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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 16, 1890 - Page 23

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON S :Y; ;Gt0BE~--SUKDAT, / 'NOY^ 16, I S90~-TWENT�^BIGHT PAGES/ 23 CLUB 11 Sketch of Working Girls' Societies. What tlio Clul)s In and About Boston ,Are Mng. "Par and Uear" the New Ohi\) Organ -Meetings to Oomo, ^ews intended for (Ms colvmn sltmdd ha emit to the editor before Friday moriiing.- JlCA-N KlNCAlU.] It haa long lioon a reproach to worn on that thoy wuro luokiiis in tho spirit of comradeship possossod in so marked a degree by men, that thoy were not loyal to each other, and thuraloro that nothing: of Uny moment could over bo accomplished by thembcoauao they could not work tosotlier, But this reproach ia heine taken nway. Women have discovovocl that they can work toBether.ithat it is both pleasant and profitable so to do. From church and charitable work to social and literary pursuits was an easy transition, and business , and politics, work and play of all sorts fol lowed soon alter. So that now if a woman takes it into her head to do a certain thing-, from learning how to cook or play whist to founding an orphan asylum, she poos and gathers together half a dozen other women who are lUcdflnlnded with herself, and thoy work together till the thing is done. One of the most useful as well as tho most � Interesting developments of this "club Idea" among women is the formation of the numerous Working drls' clubs and societies, which have sprung up like magic among us within the past two or throe years. There are a dozen of those elubs in Boston and its vicinity today, each club a member of tho general "Boston Association pi'Working GiiTs'Clnbs." Tho work done by these olubsis enormous in quantity and most excellent in quality. Thoy are unions for social, literary and business purposes. They maintain oluhrooms, have courses of entertainments and hold an interesting annual public meeting. They assist each other in evei-y way, in sickness and in health, in prosperity and in adversity. They baud together for outing and vacation purposes, establishing country and seaside homes on the co-operative plan; thoy have classes for instruction of all sorts to promote mental and industrial improvement; in short, they do so many things, and do them so well, that other women, ex- � pcrienoed in club work and knowing how pauoh effort success along these lines in-rolvea, are amazed at the results achieved. May not one reason for this lie in the fact >hat all of tl ese club members are more or less trained n business habits, and under-itand the va ue of promptness and despatch �8 wall as thorougluioss of work in whatever 13 undertaken. The general association has a board ot fljreotrossea, composed of ono member from Baoh club in the association, oflicered by a presiding directress and secretary chosen from among the number. The present board of directresses includes Miss Edith M.. Howes, presiding directress, 'Working Girls' Dlub. 401 Sliawmut av.; Miiss Jane H, Newell, No. Bennot Street Club; Mrs. F. W. G. May. Girls'Social Club of Roxbury; Miss Amelia B. Owen, Friendly Association of Boston; Miss Helen Peabody, Girls' Club of Cambridge; Miss Rose Howard, Girls' Club o[ Brookline; Mrs. F. S. Punbar, Ready-Hand Association of Canton; Mi.5s Cliar-lotte Ellis, �Working, Girls' Club, Jamaica Plain I Miss Frances I-Iayward, Boston Band of Working Girls; Miss Marianne Paine, Fraternity Clvib of Boston; Mis. W. D. Boarduian, Amaranth Working Girls' Club ot Boxbury; Miss KUen Mason, Working Girls' Club of Newport; Miss O. M. B .Rowo, Booretaiy. _ I North Bennet Street Club. Tho North Bennet Street Club numbers over 70 members, the cost of membership being one dollar a year. Every girl must come at least twice to the club before giving in her name to be voted upon as a member. Many of its members avail themselves of the privilege of joining the classes in cooking, dressmaking and gymnasium worfc, which are carried on in the Industrial buildinp on North Bennet St., whore tho club has its room. The club has a Holiday House at Laconia, whore board is reduced by co-operation to three dollars a week. This club believes in social entertainments and indulges in tea parties, to 3no of wliist mothers wore iuviiod, and a Sancing party on St. Valentino's day last leason when young men friends showed the lospitality of club members. 40 couples being present, beside other friends of tho dancing, games for tho children, and a irenerous collation. At tho close of tho evening, tho tree, which was bountifully ladtsn witli qhoico things, 5vas stripped of Uslruitfor the lienofit of all, The onjoy-nient.pf the children was a grcftfc plooauro to see: and if their faces reflcotod tho happy thoughtswithin, it amply repaid tho kind and generous lioar.ts that carried out the excellent entertainment. Amaranth Club. The Amaranth Club has throe rooms on tho lower floor .it tho coi-iinr of Gardner and Roxbury sts, near tho la Ivoad crossing, and near also the varicjua factories of this region- Prang's, Fiedler's, carpet factory, etc. It was organized Fob. 17, 1300, witii sovon iiiombers. In about throe months it had a, mciuberahip of 80, and it has been mcrcas-iiiP! over since. Glas.ses were formed iuime-di.atelv. An enthusiastic comirattoo of Roxbury ladies turnishori tho rooms, and arranged the multifarious details o� those many branches of instruction, while youiiffor ladies helped teo social elomonl, wiping nut by thoir own graciousness and cordiality any class distinctions among momhors of tho club. They formed with the girls a hospitality oom mi ttoe of la members, who take turns in introducing any newcomers and in furthering social pleasures, Otio evening in tho week is given to music, games and conversation. All nl.nn togothor (or little receptions and entortam-ments. Tho members are from an oxcol-leiil; class ot working girls, liiiidly, intolli-pent .and appreciative, i'hey wish much to become, as a club, i-elC-supportim;. Two small rooms servo for kitclion and class-room; tbo larger, a room of goncrous size, has freshly-papered walls, and inakos ,au attractive parlor, with piano, bright lights, pictures, curtains, a bookcase, a library of 100 volumes, sottoos, chairs anil all necessary appliances. The girls find this a pleasant refuge after the long day's din at the factory; entering pale and tired, thoy go lionie with a happy "Good night all," or "I've had a splendid time," or "Pm taking this muffin and this fishball to show my metier; she'll be delighted to think I can mace them." Some rejoice oyer a bit of embroidery, and some over a iiewly-trimmod hat or wcH-fitting dress, just aolilevod. Girls' Club of Brookline. The rent and care of the rooms of tho Brookline Girls' Club has been paid by the Friendly Society of Brookline; but tho club is very anxious to become self-supporting, and to that end established a system of yearly dues, small fees for tho classes, an admission foe ot 2E cents and flues for unexciisod absences. These small sums being ditlioult to collect or remember, all were linally commuted in tho yearly fee of $1. The cluVi numbers only about 40 members, but attendance is regular, and the club is gaining constantly in every way, "oBPocially in the understanding of the word co-operative," says thesBorotary. . Cambridge Girls' Oliib. The Cambridge Girls' Club has quarters in tho Social Union building, where they have two large airy rooms, two classrooms and a parlor, with a kitchen in tho basement. AH these rooms are very pleasantly furnished, in part by gifts, in part by purchase. The classes include dressmaking, cooking, millinery, embroidery, literature, singing and history. A general mooting is hold onco a month, when new members aro elected and other business transacted, ending with an entertainment, sometimes in the club's own rooms, sometimes at theatricals in Social Union Hall. Tills wccic WO Offer 3 6pedal\ij gains 111 Spool Cotton, Sllh, etc.? \ 500 yard Spool Cotton, [c.\ spool. Never sold less tliaii 5c. 3 SPECIAL BARGAINS -xs- Blach Scuing Silk, Jc. a Xcver sold less than 5c. Button Hole Twist, spoois.__ 7c. dozen Above goods were bouglit of tlio Assignees of Searcy, Foster  .Sc. apallt DoBoendants of the Sturdy" Men Who Hewed a Way to Liberty. Ready Hand Assoolotion of Canton. The Ready Hand Assooiation has over 100 members, and reports very successful classes and meetings. With a small gift of $12 tliechih-was self-surporting last year, and hopes to bo entirely so this season. A savings society and a circle of King's Daughters are among the outgrowths of the club, now in its third year. club. Interesting talks on health and care of the sick aro given before the club, and the seventh ward system of savings has been adoiitod. Working Oirla* Club of Dudley Street, Eoxbury. This club was formed in February, 1887, opening with 21 member.i, and has increased in members and importance ever since. Tho monthly business meeting discusses affairs of the club freely, and settlos many ot them as a body in true democratic fashion. The club is worldng hard to become entirely independent and self-sunport-Inir. The annual fee is 7C cents. TheLend-a-IIand Cluh, an organization within the other society has helped others, especially Eoor children for whom Christmas trees ave been prepared. At tho outset there was a great demand for amusement in this club, but not more than one entertainment aweokisnow desired, and tho host attent -ance is on class evenings. Classes in mending, ombroiderv, singing, gij'miinsium work, mfllinery and dressmaking aro maintained. The membership of the club is now about 60. Shawmut Avenue "Working Girls' Club. The Shawmut Avenue Working Girls' Club has n membership of over 200, and maintains pleasant club rooms at 401 on that street. Glasses in dressni.nking, cooking, millinery, writing, singing, embroidery, etc., prosper. Tho King's Daugliters of this club have been not only loyal mom hern, but have gone outside to visit the hoiiios for aged people in the city, giving them an evening's entertiiinmont of music, rocit.a-tions, etc. A junior club ot boys :ind girls between the ages ot 10 and 14 mcwts once a week to be taught music, gymnastics, etc. A relief fund aids members m sickness by the payment of .S;i per week. Practical t.allcson"U8Bof Alcohol," "PublicOpinimi," "Tho best things to ont nnd drink," "Is it right to buy a lottery tiolcet," find tho like have given dub members topics to think about. Dr. M;iry Hobart attendu tho club one evening each week, freely i;iving her services to any one in need. The Co-operative Homo for Working Girls, oocuDj'ing the rooms at 401 .Slinwmut av. not used by the club, is still au experiment, but promises we)!. �Jamaica Plain Working airla' Club. This club is just entering its second year of worlc. It meets in a large, bright hall in the centre of the town which is made homelike by its furnishings, the cinbroom being open tour evenings of the week. The fee is 1 a year, and the usual classes are successfully maintained. The membership is about 7a. _ S'ewport   Working Girls' Club. This club dates back to the winter of 1884-5 for its start. At first it was exclusively managed by tho teachers, but lost season it adopted the plan of solf-govorii-ment and self-support. The membership is about 80. There are smaller aooietios, "Helping Hand," etc., formed within its circle, and the usual classes are maintained. "Far The Friendly Assooiatea. The Friendly Associates org.inizod Jan. 1, 1880, with 10 members, and has largely increased since then, till now it numbers over a hundred, The club meets in Parker Memorial building, and has thetiso on Saturday evening of its well-equipped gymnasium. Weekly practice in chorus singing has been a I'eanire of this club's work, Tuesday evening is devoted to social enjoyment, and tho usual cliistits have liecii opeiiei . Tho club foe is 10 cunts a mcutli or one dollar a year whiMi paid in adviince, with an extra charge for classes which iuvolve expense. _ Girls' Fraternity Club. ThoGli'ls' Fratoniity Club was org.inixod in Ootohor, IS.SH, nni! lioru at first the name of the "First Ohurcli Girls' Club," holdirig its meetings in �\V:ureii rSdeet chape). Classes were formed at the outset in embroidery, millinery, conldng, gymnastic exercises, and tho Floyd system of wood carving. It has a nifinlicrsiiii) of about 100 .at present, and hit-; nii't in llic Pufker Memorial hiiildiiiK- siiK^e j\n\fmhtT. 188:). when its name WHS clianireil. (,)jie evening a week is givtu to gauies and dancing. and irear"-Tlie Worlrinp: Girls' � Club Organ. The Working Girls' Clubs of tho land, of which there are now hundreds, numbering their members by thousands, decided at their big convention in A^ow York last spring that they needed a paper of their own, an "organ" for their societies. The matter was put into tho hands of an able committee, and the result is tlie first number, just out, of "Far and Near," a monthly journal of handsome appearance, devoted to the interests of working girls' clubs. As was announciiU in this column some time ago, tho editor of this journal is Maria Bowcn Chapin of Now York, witli JMiss 0. M. E. Rowe of tho Boston association and Miss Emily M, Morgan of Hartford as associates. ' First numbers" are generally disappointing, but this handsome paper of 16 large, double-columned pa^es, more than fulfils the high exnootations which the well-known talent of its editors and managers had raised. I have marked paragraplia for quotation on every page, but must be content today with a briet enumeration of some of the good things to be found there. Far and Near "makes its bow-no, its cur-tesy," in a ainonilarly simple and sensible fashion, shows that necessity is its reason for being, .and goes at once about tlio work m hand. Beside the able editorials there is an excellent article on "Responsibilities of Membership in a Society," by Miss Grace H. Dodge, the founder of working girls' clubs; a plain ta! c on good breeding by Marion Harland: a t escriptiou of tlio vacation house of the Hoston clubs at Princeton, by M. Joscijliino Allen; a biographical sketch ot Lucy Larcom; a clover story by Sarah Orn Jcivett; a helpful story on co-operativo housekeeping by Miss Anna BiiiTows of Boston; and Homo ciipital  . Tin limv^iv is w tU r-tn(.!;(j(l willi the h'jst reading iiiiiiter, iniinb. rs lifini,' entitled to lake fnuii it riio iiunl; lit a tiuK'. A bank <'neuiii;i'.;f'S li;ii-it,s (t: pruiU'iici) iiiid cc0i10u13'. All V, o.'liiiit,- 1,'n N dt i,' 'fii '.�liiiriio ter are wch.'iinu'ti. Aviiliinit 'listiiu-tiiiii of rii'io or <.'r'-'<'ii, riu- jLiiiiis inr llit^ fiu])pnri of t'tu^ club iiuviuit ItCi-ii lai.snd by frleiul.-^ in Ivimc's  n'-' of t)n^ mM>-t dti ulittiil c-, (Tiiii;:s ill tlu^ liistory of the club w;is tlic Mnudny of CliriMiiius week last swisoii. Eacli iiumbe'r w.is in viled to bring, on this odoa-^ion. a little girl or boy to whom the sight nf a real Christ-mas tree would be a novelty and pleasunt surprise. The uvcmng vixm Ejieut ia stuginif. Minnie Palmer's Conservative Viev7 of a Mooted Q,ueBtion. "Kissing iii:iy have to go," said Minnie Palmer to a 'World reporter, "and perhaps it should, for v.-hen I see a pretty little one ki.ssed by a m;in who lia.s just returned from seeing ills friend around the corner Inity it. I know what it is to get a stage kiss from one of this class, and I Icuow tho difference between it aud tlie loving home kiss; but stage kisses will not 'go' as long as the world lasts and men and women lovo. "A kiss on the stage is often, as you kno-n, adramalic cliiii:ix. If love h,a.s not run as Kiin'Olhly as two Iovits would wish during a pliiy, a id.ss :is the curtain fallssuggcsts to the audience tlio life ot wedded love that is toi'oll'iw. It is too important'bu.sineas'to be liriniKlied. "P.M-iiaii'-,, like everything else, the world has overdone Itissmg. But instead of bau-iKliing tiio ki.ss allcigetljcr, liid people be more cart-lul wln-n they iiidiilgo ui it. I don't liktf to kis< unme pi-ojile. tmd won't, cspeciiillv ilio.'C v.hofat cloves, but I love to l;issii jireity, chubliy child and those I love. The kiss actual will bu indiilyeii in, however much the doetor.s may frown upon it."  Eleven Orders for Women. There aro in oxistenco at present 31 orders f.ir women. Tho oldest is the Ausirian Star Cross Order, instituted liy the wifoot Ferdinand IL The Shah of Persia iustitutcd a lady's order in 187.'J, and tlia .Sultan of Turkey one in 1880. Sjiain claims tlie distinction of liaving tlie larget.t iiiimber ot order.H, but .Spiiin eiuiii.it eoiii-I'lire with Prussia as regards combinations and classilicalioiis. No WEi.ii regulated household should bo without Augostm-a Bitters, the celebrated appetizer. See the bargains in real estate oanuce 13. Among the oldest residences in Exeter and in llockingham county, N. H., is the Lcavitt house, for 80 years tlie home of Samuel W. Leavitt, who is still living. It is .situated about a milefrom the centre of tho town on tho Plains. It is a large two-storied mansion with spacious rooms, a front porcli and a lean-to in the rear. The timbers are vorj- heavy aud mostly ot oak. The principal rooms below and above aro ceiled about the doors and fireplaces with pine, such finish being tinted agreeably to tho ancient style of carpentry. Lilce most of the provincial houses it Btands on the north side of the road (Front St.), and faces tho soutli so accurately tliat when the sun reaches the meridian, it casts no shadow to tho c,a,st or west, and there is small iioc^d at tliat liour of tlie tall ancestral clock whick still ticks behind the door. Heirlooms are plenty; a sword worn in tho revolutionary war by Maj. Pearson, asjiiin-iiiug-wli-col, two linen wheels, a waiter marked 17:^0, and a ci.idle in which have been rocked eight generations, inhabit the roomy old garret. A jiickknife was found in iho house a Jew weeks iigo, wliich must have been made prior to 1700, as the blade is part steel and part Iron, tins bciing tliomalceof tlio IStii century, when cast steel was scarce end dtar. The Leavitt mansion was built some-u'hero near the year 1740 by Major Pearson of revolutiouary fame, and he sold it to Jeremiah Leavitt, tho grimdfatlier of tho present proprietor, in 1777. It was tiien in use as a tavern, for wliicli purjiose it was built, .and was kuowu as a tavern until the yearlB;;i). During tlie war of tho revolution, situated as it was on tlio iiiain road from tho prov since, nearly 200 yttirs. Ble was twice married. His first witeldiod Uotwoou 1600 and 16G2, when ho mjried Dorothy D.alton, widow of Ph lemoi Diilt in. His children were Henry, Thomal, Job t and Sariih, He was selectman in 1013,16 Ifi aud 1G71. Mr. Dearborn's posority is very numerous in New Hampsliiro. Maj. Sen. Henry Dearborn, secretary of wir mu er Jollorson, was one of his dcsoondanlg. Henry, eldest son �f G jdfroy Dearborn, born in E.xoter, Eng.,bam 116 America with hisjiarents, and prob^ly ottled with them (vt Exeter, N. H., movng hence to Hampton Nov. 10, 1666, !wl are he married Elizabeth Marri.an. Ee ' 'as selectman in 1670-92. i His ohildron were Join Abigail. Samuel, Elizabeth,Sarah,Elizalot (3)andHenrv.. John Doarboin, son of Godfrey, born in 1642 in Exeter, N. H. larried, Oct. 12, 167'2Jtlary, daughter o'.T omas Ward. She died Dec. 14,17'.iC, agoil 'i!. Mr. Dearborn was soloctniau in 16(14; Ms name is not found on Wearo's potitiw although ho contributed �.1 Gs. towardi lelraying the expense of Mr. Woare ii; doing to England. He died Nov. 14,1713; jUs cliildren were John. Thomas and Mary Thomas Dearborn, son ot Godfrey, had granted him 80 acres. Math 13,1070. He was one of tho seleotiiicii in 107fi, 1678, 16SI3. Ho was ono of thd^iors to Wearo's petition. Nov. 1,1000, lio|was choson deacon. Ho was twice mai ed. first to Hannah, daughter of EdwaitiColcord, Oct. 28, 1605. Of this union the [(lowing children were born; Samuel, Ebore or, Thomas and Jonathan. Deacon Deaibrn married for his second wife, Huldah. 3 lighter of Joliii Smith, Jan. 2,1701. Josoph Freoso Dearborn randson of God-froy Dearborn, was borrln tho old Dearborn homestead in Hamilin, N. H., Oct. 0, 1710. He married Sarahfliorhurno March 20, 1735. Ho died July;. 17C2. One ot his children was ,7osiah Diirborn, born Jan. tho family ever men treat tho women very well, thero la nothing whioli will make ihoSe who havo come to lihom abandon them. Inasmuch, too, as those woman learn to dislike white men, thero is no way of securing evidence against them wliich would convict them of being disorderly oliaractors. So far as tho Chinamen aro concerned, thoy will never betray them. It IS estimated that fully 150 white women live in Chinatown. REDFERN MODELS. Nkw Tobk, Nov. 15.-Tha girt of tho period wna so bountifully provided for 'tn way ot cliaraotoristio costumes for each of hor sumnior amusements that she has become oxigeanto, and is not content with herh.alland opera toilottos, her dinner, reception and street costumes, hor hsibit and hunting, rig, aud hor various house negliges, but she must also havo hor sleighing, toboganning and skating tpgs. And each ono must be original and striking, aud calculated to sot olf to tho utmost all her charms of figm^e aud face. It may bp argued that it ia rather early days to be providing for diveraions which tho weather may prohibit during tlie whole season; but it seems to bo tho general opinion tliat this is to be a severe wiiitdr, ft regular old-timor, and that the lovers of snow and ioo will h.ivo all thoy want, aud more, too, botweon now and next April. At least so soonis to say all this array ot fiu'aud foathors and tliiok woolly fabrios which crowd tho shop counters nnd find eager piU'Chasors cacli day. So, wo may take for granted that tho skater will liavo her ice frolic, and now tlio auostion is. What shall .sho wear when aho starts out for lake or river? TO But, Better Still, How Daisy LIflngston Brown, a Washington Girl, Got Out of It. LEAVITT nOtJSE, B^KTER, N. H. 11,1738. and died SeptJlG, 1814, aged 77. His wife was Sarah FrtBse, who was born Dec, 18, 1737, and diedSopt. 7.1828 aged 90 yotirs aud 0 month/, 'fheir children wore John, Josoph F., Jojiah, Sarah, Samuel, Anna, SamueUz),Mollei;,FrocRe and Anna, (2). All of whom were (horn between 17C8 and 3 780. on the old licmcfitead. Joseph Freose (2), son'of Jo.iiah Doarbom, wasbornJunoll, 1761 and died Nov. 13, 1827. Ono of his cliillien was Simon N., who maiTiod Hannali Towlo, and had chil-idren, (]J, Sarah Ann, ivil'e of David Mars-iton, of Hampton; (2), John; (3), Simon; (4), .....r of Hampton iirriod Josoidi ........._...........J, Ahigail.wilo of Adna Lane, of Haiiijilou. Mr. Ilcjirliorn kvas ii farmer by occupation, and a Whig in jiolitics. 1 John Dearborn, oldest son of Simon N. Dearborn,.and tho eighth in descent frem 'jodtrey Dearborn, was born in Hampton, Ml tho old Dearborn farm, ivhoro lie always 'esidud, and which has boon handed doivn jroin generation to generation, Sept. 2,1810. 10 died Nov. 14,1880. ' Ho married Lydia. daughter of Sanborn tntcheldcr and Mary Ellcins, October. IH.'iH. Irs. Dearborn, who is now living on the old jlace, is a descendant of Rev. Stephen Jatchelder, first minisier of Hampton, .'iiiii vas horn in Hampton, Jlay 22,1811. Tlieir qildren aro Orin M., born March 15, 1841, aid Mary Anna, wile of Hany S. Clark, sou o Hon. Daniel Clark of Manchester, N. If. A i)ortioji of tho Doarho.'irii house was bSlt by Godfrey Dearborn about 104C, and nnv is in a good state of preservation. Tho iitiu part ot tho house renisiirs tho same as wien first built, with tho old squ.iro beams rmning across tho ceilings. An L has been adod, and tho huge chimney replaced by a smllcr ono. Tith Mrs. Dearborn resides lier gi-andson, Frnk Clark, son of Mrs. Mary Dearborn Chrk, so that the old house now shelters thaoth generation of its original builder amowner.___ KICK AGAIKST GARTEBS. How ia Tills ! Horoisoneinmignonotto greeu,braldod in dark green and stool cords and braid, and trimmed with bauds ot grebolot. Tho coat bodice has gretJn plush sleeves, witli braided cuff headed by a fm' hand. Tlio pocket flaps and upper part of tho bodico are heavily braided, and tho fastenings aro straps and steel buttons. nnii three large barns fuil of hay and grain. Fifty oxen could he "tied up" for t!ie night if oceasioii required, which would frequently happen in the days when Exeter men liuilt shiiis nnd the town was a market lor 30 miles aiound. About 75 rods above the mausiou Jlr. Leavitt owned a house, originally the first skeb.\. Wo Old World Beauties. Tho English people, and particularly English women, aro greatly disturbed tit the statement recently ' iln by an American writer that there iu-c very few iiretty girls in Europe. This writer recently made an extensive tourin the old world, ami in writing of his experiences, made the daring and positive assertion tliat "ono .seldom sees a protty girl in Europe, and if one does she is sure to he an American." He furth.ir cruelly declared that the only pretty girls in Em.'land were the chainher-maids at the Irotels. Tliese statements, par-ticulurly the latti^r tme, were widely circulated, and nvokod great indignation and warm denials, but withul they ha,ve ctrafjcd . .-----,------,----, .....-- ----- Boiiin discussion in Uindon as ift.whetlicr ' be. A caiaMrophe seemed impending, beauty is really cu tho decline in Eilglajid.     "Daisy, do you understand partial pay^ _ j g(____^ ............ _.....______._____________ i tlioVighti ".ioiin df.ar, it woiild be asm--priso to you." Jolm rose six feet. "Daisy, havo I over in our lives rofusod you anything. Haven't I humored all of your whims and caprices, mado you ciueou ot our homo and mysolf ? I will not, cannot, allow niv ono little sistor to go into a public ollico; npt one day's work sliall slio do for tho governuiont while I live. Slio may pout, and cry, and scold, and coax: like Josiah Allen, I will stand firm this once.' "Butdcar John"-and Daisy hangs to his arm as thoy promenade the parlor briskly- "evervhody is in tlie ceii.sua." "That's the devil of it! Women with luishaiuls and we.ll-to-do fathers, crowding into tluisc rooms when only dependent ones sliould lie .-illowcd there! 'Dioro are plenty wlio iioed tho i;i!ace8 and thonionoy. It enrages uio, Daisy! You, you scrap of a girl, working froui i) till 4, like a factory drudge, wliilo I havo lieailli and work. You atitonisli mo, cliild!" After doiivuriiig tliis speech John expected to see Daisy woeji and wail, but ratlier than "iloodsotblindmgtears," which always "(lowed" from tlie eyes ot his fair heroine in print, his "Kcriip" said coolly; ".John, did I ever refuse you anything? Haven't I always stayed by you and given up all tiio scrapes and larks and good times in vacation to mako you happy? And haven't I tended you, dear, when that old held was used up with the stretchod-out imagination work'/ Say John!" The sevi'rily ot tlio fiown relaxed a bit, aud Daisy pulled down tho big, shaggy head and bruslied his face with hci-lips. "Vos, Dai, ro .John's friend had time to speak oT"the vision of beauty" John's �y(� wcroli.ved uiion liissister. They oinittod fl.asiics of lightning! With two long .strides ho ronehed llm door. The elevator boy folt suro some poor ove.r-worked enumerator had lost his mind, aud pitituUv wliizzed him down to tlio lower ilonr. Jolin's emotions were rare and confusing. Fiction was outdone! Dinner was late, and John was very late. Daisy waited two hours. Ollico chweil at-4. "Wliy feel uiicomfoitahle nhnul tlihs first dinner after tho joy of Jolin's return?' It wouldn't lake long to loll him. Beside, who's afraid ot good old JoiinV" Jolin contemplated tho sulijeet in all its beariugs and decided to give liis sister a oliaiico, at least, to ho truthful, iio thoy sat face to fneo at the ensy table. .Separated only bv the scarlet tiowers in tliiilow glass howl, as they rested on the pretty centrepiece of white. Daisy liiid suMmio faitli in fierselt. She ^aid.ca^ele.^flly, "John, what do vou want tor Christmas?" "Nothing." "Don't be a bear. Tell nio how much i ouglit to spend on yon." Daisy's eyOs trembled. .Slin arose and marclied around ills chair, laid SlOO beside his plate, {nit her deceitful face close to his and whispered loudly: "John, i earned it in tho coissas. Will yon forgive me. dear, blessed old John? I'll never,never do so again." Firmly. "I would never have thought my sisior would-. Oh. here is my old \ an Dyke," aud .spite of his wriuii John liad io Kiiiilo. rememberijig his abrupt deiniiTuro fi'oiu the census, ntit t�ik'e susF�ct'ting X>aisy to be tho heroine ol his fri>iud's story. "Come in, come in. Ttiisis niv littlo sister, "I hopoyou do.'"'^U3ah Black la Waali< ingtou cost. SHE IS WORTH $500,000. All Realized from an Investment of $100 -Wonderful Mrs. Houghton. NS ol the lenoMfo able women in tha Northwest la Mrs. H. E. Houghton of Spo  A.T 'i'KEMOXT TE.IIPUe) OF ILKCi'lrllE. LADIK.S SHODLD IfOT FAIL TO ATTKJSrW THIS LliCTUllE, .A.3 aiME. YAI-K CUT tilVJi iilOUE VA'LUAnLK INFOU.M.-V.TIOX i-HO .\1>V1CE ON THE OULTIV.VTIOS OF J> ATIJEAIt BK.VUTt TUAK ANY OTUES SOOBCE. HEB Ll.CrlUtES AUli AUVAVS L.IJIGELY AT. TEXilED BY TlUE EXJTP', OWlNl} TO HEB I'liOMlSEXCE IN SOOEtT CIBCLES, A3 WELL A3 UER 'WO^JDEKrUL SUCCESS Uf AIDINO UEK SEX BY TEUb'U'rSO OCP Tfld MANTLE Of A 1J.*.X) OO.Ui'LESlOX AND IIB. I'LAClMli IN ITS eTEAI) TH.VT EITVIAHUB, .SQKT AND DELICATi; I'URE aiCCf OP OIULIV uool). T-iiE "tariCJit-siOK co-iim-escj ION Bl^^SACIl" IS TitE N.tME OF HER OHEAT inSCOVERY FOU CLE-A-KINO THH SlilN, AND I.S Gr.VBASl'EED 10 HE-MOVIJ FltKCKLEA AND EVEllV .^IvtN BLEMlSSt SE.VD i CENTS IN STAMl'S FUR CATALOCUa (.ilViSG I'AiiTlcrL-Vlta. -HMK- YAUH'S F.O.STON OFFICE JS CONDCt'TF.l) IIY StU-E. OI.IVK KOM.VliTti. A.FACT mvr M08t AS.SITKE LADIES COUF.TEOUS AKI> CAJtElflTi TRKA.T.ME.ST.  ADIIUEJli cosirjLEaaox specialist. 178 XIIEMOXT st., MTtrE. ai. XAI.B Witt nESULul CliJ-MONS.  CASf BE SE�K AT 10   

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