiilifcs tliiit go to make a man i'leatBr lliaii hisfeilowBI iorfuun.te for the State. Ill that it pliLcud at its ser^-ice a man broa.d .ii mind, houusi in effon, and firm ui conviction id i^uch a iiosiiiou tlia! he bias inn to  yauket) youth who wedded the Baroness liuideiiCouus. suninderiiiij both hiiuM-U and liis iiai!i,> to the liidy, has achieved a siiccfiS thereby so far as money ,m t,,     laid t!ie posse.ssioii ot .-statHjs by a wife can i.;.,-cial   !ua!:e liucet.ss.  li is true lie iiov.- in niuue-u^M   I li'ii', but ho uoubllcsj would have reiuauied How Mrs. Stevens Secured a Boston Wife's Marquis. Mrs, Stevens, who is now known us tho Duchess of Dino, was, before her first marriage with Mj, Frederick Stevens, a Silas Sam])son, tho daughter ot a wealthy New York merchant, says tho World. �ffbcn she married Stevens, who was a yoxmg lawyer, it was regarded as tho union of family without money and money without family. On the death of lier father .she camti into a fortune estimated at !(.>,-000,000. Her mrirrlod life was a comparatively uneventful one. until her mootiiig with Mar-ciiiis do Talleyrand Perigord. Tliis occurred about 10 years aao. His attentions became ver,v mariicd, anil excited no end of talk. finally a niarriayo was arrangod, and of cnur.se t.liis marriage iin'tilvcd the separ.t-tion of Mrs, .StevoiiB and husband, and the M.irfjuis ut Talleyrand and liis wife. The Frciiclnuan's wife was IMi.ss Bessie Ciiriis, M'ho was a very beautiful Boston girl, and wno caino to hun witli a snmll fortune that Iki very speedilj' dts.sipaled. It is said that she consentt^d to a separation on iliB payment to lior of (100,000 francs, liall of which was to stand as a dowry fw her dauk'liter. This daughter recently marrioil into it noble Italian family. What liiianeial consideration was entertained iiiul iiccejiteil by Jlr. Stevens in A'ow Yorl,. is, of ('Oiii'.se, not known. l-'our ciiildren remained with him, and it v. as stai-id at the time that each child w.as allowed S40(ii.i a year, .and that in consider-aiioji of these payiiieuts tho father waived al) claim on the mother's fortune. ^^oll|chody has estiiiialed that it cost Mrs. Stevens 61,0011,000 to ellcct this matrimonial rearraiigeiiient, and procure for hor the I'ri'uchnj.an of her choice. It is stated ill Paris that Frederick Sievons will be pros-eii.t ul his ilauL'hter's wedding. kodofl______,-    ________ _____ lino of red. Those last are "raving beautlea, aa my friend, the Owl, says. Beside the wool goods ol soft, warm and very durable Scotch stuffs.whioh are douhh width (Ei tnohes), and sell at 60 a yard for street dresses, travelling costumes and tho like, many otlier fabrics are found in these same plaids. Among these ave soft Bilks, much used for house waists, miscalled "blazers," or for morning gowns. There are also velvets for fajtw sleeves and trimmings, and sashes and ribbons for tha little folks. Tho warm wraps or "plaids" proper,great shawls, thick and heavy, may also bo ordered in any pattern desired. A clover girl I know has planned out a regular Highland costume, adapted to modern fashions, for horsolf, To a pretty wool gown of her family tartan, she has added a wrap fashioned from a shawl, the end of whioh is flung up over her shoulder in a jaunty faahion; while the whole is surmounted by a "Tam" in black velvet, made like the regular Scotch "bonnet." Whether sho win claim, for theadornmentotthislast.the three eagle's feathers fastened \vith a brooch which marked achiof.or the twoof thecliief-tain's rank, orcontenthersolf with tho one worn by a gentleman, is a question .not yet decided. Jkan JiiNCAn). Feaiits That Have Made Men Great. The banquets held at Delnioiiico's have, acL'ording to Ciiauiicey M.,I>epow.made and uuuiado more than one public man. Many p-.'ople ailribuiu the defeat ot James G. Blaiue for the presiUency in 1S84 to tho banquet lr.iio\vii .is BclshaKi'.ar's feast, which was held at D. liiioiiico'i, for the puniose of itiising canipaigii funds just previous to the election. li was a banquel *l)iat offered tho latu Henry W. (.Traity the oiuioniuiity of making the celebrated speech that ulaiio bis fanio us;iii orator all ox'cr the c'ouiitry. But tot the liiniier of the New lCiit;laiiil Society ul whicli liO lu.vde his tuuious spoeoh, or some similar occasion, it is nioio than probable that h'l never would liavu reached tho con-tj.ieuous iiatioii.-il oosiliou ho oooupied at lliu tiuicol his deaiu. Everybody who contemplates the pur chase of a phiid gown or wrap slionld first hunt up a Scotch ancestor, no matter how remote, and then consult a work of tho sort mentioned (or TuK Gi.onic which knows all about it), before venturing.; to do so. Ol coiirso anybody can buy a Soocch plaid, but, equally of course, it would be so much nicer to wear one's own family tartan, if the clan flower be added, and one can loam how to pronounce tho clan war-cry, or wliistle a few barg oi the elan march, the effect would bo perfect. There aro a few of the tartan plaids which have been *dmired iiiul worn all through our mndern limes, by tlie stranger as well us tho Higlilander who clnimed it as bis distinctive family garb. Among these is tlie Bob Koy plaid, which is composed of alteriiato blocks of rod and black, each about an inch sqtiaro, the simplest, per-liups, and certainly the most, oouimon of all the tartans. Ill uiarktid contrast is the old "dress" tartan of the royal Stewarts, better luiown *s the "Victoria tartan," having been adorned by the Queon when she, representing the Stewart family through James VI. ot Scotland and I. of England, from whom she is descended, ascended the throne of the United Kingdoms. On consulting the plate tiio writer shuddered to find that as a small child she hud v.-orii u gown of this rilaid, but recovered her sinrita on reool-lei'ting thut her great-grandmother ^vas a Stewart.  (Such au escapol) Tho plaid is of a complicated "sett," not easily c'e;,ciibed, but it* principal colors iire red and while, modified by many narrower bsmdijof black, blue, green and a thread of yellow. This is the "dress" idaid. The ordinary plaid of the royal btov.'arts is mostly of scarlet, which appears in large iwo-iucU blocks of color, plaided with blue, f OVmB, $100 A PLATE. wore a party of lour, with two canoes, and had been out duck shooting on J'ackson Brook lake. 'W'e had landed on one ol the headlands, where a prostrate giant ol tho forest offered a ready-made fireiilace. The ovenins' was calm, and the solomn stillness of tha forest seemed tc brood over tho expanse of waters that stretched out in the darkness from our feat. The ooffeo had been duly drunk, and was followed by cigars. One of the party had remarked that an unusually large bear bad been seen on that shore only a lew days before. This led to a conversation on bears, and some ono who had heaid of our Boston friend's experience in a famou^boar hunt that had occurred in that neighborhood a few years before had asked him for the story. "I had John Nicholson for guide that trip, and' a good guide ho was," continued the story-toller. "A, littlo superstitious, perhaps, and apt to mistake a floating log lor a sea-serpent now and then, but a good man in a canoe. "Wall, we had been down to the Thoroughfare, where we were this evening, and had had fair luuk among^.the ducks. As the weather was fine I was in no hurry to ratiim to the hotel, and so it was near 8 o'clock m the evening when we started back. John rowed, and I sat In the stem enjoying my cigar. Our Erttns were lashed in the bow; for the boat a totlish thing-an old skifif wo had borrowed for the occasion, as my canoe was*on tho other lake. 'We wore just off this point, but quite a distance out, when my attention was attracted by two dark objects ahead of us to the left. They were bobbing up and down, and at firs't I took them to be a log with large knots on it. I said notliing to John, but sat quietly and watched ."We gradually.gained upon them, and then in the moonlight ^ saw that'they were animals of some kind. Deer-waa now my first thought, "I drew John's attention to them in a hurried whisper. He ceased rowing, and, turning rotmd, took a quick glance at them. "'Bears!' was his sententious whisper, and then he asked me what wo should do. 'Follow them by allmeans,' was my shook his head deprecatlngly, and muttered something about bear hunting in a leaky boat. It was a risky business, aa I afterwards learned, especial y as ouj guns were practloally unreachable. The bears were fast nearing the other shore, and so we could not take time to get at the gruns, "John spurted, and we soon came up with oui- game. Ha kept tha boat at some distance from them,80 that we pursued a course parallel to theirs. Ho also gradually headed them off from tho point to which they were swimming, "When we got between them and the headland we set up a united shout in order to ohanga the direction of their com'se. This had the desired effect, for, with a w.atery srrowl, they turned in tho direction I wished them to go. My plan, formed hurriedly, was to get them onto the brook that leads from the village into this lake, and then when we should get them into town we might have some fun, I knew that the presence ol a camp of lumbarmen on the Spptjslte shore would dotor them from mak-ijgin that direction, ^or once I was night. When we reached the mouth of tliO'brook 1 had the satisfaction of seeing our pair of bruins ploughing tho waters ahead ol us. "Then my excitement got the better ol my judgment, for I started up suddenly atid attempted to ston past John in order to get at the arms. The result was a sudden and disastrous upset. Over KoXled Otir TotUeh Craft, crowded with �ie astonished ?aoos of the male dancers. For the moment all saomed nonplussed. But Maine men are men of action when danger threatens. Some one pro-iiptinped the magio word 'rifle,'and immediately halt a dozen young men were sotu--rylnfr home for firearms, '"Ihe bears wereall tWstime sitting on thou haunches m the middle of tho hall and casting lowering glances aroimd them. Now and then thoy emitted a low growl, more through fear and distrust than from anger." 'A bright thought took possession of tho mmd of the violinist, 'Music hath charms to sootho the savage breast,' he had heard sjiy, and so ho hastily comnaunioated his thoughts to his brother ol the Organ. With a proliminary scrape or two on tho Tiolin the music began. '�Judging from the selection made, our musicians must have believed in tho efooaoy of fast music on the beat' mind. Jigs, dancing tunes and waltzes followed each other without intermission. 'The effect on the boars was instantaneous, Tho,look of lowering distrust passed off, and was succeeded by one of peaceful contentment. Our musicians had scored a point.  "One ol the girls more daring than the others, seeing this change in the attitude ot tho visitors, and encouraged by the voice of her brother, boldly ventured along the wall to the door, Soon another followed, and then another, until the greater part ol them had sought salety in flight, . All this time the bears appeared to be so completely under the obarm of the music as not to notice tho departiu'e. At last oven tho most timid ol the young women, taking courage from the example of the others, made their way in safety to the door. ''AU this takes a longer time to relate than it did to happen. Not much time had been lost m procuring firearms; yet when the men bearing those weapons returned to the scene, the possibilities hinted at above restrained them for the moment from opoiiing hostilities. As soon, however^ as, the last girl had succeeded in making hw escape, it was decided to shoot tho beai^s where they lay on the floor. "But here a now dt�Boulty arose, musicians, wliosa presence of mind already done ' ' '- would now � too, would .___....._________ some excited masksmon, and as it was un darstood that the bears, on account of their position, could nob be killed at the first fire, an attack in return might well be expected from them. Bears, you know, have a very ugly way of rushing at the nearest living object when they aro wounded. There was, therefore, a general hesitancy among.the men at the door about beginning the battle, "TbinffS Were in Tills OoniUtlon when John and I, In a woe-bogone state, came upon the scene. Wo found the whole village, yotmg and old, gathered around the lower door. The stairs leading up to the dance hall were fairly packed. Everybody was talldng, and everybody had his own plan of action. Never in its history had Brookton been so excited over anything. A couple of bears to break up a danoer and the musicians obliged to play for their lives. The thought took the pubUo breath away. "We soon took in the situation. It was plain that something should be done; Nicholson, alter acouSng.aroxmd a little, came to me and asked me to help him bring a ladder, A ladder we got, and as soon as the crowd took In om- intentions willing hands soon raised it up against the wall just under the wmdow nearest the music. John ran quickly up, and raising the sash, he fixed it so that it would remain open. Ho then told the musicians to oome out, one at a time. "The organist, whose fingers by this time wore almost numb from enforced exercise, was the first to obey this summons. Tho flddlerfaithfuUy continued to saw away at tho 'Irish Washerwoman.' "As soon as he felt that his companion was In safety, he dropped violin and bow and made for tho window. So anxious was ho to reach terra firma that he came near dislodging the ladder. "There being no further obstacle in the way of our friends above, they at once opened fire on the bears. It required several shots.to kill them, and one of them, 1 believe, did charge lor the crowd at tho door. He feceivad his coun de grace, however, belore he could do any damage. "You will be surprised to learn," concluded our friend, "that this adventure with boars resulted in a lawsuit, and engendered considerable ill-will among a number of the -------- -_      jjg trouble was about tho and over went John and myself. My only thought as I felt myself going was for my gun. We were both good swimmers, and as the brook, though �^eov, was narrow, I felt no concern personally. "When we came to tho surface we made lor the boat, whiOh was floating bottom up near us. We had no diflioulty m reaching it, and we soon had it by some logs that lay near the shore. Although the footing they afforded us was very precarious, it was suffl-cieiit lor us. We soon had our old craft righted, and then, much to our surprise, we found that our guns were still lashed in tho bow. It did not take long to empty the boat of most of the water; and so in a lew minutes we were again afloat. Having picked up the oars, which floated near us on the dead water, John again addressed himself to the duty of rowing." "What beoamo of your bears in the meaa-timo?" Inqulxfid one of the party. "WoU, the bears, hearing this tremendous Bplashinp behind them when our boat upset, also lost what little judgment they had. Instead of taking to the sh'bre they followed the brook right up into town. I suppose thoy imagined that we had taken to the water after them, and so they redoubled their efforts to escape. They must have landed near the steam mill, just behind the hotel. It was thou that the real fun began. "It was Saturday evening, and the ordi nary hebdoininal Satm'day night dance wa; in full progress in Dudley s Hall. "You must know," continued the spealier, turning to two ol the party, who were strangers, 'that a weekly dance is one oi the institutions of the backwoods of Maine, It appears to be necessary to the mental, moral and social well-being ol these people to dance at least onoe a week. The musio to whioh they dance is ordinarily supplied by a country fiddler, with sometimes an organ aocompouiinent. The -etiquette ol these weekly reunions is peculiar. , No young mnn ever thinks ol taking his girl with him. Tho young men go singly in a body, and expect the young ladies to do the same thing. Refreshments, in the shape of a drink of cold water from a pail in the corner, are served between dances to the ladies, while gentlemen adjourn outside for a smoke." "But you are forgetting all about your bears." tiere interrupted the youngest mom. ber ol the party. All in good time, young man," replied oui- Boston friend, as lie bru.shed the .ashes from the end of his cigrar- "fbos" 'iKt.niiB >. "Wonderful Dinner that 'Wtis Given bv the Kabbit Club. Chauncey M. Depew, speaking ot the Babbit Club, said to a New York Herald reporter: "One ot tho most successful .and interesting ot the dinners given by this club last winter was one given in Philadelphia. , y. ....-e,-. , �7,----x:,!-;,, i;-:v,.,.""^^ The members of the club were all wealthy te,fettS*^ti?c\l'Xe^ all.good livers and all fond of a very good tinio. The night selected lor the Philadelphia dinner, tho members wero notified, would bo utilized in attending a prize fight at Elizabeth. A private car had been engaged, the notices stated, and after tho fight tho car would conduct them to their dinmg place. Tho dinner took place at the Mcrcliiints' Club iu Philadelpliia and w.as a terrapin dinner, especially prepared tor tho occasion. The terrapin was accompanied by all kinds of templing viands, all of which, exotpt tlie vegetables, were produced from the water and was unanimously declared by tho members of the clubtobotiio most successftil dinner they had ever attended, '�'riiis dinner cost each member ot the EabbllB over $100. Thoy wero served with every kind of wine tho mo.st oulturod epicure could desire, and no pains or expense was spared to make the dinner coinplele. What McAllister Drinks. The Tokay that I speak of cannot bo purchased in tho market. It is never sold, and is absolutely jiriceleas. It is nectar for the gods. It is served in thimble glasses at the imperial court in Vierma, and is so rare that there was no lioher offering icceivca by Queen Victoria upon he^'jubiloe ciilebrntion liiau the tour dozen bottles of it which the Emperor Francis Joseph made his royal gift to hor majesty. I have half a dozen bottles ol this infstimable treasure, presented to lue by the Avistri ' '* -"i .j-would think of dri these details are necessary to my story." ,, "Our bears," continued ho, were so com plctolv disgruntled that by the time they landed thoy wore utterly regardless ot con-sequencoB, Asifiu pure desporaliou thoy boldly made their way right into .the hoart of the village. Where sl^ould their wander- BPWABBS. Call Early and Secure the Bargains. We have one of the largest linos of CHAMBBK AND PAKLOU SITITS to 1)6 found iu Boston. Call and he con. vinced. bounty. Several of them claimed the honor of killing one or the other ol the bears. I don't know that the feud has yet died out. And he rose, paddle in hand, and pushed his canoe back mto tho water.      __ Wm. C. GAtkoek. SHE BELIEVED A LIB, But GOODS BELIVEEEB FEEE. Exposure Game Swiftly, Bringing Bitter Tears. So long as women will be so foolish men will be deceptive, saya tho Sun. One day I sat behind a couple on'an Ohio & Mississippi train, and it wasn't 10 minutes before I discovered that tho girl was 0 village belle who Imew nothing of the world, and that her companion was a traveller who saw in her a victim. Several others noticed them as well, but it was hard to see how anything could be done. He professed great admiration for the girl, and she blushingly queried: > ' But how do X know you are not a married man?" Oh. but I assure you on my honor that I am not." "Where do you live?" "In Louisville." "And you have neither wife nor children?" "No." At that instant the conductor' came in with a telegram and called out the address, "That's for me," said the man in the seot ahead. It was handed to him, and he was smiling as he tore it open. Next moment he fell forward in a heap and rolled into the aislo in a dead faint. Half a dozen of us, including the girl, read tho despatch, It was dated Indianapolis, and road: "Your wife and oaby btuned up with the house, last night. Come at once," It took us a quarter of an hour to bring him to, and It was half an hour later when he left the train. He had forgotten the girl who shared his seat, and she was orouoned down and crying lllce a baby. She Owns 150,000 Aores. Mrs. Emma E. Forsythe is an American woman who goes by the name ol the White Queon. Her realm is an island in the Southern Pacific called Now Britain, whose obiel industry is the sale of mother of pearl. Mrs. Forsythe was left a widow at the age of 18. and with veiT Httlo money. She now owns IfiO.OOO acres of fertile land, two steamers that ply between the islands and tho port, and sho is preparing to close a contract for the bvuldlng of four more vessels lor the island trade. Patti's Syiiagogue. Adelina Patti Nicolini is a Jewess. No one knew it until lately. But now she is making a sensation by building a synagogue at Criiig-y-Nos. It is to be exactly like the famous Jewish temple at Berlin, and mav, perhaps, bo opened all the year for public service. Tho synagogue is sai d to be a great disappointment to other religions, for it has long been known that a church of some kiad was to be erected, and Catholios who saw Patti at mass at Boulogne hoped that it would be a cathedral of their own. 126 and 128 Hanover St, 2 DOOES PROM -WASHrUGTOH J. J. QUINN, Manager OPEN EVEHm&S, "I BTEEEK Produces a Beautiful Complexion. 'VS^tena a Sallow Skin. Kemoves Moth and Liver Spots. Prevents Sunburn and Tan. To Travellers It is Indispensablo, Keeps the Skin Perfect in any Olimato, PLANTA BEimUCE, PER JAK..........S1.2IJ FLESH   WORRffl   PASTE. Skin Refiner uuUL I�lmplo Romovor. Will rollno a COAESE, KOUGH, POEOUS. 8Km, a positive euro for PIMPLES,   nruptlons mi euUrely removes that disagreeable with whicli 80 many aro afflicted. Tor jar, gl.60. Oar complete lino of toilet requisites and manIout� goodB iu� absolutely PUIIE ftTid'HARMLESa, and can be obttUned at tlio foUoivlng representatlTe Bom ton dnigslsta i Joseph 1. Brown &: Co,, BOiWmbiagton and Bcd> ford streets; Tlieodoio Metoalf * Co., SO Tremont otrdet, nlfio at Copley Stpiaro Store; Charles Cspl. talno & Co., Columbus avenue, oor. DarlmouHj street; P, Konnlson, 10 Temple ptoco, Edward Oai� rol, Jamaica Plain, Kosllndale, and oU ilrst-olasi dealers. " 'Wliolesule A.Konts for Wow Kuglaud States, WEEKS & POTTER, 3at Kx:t. IcptandFa,� BCrupits. Glycrrlne, q. 8. Mir, Makeo^pi la. takelpUI iit8p.in.,ftmUn. other on go ng to bed. Jn aomc cmdo It will be neocHEary for iho patient to titke Iwo nlUa at bedtime, maklnp Ijie iniwbcr threc a day. a'hla '�eraedy le adapted to cverj' condition of nerroutt debility and weakncBs lu elthorsex, and oapeclally In those rAies rosultlnET from imprudence. The rtouiierattye povern of IhtBi-eiitoratlve are truly astonitihrnpr.andltii upb continued for a-flbort time chanircs the laninild, debilltatod, nerrelecs conditiou fco one of renewed life and TiKor. As we are constantly In receipt cf letters of Inquiry i-olative to thla remedy, we would cay to those who would proU-rt^' obtivlnltof UB, by rem,lttln(r $l a Becuroy neaUd paok-atfti oontalnlni: AO pUln, carefuliy coro-pounded, wai be Kintbyretirn raall from our private laboratory, or wi will fumleh � packafresi which vrlll oure mo3t ca&oa, for 8& Address or call on Kew England Medical Instituts. S4 Trenmnt Row, Boslou, Mutt. OopfriElit. Itet, bj r. B. f?'"" SEXUAL POWER PoflUlvcly and perinr.iieuriy rt-Ptornd iu li to 10 dnj-Bi effeclH �n 554 UoiU'fcit ulinu.st iinnmltnte relitil. l>o iiiiiiBtuiiiwg dniKti, luliiurulH, pills or poiBona, but tliO (UrUciouB SiUDXlCAX CONJCEOTIOK, coniiKiBed of triiits, herbs and ishmtB. The moftl POWKK-FOr. touio Imown. Rcetares tli5 Tlgor, Bunn and liealth of youth. Sealed book fr�e, ' ' fiUi parttculttTB. AddraaB fiim Wateo .Mc4. 0. bQxd61tfit.Loui4i^Qt     �ia^ injfU   

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