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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 16, 1890 - Page 20

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                20 THE BOSTON SUKDAT GLOBE -STODAT, NOVEMBER 16, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 0strm; Sttnba|> ^labt. TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. SUNDAY. NOT. 16, 1890. STANDARD XIMK. pn IfUsos.... 6 30 Sun Sets.....4 20 length otDaf, 9 41 Hlgli Wat, Moon Sots ; .10 21 TM Moon's Clmngos. rirst gnarter. Nov. 19, 7h. 41jm., mominB, E ruU Moon, Nov. 26, 81i. 23m., morning, W :*8tqnartar.Dea4:, 8h. 37m., mominB, W ! yho is too poor to go to college to receive a cortiflcate of proficiency almost as good as a college diploma are gratifying evidencos that loamlngis taking off its stiff old-time wigs and coming down to the people. When the nniversitios in every State come to put this beneficent Bchomo into praotioo and convert the hiirh schools into evening colleges tho.v will have won a claim for State aid, such as few citi-teno will bo disinclined to honor. The doors of Harvard have Jong swung on easy hinges lor those not on her academic rolls who Book to come within the light of her loarnmg. It would not bo surprising, however, if she should yot take the farther step of going out to thoso who will not or cannot come to her, John P, Ford. The avcrtJije cirevlation of TSE JtOS-leoy STTKDAT OIiOBX) for the month �/ October, 1800, was 9 THE GIjOBE fiaa a Jarger, regular, fiaid, h07)a fide civailation than anj/ either Boston newspaper, and ioitt pay $S000 in cash to any man viho will prove that this statement U not an absolute fact. SUBSOEIPTIOW BATES. THB DAILT Gr,03i!-0no copT, pm minth, BO Mnts; por year, S6.00. Postage BropMd. TnB ScsBAT GLOBH-nT �mU, J2.00 p� year. Postope nrepaia. Tnn Weeklv atoBB-By man, {l.oo per yew. Postogo prepaid. the OLOBI NKWSTAytta Co, Mi WMhlngton StreM........................Bostom Enterod at tha Po�t Offlco, Boston, Mass,, � mo-end class matter. MOEAIITT AHB TAEIIT BErOEM. As to the economic effects of the tariff, like all other thoughtful voters. I have my opinion. Nor have I any hesitation, at the proper time and place. In expressing that opinion. But there ore certain moral aspects of the question that are not often or suffl-olently noticed. Two or three of these seem to be worthy of the careful attention of your readers..., 1. Christendom professes to worship the "Prince of Peace" and to believe in the doctrine of human brotherhood. Now, every student of the growth of civilization knows that the greatest hin drance to human advance is to be found in the barriers that separate nations, These are perpetual sources of misunderstandings, Which lead to jealousies, irritationB and wars. And those wars destroy more wealth, do more to keep the worid poor, than any and all other agenoibs. The natural barriers that the world is always trying to overcome are such as mountain chains, BOOS, differences of language, of religion, of raoo, of customs. These are hindrances enough: and people already hate eaoh other badly enough because they do not come more closely together, and so understand each other bettor. But, as though there were not enough notural barriers to keep,people apart, they arecontinually atwork building up artificial barriers. Of these, the more importiant, the least excusable and the most pernicious, is Buch a tariff as prevents free and cordial communication, 2. listen to an advocate of an eitromely high tariff, and you will frequently hear him avow plainly his belief that it is an injury to other nations; but, so long as he thinks it will build up our prosperity at the oxpenoo of others, he does not hesitate to glory in it. But not only does this seem to be poor doctrine from the moral point of viowl I lilso behove it to be a business delusion. A )nan is not made rioher by the impoverlsh-taant of his neighbors. Each individual is W necessity benefited by a general prosperity. Easiness appears to be stlmu-ated by a wholesale destruction of property, as in the case of the war. So it is by a fire, teut, in both cases, the people as a whole are |)oorer than before. So it is in the case of a ^orld-wido' prosperity. Wo ought to be beyond the barbaric delusion that one Ration's prosperity can bo bought at the t>ric6 of making others poor, 3. The direct way to hinder national growth is to isolate oursolves from the rest of the world. The provincial policy of not eoeing anything good beyond its own borders has done more to injure France, for example, than almost any other thing. What would wo think of a man who would not take and use gas, or the elootrio light, or the telephone, because he didn't invent and (nake themf Wliat shall we think of a na-Sion that tries to prevent ite people from being benefited by any good thing that ftny other people can discover or make? Personal selfishness, in the long run, is pot only OTil, it is also folly. So national kelfishness, in the long ran, not only develops a mean national state of mind, but ^lsc leads to national weakness and poverty, ^The natural laws of human growth toward universal brotherhood ond a world-wide prosperity are God's laws. And they who try to outwit them will not only meet with moral faijlare, but will find out that they iiaye been guilty of that which is said to be ^worse than a crimo"-a blunder, M. J, Bataob. CAUSES FOE THANKSGIVING. When the annual decree goes forth from 0.B8AR AnoTjsTOs that all the land be taxed for turkey and cranberry sauoe, it is impliedly nommated in the bond, if not eSc-pressly stipulated, thot every law-abiding, citizen shall at the same time be thankful! not necessarily to the diminution of the supply of fire water and red paint, buli Bufflclently hilanous to pa.ss creditable muster with the Deportment of the Interior, Accordingly, we all cudgel our brains to think up reasons for thankfulness. The old stagers, fired at us year after year by well-meaning but misguided gentlemen of the cloth, are a trifle passe, and an observer will readily note dozens of reasons less worn and jaded. Take the political situation; The winning candidate is thankful that he was chosen, while the defeated candidate Is equally thanlcful that "if such demagogues are to misrepresent the peoplo he was not disgraced by an election." Oidarly, here ore two thanltful hearts rarely mentioned in Thanksgiving talk. The winner, "chosen solely on his merits and personal popularity against big odds," rejoices with exceeding joy that it didn't finally talce but one mortgage to cover legitimate campaign expenses. The loser mnat be grateful to his loving neighbors, too fond of his society to lose it even for a short term of office, and oh, so happy in the anticipated joy of saying "I told you so," when his rival blunders. Yon and I devoutly thank a kind Providence that wo did all in our power to save the country from the maohinations of the other fellows, and that perhaps-blessed hope I-these misled mortals may before another twelvemonth be brought to see that in every question tfiere is only the wrong side and our side, and repent the error of their ways political accordingly. The Democrats may be thankful for a larger helping of victory and hurrah sauce than they dreamed of getting, and the Republicans can at least be grateful that it is not, after all, quite unanimous. In a more general survey there appears even brighter hope of an exceptionally joyous   and   genuine   Thanksgiving.   The new-made  benedict and the now-made divorcee    �will     join     in     a    common    thankfulness    too   sacred    for words. The optimist will be thankful i of course, sat him on a powder mogazine and touch a match thereto and he would thank heaven it was no worse. The pessimist will hug to his l)osom the hope that he may before long turn on his reign of terror and the anarchist may at least ia thankful that his creed is no worse than Most, The gentle Wall st. shepherd will bo humbly gratified for the success vouchshafed to his sheep-shearing industry,  and the lambs may be thankful that they have still the. strength to bleat. The great man living has reason for devout thonlcs that as yet no monument soariflos bis memory, and' the shade of the great man dead may be    suffered    to    rub    its    ghostly hands   in   ghoulish   glee   over tombstone virtues unsuspected during life. The Pharisee's old-time prayer, "Lord, I thank Thee that I am not as other men-even this publican," the publican will heartily echo. Kxplorer. Stanlbt's thanks will well up at the thought that, bad �s it is, at all events Explorer Oor.DMBUs' world's fair is none of his funeral. New York, on reflection, will return thanks that she was not entirely thrown out of the census fq? pernicious Democracy. The immigration statistics fiend will gloat over figures pointing to a prosperous career for America as the geatest almshouse lozaretto, and International insane asylum in all Christendom. Plainly, the wider our scope of "bsorvaUon the more the oausos for thankfulness that appear, and yet most of these great and significant reasons have never been oven hinted at in our formal thanksgiving. Lot us change all that this year. It is no trouble to be thankful if we only set about it right. birds for personal adornment be enlarged upon, while the cruelty of the sportsman, who, with gtm or fishing rod, destroys innocent life for omusemcnt, is ^loissed over or charged to the account of laudable ambition? Is not slaughter in the latter case the morowanton'V For woman destroys birds by proxy, so to speak. The cruelty is not peiTotratod before her eyes. But the sportsman coolly and deliberately brings down the songster upon the wing, while the sweet notes are pouring from its throat, and with his own hand gathers the quivering remains of the life he h.as stilled into his game bag, to bo displayed later, with his string of "speckled hoautios," to admiring companions whoso hearts burn within thorn to go and do likewiso. Tho sins are no doubt equal in the long ran, but does not tho man's cruelty seem a shade or two more ruthless than the woman's? And Is it not in both cases reprehensible thoughtlessness rather than wanton cruelty? If woman, as a rule. Is intolerant of her sister woman who has deviated from the right way, as no ono will pretend to deny, is she then a sinner above man, in her laojt of tho sweet charity which "hopoth all things?" Can he not be bitterly uncharitable m certain directions? Ho m,ay condone one kind of sin, "because," as Mr. Adams says, "he recognizes more plainly than woman the stress of temptation, and the complexity of motive which lead to transgression," but he makes up for tlus leniency by intolerancO"of other shoirtcom-ings. I have often been struck with the Scant allowance made for the victims of the drink appetite by those men who themselves have no craving for stimulants, or are so organized that they can indulge without excess for a lifetime. They scout the Idea of "hereditary tendency," or any of those pre-natal conditions which make us to differ. They seem unable, by any stretch of imagination, to exchange places with the weaker brother, or to realize the desperate odds against which ho straggles. "He could, leave off drinldng if he tried," is the short, sharp summing up of the case. And this, too, in face of the evidence that the man who goes on sacrificing health, family, friends, position, in a word, all he holds dear in Ifis normal condition, to the craving for stimulant, must bo under some terrible pressure from withm wMoh requires superhuman strength to combiJt. As I walked up the stairs of the Sixth Avenue elevated in New York the other day, two of the road employes were assisting a partially Intoxicated young man to roach the elevator. He was silent and civil, yet they were mocking his "tired" condition, and altogether treating him unfeelingly, forgetting that "a man's a man" even when tmbalanccd tlirough stimulant. Men, as a rule, seem to have little patience with this folly. Policemen are often shockingly inhuman to a drunken man under arrest. Of course there are men who stand by their weaker brothers loyally, but tho same exceptions are not found wanting among women. As a last word. Is It not a short-sighted proceeding for a representative of either sex to take up cudgels against tho other in wholesale fashion? The interests of the two are so commingled that every blow rebounds upon tho assailant, ISABan HOLSTES, attmsment of a decent order is good) ajid' did n.pt' this great' Teacher. himself r rebuke. some busy- bodies with tho roimark that it was "lawful to do good on thdiSabbath day?" Will some one object If wo, on our side, say that what is "lawful" is "right," and that tho Master's dictum is authoritative? ..... The foundation of the special pleader's argument is, that anything in the theatre except (dt least on Simday) a sermon is wrong. In short, that the things theatrical are wrong-influenoo, association, everything. Real knowledge would knock away that f oimdatlon. and tlio writer will not say, for fear of tho charge of special pleading, that in an equal experience with Church and Theatre, not seiiar.atod by time or dates, but concurrent, lie absolutely learned more that w.oa harmful asa young Sabbath sohool scholar (together with a great deal of good) than ho ever learned in a theatre i and he would much dislike to be called upon to prove this for fear of hurting tho feelings of many non-theatre-goers whom he admires and deeply respects. Philip Fkbidhak, EDITOEIAI, POINTS. Gov. Brackictt's ThanksgivlnB proolo-mation is a folioitoas document-barring tlie poetry, which Is not happily selected. Tho proneness. of our governors in recent years to ImltateSilas Wogg on these annual occasions and "drop Into poetry" is to be regretted ; every-day ptose, plain, slmplo and sturdy. Is far better. Mayor Hart's observations on the nomination of Mr. Merrii,!, are at once serene and suggestive. Ho presents his successful competitor with his '.'best wishes, personally and politically," and says that ho has "nothing to regret and a great deal to bo thankful for." His honor evidently appreciates what he has escaped by Fridaynight's balloting at Union Hall. The publio record of Nathan MAiTHHWs, Jr., is a sufficient guarantee that he has all the qualifications of a worthy successor to the most eminent chief magistrates o( Boston. If one-half the African explorers are tellr Ing about each other's diabolical doings is true, the natives of "Darkest Africa" must have formed a very poor, opinion of the wlilte man's boasted "olviUzatlon," Flogged to death for petty offences, their women and clilldren kidnapped and held for ransom, and invited to spread a cannibal feast for tho "sciontiflo" amusement of their English explorers, the poor Afiican's "untutored mind" may well be excused if it fails to properly appreciate the boon of being brought into contact with these supe-rior Christlau(?) gentlemen from Europe, AmeriGans Like Lionize Men. See Stanley and the Irish Patriots. fell to Lool tlie World Spare m tie Pays Here and is Certainly Best Hereafter. ingenlDus and Dangerous Devices ot the Wicked. New York, Not. is.-'hie tendency ot American In general, and New Yorkers in Everybody has heard of .that great English institution-Mudle's Circulating Library, Its famous foimder, Mr. OharI/DS Edward Mudiii, who died Oct. 28 last, was really one of the great inventors of the age. To his bram, In 1843, first carne the idea of establishing a subscription library for the loan of books. He fixed the subscription at a guinea (6.25) a year. Mudle's Library today has 25,000 subscribers, and its annual receipts are aboxit 3500,000. Mudus was, in a sense, one of tho most powerful literary censors of his time. GitORQB Eliot has told us how eagerly she waited to know whether MuDin had ordered 600 or 1000 copies of her latest novel, because It surely indlcatea tho extent of its success. Hence it was that Thomas Carlyle made to Mr. MuDiic the famous remark, "So you're the man that divides .the sheep from the goats," Mr. M- will certainly be the next mayor of Boston. _ AnnitET Ellis Hott. UNIVEESITT EXTENSION. The radical dcaoienov of our American SaivoTBitlea has always been that their in. Buenoe is too circumscribed. Thoy have lailed to radiate the light of knowledge ^ong tho peoplo and have kept it all krithin their own walls. In Germany the lecture syBtem Is the (Treat instrument in diffusing academic lore, fcnd is open to all foreigners uiion the pay-toent of B nominal matriculation fee, and Donditloiumy to all her own citizens. In England the universities provide branch Boliools OS tributary to the fountain head of b liberal educatiou. It Is only now that the American universities ore becoming ahve to the iinponauce and neoeBsity of what is known as "univor-eity extension-" Foliowijig ilio example long ago set in Cambridgo, England, tlio University of PennByivaniu is to maintain b number of scientifio courses open to tlio public, embracing science, literature and historr. �md other institutions are oonlem-filatinjt tlie establishment of branch evening colleges. The Bttooess of the evening high school tnvites the university to co-operate m mulling tho eEsentials ot a college eduration ficoeaaible to the ttudiously inclined who cannot afford a regular college educoti'.ii. Brown Calver,',iiy is ul-Jnt to inangar-M the erpciinifnl of u branch evening collotje In the neighboring ciiy of Pawtuckti, the tasiruction to consist of regular courses of l*oteireB by Its faculty. The High ecuool "THE EUTHXESS SEX."  Woman is cowering under her second indictment in the North American Review. Mr. Oscar Fay Adams has "taken her In hand" with all the intolerant severity of an old-time schoolmaster brandishing his birch rod over a bench full of exasperating pupils. He is nothing if not sweeping in his arraignment The sex is first "mannerless," next "ruthless," and tha third indictment which woman awaits in trepidation may "show her up" as tho altogether "graceless" sex. But woman is of elastic spirit. Though oast iovra upon hearing all the "counts" .against her, she is not utterly "snuffed out." LikoWAiiMJN Hastings, when rid of tho spell of Burke's eloquence, she gets a new grasp of herself, when the reaction sets in, and begins to perceive that she is not, after all, the only sinner on thu footstool. While Mr, Adams is posing as one of the superior sex, an"l accusing women of coii-tracted vision, ho should himself bo careful to maintain a fine impartiality of judgment, lest ho be suspected of a taint of tlio f ednot�a This Idea. I was in company -with^Frank Burr, in London, a few weeks since, when he called my attention to a notable firm on the Strand, by whom I had made and from whom I purchased an overcoat, of the best broadolotW, lined -with tho best silk, built in the most substantial and most artistic manner, and c  No-iv See the Troulble Ho Went To. In the first place he doubtless saw through tbo glass doors the ooat hanging on the rack-a very foolish habit by the way-then he took the trouble to ascertain the name of the occupant of the house, then he called and iJiwi the risk of meeting me in tho hall or cpinii�? from .the drawing-room, or coining down Hie stairs, when ho would have been puzzled to give me a satisfactory explanation of his ridiculous errand. Ho also ran the risk of being caught by my man, who was gone but a moment, and he now is In danger ol being laid by the heels with the certainty of a conviction, abd a term in prison. Another cose. 1 recently received a letter from & lady in a town not far from Boston, enclosing several memoranda purporting to be a correspondence between herself and a follow signing himself I^e-w Arden. The lady Is evidently stage-struck, and, having replied to some one ol the numerous dramatic decoys, received a communication purporting to give the names of reputable managers in the oity of New York who desired the services of amateurs. The Ingenuity of the rascal was most interesting, for he gave, as residing at fictitious addresses, names slightly varying liora those of well-known peoplo, L L. Hill, for Instance, instead of J. M. Hill; Charles Thome,6Vidently seeking to convoy the impression that it was the late Charles R. Thome, Jr.; H. Lacey, instead ol the actor, Harry Laooy t C. Hoyt, instead ol Charles H. Hoyf, B. Reed and Charles Wallace. �KTien Came a I-ottcr, the heading of which would seem to indicate that Walter Edison attended to the electrical .and water effects, and Fred Erricscon attended to the stage mechanical effects, all under tho management of Charles Thorne. Tho letter itself is so apt a typo ot what goos on in hundreds of instances every week, that I reproduce it in its entirety: Tin; BOVEnEIGN ATTnAOTION pgr 1880-01, ignorant, that he would pay hor expenses to New York ond her expenses during rehearsal, a something which. a first-class star,-even, would neither ask nor expect nor obtain, and doesn't it seem equally absurd that a comnion-senso woman would swallow unhesitatingly the taffy that, although at first she wasn't expected to bo first-  well-intentioned, industrious and sell-regardful, the world couldn't exist lor 24 hours without an all-aroilnd fight, in which the weakest would first go under, and so on up, until the last man stood among tho vrreckago, prior to suicide. But my point is that in this great city there are thousands pf men and women who industriously pursue a course of lifo which is hazardous in the extreme, and which bids fair to land them ultimately in the net prepared; lor criminals, an industry which, if intelligently directed in normal channels, woiJd insure them not only a generous support, but such self respect as enables men to meet misfortune with a clear eye, and to walk in tljo valley of the shadow of finanoinl distress with a firm tread and a trustful heirt. Just see, now, the steps taken! ' In the first place this fellow, Puta out an advertisemont which costs money. Having received his -viptims' missives ho sends to each a postal card.f n which ore the names ol a half-dozen alleged managers, with fictitious addresses. He advises his correspondent to write to each ol these, enclosing a two-cent stamp for answer, saying that it no reply comes to the first it would be wise to write a second time. By some arrangement he secures each of these answers, thereby gettinir, first, his two-cent postage stamp in each. One of them rephes and leads up to the proposition indicoted in the foregoing letter. TUs programme requires thought, money, memory, Industry, system and DonbtleRS Keapo a Kloli Ke-nmrd. Some day a reporter -will be put upon the fellow's track, he ^dll be nm to earth, his true name and address and his history will be given, some of his victims will appear, and he will be charged and convicted ol obtainmg money, under lalse pretences, and.will spend several years in work arid contemplation at tho expense ol the State. Does it pay? Well, I remember to have seen in the Bible a suggestion concerning people who envied the prosperity ol the wicked and thought what an easy time they had in life, and were disposed to grumble and complain when it was intimated that perhaps if the end of the aforesaid. disreputable could be seen there would bo very little occasion lor envy or jealousy. As it was then so it is now. The smart fellows who trip their comrades, who fool the street, who run the ship ol commerce well'insured upon the rock ol financial disaster that they may reap unlawful benefit, who, descending in' tho line of crime, cheat, steal and sneak away their nelghbors'jiroperty, succeed for a while. Those ol the upper grade live la magnificent houses, in significant localities, They drive good horses, make layish display of wealth, entertain bovmteously, are ap-parently swimming in the very upper air ol golden sunshine. When'Slack Friday Oomea they are shovelled beneath the ruins ol theh: own greatness, never to rise again, And in the lowQr strata, among the burglars and tho decoy letter -writei-a and the swindling dramatic agents and the snoak thieves $1 bays this to7, 20 inohsg long. Horses assorted colors, ttrlth msset lea-ther hsa-nosB, Alargelluo of Horsoi, OartS) Iioaded Teams, eto,,,26o, to $13,50, �ffb have an endless variety of Tift Toys, Me-ohaaioal Looomotives, Eleatrloal Motors, Steam-loats, Steorn Enginos, Fire Engiaos, Sailboats, oto, Lots of happlnosa lor any child lor -rory little oost, Wliat hn In Ho-wing ?oap Babbles I Did yon ever blow one that wotud float In mid-air, resplendent in all gorgeous colors? The PAIEr S.OAP BUBBLE OZmTT will produce a bubble that can be tossed about the room. Price, 2Bo. Also the WIZAED ond tho DAISY OtTTPITS at the same prioo. A large purchase ol hanging blaokhoarlB enables us to offer greatly reduood prices. These boards ore being adopted in ttdhaands bl Bchcols ^aoe ol the slate and other boards, FormoT rxioas. Onr ploture department has been moved to the IcwOT flcor, where we are showing among other attractions, a line ofAQUABELLES, which cannot he tflathigulBhea from the moot excinisltoly tinted Water. Odors, except by exports. BinOi 20x24 in.) heavy oak feames. The largest line of dainty, artistic and nsefnl BASKETS to be found in Boston, inolnding �Workstands in White and Gold, Steel, BraBB, Cherry, Oak and 16th Century finUhcB, FEEB DELIVEEYin Boston and surroundhig towns. 497 Washington Street, 5� Temple Place. 3' TUB tutensely ronJIillo drama, noIANY BAY. Boudan EiouTElona. On Tuesday tlio Bcwlon & Maine railroad will run trains on the Gloucester branch from Roekport up to give residents of Capo Ann opportunity to see tho great play. On Wednesday the FitcliuurK railroad will bring in i-anies from iulehburi;. Marlboro, Ci'ucord and all iiitennediate stations. Tiie Kew Vcii-k and Nt-w l^nijlaiui railroad wiW liave aiioilier lai-^re parly from ilurtford, (.^inn. On 'i'lmr.--d;t,i" tlieOid t'okm.vniilroad will iia\*e tiiiins li-uui tM>-iiU)ut!i. ICiUKbton, tlie llanbon^i and other becliuns. ;ate and fmd rett is good; 'i'llEi'K is no occa.'iion to look farther than on pime i;! of toilay's Gr.oiiK toljnd plenty of line btu'b'uins in real estal'j. ElectrioRl nnd water ofleoLa,,,,. ,By Wnlt�r EdlBon Stage mechftnical eflccta,.......By Frpd iCiTlcosoa Scenery designed..............-.By Ilarley Merry AU under Uje maniigement of CiiAiiLta TnouNs, Kcw I'ort:, Kov. 2, '00.      _ Miss-. � dcau Miss-Tour letter received. I -n-Ul engngo you for ft seaaon of 40 weolCB at u salary ol ^18 jier week and uP. expenses. Wo open on or about Dec. 15, and as wo start bo soon you muatcomo perfect. Now, in order for you to kuow your lines I muBi send your part to you by mall. In your next letter tend two doltarB (^'J) to jiuy for coiiying your part, and I will send It to you tiy return imiU with your contract of engagement. I will Kend lickel for you to Join eoinpany In time for rehenrsfil. I i>ay ex-penses wliUe w-e arc retiearslug In New York, and ol&o furnish wardrobe. When you return your part at rehearsal yon will receive your money. 1 do not expect you to do as well an an old-Utuer, but after a while youwili do a^ well as any one. If you really wish to go on the titago now U the lime. My company Is nrst-clauB, and j-ou vVl l>e treated like a lady. Answer at ouco if you wish to join. Theao axe my only terms. Address all letters lo Chakusb Tiiousta, 1800 Park av., Kew York atj. Wow. laii't That ICfcUt And doesn't it seem as though the most ordinary capacity would at once grasp and tlioroughly appreciate tliu absurdity of the situation? T)ie idea tliat any reinitablo manager would, under any ciroumstanees, engage a girl whom lie had never seen, of whoso mental Qualifications he knows nothing, of whoso phyBloal uppearauco he is entirely and the pickpockets, it is decidedly the same. They prosper for a while, but their end is weeping and wailing and gnashing of tooth. There is a groat moral doducible from the certainty of their ultiinatfi disaster, and that moral is that il tho same degree' of intelligent -industry, werii. devoted 'to prooediire � in normal channels, along honest ways, in reputable emplcv, while prosperity might not be as fifUdec, while success might not be as phenomenal while the glitter might ntjf be io startlin? success would he more substantial, prrs perity would bo more endurlig, and in '.�ny event that self-respect and pjrfeot frpjdom which enable one to look his r.eighbor sciuare in the eye, to walk the streets tmdis-tiU'bed, to care lor naught save what tho head teaches and the conscience approves, are worth something. Something? It is worth everything, oven In this life, and surely those ol you who believe In tho coining ol another lile .will indorse the assertion that il it is worth much here, how much more in yoiir shado-wy hereafter 1 If further illustration of my point were needed, It might be f otmd in the cose which today is before our police courts. Ayoimg man of unusual ability, a good writer, well brought up, of fhie address, exercised ilia ingenijty on the rospootod household of Archbishop MpGloskey, present-, ing ''lorgod;>.'.,certifioat!08,,' of charac^e?. and begging assistance. Tho aroli-bishop's secretary; gave him some noney and asked' him to call again. Byone ol those curious accidents which so frequently occur, tho fraudulent oharaoter of the young man's papers were disoo-^'ored, so that when he called a second time he was put under arrest and now bids lair to servo his term lor obtaining money under false pretences. Evorytliing about him Klves e-ddenoB of his ability to earn an honest livelihood. �Why didn't he do it? �Why devote himself to cultivating abnormal fields when the groat spaces of tho earth lie fallow before him? Don't try to answer the conundrum. It Is a Problem that your ministers cannot solve, and your students of human nature   throw   up, shrewdly preferring to accept rather than to enplain facts. You will find loitering about our publio buildings, our courthouses and our great hoteliJ young men of fine address, plausible In manner, morally rotten, who wait, with outstretched hands, for the luscious plum of chance to fall into their hands. They devote hours and days and weeks to scheming, and other hours and days and weeks to executing. Very often they succeed, but in the end' they fail. The same amount of thought, of care, ol industry, of shrewdness, ot patience, would ensure them not only on ample livelihood, but greater gains in manhood, in true virility, in moral structure, the outcome of which in this life is peace jind comfort and independence. And the other life? Oil, don't botiier me. Ono at a time is quite st^fScient, Points; Next week will virtually commence the season at tho Metropolitan Onera'Houso, for the box office opens on Monday, and the final dress rehearsals are being held and final preparations made for ushering in tho the seventh regular season of grand opera in Gorman, with tlie gigantic feat of producing two new operas dtu-ing the first tivo weeks of tho season. These novelties are Franchelti's opera, "Asraei," which will bo brought forth on Wednesday evening, Nov. 20, tho openingnight, and Smareglia's opera, "Tho Vassal of Szigeth," which will be presented on Fridav, Dec, 5, The other operas to be given are "Tann-hauser," on Friday evening, Kov, 29, on wliich occasion Fran Antonia Mielke will appear tor the first time before an American audience as Elizabeth, and Herr Heinrich Gudohus, tho groat Wagnerian tenor, will make his debut as Tannhauser, Herr Fischer and Herr Thoodor Koichmann will also make their reappearance as the Liandgrave and Wolfram re6poe|ivoly. On Wednesday evening, Dec, 3, Meyerbeer's "Les Huguenots" will be given, and will introduce Frau Paulino Sclioller as Valentino, Fro Jennie D/och ns tho Queen of Navarre, and Herr Juan Luria ns tlio Count do Nevers. Tlieso wtists are all new to tho American public, Fre Mario Jalin, Frau Marie Ritter Glotze, Herr Andreas Dip-pel, Herr Bruno Lnrgenstcin and Hert S. , SScr 60c, 7eOii $1.00, $1.50, $4,00, SPECIAL DRIVE IN We are closing cut at rldiculonslv low priot| several lots of Bella, some of them slightly' dw� aged by sea water. 26 doz, Bolls, 23 Inchea In height, with ghlrt| regulni price 87o.| offered at lOc. each, One lot of 12 dozen Full Jointed Bolls, with bisque head, exposed teeth, flo-wing 'blonde hair, shirt trimmed with lace, height 19 Inches, regular price $1,26, present price 49c. each. Also a lot ot slightly damaged Bolls, in vaiicui styles and sizes, at prices equally low. 497 Washington St., 69 Temple PI. torfl will all make their first appearance on the opening night in "Asraei," Nearly all the boxes and orchestra seats have been taken, and a brilliant and re-iharknble season is assured, I hear that Daly has purchased tho "Prodigal Son" and pantomime, which under favdrsible circumstances, if intelligently played, ought'to be good lor a two years' run. � The horse show closed tonight. It was a phenomenal success Irom first to lost, taking Irom regular entertainment channels between 8000 and 1.2,000 people every day. Dr. Talmage Is to lecture in the MotropoU-tnn Opera House on Tuesday night, his subject being the "School of Scandal." Mr. Dana said some years ago that he made it a point to read the Dtimaa novels at least once a yeai. Brother Dana's head is level. The combined instruction and entertainment to be gotten out of the romances, historical, picturesque, full of studies of human nature cannot bo exaggerated, so next time you are in the vicinity of Little, Brown & Company's place, ask them to show yoti their latest edition of Dumas and then thank me for the hint. I have bought them all ahd find renewed pleasure 'in eaoh perusal. > � Henry Gtiy Carleton, a good writer and a playwright from whom I expect ihuch good work, was married some weeks since to Miss Effie Shannon of tho Lyceum Theatre .WOMAN'S Notes   and BEUEy CORPS. . the Order In Gossip  of Massachusetts. The national convention will open at Detroit, Aiig. 5, 1891. The convention of the department ol Massachusetts will beheld in theMeionaon, Tremont Teniple, Feb. 11 and 12, 1891) hcarapfire will probably be held on the evening of the 12th. Mrs. ISmllie L. W. Waterman of Boston, Mrs. L. P. Flowers of Cambridge and Mrs. Hattie M. Tuttle of South Boston have been appointed a department relief committee by Mrs. M. E. Knowlos, department president. This is a new committee authorized by a veto of the recent national convention, Corps 133 of Westminster will be visited Nov. 19 by Mrs. Glare N. Burleigh of Athol, tho department inspector. Phil N. Sheridan Corps of Salem -will hold asocial meeting on the afternoon of the 10th and will entertain the Post Sonaof Veterans and other friends in the evening. Isaac B. Patteii Corps of Watertown vrill hold Its fifth anniversary on the evening ol Nov. 24. Francis Washburn Corns of 'Brighton, is arranging for an anniversary celebration, Jan, 12, Mrs, Adeline P, Snell, president of Gen, Kilpatriok Corps, Holyoke, has been engaged in missionary v/ork at South Hadley Falls, with.good results, Oomiimnder H, W,Coye'of Pest 201, re-ports that arrahgoments are in progress foi a corps to be organized at Vineyard Haven, Gen, Sedwiok Corps ol Orange w ill open a fair Nov. 19. company. . �you will all be sorry to know that Miss Annie RussoU of tho Madison Square Theatre, wile of Stage Manager Presbury, is still very ill, and within tho week has endured a seoond most painful and very dangerous operation,' tho safe outcome from which is by.no manner of means assured. Mr. DunlevY has produced In the new Park Theatre' a local play called "The Inspector," which is full of local color, aboimding with familiar incidents, and made'particularly enjoyable by the chief figure, about whom tho story revolves. Tho chief figure is a duplicate of our great inspector, Thomas Byrnes, for whom Mr. Coulter makes up perfectly. Tho theatre is crowded every night, and I can see no good reason for its not enjoying a long and prosperous run'. - - The '.'County ��Folr,!'.with- Neil Burgess, or. rathier' Niill' B,nrgoS3', J.withithe-' ' "County Pair," draws plienomonal �houses. Tony Pastor's place is crowded every night; Oarmencita and Otero charm the gilded youths, and the great houses of entertainment pursue their way prosperously and unobtrusively. This afternoon Billy Crane was seized with vertigp just as his cue was given in the third act. 'The scene was where old Den-man and his daughter are in the anto-room of the Senate chamber. The curtain was rung down, and many left tho house. Crane appeared in about 10 minutes very red in the face, and was greeted with loud applause.) He smokes tpo much. It was deemed best by liis doctor, however, that ho should not continue the play, so George W. DeVero, tho stage manager, played the fourth not and did it very finely. Ho was nearly letter perfect, thoroughly up in the business and deserved the Uboral applause that followed. Mr. Crane -will be - all right after Sunday's rest Weather fine. Howaed. Look Out for Your UTeok. The edge of a stiff linen collar rubbing against the tender flesh of a woman's throat in time hardens a little line all around the neck, and if you wear lin�ii collars in cold weather your sensitive skin will be painfully chafed. 'Vou can get in place of th . H.. maksK you O. K.. COBH'I-KXIOSr blemlshea, phnplca, etc., Ono, tU6 Balm Sltlti Cure, EDcSOc, HI; drugglstj.eta. CtKAPJ'En 11AX1�S, Cactus Balm Skin J Cure, 2Sc.. tiOc, f-l; rtruggtota, etc.  Try It. ECZEMAS, try CncHia iiidm Sklu Cure. Best lu the worid, Iiric, fiOc, gl; druKldsts, etc. �](�,�> AlilXlvSTl AI it^TriVali^cTu^m^ X; Cure, UDc, bO'\, gl; drupulhls, cti?. S" 'ctin'-rmSEAhEM; "< i.Vt tiTBriim Skin Cure. Beat in the wi)rld,r.tK-,., t-l; drugpiata, etc. ITCHrX'fiT^AJi Y TuiiT'uTil'jnroily, Chclus Balm Skill Cure; lustjiiil relief; i;tic.^50c., gl, rriiu sHAviivoTcacTSTiuUn siSicur^ uothius like it, �Cc., COc, $1; drufisliit, 0941   

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