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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 7

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON SUM)AT GLOBE-SUJH)A!, .NOVEMBER  2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. Wants of An Citizens. Greatest Want-to Let Alone. , Werwortli Brave lint Was I MplMo. Line. ^WomM Pierce Prove to be Braver? Believes the Next House Democratic. If a man of ultra-Republican tendencies, having a disbelief in the earnestness and determination of the Democracy of the third Congressional district, had by chance Btrayod into the Vine Street church in Eox-trary lastevening and witnessed the enthusiasm displayed by the large audience in attendance, his scepticism would have reoeived a rude shock. It Is    seldom*' that    such    a    rousing Seception is given to campaign speakers in he outlying districts as was tendered to he orators of the evening, whose areu-)nents, strongly and tersely put, cannot fail fco. have a leavening influence throughout the district which will be productive of good results on election day. Mr. William B. McOlollxm of the Democratic ward committoe of ward 20 was introduced by Mr. John F. Dover as the pro-Eiding officer. Mr. McClellan addressed the audience briefly, closing by introducing as pne of the  younger  men of 'the party Gen. JP. A. Collins, who was received with enthusiastic applause and cheers. After the uproar had subsided Gen. Collins Said: Fellow Citizens-There was a time when the chairman of a meeting of this kind could rightly have introduced me as ono of tho younger members of the party, but Dr. HolmeB says that old agecommencos at-46, and I am sorry to say thatlhave turned tho point. (Laughter.) But a man is young or old as his heart is young or old, and my heart is as strong in tjje cause of the Democracy and as buoyant as it was in tho days when I was 21. (Applause). I am here tonight chiefly, in my capacity as chairman of the State committee, to visit the outposts and see how tho Democracy stands, and I am glad to hear from tho district and ward committeemen that all is well in ward 20 and in Roxbury generally. (Applause.) In a newapaper which I seldom see, but which I understand has a considerable circulation among the remnant of tho Republican party, I read toniprlit of tho proceedings at a meeting hold in Faneuil Hall today,. One of the speochos mado at that meeting was by tho presiding officer, ex-Gov. Robinson, and ho asked two questions and tried .to answer thorn. One was, What ' does the"Aiiiorican'citiisefi want? 1 think I could have answered that question a little better than he. Tho main thing that tho American citizen wants is to be let alone and allowed to work out his own salvation. (Great applause.) He then statod that the American citizen wanted a good j(ov eminent, and suggested that the Republican party had given mm a good government, and that that, government had given us life, liberty and the right to pursue happiness, Iliad a notion beforo I read the ex-gov-enior's speech that a power higher and greater than tho Republican party had  given us that mysterious essenco Wo Call Unman JLife, find I was under tho delusion that tho prosent government was not conducted with a view to giving the American people liberty, but that it was possessed by monopolies; that they had undertaken to establish monarchical taxes, and that they had acting at the apex. And I had an idea that the best way to pursue happiness in this country of ours was to havo tho least government possiblo consistent with public safety. (Applause) But tho difference between the Democratic and the Republican idea of government is � the difference between Jefforson and Hamilton in their theories of government. The Democratic party believe in the least possible government, and believe with Wendoll Phillips, that government is only a necessary institution.  The Republican party believe that the government is something to be set up as a ietich to protect and give certain people what they want at the expense of tho greater number. ,        |(f;;.;$ Two years ago, my friends, the issue hero in tho campaign was not whether we should havo a higher rate of taxes imposed upon tho peoplo of this coitntry, but whother the taxes should remain as they were under the act of 18�3, or whether thoy should bo lowered according to tho Mills bill. Tho question to be determined between tho two parties in Congress then was this, whether wo should add to the free list by giving free ^vool, free coal, free building materials, and ft lower duty upon iron ore and pig iron, and tlion whothor wo should reduce tho other duties from where they stood from 47 Percent, down to an average of 41 Vz per bent. The Republican theory was that tho tariff Wn� well enough as it was, and the Democratic idea was that tlie people needed a "Low Kate of Taxation. The condition that confronted us there was that tho government was raising $400,-000,000, wbeij the government, economically administered, required an appropriation of only 300,000,000, thereby taking 1 unnecessarily out of the pockets of the peo-.'pie 9100,000,000. I   Wo went to the polls upon that issue, and , we were not fairly treated.   I believe the : election was controlled by the corrupt use I of money, and the Republican party has since passed this legislation for a higher 1 rate or duties because thev wanted to miv ' that political debt. We tried bv the Mills bill to make a dollar worth to an American Workingman or woman, an American salesman, a clerk in a store, a conductor on a Jiorse railroad, a laborer in the street, 1 r> cents more than it was under the act o[ 1883. Bv reason of tho higher duties under this McKinley bill, passed under the lash of Speaker Reed when ho counted a quorum, an American dollar which wo will say for 'purposes of comparison was worth 100 'cents, is not worth more than 85 cents today. There is no clamor for higher ratos of duty except from the people who already tave their duties too high. Now, the gentleman who is a Republican candidate for Congress from this district, t&x. Pierce, who is an old Personal Friend of Mine, pays in his opening speech that ho is in favor of lower duties, and criticises the act of the present Congress.   But the question to he asked of him, and all like him, is this: "If you were in Congress now, would you, tinder the party lash, vote to repeal that (tct? Ho can not say that he has more f:ourage than Mr. Ben Butterworth, whom I enow to Vie a brave man, and yet every man n the party, mid ho with the rest, under party pressure, had to vote for the bill, not ns prepared by tho committee on ways and means, but by the lobbv of the monopolies. Which are already overfed. Now, fellow-citizens, thev tell us that this question is settled, Hint- there is nousuin electing men to Congress pledged 10 repeal n high laxiluw; that tho Senate is Republican. I spring from a race of people who have never read in a book yet a statute of limitations that- undertook to impose unjust burdens upon them Unit they did not resent it, as British subjects and otherwise, and it is in my hone and running in ui.v blood. (Applause..) I nut it Massachusetts 111:111, ami Massachusetts never > et. has recognized a question as settled until it is settled right. (Applause.)  .... ,  Tlioso framing this lull have not only not settled U right, but they have settled u on { lines which havo never been in issue before tho people at the polls. Nothing is more clearly written in the book of fate than that tho next House of Representatives shall be Democratic, and nothing is more certain than that ultimately the Senate of the United States, Will Ho Democratic) but in the meantime the States in the West represented by Plumb and other senators, will force those men to vote with tho Democratic House to rostoro to the people lower taxes and taxes only for the expenses of the government of the United States. Wo can see the good work that has been done by the Democratic party throughout tho Union. Wo Bee that in Rhode Island the adopted citizens of that State are to be roleasod from the thraldom of the property qualifications, which has been on the statute Dooks for two centuries. From the State of Now York we are to have a Democratic senator. The Republicans stole two senators in the State of Montana, but the people of Montana will correct that, and add to the Democratic vote of the country as soon as they get a chanoe to assert themselves. It mokes no difference to me in this neighborly talk whether the Senate is going to oe Democratic immediately or in the near future, as far as the prosent issue is.concerned. If a Democratic House is as certain as Ibolieve it is, and if Massachusetts speaks her mind as I know she will, the Senate of the United States will not dare to refuse to revise the tariff. (Applause.) But, in addition to national issues, we havo also local issues and state questions to consider. Last year, in Massachusetts, with evil influences operating, in certain directions, under adverse circumstances, we came within 6000 votes of electing bur candidate for Governor, and practically our entire State ticket, The conditions are so changed this year that all I ask is a fair and full Democratic vote and I will guarantee the election of William E. Russell to be the governor of this State. (Loud applause.) I Am Concerned Hero for the election of Mr. John F. Andrew. (Great applause). I know there is a sort of good-natured sentiment hore and there in the district, in favor of throwing a vote for Mr. Edward L. Pierce for old acquaintance's sake, but, gentlemen! this is no year to throw away a vote. Mr. Edward L. Pierce has reached that age when habits, sentiments, and even convictions are fixed, and he is utterly immovably sottled and staid in his Republicanism as a stone above a grave. Mr. John F. Andrew, when h_e left the Ro- Eublicau party, burned the bridges behind im, and I am proud to be a constituent of his and to have him represent me and represent you in Congress as well as he has. (Applause.) I say lot no local disturbance here pro-vent you all from supporting the head of the ticket. It is vital, as it seems to me, to the future of Massachusetts that her voice should speak strongly for her own industries, which were sacrificed by her misropre-sentatives in the last Congress. Mark this, and I want to talk to you soberly about it. We have been living here in New-England for 100 years by our wits and on tho rest of the country. We havo an arid, scanty soil. Our agriculture counts for little, our commerce has been destroyed by act of Congress, tho foreign markets have been closed to us by tho tariff.we have no mineral wealth, and Massachusetts has Erospered in her manufactures for 100 years y getting the raw materials from elsewhere, and by v lifer Skill and Ingenuity manufacturing them into finished products, and selling them practically to the people from whom the raw material was bought. The salvation of industries depends upon as low a tariff as we can possibly have upon the raw materials. We are told that tho McKinley bill gives us free sugar. We cannot manufacture sugar into anything, except to make it a little sweeter, perhaps: They put that on the free list. (A voice-"You are right there.") But the tariff is simply taken off raw sugar, They say that it is going to lesson the price. Well, if it were anything but sugar I might say amen.but where is the man who knows that sugar is going to be cheaper than it was before? All the raw sugar that comes to this country is bought up by one combination, a sugar trust, wfiioh can make* its price for buying and selling the article, and I question very much whother it is going to make a cheaper breakfast table. But why don't we have free wool? There are 8000 woollen mills in this country and the power of imagination does not go so far as to put them in a trust or control the market, and free wool would make every pound of cloth worn by our people 30 to 36 cents cheaper.. A low duty on iron, and free ooal and free building materials; would start up all our mills and would encourage the building of now ones. The fact in relation to the tariff law as embodied in the McKinley hill is that we asked those pooplo for broad and they gave us a atone. (Great applause.) Hon.  each. Solid gold Bettings fully warranted. Vou must not mlBs this; all sizes; open evenings until. 9, Bnturday until 10; fine repairing. KEENE, the Jeweller, 1801 Washington st.    it*- THOSE WISHINO the Art Amateur for 180.1, to Join my club and save gl; best of references given. A 27, Globe ofllco. It* �srR�- M. B. JOHN-SOX will hold a test cir-1WL clo this evedlng at 7.80; circle Thursday after-noun at 2.30. 41 Winter st., room 0. It* THE  BALL ROOM. DANCOTO SCHOOL-PROF.. OAUDKEH, 176 Tremont St. Theatre bldlding; November's class for beginners In ball room dances opens Tuefl. and Thurs. nert at 7.4D; private lessonB daily. dSudt* o31 FfSTKCCTIOar in dancing wanted;   lady teacher preferred; slate particulars and lowest terms. Address K 172, Globe ofllce. If WALTHAM WATCH, gS.Oii; most wonderful; see It now. KEENE, the jeweller, 1301 Washington st. It* PHOTOGRAPHS, CRAYONS, ETC. C1A.BIKETS OKLT c2 AIM* SB.BO per J dor..; not club pictures, but all (list-duns phofos, warranted equal In tlnish and artistic lighting to any 87 pictures. A. Si. UKNUKOX, photographer, 13 Tromontrow; remember the place, over SfjtHsaclui-setts boot and shoe store; wo have no other Btmllo and no successor. riudtf my-l INFORMATION  WANTED. $9.75 MAEBLE CLOCK. Tills clock Is sold elsewhere for g20. Solid mar-hie; giuintnteocl 10 yejira; my price S9.7B; 10(1 choice pntterna to be sold this week. Opei; evenings until 9; SiUurdvn-s until 10. Clocks repaired. KEENE, the Jeweler, 1301 WastUngtou|st._ INFORMATION" wanted-Will the expressman that a lady gave cheek for trunk marked -M. E. 11., to be delivered to the American Exit., please communicate or cull on A. A. IiAllli, 58 Winter St., room 10. It* WAX.XHAM WATCH, �3.05; most wonderful; see. it now. KEENE, the jeweller, 1301 Washington st.__It* DRESSMAKING. AUTISTIC dressmaking and millinery done at moderate rates; French designs.  Apply at 70S Washington st. Suu3t� ni! T^XPEKIKSiCEJ) dressmaker wants enguge-X?j nieuttibv -Bnshelwoman, ono that can put on hlndlug. Apply nt G Jefferson at. If TOUIVCa- r.A.O'V wanted; rapid and corroet (Galiffraph typewriter): having Bomo oxporienco in bookkeoplnK. I^oston Stenographic and Copying Co., room 41, V Exchango pi. 811M* oa X^AIHISS to tuko Hnwlnp: homo. Apply 108 ^jU Eliot Bt., lioston, orS115 VVulnuUt., Chelsc DIAMONDS, JEWELRY,  ETC. This week, one lot1 Ladies' Dlamond-Cnned Gold "Wntohcfl, #29,00, Walthnm make; thOHe suit for #45 elHOWhero; your old watch taken us part pay. Opon evenings until 0: SaturduyB until la KEENE, tho Jeweller, 1301 wnshhigton st. DIA*GOIV;�N ! mjVMONMS l-DIamond rimjs, #JO to #t')00j diamond �nr Jewels, #10 to S400; diamond studs, laco pins, collar buttons, cult tuittous, scarf pins, eta, In fact, diamond Jewehx of overy description at pricoa Unit defy competition; also watches, clocks, etc.; will exchange these goods for pianos or organs. ^Nonm I'iunonnd J)lamonil Co., eslnbllshiid IBfiU, 37 Court st.,opp. Court House. It* IA�r NW^fsT�i48---L"lirgo ulamondliFoH^ has 00 while diamonds; a perfect nhizo: has been worn by ono of the cardinals In Home; will bo sold cheap. Korris Piano and Diamond Co., established 18o2, 37 Court at., opp. Court House.    It* DIAMOND CJftOHB-lint-go diamond crofis, hno 00 whlto dlnmonds: a perfect bhizo; has boon worn by ono of the cardinals In Home; will ba Bold cheap. Norris Piano find Diamond Co., entali-llshed 1802, 37 Court st., opp. Court House.    It* Ci^aa CUFF BUTTONS, 18 largo dhv tjPOvfl/ momis; mako a very handsomo and miinuo design, and the price la lean than we could duplicate them for. Norris 1'lano nnd Diamond Co.. established 1852, 37 Court fit., opp. Court House, If* HORSES, CARRIAGES,  ETC. WATCH. Th!u watch lias three-ounce case, nnd Is fully warranted worth $12; 20 to bo sold this week, with chain and charm; Apploton, Tracy & Co, IValtham watch, }?i3.7D. Open evenings till 0; 8nt. ml 10. KEENE, the Jeweller, 13Ui'WaBhlug- I7tOK. SALE-A nearly new milk wneon, in per-' fret repair; also n 20can mill; tank iinrt n good working liurjiess; will sell very cheap, as I have no u.sf t'tr t.Uem. Can button at 10(13 Dorchester av,, ABhmout. It* HOirsmM--J',or sale, on easy terms, 20 acclimated hows and mares, (1 to 10 yuan* of itge, 000 to l.'JOO pounds, several quite speedy; also 2 top box road buggy.  132 Unggles st,       Mud3t*  n2 O MOICSKS tukt!ii for debt; no reasouaMo otfftr >j refused. 17 .Seliunl st., near aqua re, Charlestown. READING   MATTER. ItEAWIlVO MLATTJKM- If you nro 1 undecided what papers to subscribe for, ornd us yonr address with 10c. silver, arid we will forward your name U\ publishers all over tho country, who will send yon inugazlwsund papers of every description in abundaiice; it is the best investment you can make of a dime; it will yield large and pleasing results; try li; subscribe to no paper �without gelling our price. Hub Subscription Agency, box 3001, Bostmi, JSIass.; mention Sunday Globe. It* CIAHINETAIAKKK-A young man with 1 or ' 2 vears experience.  Apply at JiO Thayer st.. 2 flights. It* ClABIKETMAKEKS-llench room to let. 50 / Thuycrst., Itead's block, l^fllsUts.____lt*_ C""'1A10�JBT AKDSHAK Email wanted. I'OW-i EKS' antique siore, tfO lloylsiun t>L, Harvard a  MAKUH: CLOCK, tfV.Ti., ?S0, this week. KEENE, the JeWulU-r, 1301 Washington tjl. It* WANTED*--Young man with riiy txtirri'iu'e u* tiub'Kttian; aluu vomer iiri'i rob-:u� lb*' Ikim-net*. KEENE, lh� jewoller, i:\Ol Washington hi. WAXTED-Ai; iwpu'iem-ed waiter.   A;-i-lv at -  *L?iLu"Lbi'________U*- TAXTJKW mTt7i"i:nd wife: unit* a Is-�; 2 muu-|o men and Htpm-tT.  782 Wa^binguni t-t 7 AITKH- V ti i'sm-iii'itcrd   w *iut  t  w   !, �toady.   WVAIAN'S, SO i fcUtuid fit* It* \T�EBLW �U� tVV   ami ' carriagi-j.mnh'a Jujlpv-r wanted, Apply fit 120 B it-, ho. ltuai-n. FOR ADOPTION. ADOPTION - I'retty Utile boy, IE _E liiuiiMiti; lull Kurrunckr ytvoit. AcUtriiBB C. 1H7, (ilobc (lllll'f. It* T^OUC AMOI'TIOa,'-Hnmlnomu, licnlthy r.irl, JP 7 ni'iMttiti old; u1m> boyu unci " :m(, 5 luuuttiB, rt'Sl"^ttvi;ly.  Addtt'bs K 104, (Jlobe otlii:t\       It" ADOPTION-I'retty, durk complexion 1 l.'itby Kit'!, - weekH old, of good paretita.  Ad-die�B 1* IO--', lilulu- office. It' INSTRUCTION. AJ8II-A new 7-rooin ItotiBo finished in whlto wood, )mn sower nnd witter, is on high Innd, in cood neighborhood, nenr Somervlllo dojiot, Lowell li. It., fare fi oent^, homo or Btciim cnrs near: price only J3K100; only SHOO down, balance glG month; nave rent (no extra payment for internal); wo have built. 84 hotiHos slntio Anrll, and 2(1 families that wero paying all they could aearo lip for rent, now havo happy homes of their own; witfoll tho boom. J. W. }V I Ml mi, MR WnsblnRtoii Bt.'_ J.t I?oA HAXB on Partridge av.. Wlntar IliiT Sontenlllo, H or 4 new cottages of 7 rooms, good cellar, oltited roofs, bath tubs in kitchen; a lino thing for a small family; witter nnd ntr; always warm In the Itltchon nnd no extra expense; good garden; near horao cars, steam ears, churches and schools; hotiBes shown Hunday p. m.; price j?H2fiO; On easy terms; key at 34 Jci ly r.ind av. Apply to HORACE l'AKTKIDOE. f)5 llimovor Bt. It APARTMENTS AND  TENEMENTS. ____________Sawer St., 5 rooms and QUINCY * CO., 28 School Bt.      SuM* mElVEMENT to let, JL bath, ....... mENKMENTS to lot, 040 Tremont at..Brooms; X jJ12 and 8S1B a month. QUINCY & CO., 28 SohooUt:_____SuM* m'KNEMUENTS to let. IS So. May St., 4 rooms, X 82.2B a week. QUIKCYACO.,28 School st. SuM* BOARD AND  ROOMS. IIBItAItFOien ST.-To lot, newly furnished rooms: largo closets, bath and heat; gentlemen only. lt� HOIT8E of 10 rooms at Montroso station, l'/a miles beyond Wakoileld. 100 foot from station; good stable, hennery (JO feet long, 2 acres host land; price ^3000, on easy terms; koyB at station. Apply as above. It aOlTSES-For Bale, Enst IloBton, 2 hotiaos, now bringing $000 a year rent; price 83200; near ferries; great bargain. Apply to T. C. KENNEDY, .........lock, Kaat Boston. It* 0 Winthrop bloc: BUSINESS CHANCES. AK.onoiNO-lIOirSJB-15 elegantly   fnr-nlBhod rooms, ilrst claBS every respect., paying now #80 per month above rent; will clear fftlOO; ln- vestlgato. STEVENS & BECK, 230 Washington at. BuM*- ANlTMMIillt of good paying lodging-houses, . liotol, 4H roottiB, barber shop, moat market, billiard roontB, cigar store; variety' of business. STEVENS it, BECK, 235 Washington st.    SuM* A Ilt-Lotlging-houaes 8200, S300, (H00, |?B00, S000; best streets. WILDUIt, 235 Washington. and iioliday goods store, dressmaking 1 connecterl, on thoroughfare; first door oil Tremont St.-, 8500.  WAKT1N, 1R0 WaBhingtonBt.   It* PA.KTNI3IC wanted, with B12B, to buy a half interest. In a well-established uubIucsb. Addresn or call, W.F.HT ,t (1KAFTON, U. H. View Co., 8 Bromtleld bU, 10 to 8j_.___It* OO^i�~MULKBI.Hi ClMtTML. worth C� 820, this week. KEENE, tho Jeweller, 1:101 Washington st. It* HOUSES, STORES,  OFFICES, ETC. AIMO house No. Oft Jenny Llnd nv., 7 large rooms, good cellar, large, garden, Mystic waler. Keys at 34, whero you can apply. It FINK'HAI/TjS to let, by tho day or evening; Partridge Hall, 4. dnyB in week; Hibernian, 2 days; Foresters', 3 days; Fuslleers', 5 days or evenings; Franklin Hall, 4- (lays; Hanover Hall, 3 days; all of these can bo let by tho evening 2 evenings a month for lodges, BocletleB, etc., or for dancing, concerts, cto. Apply to HOKACE I'AUTllIJJUE & CO., 55 Hanover st, It 1NORTHAMPTON PI,.-Nicely furnished rooms with or without board; private family. _________Sud7t� n2 furnished lodging rooms, furnace heat, ,v.c; walking distance to P. 0.; respectable-peoplo only.  30 Gray Bt., off Berkeley. SuTW* n2 ?~Q~T*X?i?Ebn ST.-To let, 3 tarnlrted ..L.-) rooms, Bcparato or together, for light housekeeping. It* fOAIlLAND ST.-"cTtanged handa;"newly ftirnlshod rooms, 82,83, 84,85 week. SnTTliS* n2 16 A A UNIOBf pk__Ilandsomely furnished al- 'devf cove room, also other rooms, with board; dinner at 5.30:__ lt*; KYlTj'jAJND ST.-Alcove room, square and sido rooms, all modern improvements. SttdSt* na 66 TQ UVTLAN1) ST.-Front and,back parlors, nJ handsoinoly furnished j also  back scnuira room; tablo board. it*-. 130 I'EMIIKOKIl ST.-Rooms, all sizes and prlcoa; board tf desired._SuJt* ' TJ QQ WEST"co~NCOKB~ST.-Furnished lOO flqttaro rooms, single or connected; all conveniences; rent low to right parties. It* ClillvriilEN boarded reasonably; mother's care given them; 9 Camden St., 2d bell. DICKSON.____SuM* CliillDRKN boarded and taken for adoption; ) terma reasonable. Address N 164, Globe office. FKONTItOOIIf to let,'neatly famished or m\. furnished; rent oheap. 121 W. Brookllne st. lt� I?UI�NisilEliTrooma to lot 6y tho day or week and would like n lady boarder: in a nrlvate family^ 1-167, Globe otllce._BuTWTh* ng 1~?UKNI8III3I� WUO�I, for light bouaekeop-; lug, and sipinre room to lot.  G Dover St.     It* NIOI&JVV furnlahed sunny room, furnace heat, gaa,water, 84,  54 Chandler st. It* ROOM-To let, a largo square front room, newiv and neatlv furnished; price reasonable. 8G Harrison av.,.2 illghts. It* It* ROOM'--To let, 1 Biiuare room, prlci , i.tudall pi., off Cambridge st. ROOM to let in family of 2, to a quiet gentloman. 402 Tl-f.-mont st.; relorence. It* SOI/Uf MA ft Ki.IC ?I,UCK, 811-75, worth 820; see it. at once.  KEENE, the Jeweller, 1301 Washington nt. It* HOITlSi: to let on Sussex St., to rcflpectnblo white or (udored family with best of references.  Apply at 23 Gray at., oft Berkeley sL It* TIO I..1I3T, furnished parlor and side room, connected, with ubo of pmno and privilege of Itglit housekeeping; Highlands. Address K 178, Globo office._____   It* 7v57rilAM �W-ATOir.~83.n5; most won. derfnl; see it now. KEENE, the Jeweller, 1301 Washington st. It* STOItE to lot on Tyler St.. near Harvard, a entrances, good Bhow windowB; rent 815 tier month. F. W. HYDEK A SON, 8 lioylatun building, cor. of Washington ami Boylston Bts. It SOLU* MAttM.K CLOCK,'S0.75, worth 820; see it at once. KEENE, the Jeweller, 1301 Washington Bt. It* npo I-KT-House of 10 rooms ami bath, newly X frescoed, papered and nut in thorough repair, on Brook av.f very near Dudley M.; also suite of 5 rooms, hath and steam, in Hotel Fillmr, Bill lludlev St.; flue location, 2 min. to Dudley st. depot, N. V. A- X. E. lt.lt.; 20 niln. horse car ride. Apply to janitor or at 11 Exchange pt. It* rru� LirF-Lotrer ti"ui~ <�n:�i:irtd|ie nv., \viiiter X Hill, B rooms; kevs al :',4 Jeuny/.tnd av.; rent plB; Mystic water atld closet tuslde. Applv at 34 as aljove. '      it WAT ; .Siitiird;iy nmil 1U. Kill.'Xt, tlm Jfw-fllt'r, 1301 WuahliiKLon st. It* OTpiKI., sTKATHMOttE~(!osy snit.?~ rooms ii'id i'lUb and idl fonvtMiichrt's; rent t-ii.  Apply to janlUir, 6utt�> 5, 77 \'illai,*e st.    It* RCM>MS-1'o let, snnahlt- forhotWkwi"nusT2 lar^t* rooms and Uut;'' pauiry; ull mudern im-provvnu-nfB; mat rt-usoimblo. Apply with ivft-rt'u:\ti, ^Briy^iL____It* SO. BONTOK-To let, tanement 3 rooms, nuth, tirtii tlucj-; rttit ^14 niynth; also U-'tu'ment 3 roums. thir nri a week in SpunUh.    .Addresu, stating U:rms, N IfiO tUutm ullk-c._______ OlIOKTUiX'II,   tviM'wrUii:^,   bookki'iM.'snK. O i-tc, at \h>-   }U  Vi'iisliisi^tun t.i., cov, liuylai"ii ;t.; day isn-i MEDICAL, OTKH^TUKi: Mu-i-i-aMuUy curort hy a ntw uiv-thud; n\> p.dti, no icUip-soti ox dctcunon ti't-m liil.'iUivto; toprulil uttrtiUo.u yt\�;:t U- ihtf tvt>f fiiic'i' "t QOt-in MAKHfi-K CLOCK, 75, worth JO J?L* iiM*^ rpEXEMEXT '.o let. 75 AUnoa a:., 6 xiwuvs siid TOXTNO MAN wants comfortably furnished room In tlrat-class privnto Catholto nvmlly, with partial bourd; convenient northern depots. Address 0 184, Globe olllce._It* FOR  SALE. ' This Itfamond is fine and white; was taken In trade; weighs nearly lH/i carats; It must be turned into cash at once: open t'veninys until 0; Saturduvs until 10. Kr.lvNK, the Jeweler, 1301 Washington�t� 1"7t>St SAI^E, ii-ton elevator, in good repair, 1 WlitithT make; in operation 57 Hanover Bt.; can l>� dcHwrt'd In 1 mouth; e,au bi> been auy week tlayx rlBt'b 5 tttories; also 2 windlasses for hoisting, all complete, rope wheels, eto.; also 1 large sizo, eoppur carburetter, seeoud-lutnd, and i^ood repair. Apply to IIOUACli PAllTlilOGK, 55 Jianover st.__lt_ 1^4>it SAX.ii cheap: roll tup desk and chnir�i 1 Rood as new.  W 108, Glol>e �fflce. If MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. a-CnitKERlXO piaxo, rosewood case, sweet tone, in perfect order. SttO, �5 down, j?l n w�ek: stool and book; will allow �00, reasonable time In exchange; pianos to j?40O, cash or easy terms; pianos slightly used at one-quarter of cost; organs all prices; pianos tuned, polished and repaired. Norris Piano and Diamond Co., 37 Court st.,opp. old Court House; established 18D2. lt� MUSIC. FLUTE OK PICCOLO instruction, fiOc.j thorough     instruction,    raoul    advaneemetit. .IGIIN'STON, 795 Tremont st. It* "\TlOI*IN IN�XltCCTIOX-Mr. J. C, Bl.N-T NE'IT, 1st violin lioston Museum orchestraT For tortus, etc., address above theatre. It* SO LEO UAHBLE CLOCK. $9.75, worth $20; brto it at once.  KI.EXL., the Jewellej, 1S01 Washington lit. It* CLOTHING. I^OK 8 ALE-A line Alaska seal ulster, bust 38. 7 length GO inches: cost c*7i�d; will sell tor gSOOs tttthtt"tliot Loan Co.,U7Kiiot St.. A. TKOEBEK, l'roprietor. * lt� DRAMATIC. .:t.. CbarlesLowu. �altst ,s coached.   Address 2 Cni^d ir JJ. CO KEMASI, vocalist mid dancer; � amateur tutUsH' ' '" "'     * ' '     " " *' ' S69Pag8s13,14&l5 �ft&    por additiooal smalt ciassifisd advertisements.   

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