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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 16, 1890 - Page 2

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 16, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                ft,' |)i THE BOSTON  SUNDAY GLOBE-SUM)AY,  NOVEMBER ^16; 1890~TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 0 Tells His Story at Last In Court. Parnell Will Make No Defence. Irs. O'Slea to Tate Ho Fart i tlie Case. Irish Leader Will Be a Leader StiU. Sensational Testimony for tlie Libeilant. rcopjTigw.] I,om>on, Nov. IC-Parnoll 'has mndo no dorendeintho O'Shoa divorce ciuso, simply bcoauso tho evitlonco against him Is scem-iiisly impregnable, and tlio �Irish leader is shrewd criousli to see that a iTOuk delonoe Tv-ould damage him more tlian no delonoo at all. But ha has kept his counsel -woll and allowed his friond.s to do all tho talking they liked about clearing him when in court of calumny. "Do you expect." Mr. Paniell -n-as asked, "that this .suit shall have tlio result most desired by Unionists and cause you to resign your lea  of tho Irish party?" "Certaiuly not," replied Parnoll with a scornful smile. "From tho first hint of these divorce proceedings I h.ivo determined that they should not result in dping that. "I fancy tho people of America and England n-ill see clearly enough for themselves what this case Is, and what has been Its hi.story." "Is there any truth in tho reports In Tory newspapers of your going abroad to remain away during tJio next session?" "Not a particle of truth," answered Par-nell, enipliatlcally. "Tlien you will resume your place at the head of your party when the House meets?" "Yes, o[ course I .shall. This suit will not ailect my public action in tho slightest degree." "Were any steps taken at any time to defend thissiut on your behalf?" "Oh, yes, I linvo worjced very hard in petting up a defenc*!, 3nit for various reasons one oi tliem, Jlrs. (^Shea's very serious illness at tlie present 1110111001, it wius decided cventunlly to let, tliis carefully prepared deteuce go by the board." Tho Court "Wiis I'ackod. Tlio court was packed almost to suffocation at K) o'clock, when tho special jury iilod into the box. LaiKO crowds surrounded tlic doors clamoring .for admittance. C'itiit. O'Shoa, jaunty �,s ever and wearing a buttonhole boutiuet nl violets, came into court early with bis son. He chatted airily with hiseouii.wl. lie laughed when Tkk Glokf. correspondent told him that it was rumored that neither Jlrs. O'Sliea nor Mr. Parnell would defend the case. "That win make itso much easier and less cxnenKive for me." hesaid. Tlie court room buznod with oxcitomont as the fauioiis lawyers eiipaged found thoir resiiectivo nlaces. Thons appeared for O'Sliea Sir Edward Clarke^ollcilor-eenoral; Mr. Indorwiek and Lewis Ooward. For Mrs. CSlieii there appeared Frank Lockwood and Mr. Pritchard. A gontleiuan named McjCall was present for the intervening party, Mrs. Steele. P.-irnell was absolutely nureiiresonted, though liis solicitor. Ueorgo Lewis, hovered about, closely watchhig all that was going on. "Orderl Order!'' shrmted, tho usher as Justice BuU took liis sfotui.on the bench. Aud the great case W!i.s beami. Amid a breathless silence Lewis Coward opened the case. Hocxiilain�d the nature of the p,-oceiidings to the jui-y, and remarked that Capt. O'Shea, who was at one time a liieniber of the Irish Parlianbontary pai'ty. and one of Pariiell's friends, was endeavoring to obtain a divorce fnuii bin wife on tho rround of adultery w'iili (Charles Stewart; �'arnell. the leader of the Irish party. I'arnell denied the adnltei-y, and Mrs. O'Shea. while denying it al.so, alleged that the petitioner had lioen (juilty of neglect and of misconduct conducive to adultery, if committed; that ho had wrongfully separated from the rcKPondeiit; that ho oom-initted adultery himself, and that, finally, lie had been guilty of unreiisonablo jealousy and cruelty, (.'apt. O'Shea denied these aUegations. When Mr, Coward had tiulsliied, Mr. Ijock-wood rose and said : "I appear with Mr. Pritchard on behalf of the respondent. NiicRks for Airs. O'Shea. "For Mrs. O'Shea I take this onportunltr of saying that wo do not intend cross-examining any witness, neuther do wo intend to call any witiu'ssos or take any part in tho proceedings whatsoever." This produced a great sensation in court. Several persons even shouted, and cries of "Order! Order!" were 011 overj' hand. Finally, M'heii tho noise had sub.sided, Sir Edward (.'hirlte oiiened the case for tlie petitioner. He said that, with ilr, Cowurd, he represented Cajit. O'Shea. The statement inst made by Mr. Lock �wood was cerlainly news to him as it was to the jury. It was an announcemoiit which BcriouBly altered the position of the case. 'iliK'iS''^'^0'^ "ow that neither Mr, Par-BelUaSEW. O'Shea would take part in the case, .1. Butt: "Has no one appeared for themV" "That cerlainly is news to me, also." Ccjntinuing, Sir E(;iward Clark said that lie bad made inquiries and had found that pir. Parnell was unrepresented in the case and therefore iirainically undefended. Although, of course, he was bound to provide evidence which would satisfy the jury, it would tie no longer necessary for him 10 rnake comments wliicb would have been rtyuircd had the rase been seriously contested. Tho pleadings were romnikable in their character, and be would be doing a great In.iusrfoc 10 tliei.eiitiouerif he did not 0111-ploy time ni stating the matters which had liecome rnosi mafi-rial to Capt, O'Khea's hniior bj- reason of the defence upon record. Tiioiieutionei-presented, on Dei;. Uli, last, the �cces3iirv papers. In cue time Mr. Paruell Bppe;tren and i>ut in a simple denial of aduhen^, Mr,^^. O'Shea did not content herself with that denial. Mrs. O'Shea had made a charge igaiiiBt the petitioner of coniiiv.ance, and lud alJoKid. that he was gujlly i.f adultery .vith licr tister. I\Irs. Steele. Mrs. O'Shea laid the Iniurmaiion respecting these charges on ,)une ;i, .luiy 20 and Xov. A. Her Btateioent was that from the autumn of 1S80 until the spring of ifiHi;, both before and aher herhuaband had accused her of adultery, ho had left her alone with tho corespondent, Accuncd tit A  abholutelv and coniplstely destroy 6vi-ry posfiibleBUggestion of that kind, Kot Mify duld lie produce testimony, but correspondence. In fact, he could thow hiiu-dredt of letters, many of them written hy Capt. O'ftlji-a, and in those letters there wati fiot one VMrd or ej.prCSSJon 1,0 confirm tne ihaigDS made agiiinst ibe pttirioiier. Sir Edward then digressed, and gave a (br.rl hkrtru of lillr lite o) Cupt. O'Shl'U, Hit marriup;,, witli the .'esponden'l occurred in li-fJ,7. Mrs, O'Sliea's maiden nutiie WHS Wood, and the marriage t<,ok tihorlT aili-r the death of her .(atlier. ,S;eiI(, j..ri_-sent at the cereioony. JT'jU! J�f:T 1'. ihwi their hfo was one un-Of k'-n dreiim of iiappincss. , , Thej- li-. ed lit Brighton urA (1160 6t VTel j:i.r;'jn. ^^iwuiujk'-i. wliere he bad stubles, j�:itl !i;i-t iv;ih ih., utual rosult, liis money ��b* abson.fi aii-.r he bid t-njoytid lui-ory forafo'n'yoavs. Tho oldest hoy of O'Sboa's �(viw borninlSGT, a girl in 1873, another child in ,1874, and still another in ItJBa, ��'Wch died. In 1874JIrs.O'Shoawontto]ivoinU;itliam, This was .apparently for Mr. Parnoll's convenience, as his apartmentshad a door loading to Mrs. O'Shea's boudoir, of wliioli Parnoll possessed a latchkey. Ho let himself m �when ho called late at night. Tboro was one witness of what took placo in Kltliam, said Sir ISdward, whom ho should have had to call if tho case had boon contostod, namely tho son, tior.ard. Xnt.roduood to Pnrnoll. In 1880 Capt. O'Shea contostod tho seat for Coimty Clare. He'was introduced to Parnoll .ind ho unfortunately asked tho corespondent to dinner at tho Hotel Bristol. Mrs. O'Shea and Mrs. Steele -wore In tho party. Mrs. O'Shoa in tho beginning of Blay. 1881, returned to Eltham from Brighton, and immediately Mr. Parnoll began to visit lior at the lodge. Oapt. O'Shoa know nothing of this until later, when ho found a portmanteau bo-long to tho corespondent in tho lodge on tho morning of .luly i;i, 1881. Tho captain walked to London and told Mrs. Steele; ho also sent a clialieiigo to Parnell to fight a duel on the contmout. It was couched in tho following terms: 8ALi.si)tinv Ci.un, St. James, Clinrlcs Rtownrt PnnicU, Ksq.: Km-Win you iilcnaoljc no kind as to 1w at Male, or nnyollicrlown In Norlli Frniict! which mny milt your coavoiilcncc, 011 Siitiiriiuy monuiiB tlictflth Inst'/ I'lensc let ino know by 1 p. m. loilny wliollior to cxiicnt, yon on thitt day, bo 1 mny bo nblo to. infonn yon lis to tho sign of tlio Inn at which 1 ahnll etny. I nwnlt yonr answer In order to I0.s0 no lime in arranging for i\ friend to accompany me. WlI.i,i,\m HBSnT O'.SllK.i. Mrs. Stoelo exerted horsolf to prevent the meetings. She called on Mr. Parnell, and he assured her that ho was entirely innocent. He promised that in tho future ho would not see IWrs. O'Shea, or give any cause for suspicion. Capt. O'Shoa then wont to Eltham. There, was a stormy scene. At one moment ho said ho would never live with bis tvifoa^ain. She implored him to dismiss his susnioions, the truth of which she denied. At last ho agreed and their Tolatloiis remained unaltered. He came to town the same day and throw Parnell's portmanteau out of tho train at Charing Cross. Ho bo-lieved tho assurance Mr. Parnell had givoti about Mrs. O'Shea, and accepted tho assurances of his wife. Capt. O'lShoa wrote^that evening, July 13, 1881, to Parnell as follows: .SiR-I have called frequently nt tho Snllsbury CI1U1 todny to And you. You are not golng.ahroiul. Yonr baggage Is at Chnring Cress station. Yours obediently, W. �VV. O'Sar.a. Parnoll replied the next day, stating that his surmisoabout not going abroad was incorrect. After pausing a few moments for a conference with his colleagues Sir Edward Clark continued; The relations, he said, between Capt, O'Shea and his wife were then resumed. In the autumn of tho same year they were in Dublin and a.skod Parnoll to supper with them. Then Mrs. O'Shoti suggested to her husband that if Parnell never came to Eltham people would talk. In the captain's jireaenoo she in-vlted Pni-noll to come occasionally and remain from Saturday till Monday. Capt. O'Shea �ivas then taking an aotlvo part In politics. Slept nt Klthain Often. .After Paniell's release from Kilmalnham he was staying at Eltham, and again m May, 1882, notwithstanding his promise, ho resumed his visits at Warwickshire Lodge. Until 1880, however, the children were very young and one could not attribute the Importance In Parnell's visits they afterwards did. The evidence, s.aid Sir Edward, would show that Parnoll camo to habitually sleep at Kltham. In the suite occupied by Capt. O'Shea wan a bedroom occupied by Mrs. O'Shea, and adjoining It was a dressing room occupied by the captain when he came to Eltham. On the other side of Mrs. O'Shea's bedroom wius another dressing room, loading into anothof bedroom occupied by Pai'nell. When they were occupying their respective rooms, tboro was no ditiioulty of communication. Parnoll .and Mrs. O'Shea had boon heard t.alkingto each other from their rooms, had been hoard spealdng together in the same room, and there were other rooms in which they had boon seen from time to time extremely late in the evening. AVhen Parnell was In town he wont to Eltham, sometimes by way of one station, sometimes by another. Moreover, Mrs. O'Shea, on some occasions, loft tho house and was absent the entire night. This wont on all through tho year 188'i; Capt. O'Bhea being entirely ignorant of the aftair. In Anril, 188.'!, the O'Shoa family moTod to :in liedtord sa., Brighton, where sho from time to time was visited by her husband. When he was not there there was another very constant visitor who wont by tho name of fimith. There is no doubt but this wa.s Mr. P.ar-noil. Tho pair were onoe found In Mrs. O'Shea's rotun with the door looked. In Is'oiembor, 1883, another house w.as taken, this time at Elth.ain, where Parnell was also !i i;rec|uent visitor. There he was not "Smith." He was "Stewart." He used to come from there here, but was always very careful to got out of the way when Capt. O'Shea came. There is reason to boUevo that on one occasion ho escaped from a balcony to oscapo tho captain, then came around to the front door to present himselt as a newly-arrived visitor. In conclusion. Sir Edward siiid: "Mr. Parnoll has seen fit not to appear in this case, but lot judgment go by default. It is my strict and obvious duty as counsel to call so much evidence as will enable the jury to return a verdict which will liberate iny client from this inarringo-this now shameful bondage. Tue corespondent, by his own admission, shov,-s tiiat ho daro not enter the witness box." It was evident from the merest glanoo at the jury that Sir Edward's speech had made a doop inipreiision. Cupt. U'SUoa Xestiflos. Cant.rO'Sheii tlien took tho witness stand. Mr. Inder\rick conducted tho oxamiiiatlon. In answer to counsel's questions Capt. O'Shoa spoko of his marriage to respoudont and the birth of their children. Ho said that when Mrs. O'Shoa went to live in the house provided by Mrs. Wood at Eltham he bad somo rooms in Ltmdon, first in Charlo.s St., then in Victoria st. He and his wife used to visit o.ach other constantly. In 1880, during tho parliamentary con-tost, he inet Mr. Parnoll at tho Ennls railway station. He was introduced to hiin and subsequently invited him to dinner and afterwards to his house, where Mr. Parnell stayed fcu^ a few days. Eventually, in consoquenco of what ho saw, lie wrote Mr. Parnoll asking for an amniintmcnt. Mrs. O'Shea gave Iiim tho stroiigost a.s-aiirances with regard to Mr. Parnell. Ho was convinced by Mrs. Steele that there was nothing wrong between them. His wife's assurances were consequently ac-cejited. In the autumn of 1881 witness retunied to Ireland, hut saw Mr. Parnell on his way to Pans. He said lie had found he was not at Eltham, so came to Victoria St. Ho was at that time in bad health. After the session of 1882 Mr. Parnoll was at Cork. In the autumn' of 188,'H witness t i, George E. Bujtell. .Tames Mitchell, froor^-e A. Sniitli. M. Paul. Ihdland, and a Mr. SouU.'wick, who n-fiised to give bislirst nanie. Aif'T T^vkin^j the men to tho Citation The '.lUitiula;,re carried oif the furniture. Tlie otiiCiTsniMi (,;>rtnert eight packs of canis and quite a iiuniln-r of chips. Touching Incident that Revealed a Great Soul. "Let us pray," said Chaunooy Depow in a low voice. And there, standing with his hands folded across his breast, ho closed hla oyos and appealed to heaven In intercession for tho dead man's soul. Lawrence Richards and George Barr, the porters, htid knelt down near tbe door. AA'hen the prayer wan ended a ohoruB of amens oamo from every man's Hps there. Then there wiui another sllonoo, which was disturbed only by the lashing of the water against tho window panes. Only a handful of persons heard tho prayer, yet who shall say that this appeal to the Fatlior of Mercy for a dead man and his orphaned children wa,s not tbe most boautl-ful speech that was ever uttered by Cliami-ooy Depew? The above Incident hoppenod at Greenfield. Mass., about two years. :igo, says the AA'orld. The dead rnan was a poor printer, and had been killed by tbe tr.ain carrying Mr. Depew and a party of friends to Boston. Tho prayer vi'iis supplemented by a generous euhscriptlou for the family of tho viufor-tunato.     _ SENT HER   CHILD   TO   HEAVEN. AValtham, Nov. 15.-The physicians of this city are puzzled over a singular case, which resulted In the death at the AValtham hospital this afternoon of AUoo Bourne, 26 years old. Miss Bourne ivas employed in Thomas' department in tho watoh factory and lived with her mother in High st. Yesterday afternoon, about 8 o'clock, sho loft her work, complaining of severe pains in her back, and went to the office of Dr, Cutler, where sho waited until about 6 o'clock for his return from his calls. The doctor gave her a simple remedy for the pain, wliich did not seom to have the de-su-ed effect, Tbe pains continued and at 8 o'clock respiration stopped and the patient lost consciousness. The action of the heart was excellent and tho physician kept up respiration by artificial means, sending for Drs, McCormack and AVoroostorto assist him. At 9 o'clock Dr. MoCormlck was obliged to leave and Dr. Greenwood took Ills place. Tho physicians, assisted by Dr. Cutters son and the nurses of the hospital, worked con-tinuoiLsly all night and all day today tmtil 4 p. m. AX this time the respiratory tubes became so clogged'.wlth mucous that the efforts of the physicians were fruitless aud life ceased. The iihysicians state that tho keeping up of respiration by artificial means for so long a time, some 20 hours. Is extremely rare, if not unprecedented. Tiie action of the heart remained perfect until the clogging of tho tubes rendered tho artificial \vork futile. The doctors agree as to tho cause of death that some disease in tho coverings of tho brain worked into the tissues of tho bridn and caused paralysis of the respiratory centre. Owing to the wishes of the family, a post mortem will probably not bo hold. Kansas Mother Oonf esses the. Poiaonlng of Her OWld. Toi'kka, Kan., Nov. l/i.-Mrs. John Swln-son last night murdered her 4-year-oId child hy giving it a dose of laudanum. Mrs. Swlnsonhas been morbidly Insane over since last winter, when she had an attack of la grippe. Sho is now in tho last stages of consumption. She confessed to the crlmo. She said sho knew she was about to die, and could not bear to leave her favorite child behind. She determined to send It before her to heaven, vi'bere It would meet her when hor oyra death occurred. REALIZED  HIS  POSITION. IJitjlocaled Hio Knee. iTohn KoK.an of rio BrnoUline St., Cam-briQ[;eport, fill irnm a Mreit car'last evening, at liie corn'-r of Main and Portland sts., resulting in a dislorauou of tbe knee. Lieut,   Jameson's   Death   Ascribed to Grief. London, Nov. 15.-Tho Sunday Times says It Is authorized to say that Lieut. Jameson's death was directly duo to tho griof and anxiety caused by a full realization of his position,____ "Dckes" at Dinner. Nk,w A'ohk, Nov. Ifi.-The 44th annual couvention of tho Delta Kappa Epsilon Eraternity came I0 an endjtonlght with a dinner at Delmonico's. The morning and afternoon were spoilt in secret session. At H o'(doi;U in the evening about 300 delegates sat down to dinner. Gen. AVager Swayne presided. Foreign Military News. A proposal to carry out the lighting of tho camp at Aldershot by means of electricity is now under the consideration of the military authorities. Slime intere.-^ting experiments have just been carried out at Aldershot in connecliou with range-ilnding in tlie army, and it is understood that a reliable system of estimating ranges by night luiB been discovered. French military critics are now amusing one another with distuissions or* the value of smokeless powder, and it is not at oil certain that the "poudre sans fumce" is altogether such a desideratum. Most of the writers seem to imagine that a soldier would prefer to fire his rifio when tho enemy is rendered Invisible by powder smoke, as the firing into a smoke bank gives confidence to tiie siildier. The gunfi of the (ierman field !lrtlller^� are to be changed from steel to bronze, 'i'he ]irinc!pal advantage of the steel cannon is that it is of such durability that it maybe tired several thousand limes biifore there is any danger oi exph-wion. Once worn out, huwever, it is a detui )os.s, for it cannot be recs.st. It also gives no warning of an ap-proacliUig explosion and is very lieavy. AN ith bronze cannon, 011 ihc contrary, seams iiud buliriuiis betray the growing v,eaknei3. NEW YORK   HORSE SHO AST. Scenes in the New Madison Square Garden. Neiv Yoke, Nov. IS.-There were few less people in tho spacious amphitheatre of the now Madison Square Garden today and tonight than have attended the horse show dally dm-ing tho week. Tho afternoon programme presented no particular attraotion, and ohildroii formed a good part of this matinee. For the first time during tho week the, judges finished their decisions early enough 111 tlie day to allow of an extra event. This was the high iumning of lady hunters having won no prize, a con.solation event, so termed, for which two money prizes �were offered by Mr, DodBC. Tho horses .lumped so well that the decision was a dilHoult one. The first prize was finally a-vvarded to Miss Mabel Metcalf's Lancer. Tn tho evening the crowd was a more noisy one. The parade of all the horses which had won prizes opened tho evening performoiice and filled tntj ring. Tlien followed tho jumping hotween Jlr. Herbert's T'ransport and Zoborowski's Countess. The bars wore placed at six feet six Inches and after a few jumps Countess was declaimed the winner. The closing event was for the champion prize between hunters and junipers, winners of prizes. Four were entered. The contest brought the horses to 10 liurdles and to a final jump over a C-foot fence. The prize was ciirrioa oft by Mr. Griswold's Humstead.___ BUNKER HILL DISTRICT. Palrolman O'Brien last evening aiTo.stod AYlUiam Dohorty on a charge of larceny of 340 pounds of pig iron, the property of somo person unknown. Catherine Horan was knocked down by a Lynn & Boston car at tho corner of Henley and Chelsea sts., last evening. Ouo of her ankles was dislocated, and her head, was bruised. Sho was taken to her re.sl-denco, 31) AA'apping St. Gov, Bullock and Council. Executive Clerk Hamlin has succeeded in securing a photograph of Gov. Bullock and his council of 180G. Tliis has been hung in the ante-room of the executive deportment, and completes the collection from Gov, Andrew's time to the present. ,A photographer is now at work on a group of Gov. Bruckett imd his executive family. The council next Monday v ill begin tho work of opening and canvassing the returns of the State election. Every town and citv has been heard from. Not In It. Cllarvard Lanqmtm.] Little Georgie-Manmia, ivhere   is the world's fair going to bo held? Munima-In Chicago, dear. A\'hy7 Little Georgie-Oh, nothing, only while . was hiding imder the bofa last night I hoard Charlie toll Grace to como over to him and lie would show lier whore the world's fair to ougiit to be hehi, and 1 was just going psei> out and see -wherp, when the gas M'cnt ou FeU from His Stable and KlUed. AViLTON, Me., Nov. Ifi.-Fenderson Stiv. ago fell from his stable today and w.a.s killed by the fall.  He �was ouo of AViltou's best iind iiiracst farmers. A PRINCELY PEBLE Romantic Story of Peter Schapaschnikof. His Great-Grcat-Grandfathcr was Ivan v., Czar of Russia.'. Now He Contentedly Sella Trinkets in tbe Streets of St. Louis. St. Loni.s, Mo., Nov. IB.-Peter Sohapa-sohnikof is a trinket pedler with a little stand on Broadway, If his story is true ho is a prince of the house of Ivan V. of Russia. Peter Schapaschnikof claims to be the great-sro.at-grand-son of Ivan V., who reigned jointly with his brother, Peter-tho Groat, on the throu'! of Russia, and In a story obtalnod today liy the greatest difficulty ho traced his llmiako. His father, AVlval or John, Inherited great possessions on the death of his parents. Peter, though. the pet of his fond parents, wtts restless and disliked restraint. Wheu he became old enough his father, ambitious to see him. fill hla station in life with honor, had him entered as a student in the university at St. Petersburg. AVliat advancement the young man made here, or ho'w long he remained, is not known, but his stay terminated very abruptly aud in flight to avoid the consequence of some aotoonneoted with an insurrection of students, ho came to America, landing in New York in 1803. Soon after taking quarters at the St. Nicholas Hotel in New York, he was fortunate in making tho acquaintance of an old French gentleman, who, with his family, a wife and two daughters, had ju,st come East from their home in Kansas to spend the summer in visiting relatives and to make tho rounds of the summer resorts. The old Frenchman, on hearing the young Russian's history, beoame deeply interested in him, introducing, him to hlsiamlly, and Peter fell In love with tho daughter. Tho first intention of Soiiapaschnlkof was. It seems, to engage in somo business with a firm of Russian gentlemen in Detroit, but this plan must have miscarried, for ho came to this city in the early part of the fall, when he made his appearance at tho bank of John F. Darby for the purpose of haviiig some Italian bonds cashed. Capt. Frank Vail, a well-known notary of this city, was then cashier of the Darby bank, iind being the only one in the bank who could speak French, had to oondtlct the negotiations. It being necessary to send tho bonds to the correspondent of the bank in Paris, France, to bo sold, which would take some two months, the matter was explained to Schapaschnikof,when he left the bonds -with them to bo forwarded while he proceeded AVest to �visit his French friends. Capt. Vaile describes him then as a very prepossessing-looking gentleman, having nothing of the wrotohod appearance he now presents in his tioggarly attire, aa he follows his lowly calling in the street.     His sweetheart died, aud he seemed to be brokenhearted. Soelnij the necessity of some bumness or occupation, as ho had spent considerable money in his extensive travels, and the balance was gradually going, he concluded to make his support by handsomely fumish-ing an apartment house for bachelors and renting out the rooms. He accordingly, says Capt. A'alle, leased a 12-room house on the corner of 4tli and Vine, and furnished ft In the most sumptuous style. The furniture was mahogany, the carpets the finest brussols, the curtains penuino lace, and everything else in keep, mg therewith. His next business with the bank was to have a large sum of Spanish bonds negotiated, which was earned through sucoess- ^A^out this time, in 1865. Schapasohnikof received tho sad intelligence of the death of his father, which was Indeed another bitter blow for tho poor fellow. . Ho readily succeeded In renting .out his rooms at haiidsomo prices and making tho house net him some .�!5000 a year, but,, im-fortuntitely, he possessed no business ability and iieglooted to collect his rents. Acquaintances imposed on his generosity and rogues filched from hlra at every opportunity. The result was that his moans gradually dwindled away. After a time he again applied at the bank to have a portion of his inheritance collected from his father's estate, and gave Mr, Darby power of attorney lor that purpose. ' On this commission Capt. Vaile says S12,-000 was received, and later 4000 was obtained from the estate. ,  ,   ,   , Altogether, he received through the bank some S2fi,000, but it slipped through the improvident man's hand like sand in one and anotherspeculatlon and wild adventure till he was reduced to his present penury and woful want. Thedeath of his mother and older brother occurred soon after his father's, and since tlioii beseems to bo imable to hear from his people, or receive any of the abundant means that must .await him. BARNUM DANGEROUSLY ILL. Great Sho^wman Confined to His Bed �with Influenza. EKiriGnpORT, Conn., Nov. IC-P. T. Bar-num, tho octogenarian showman, lies dangerously 111 at Marina, his handsome residence in this city. For a week ho has been confined to his bod Bufforing from an attack of influenza In its,most malignant form. Dr. Robert Hubbard has boon in almost constant attendance upon the invalid. Mrs. Barnum, too, and a trained nurse have �\vatched him solicitously night and day. If he pulls through safely It will be because of their nursing. Barnum has not boon well since his return from the AVest, two weeks ago. He had been ooinplalning of his health and had been seen but seldoin In public, when last Saturday ho was seized with an attack which compelled him to keep to his room. it was reported at liis residence lato this evening that Mr. Barnum was feeling alightly bettor. CRISIS OYER. TEEMBR TO MOVE  WEST. Sells Out Hla Saloon, and �will Devote Time to 'Training Men. John Teenier, the otirsmaii, has sold out his saloon In McKeesport, Penn., and will in the future hall from the AVest. Teenier was iievor cut out for a bonlface,  eady Sent Over Several Million Dollars. New Yoek, Nov. 16.-AVllliam Nelson Cromwell, the assisfnee of Decker, Howell & Co., says that he has received a cablegram from Henry ViUard statung that Mr. Vitlard will sail for New York on the 20th inst. The assignee states that Mr, Vlllard has not lost faith in the euterprisoB vrith which he was connected, and that while in Europe attending to a sick daughter he has remitted several million dollars in cash to his representatives here. �9,000,000 Guaranteed. London, Nov. 15.-The Pall Mall Gazette, referring to the large financial firm which was reported to be in diffloulty, does not mention the name of tho firm, but says that the trouble m.ainly lay in its South American commitments. The sumguaranteed by those who came to tho relief of the firm is �9i000,000 each firm, including the Bank of England, contributing �500,000. The arrangement had a reassuring effect, Anxiety in Montreal. Montreal, Nov. 16.-The announcement that Baring Brothers of London wore in difficulty created groat consternation on the local stock exchange today. The ofloct on stocks was depressing, and orders to soil poured in, but the board closed before definite news was received. The Btiiik of Montreal stock broke four points, and all other securities followed in sympathy, Monday IS a'walted with anxiety. GOLD I COLD!  COLD! Ridgewood loe Company Finanees-Attachments and J'udgments. Nkiv York, Nov. 15.-Judge O'Brien of the Supremo Court today granted an attachment for .$40,000 ag.ainst tho Ridgewood Ico Company, In favor of .Teannette Burchall. The company had delivery stations at the foot of Rutgers St., East Sd st. and AVest 24th St., as well as in Brooklyn, where It supplied a largo part of tho loo. This Is one of tho New York companies which. It Is said, got Into trouble on account of Maine loe, on which it is said the losses wore S3 or S4 a ton. Judgments for about .$20,000 have been entered against tho company in favor of Albany and Saratoga banks and others. About a month ago tho oompauy's real estate was mortgaged for $136,300 ;n favor of AV. H. Hustod, and a oliattel mortgage wa.s also given in favor of S. R. Downer on tbe plane for .S107,085. This was given to secure certain creditors, among whom were the First National Bank of Yonkers for $31,000 and other banks for less amounts. The Ridgewood Ico Company was incorporated in 1875 with an authorized capital of 8100,000, which was increased in 1881 to 81,000,000, of which $140,000 was paid in. In January, 1883, a loan of $140,000 was obtained, secured by cliattol mortgage and bonds. John Clark of Yonkers was the president and principal owner of tho company. Tho ico houses of the company were at Castleton on the Hudson and at Gun Point, Me.___ AFTER OHAUWCBY'S ROAD. IAS BORN A SLAVE. Knights of liabor Convention Desires an Investigation. Denveh, Co!., Nov. 15.-At today's meeting of tho Gouer.al Assembly K, of L., a resolution was introduced which provides that any member who advocates the olectloii of any 0110 wnois opposed to the principles of tlie order shall bo suspended or expelled. This resolution will como up at a future stngo. A resolution was adopted which provides for the apjiointment of a coinmittoo of three, of which tho general master workman .shall be one, for the purpose of applying to tho Legislature of New York State for the appointment of a committeo to ascertain tho cause of the late strike "on tho New York Central railroad, said committeo to have power to have a bill dra'Wn which, if passed, will put the State in possession of said road. YOUNG ROBINS IN A CELL. Though He Has on Inoome of $100 a Week He is Under Arrest. Albert C. Robins was arrested by Patrolman Morrissey of station a last night, charged with selling a $00 watch that was leased of David Bcnslin-hop. Robins, who Is 22 years old. Is said to have a weekly allowance of $100, the income of $100,000, held by trustees. His grandfather was Nathan Robins, well known for years in Faneull Hall. Robins was not balled out at a late hour, and he will be arralgiied.in court tomorrow morning. __ HE IS A  DEFAULTER. Amsterdam, N. Y.. Bank Employe Makes a Confession. Albany, N. A'., Nov. 15.-Julius E.Smitli, assistant cashier of tho FKrniers' National Bank of Amsterdam, is a defaulter to tho amount of $9000. Tlio crime dates back to throe years ago, when ho w.as teller of the Merchants' Bank, which was merged into the Farmers' Bank about a year ago. He has confessed aud a warrant is out for his arrest.__*___ Local Linos. -Last evening Thomiis Sarsfield, 48 4th St., fell from the front platform of a street car at tho corner of Beach and Kingston sts., receiving severe Injuries. City Hospital. -Special Ofncors Johnson and Trvder of station 1 lost evening arrested George AV. Clemeut on the chiu^ge of obtaining property valued at $30 by false pretences. -The olarm from box 28 at 2.55 yesterday afternoon was for a, slight fire at 18 Bluckstone st. Damage, $100. -AVilllam C. O'Neill of St. Lawrence Hall, Montreal, is making a short stiiy iu Boston at tho I'arker House, on his way to New York. -A feature of the ball to be held in Odd Fellows' Hall tomorrow evening under the atispiccs of tiie ,SoutIi Boston Catholic Insti-tut�s will be the grand march, for which extensive preparations have been made. Former Owner Still Claimed Him After War. Career of Brilliant Young Colored Orator. Triumphs Won by J, J. Smallwood in Face of Obstacles, Probably the best known young colored man in Kew England today is Mr. John Jefferson Sm.allwood. For the past four years lie has been upon the platform, giving lectures upon the American colored man. That ho Is successful as a lecturer and popular as an orator Is apparent from the fact, that wherever he is announced to lecture, tho bouses are inv.ari-ably filled. Ho was born aslave, and when only five months old �vvas torn from tho arms of his mother, who was sent eventually to El Paso, Tex. From that day ho never saw her until about a year ago, when he discovered her whereabouts, after tho manner resorted to by froedmen who since the war have sought to reunite their scattered families, by continuous advertising. In the moantlma, Mr. Smallwood endeavored to so educate himself as tp bp able to rightly set forth the wrongs perpetrated upon his race. Hence he can be called a self-made man. But through the broader � knowledge which cultivated intelligence brings, Mr. Smallwood has not stopped at the race question, but has entered upon the agitation of temperance and labor, topics affecting American citizens, white and colored. His style of oratory,: which is dignified and gracofuhissuggestive of that01 Hon. Frederic Douglass, aud his friends, of whom he has a host, nurhborlng among them some of the leading men and women in Now England, say that in time he will surpass Douplass. His voice is very deep. In speaking he uses many gestures, and i(lustrates and emphasizes his argument with witty anecdotes. He stands about 5 feet 8 Inches. He is well built, his shoulders arosquare and he has a well-formed head. His complexion is brown and ho has expressive brown eyes. � A^'ilbrah.am, Mass., is Mr. Smallwood's New England homo. At present he is visiting the family of AViiliam A. Smith of Randolph, where a visit was mada to him a few days ago. AA'hen told that a request Ijad been mado by many readers of Tim Globk for a sketch of his life ho said: "There are, indeed, in New England many friends ef mine who ai'e tioxly lutor-estoa in my welfare. How different it is now from when I first sot my feet on Now Ensrland soil. "Jt thought that liberty dwelt on every tree top. mountain and valley, that everywhere here a man was a man. But after nine months' residence In Massachusetts I awoke to the fact that the spirit of prejudice against one of my race was almost as deep bore as in Virginia. "My awakening came about In this manner. "AVhen I first went to Greenfield, Mass., I v/as employed by a publishing company, and was to rocoive a certain sum nor day and my board for my services. "After I had worked there about nine months my empleyer told mo ho bad concluded that I was Olijeotloitaltlo to Wlilto Help in his employ on acoomit of my color. "I was disheartened at first, but I took my money and returned South to Virginia. Since I have become more widely known there are undoubtedly many up there who wish they had not objected. But, after all, they knew not what they did. For Now England and her people, with but few exceptions, I can only speak in the highest praise. "I was born Sept. 19, 1803, a slave upon the plantation of Hon. Marcus W. Small-wood of Northampton, N. C, who was at that time representative to Congress from tbe second oougressionai district. "His plantation was tho largest cotton plantation In eastern North Carolina and was worked by hundreds of slaves. It was 25 miles from a ra Iroad and 10 mlloa from a, steamboat landing, the nearest river being tho Roanoke. "This district now, by tho way. Is repro-Bonted by a colored man, Hon. H. P. Cheatham. "My parents' names were David Jefferson and Mary Elizabeth Smallwood. Tho slaves usually took the namos of the masters upon whose plantations they worked. I am the youngest of eight cliiidreii, five sisters, and three brothors. "AVhen I was ababe 5 months audio days old, botli of my parents were sold to a slave trader named A. B. Frutrel sind carried to Blrmingliani, Ahi., where they were separated. My mother was sold to John B. Johnson of El Paso. 'Tex. Sho never saw my father again. Ho was carried to Louisville, Ky., whore lie was afterw.ard sold, iind what became of him I have never learned, for I can trace him no farther. "A little over a year ago I found my mother, who had ^vitll her two ot my sisters at El Paso. Of tho rest ot oiu- scattered family I have not yet learned the whereabouts. This is only an instance of the hundreds of colored families who through (U-iiol slavery have become scattered. It is truo tliat some liave become reunited, but the majority never will meet thoir loved ones again. "After my parents were taken away from me I was left on the plantation in the care of the 'mammies,' The war had closed and on every hand the wildest Sesolation prevailed. At tho age of lOyears, after having been permitted to roam arour.d the plantation at will. I found that my former master claimed that I was bound to him until I was 21. "At tho age of 14 years I questioned this right In court. "It was decided that as my ma.ster was a man of undoubted Integrity that right was unquestioned, and I must stay \  - . "In tho campaign of 1888 I SDoke from tho same platform' ,with Hon. James G. Blaine SIX times in the Middle States.       � ','In 1889 X was chosen with Rev. ,T, R. Gushing, a delegate to thoAVorld's Sunday School convention at London, Eng. There I; was Invited by the Lord Bishop of London to speak in the Crystal Palace with Sir John Lawson and Sir Charles Russell before the royal family and Parliament. I also spok� at St, James Hall on the 'American Negro.' "A tour through England, Ireland, Scot land, Germany, Prance and Greece followed. "On my return to America I became in. torostod in the labor question. I learned that a colored man could bettor represent his race upon such issues when they came-before tho public. . "I have been several times mobbed m yirginia, but I am dotormined to stand nnn for my race, temperance and labor. For this I am now fully satisfied that I com. maud the respect of the host white and colored people, not only in the South bui also m New England." Duriiiff the interview Mr. Smallwood spoke m tho highest terms of Rov. Phlllipi Brooks, Rev. Dr. Minor, Dr. Steele, Dr. Orowoll, Mr. Arthur M. Stone, Rev. Ira Q, Iloss and many others to whom he owes the fulfalment of many of his ambitions. WINTER BATHS IN BOSTON. Prominent Natatoi-s Describe the Benefits of the System in England, and j^ecommeniJ It for This Country. The donation of $250,000 to build a monster public bath in San Erauoieoo, has started considerable discussion in this olty, and many gentlemen, members of the Boston Athletio Association, are already talking about the introduction of the Dublio bath system in this city, b Of course we are second to no olty in the line of floating baths. AVhat is now wanted is �winter quarters with all the comforts of the floating house. � To be sure the bathhouse wlh be expen-slvo, but unlike the floating struoturoa they will have a source of revenue that will make them, in somo cases, self-supporting. The interest has been awakened in this noble enterprise hy Thh Globe, and if the city government does not take the matter undQr consideration, the people's paper will have tho satisfaction of starting a boom for a public benefit that is bound to come In time. "AVhat we want," said a prominent B. A. A. man, "is a system like what they have In England, where the young and old can indulge in a bath or swim in mid winter for a small money consideration." In order to give the readers an Idea of how things are conducted In Englsmd, a country that turns out more and better swlriimers than ar y part of the world, Tksi Globe reporter called on John. Graham, superintendent of tho Charlesbank outdoor 'S:TGraham Bald: "I am delighted to see The Globe take the matter up, for I kno'w that its Influonoe will do much toward bringing it about. "Yes, they have five of those 'land baths' iu Liverpool, all open to the public tho year round, '"The largest is the one on Oomwallis St., which is situated about half a mile from the rivor Mersey. This does not prevent them from, having salt water in the tank, which is 80 by 60 feet. "Tho water is seven feet deep at one end and other parts of the ttink vary betT('een three and six feet, sloping from the centre toward the sides. Springboards are pro-�vlded at various heights, ranging from two to six foot. "Each bather is provided with a dressing-room and fresh water shower baths are also provided for swimm6rs who have been in the salt water for a long. time. AVhen a man enters the bath he is provided with clean towels and a dressing-room, for which he is charged sixpence, or 12 cents. Ho also gets the use of a pair of swimming trunks without additional charge. Of course, the pricos vary and some of the swell baths come higher, but 12 cents is the average cost. "Plunge hatha are also located in tho building for those that cannot afford the iuxuiT of a swim, and the admission foe ranges from four to six cents. In the four-cent plunge the �water is four feet deep, and the six-cent baths have six feet of water. "In each of the baths a professional swimmer Is in attendance to see that when a youngster divos^lie don't remain at the bottom, and also to give tlie lads instructions in the art of swimming. "There are also baths for ladies that aro provided witli female instructors, for you knowthatiemalos have mastered the art in the old country to perfection, "Tub baths ore also provided at a cost of six cents, aud this enables the people wh< do not care to sWim In the tank to have th( wash that Is so difficult to bo obtained ill , largo and poor families In a crowded city.  "The temperature is regulated so that th� bathers can enjoy themselves, no mattei how cold tho day may bo. In tho majority of the baths an adjoining room that is Inoe. pendent of tho baths is provided for a wash houso, and the poor people can bring tlieli clothes and wasli, dry and iron them for a small sura, not more than 25 cents. "The swimming ba^hs aro open from 6 a. m. to 0 p. m. in tho summer, and from 9 to Oil! tho winter. Individually I favor tb(j baths, and think that ono could be erected In each district. AVhat bettor site could be secured for them than on the banks of th� Charles rivor, and in East � and Soutli Boston, and the North End buildings coulg bo supplied with salt water at a very slight expense." The instructor of swimming at the Boston Athletic Association, John Robinson, waj next seen, and, liko Mr. Graham, he had learned how to swim in tho English public baths. "You will find," said Mr. Robinson, "hundreds of s^mmming clubs In London and Liverpool, and, iu fact, in all tho large Eng-Ush towns. The^y are organized the same 'as our athletio clubs and'' hold swimming "galas" or tournaments in tho pubho baths. 'There are also private baths that can be hired evenings and yoit can rest assured that they aro well patronized. "The baths are of course run by tbe city, and receive annual appropriations from the city government. "Since I have been connected with the B. A. A. I have received hundreds of letters from oientlemen who are not members asking where they can send their oiuldrouto loam to swim before going to the beach. "What wo certainly want is public swimming baths, where tbe rich and poor alike can enjoy a good swim at a price �(vithin their means.'' , , .   ,   . Several gentlemen well known ,in business circles lavor tho scheme, and it would not bo at all surprisiii this city .should, ill h reconimond tho erect; as an exiierimeiit. It now remains for Boston to go on record as being tiie first to introduce a mucli needed rifo-savlng, liealth-Klving institution such as tho swminiing baths into tliis country, and have it controlled by tho city government, if tlio next mayor of �s inaugural address, :on of at least one bath BAETLBTT KNOCKED  OUT. Fought Simmons for Twenty-two Bounds Wear AVeehawken. New Youic, Nov. 16.-A kid-glove fight to a finish took place this afternoon near AVeehawken, between "Red" Simmons and Jim Bartlett, both of this city. The former was seconded by .lim Bray and Fred Ayres, while Bartlott was looked after by Ike Tracoy and Sam Sloan. They fought for a purse of $100. The men weighed in at 130 pounds. �* They went at each other like two tigers, and fought very hard for the first four roundii, during which thore were eight knock downs, five in favor ot Simmons oud three to the credit of Bartlett, who also secured first blood in the iirst round. They were pretty "well used up by the close of tho fourth rouml, and both showed signs of fatigue. Tliey kept up till the twenty-second round, w leii Bartlett was knocked out, ana Referee Frank McCloskey declared Simmons the winner. ETAVAL Oi'FICEE.3 PUNISHED. Kush and Eyrd Were Out for Air After Sundo^wn. AVashikgton, Nov. 16.-A general coitrt. martial order was issued from the Navy Department yesterday announcing the sentences of tho comt-marilal and the action of Secretary Tracy thereon in the cases of Lieut. AViiliam R. Rush and Ed-8 en Manning K. EJyre, the two officers of t le snuadron of evolution who were tried at Rio Janeiro, Brazil. In Julv last for dLs-obedlenco of orders In failing to returu to their ship, the Boston, boforo sundown. Lieut. Rush was sentoucod to two years' Buspcnsion, on half of waiting orders pay, to retain ins present number iu the grade of lieutenant (junior grade), and to bo publicly reprimanded. Ensign Eyre was sentenced to two years' susponsion, retaining his present number in tbe grade of enslg-n. Tho sentences in the two cases take effect from July 12,1880. Police Complaints. In the matter of complaint made a.i^rEinst Capt. George A.AA'alker of division 0 and Patrolman Edward L. Morrissey, on tho charge of violating rule 24 of the police manual, the board of police dismlsaed tho complaints. ^The complaint against Patrolman Patrick Burks of diyisioa 3 of aeglfiot oi duty was placed on fclo.   

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