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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 16, 1890 - Page 22

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE "STANDARD" COMBINATION THE "STANDARD" COMBSfVlATION This cnt filioiva ft new pjj cn, ward, robo cr bookcase, Ions and sltort drawers, shelves �or brlo-u-brao, ka. Tho iTardrobo door has a loner, liand-eomc bevoUod mirror, �n-Jilcl) takcB the jilaoo of a chcvnl einsa, a point ladies will bo s\ira to Bpproolato. I BIS IWt f y| ^ ^^i^ 0-UNION STREET-5 BOSTON. The **S*nii�laril TSo�l,�� when closed, oonuples no moro space on thn floor tlmnan ordinary \\lm "Tlie Avenue" on a Sunday Becomes a Dressy Dreamland. HAT a sight to bob is Common-wealth av. on a Sunday afternoon after church! Piffunntand pretty; in litllo swarms of fashion and loveliness, appear there tho fair ones o� the smart set of tho Hub, in all the hravery o� their fetching: toilets. Of course, tho men are tJiorc, too, buttoned into tho perfection of their perfect coats, witli theU' / shining hats and shoos, and faultless ' ties and sticks, so like their brother Britons. It would not bo intorestins without them, rou know; but I am not going to write about tho men, for their goodly appearance is, practically, the same, or, rather, It is never BO delightfully agprcssivo as that of tho jrentlcr se.-c in the bravery and bloom of Its endless variety. Surely it cui no longer be said thatBoston women do not dross well. Of late years tliov to have acquired an inimitable approoidtion and knowledge o� faultless (Ires.sinp,-. Tlicv combine exciuisitoly the French fiissinetis with tlio English severity, and tlia result is .a graceful elegance tliat suits tlieir lieauty to porrection; lor, generally Kpoalcing, Boston women are beaiitl-ful, and v,-ith a beauty all tlioir own. It is t!:o cnlturo. maybe, that gets into their Jiicos and adds tliat subtle touch of melancholy ciiai'.-n aiiil poetic retinomont t/iat characlorizi:^ : ra the world over. Bo that as it may, houevcr, I Icnmv only tlnit Boston wouien are, as an acknowJedged fact, I'XcetdinglY lair to look npou, and that they hiivd Koulsm their faces. The buds of seasons gone, those of last Eeason and tho prosi'Oetive buds of tho co)niiig winter swarm up .and doivn tlie RV.-nne in the S.abbatb stillness. All those radi.ant. dnin.sels wlioso engagements have trijiped o\'er one another witii such a scrambla in tabic gossip of late ai'o there with their iiances. Each .and every one miglit well be an established belle, so far as one could judge froui sweet, fair f.aees and fetching frocks; but bore is one whom you all know to bo a lielie, who carries the supremacy in her happy iace, lliat is bright with a sweet radjanec as she v,-a!ks beside her betrothed. Tliose amber brown eyes, that sunny cheat-nut iiair and that matchless bloom of tho skin set her apart from all tho other beauties and easily give to her tliat exalted tioUeship wlueh sUo has held so long and will) sucli grace and sweetness. How enchantingly demure she looks in that dove-colored cloth gown she wears to Bervice; its puritanical severity only serves to heighten the loveliness of face and figure. What a superb couple they make, to be sm'C, slie and lier fiance: and what a match of matches it is, almost too good to be true, wealtii, po.sition, boauty. Ayel but It is dreamland come to earth. And when they are manied in December, and have gone across the seas, the ai'enue on a Sunday iitternoon will bo a littlo less bright, a little less intere.'^ting. A snow w/iito cloth gown out of doors of a November dayl (Jii, dear, yes! Why, they are quite the sorri'ct thing, you Icnov,', and you will see lh(un all winter at teas and receptions and loncerts and the like. They will be made >f corduroy and broadcloth and oven of Inxurious velveteen for very swell alter-lioon concerts i\nd drawing-room reading^, i'hej ai-e excessively French and considorod th(^ very piniiaolo of all that is chic. Tlio white gown that so startled the eyij-ligiit of tho eymuhony goers last v.'eek, n'ith its dazzling audacilT (uid uncommon icparturo, is not to bo mentioned, however, )cside that in the possession of a woll-mowu Back Bay beauty just homo from "^iiris. It has not been worn vet, but ius in its ghost-like swatliings of snowy jnon waiting for that supreme occasion when 'It Bliall lie v/oni fortli to do sweet honor to its fair owner's charms and to the matchless skill of tho only Felix; and, doubtles.s, also, to jeopardise the peace of mind of aU the gentle crr-atures who gaze thereon for envy and covetousuess. It is really the mo.straiiulsite creation in clotli thai I liave over seen. It is of white broadclotli, fine and lustrous as satin, and cut in tluil wonderful muuucr that bcwil-der.s wilh its simplicity and elegance. It is Bdged witli long yellow tur and embroidered ro.vally in heavy gold braid. Tliere Is a fircam of a hat to go with it, of while oloth and gold embroidery, with a curling, nntiuciiish briui ot yellow far, and tVireo-gpi.i! goluen j.o).iii;ons piled ou the biick of t:,^'. cruwii, out of which springs a golden aigr.-i;e; and there is a poem of a muif, too: a T(-r.v t.eri'le.viisK puem o/ tho cloth una gf.l'i and iur. Tiitn tiu^ gloves-dear, dear, liios-; niiirvrlhjuri gloves! They are tho final itLTOM. EMMOES OF BOSTOH, Two of Tliem Have Been Governor Also. Personal Traits of Rice, Lincoln, Cobl), Prince and Cii'ccn. EToryday Life of Gaston, Pierce, Martin and O'Brien. The MediK5val Warwick, tho. "maker of kings," was a mild typo pf tho modern free American voter who makes and nn-nialcos rulers of power with apparently marvellous ease tvnd unconcern. No mora charaotoristio indication of the democratic spirit in tho government of tho country can bo found than tho spootiiclo of a simple citizen assuming tho forms of power, administering affairs for a period, and quietly resuming tho plain position from which ho was taken. Tho celerity and.smoothness with which tho transition is made, Jho facility of. ac- ALBX. H, RICE, oommodation to altered conditions are tho marvel of king-ruled nations. The president of 50,000,000 of people wields tliQ sceptre of .'owor today and tomorrow pleads as an advocate before the judicial authorities whom perhaps he himself has invested with position. Tho mayor of a big city like Boston goes back to his desk or his library, and the young men that vote fcir his successor hardly recognize his features or his figure on tho I3ublic Btreot, Of all the men who have-occupied the mayor's chair of Boston in the days that are not, there siu'vivo nine. They are historic figures which thatsolf-nossessedyoimg person, tho rising generation, knows no more about than tho meagre pages of the text-lDook afford. They move along in the mad rush of a money-changing rhultltude with the placid leisure of men for whom the day of littlo things is done, men whose,' lives more to tho order of on ampler experience. And yet not one has relinquished-active business or professional interest or lost sympathy with tho movements of his political faith. Boston's ox-mityors aro all exoellont specimons of mental and physical, vigor. No one ot them can bo called a distinct man of leisure, although nearly all of them ars beyond tho age at whicli tho ordinary business man usually contemplates retirement. As far back as 185n, in tho days when the sltflod moan ot tho slave began to echo in tho silvw tones ot Now Rnghmd's orators, Alexander H. Rica, at the age of 38, was elected mayor ot Boston. He had served in 4,ho.Oommon Council in 18S1. His service ff, N, UNCOLN. as mayor lasted ono term. From 18C9 to 1807 he was in Oongi'OSs, and from 1876 to 1878 he wa>s governor of the State. The famotts centennial governor is in his 72a year, and ootive y at work as senior member ot tho firm of Rice, Kendall & Co., paper manufacturers. He is pre-eminently a man ot business. Nevertheless he has found timo tor tSio griuiea ot intellectual lite, and his marked characteristic has been tho combination ot business sagacity and mental aocomplislimout. william qaston. mghest of �S in I^aveokig Pover.-U. S. Gov't Report, Aeg. 17, He is about C feet 8 inoliea high, and weighs aboui 105 pounds.   His hair hns UiiiUK.'d greatly in the past few years, aiid his grizzled bt:ard, cut to a poiutiis rapidly taking on the piitriar
                            

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