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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 16, 1890 - Page 26

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON SmOAT GLOBE-SIMDAT, NOVEMBER ,16, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. in-  '1,1. ^if^,,      "i I irf. r,, , , , HunMs Going to See Tliem. FREE FOR THREE MONTHS. All who -dslt the great English and Gentian X>octors uofore .T:in. 120 Mill receive sorpitrps free of sIiRTEO. All diseases and deformities treated. If Incurable they mtIU frnnWy tell you so. During tho past month 1023 visited Uio Doctors, and 683 �were reject�d as incnrahle. Go early, as their ofllcos Rre orOT^ded from morning until night. OFFICE, 612 TREMOHT ST., BOSTON. Hundreds Going to See Tliem, FREE FOR THREE MONTHS. COUPON. ThlB Coupon entitles tjio holder to ftdmtfislon, .* ; consultiitlon.oxamlnatton.advicoandallsurgicftl  . opcrfttions free of cluirco until .Tan. 20. All *  diseased and deformities treated. Hours 0 a. m. � . tb1.S0p.m. Sundays, 10 b. m. to 4 p. m. : :   Present this coupon to tho English and Gor-   man Dootora' OlBoo, 018 Treimont sU, Boston, . . between Canton and Dedham sta. ; ; P. S. This staff of dootora Is Incorporated by ; . an not of teglslaturo.                                  j PHETTY OiBL'S It T\-.is SI beaiitllHl sardon-a enrdon in which one misrlit alinost lose one's self flnianfr (he lieavy sweetness of tho blos-som-Ing syrinpa bushes and the avenues of pink vrygolia that -wound irregrularly hero and tliero. It was a July day. A girl lay idly in a wide luxurious hammook, her bright head on the soft tinted cushions, her deep brown eyes npraised to tho whisnerinf? leaves above, She looked tho ideal of hiippy content as she lay there in pretty laziness, one slim hand droopine: over the haminock's edge. A (rrcat Newfoundlimd dog lay on the grass beside lier, as she swayed gently to and fro, toying uiTectiouatoly with the dog-'a groat, noble dead. Sometimes ho would open hia almost human eyes .and loolc up at her silently, (rith a happy content that matched her own. It -.v.is very pleasant there. The book she !ia.: ���� , uc iUi-i v.iieii I 1. t'lce,  AVilma. that 1- itiiuorrow. He is iiiiu I'jdaj-, and Give the Bird Iiettuoo. AlthouBh rnort jieople give their birds lettuce, they generally cunsider it as a food, and not, as is rvally the case, a medicine. LuttU'e a^ts as a tonic for a bird, and pre-j vfii!--it i;citiii-,; its bloi.d too hot.  The bird j ou"iit to h:t^-e it %\heiie\ei' u is pos Ible to eel It for him.  Apiile.-. are very good for irdf, t'j'i. aii'i ri-I ;":-!--r, if given ucca-! sionaJl/, li i'ood for hrii'hitnini; their iduia- As tho festive season of turkey and chicken pie approaches the mind of the young housekooper is visibly perturbed. Perhaps this Is tho first Thanksgiving dinner she is to cook for Charley, and more likely than not Charley's father and maiden aunt, to say nothinit of half a dozen favorite cousins, have signified their Inten-tion of looldnp in .about dinner time, "just to soe how tho young people got along." The bride of last Juno is tho anxious woman of November. True, she has mastered the rudiments of cookery, but the experience w.as bitter, especially on Charley, �who had to oat up succesQes that caused dyspepsia, and failures which made him homesick. His little wife hag now learned that sal soda and saleratus are the same thiner. and that bisouita from which it is omitted won't rise. She has learned that gingerbread cannot be half-b.aked one day and/finished tho next. She has learned that while coffee should bpH-,, tea shouldn't. In fact, hor mind is packed -with domestic lore, and Charley foods daintily every day. But getting up a 'Ttianksgi-ving dinner for a number of criticising'friends-ah, that's entirely different. To begin with, If slio is a sensible little woman, she will not attempt too much. Naturally, lier first plana will be very aspiring. Thoy-will, begrin with consomme and end with black coffee and frozen pudding, witli any quantity of goodies between. But when she descends to consideration of details, she foils to see how she can get np an elaborate dinner and yet present the cheerful, neat appearance which Charley's wife should when his relatives are around. All Xlxoelleut Itinncr* which cannot fail to be appetizine: to any comp.any, and yet which presents f e-w difii-culties to the young housowlEe, is as follows; Oyster soap. KooBt tuikey, glhlot sauco. Chicken pie. Mashed potatoes.      Baked sweet potatoes. Turnips. Boiled onions.. Celery salad. Mlnoe pie. Queen of puddlnpts. Fruit. Coffee. Nuts. This menu looks rather elaborate, perhaps, but if it is studied one will see that nothing but tho vegetables, the soup and the turkey need be cooked on tho day; the rest can all be prepared tirao enough before to give the yotmg housekeeper leisure to rest. The first things to be mado are tho mince pies; Thoy improve with keeping. Tomorrow morning the young housekeeper should go to the market and select a. piece of beef --a piece off the neck. What is Called tho "first cut" should be avoided,- as it is too full of blood, but about throe pounds of the second or tlurd cut will be just right. Wiion she gets homo she must put this niece of meat on to cook, in hot water. Lot it gently simmer for at least live hours-say until after tho dinner dishes are done, if tho moat was bought just after breakfast. In tho early afternoon chop the moat, and when tho moat is nearly fine enough chop into it pared and cored apples, about one-third as much apple as meat I know most rocipo bookmakers order more apple, but your pios will not ba sufficiently rioii if any more is used. Tho reason the apple should not bo chopped with the meat from the bo-ginning is that such a process would reduce tho apple to pulp, it is so much softer than tho moat. Add to tho chopDod stuff about a cupful of tho liquor from the meat, and sufficient molasses (the cheap black variety is better tlian other for this purpose) to make it properly swoot to your taste. You must also salt it to taste, and stir m a grated nutmeg, throo tablespoonluls each of ground cinnamon and cloves, a toaspoonful of allspice and mace, and a little pepper. Tho next morning lino your plates with good pie crust, fill \vith mincemeat..and. before the top crust is put on stick about .t dozen largo raisins (not seeded) into the filling of each pie. Bako tho pios in a slow oven a long time. Three hours is none too long: if you want them Kltili uud 1'aotlisonie. The day before the groat event tho chicken pie should be mado and baked. Get a fowl that weighs about four and a half pounds. Chickens are thrown .away In chicken pies, so do not pay extra to get one, but secure a plump fowl instead. Have the butcher cut the fowl Into pieces, as for serving. He will do it "for nothing" if you ask him to. I-'utit into a stewpan of hot water, and lot it boll np; then remove it to where it will simmer one hour. Make a crust .as follows: Three cupfuls of sour milk, sweetened with salenttus (when yotu- milk foams i\ is swoot; put in saleratus until it foams). Salt this slightly, and nake into a hard dough with pastry flour. .ioU thickly enough to line the sides and jottomof tho dish your pie is to be baked n. Cut finely a few shreds of f iit salt pork, and stick around this crust. Ttiice up your chicken moat and arrange compactly m tho dish; let the gravy boil rapidly one-quarter of an hour, then poiu- this into the pio. Tho top crust should have a thin layer of butter rolled into it three times, then out an opening in tlio centre and put the crustover the chicken, previously salting and popner-ing the pio well, and laying shreds of pork-over the top. Put dabs of butter all over the top crust, and then lot the nio bako about an hour and a half in a moderate oven. The bottom crust may seem very plain, but tho gravy makes it very rich by cooking into it, and a sour milk crust is far more tender than any'made with lard can be. Tho chicken pie is, to be warmed before serving. After the pio Is disposed make your pud-din,-?. Put a quart of bread and stale cake crumbs on to iiwoll in throo pints of milk. Beat two ogg.i and halt a cup of sugar, and vom into the mi.xture. Put into a long dish, and balco a dolicato brown. If broai or cake is used as a ba.sis the pudding wil come from the oven of a jelly-like consistency. Crackers make a softer pudding, more Uko custard. WHOM It is Quito Colli, turn out of tho dish on to a platter and spread with a thick, even layer of red jelly. The jelly should bo warmed a little, so it will spread easily. On tho morrow, before it goes to the table, you will crown it witli a layer of frosting, the whites of two eggs beaten up with two cups of sugar. Powdered sugar makes the nicest frosting, butgrauulated will do if you have no other. The same day tho white and sweot potatoes sliould be washed-allow three potatoes to each person whom you expect to dine-: tho onions peeled before an open fire so the fumes may go up chiinnoy in.stead of into your eyes, the turnips wasiicd. Ope turnip to each guest will niako tho riijht quantity when mashed, and three onions. Then scrape and wash your celery, put it into cold water half an hour, wipe dry, and cut into cubes about half an mcli long. Arrange it on a tint dish, n-ith a border of the bleached leaves, and put aw-ay in cold place. .lust before it is served it is to be doused with mayoiinaisu. It is so much cheaper and easier to buy cream salad dressing ready made, nowadays, that I do not believe any young liousokieper would go to tho botliL-r of making it. It can be mado at homo, how~ ever, in this way: � Beat 2 eggs w-ell, add 3 tablespoonluls of �,'inegar, 1 of ct-eam, 1 teaspoonfiil of sugar, teaspooiiful eacii of mustard tuid salt. Place in a doulilo boiler and stir until like thici; cream. Ten minutes will do the job. It must, of course, he cooled before using. Arrange your fruit ready for serving and crack your nuts. Kcd-elieoked applog, oraiige.i. liaiianas, w-hite and puriile grapes are nm high at this timo of year. A jiretty war to .an-aiige fruit is to take a large flat salv-sr, on the botlinn place a layer of apples, altei-nating with baiianas-tho latti-rslid in '-.he narro-w way. Above this put a layer of oranges, and to top the pyramid pile your grape bunches in such a way that tho stems all come to,{etiior at the top. tastly, on llio "ttay Ueforc," pr one When the joints appear ready to separate fi-om the body. While tho turkey is cookingr set the heart, liver and gizzard on to ste-w in a pint of water. Stow until soft, then mash with a spoon, .Return to the water, into which stir a oouplo of tablospoonftils of floitr made smooth with cold water. When the bird oomos out of the.oven pour the giblet liquid into tho pan with the gravy in which the foul was basted; allow the whole to boil up once. If there is not gr.avy enough add more hot w.ater, Sweot potatoes should bake about three-quarters of ail hour. Onions should be cooked an hour and served, drained from water, well butterod. Turnips should boil half an hour, perhaps a little longer, and be ma.shed with butter and salt Half an hour is enough for Irish potatoes to boil. When they are done, drajn, peel, mnsh BRIMG np BABIES. Homely Lessons Few in Number and Simply Taught. Several "Dent's," and Otiier Little Everyday Hints to Mothers. The Difference Between a Telling and a Drying Baby. finely with a silver fori lighter than a vogotab" butter, salt and hot m k (a fork makes them e masher does), add Ik, to malco the mass of a pasty y ot airy oonsjstanoy. Your oyster soup may be a simply made affair-a quart of ooilinfir milk, into which turn a pint of oysters, half a cup of butter j salt and pepper to tasto. Boil about three minutes. Serve -with crackers, and remember to under rather than over season the soup, a.s some tastes may differ from your own, and salt may bo easily added but never subtracted. Your coif 00 had bettor bo the boiled kmd; it will bo blacker and easier for you to m.ako. Emse your pot with hot water, put in a largo tablespoonful of coffee for each cup, and let it boil, with a very small quantity of water, for IC minutes. Fill the pot with hot water, and set on the back of tho stovo until wanted. Tho small quantity of water fii-st poured on the oofleo must bo boiling. Such a dinner as this it Is not hoyond the powers of any young housekeeper to prepare unaided. If she feels unequal to quite such an elaborate menu, let her cut oU the soup or the salad, and bear in mind that it is not so much variety as perfect cooking and serving that goes to make up the ideal Thanksgiving dinner.    Edith Miniteu. WIZARD OF THE CUE. Boston's Boy Billiard Wonder-Frank Sti-anahan's Power Admitted by. Leading Experts-Artists are Born. ; Billlardists, like poets, are born, notmade. There is an indefinable something which makes the delicate touch, the accurate calculation and the proper force easy to him that may become an expert player. Years of practice will not produce it, and what to one is pleasure is labor to another. In this strange power Jake Schaofer leads the world. To him it is as natural to play billiards as it is for a duek to swim. It is no effort of calculation for him to know where the b.alls will roll with a certain ariiount of force; it is intuitive in him. That masterly, delicate toucli; that wonderful nerve power and power of judgment, developed as it lists been by years of practice, was latent before ho ever saw a cue, and the samo amount of study and ajiplication would not have raised tho majority of players above mediocrity. This is also seen in tho Chicago "boy wonder," Frank Ives. This rlsin/j yoimg star is a natural jilayor, and as distinet from the forced bilhardist <13 the sun is to the moon. In Ives tlie instinct is wonderfully strong, and those who saw him on his last visit to Boston will remembor his grand manipulation of tho ivories, ospociiilly those who saw him hande them on the rail. Ives more nearly resomblos tho champion in style than any other player, andoxcent that he has not got tho iron norvo,,of the "old timer," ho is oho of the leading' exponent of tho science of billiard playinp in the world. It is this artistic instinct, inliorltanco, or whatever it may bo called, that makes the leaders in all branches of tho display of nerve force, for that is what billiards is. It is a powerful drain on tho brain posvor, and sometimes on muscular energy. One of tho most natural hilliardists Boston has seen in a very long tinio is the subject of this sketch, Frank' Stranahan, son of tho proprietor of the Treniont House. 'This lad, just entered on his teens, is today tlio superior of the majority of amateur billiard players in Boston, has run 100 at the three-ball game, has fow superiors among the amateurs of tlio country, and no equal at his age. Ho is going to school, and during hia leisure moments started playing with his father. Supt. Gilman saw the natural brilliancy of tho boy's stroke and encouraged hini by giving him a few lessons. Tho material was tliero to work on and soon the lad developed into a strong, open player. Ills ability to nurse tho balls on the rail is rapidly gaiiiing and when ho has a little more practice ho -ivill bo a flrst.-r.ato amatoiir. A few weeks ago he was in Now York and had an opportunity to show bis skill before good judges who pronounced him a wonder and the 'champion boy plaj'cr of tho ooim-trv." Jake Schaefer and Frank Ives both have played with him and the cue that the boy uses was tho gift of tho chamrion. "KOBS"  AND   "SWELLS." McAllister Explains to a New York Herald Eeporter. By tho way, another criticism against mo is because I use the words "noiis" and "swells," .and try to deliiio tho diiVerenco. They say tlieso words are vulgar and are never used liy well-bred peoiile in England. All I have to say in my deleiice is that I first Iieard the wurils useil by a lady of unquestioned rernicment, one of the most distinguished woiiii'u ill this city, iSlie was a daii;,'liter ot  ; luor^-to do With liiiu. lit. therefore vauii.-i his prcti-nts. HE distribution of children and ftioney seoms to have bpen conducted in this world -with equal pie-headednoss. ' Many -who want money and would use it wisely neVor get any, while those who have it In abundance either find it a bore or put in their timo yearning for sonio other blessing to cjo along with the riches. Children seem to be given out in the same stylo, Whcro thoy are wanted tboj' don't come, and where they are not desired or particularly tyell cared for they arrive annutilly. It's lucky that everybody doesn't have children, because as it is the number of misplaced babies is enormous. People think it's very easy to bring up children untU they try it.; Old.' maid's daughters are as proverbially perfect as aire old bachelor's sons, I was in a friend's Mtohen once on baking day. Hor two small boys were spatting dough cakes on the table, their high chairs fau:ly lost in tho oceans of flour they had spilled on the floor. "When I was a girl at home and used to see my stepmother allowing my half brothers to play with douffh on baiting day t always vowed my ohildron neveF should do anything of the sort," .-said she. "Now look-attheml" Some people seem to think that the mere fact of being a mother teaches a woman how to govern, control, instruct, bring up her child. If this was only so there would be scores of perfect mothers, instead of one or two in every town. Tho truth is, because a woman happens to have a child she is not necessarily better fitted to take care of it than she wonld be able tp play a piano merely because there was' one in the house. "Mother instinct" sounds well; but it generally teaches a mother to feed her baby on mince pie anil pickles if it cries for them. A woman must go outside of herself to learn to take care of her children. -Would You Xilko to Manaffo this child?" tho mother of a screaming boy inquired of a young married woman. "Well, I think ' I could," was the frank reply, "if I begin early enough. I wouldn't care to take him now." That's the whole gist of the matter. You must begin early enough. Don't think you can give baby its own way until it is a year old and then start in to teach it obedience. Don't cro3.9 your children in every point, but insist on implicit obedience in the few things where your judgment ought to rule. Don't be lilco the woman who gave her first baby everything ho yelled for at the table but insisted on his wearing heavy starohod skirts and scratchy, head heating caps all the time, because he "looked so cunning" in them. Give the child its own way in posture, times of eating, and times of sleeping. If baby wants to lie on his stomach; or curl up in a ball, let him; if ho gets hungry a little before meal timo, food 14m; don't be as cranky as tho old woman who was fotmd crying because of hunger. "Why don't you eat somothing?" the people asked. "I oan't," was tho sad reply. "It isn't moal timo." The state of tho weather, the state of his health, a thousand things may occur to make baby hungry sooner than he should be, by your rule, and when he is hungry you are cruel if you don't let him eat. Lot livm have Ids own way in sleeping, also. Don't dose him with paregorio if he won't go to sleep tho particular eveningyou have set- for -visiting the theatre. What with all tho published accounts of horrors caused by soothing syrups, one would think tho day of dosing babios to their ruin should lie past, but it isn't. Only yesterday I heard of � young mother who buys hor paregoric bottles by the dozen at tho village store, booauso she gets them clioapor. And I know a woman who had one child wakened out of A SootlilMisr Syi'up Caused Sy-ncops to a life of idiocy, and who has buried half a dozen bright babies down in the family lot at the cemetery, yot she buys tho deadly syrup for hor last born little one-the end is not yet, U your child cries, don't run to tho paregorio bottlo. Yelling seldom hurts a child; it only strengthens the lungs, while drugging kills tho brain. If possible, I tiiink it is a good thing not to food children at the tablo until they aro 4 or 5 years old. If they sit down with adults thoy see the rich meats, plea'and cakes wliich their elders eat: naturally thoy want tho samo, and there is a circus if thov don't get it. If tlio mother is woak-iuiuded, baby will fill his sloniaoli up with coffee, tarts, doughnuts and ha,sh, to tho detriment of both mind and body, If tho mother is firm in denying the child, it will not eat the rich stuff, but aggravation of seeing what it -wants and can't havo will som- its temper. This is what I saw fed to a year-old baby one day. On awaking tlie child was hungry, BO its mother handed it a ginger cake, some of which went in tho month and a ^ood deal more went outside. At tiio breakfast table baby appeared. Ho drank from mamma's colVeo cup, licked tho butter off a piece of bread and swallowed bits of evory one's boef-Bte-ak. Soon after he bumped his noso, and was allowed to nurse a littlo to stop his woop.ing-only a little, for an effort was being made to wean him, Then came a dougnuut, gnawed at during tho forenoon. This, with a cup of milk, Kept him up till dinner time,, when lie swallowed soup,, meat, notato, mince pie ami lumps of sugar from the sugar bowl. After dinner lio had tho hicooufjTis and wont to sleep. Ho woke up with his face fliisliod, and cried until pacified by some peppermint candy. Ke-lays ot btma, gingerbread and milk lasted until tea. This really meant tea to the baby, with hot biseuit, cake-from which lie pulled the plums, and sucked tho frosting-and blackberry jam, of which he ate so much tliat iiis mother was forced toremarlc: "I know well enough it'll make liim sicic, but I can give him some castoria. So Ho'll bo All KKjUt." During the evening guests earao in, and cider was passed around, of wliioli baby had his sliaro from proud papti's glass. The Bi\ests had como supplied witli candy for tlio cliild, and altogether tliero w.as need for tho medicine by bed limo. 'That he diii not 
                            

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