Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1890 - Page 6

Share Page

Publication: Boston Daily Globe

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                ibE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY,. NOVEMBER  2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES, WRINGER, RUG OR MMP To Every Purchaser or $50 WORTH OF GOODS A?r� crwAitit. A eJwice of the following article)!, viz.: HANDSOME BANQUET LAMP, Brr.ss or Nickel, no incites hlKli, I.inen Snudo, irtt.li Fringe ami Duplex Burner, nil complete. AN ELECA^T RUG, Rouble Faced, f> ft. Long, -on a- rst-Glass Wringing Machine FREE OF CHARGE. IE DELIVERY -At .any Xew England Freight Depot, and at 'Residences Within 10 Miles of Our Store. Prompt Attention to Mail ov Express Orders. We frnor��too every nrttolo In our stoclt lo be just as represented. This Roclcer, walnut frame, upholstered in fan-cy covcrln:ttterns� and we hav fixed the price at No such value was ever given for this price before. We oiler the above Couches upon a pavuient of $1,00   down   and   $1.00 per weefc until paid. Mall or express orders for these Couches promptly attended to. Send rush, or lirwt iiayment of ftl.OO, ivltli order. Only one Couch, sold to a Customer. STREET-5 BosTuar. Gents' Underwear. tn Scarlet, also Grny Scotoli Wool, in Bhlrta and ...   Drawers,, at $1.25 i marked from $2,00, Children's Underwear. Dliildren'B Merino Shirts and Drawers, Bizeu 18 to 34, at 25o.) marked from OOo. Ladies' (Underwear. Ludios' Merino Vests and Pants, at 3So.| regular price, 50o, Hosiery. Ladies' Improved Gar.hrjjere Wool Stainless Hose, at 23o.| great value, Kid Cloves. Ladies' 7-Hook Kid Suede G-loves, in Tan and Gray, at 64c.| regular price $1,00, Corsets. The penninc P. If. Corset, all 'bone, Eewman Cork C!:.3P Protector, in Ecru and Gray, at 46c,j regular price 75c, Night Gowns. Mother HuDhard Night Gown, with tucked yoke, double back, neck and sleeves trimmed with Hamburg, for this sale 50c. each. White Skirts. Welkins: Skirt, vrii-h wide Hamburg Plounoe, 3 lucks i.boTt, good cotton, icr this sale 59c, Handkerchiefs. Lndii-i' Bt'?.U-;H'd Er.as Bilk Enadkerchiefs, in red, blue, pink, wait* and yellow, at 23c. each j a b;:n';ain, Ribbon. til Bilk Ko. 12, Blucke-J tied Gros Grain Bat-in Edge, at 10c, per yard : worth double that price | r.l! colore. Kuchins;s. Bilk Cord Keck Suchinr., at 3c, p'-r yard, Ladies' Aprons. Manufacturer.-' Sampler., about 100 style*, extra values, your choice 25c. each ; every lady in need should tx&tuisf. Corset Covers. Our 33c, and 37*c. Cortet Ccver, perfect fittinr, handsomely trimmed, vo'-r choice 25c, euch i for cue week, Umbreiias. 26-in' tt ce&ttise Bilk Gloria, handt'Omt silver Koarts, P&rfteoc frame, for this sale at $1.00. Ltand Chhisen'e CABHMEHE H0S.TXEY :.t ttoat HALF PE1CE, tnhject to manuiaottr-r:'. tl-tfii iaperfecticas. Laoiet',in5or 6 styles iJlKckt tte Gray;, 29c: Children's 12�c, Small !'..\r.t.tri ttii'-ct he durJicatea, A.. 22 Temple Place. Lee's Ditty: "Around the End I Go," fail: "Ob I a Roast" Yale to Wesleyant "Your Line Is Leaking." Sighs, Yells and Foul Tackles From Other Fields. ARVARD and Cornell played foot ball on Jarvis field yesterday until darkness came on and the stars began to peep. It would be a more precise statoment to say tdiat Harvard played foot ball and Cornell looked on, for when the game was ended Harvard had mado the highest score of tlio year at Cambridge and Cornell had not made a point. There were rumors that Cornoll had serious intentions of winning yesterday's game, or at least of keeping Harvard's score down to respectable limits, but Capt. Cumnock's men playod in earnest for a few minutes and tired the Cornell players so that they dragged themsolves up to the oentre lino with considerable hesitation. The final score was 77 to 0, and if Harvard's sprinters had wanted to run it up to three figures they might easily have done so. One thing which Lee did yesterday has never been soen before at Cambridge in a match game. In tho second half, soon after resuming play, Lee got past everybody on tho Cornoll team, sprinted towards the goal and then, to the surprise of the spectators, instead of crossing the line he turned off to the side of tho field about 16 yards from Cornell's goal and touched the ball down. The Harvard team then lined up at this point. A few minutes latorLee repeated his performance, and at last, to cap tho climax, ho deliberately turned baok in one of his runs, thinking apparently that he was too near the goal, and retraced Mb steps for some yards. This play was brought about in order that the rusii line might have practice in blocking, while Trafford tried for goals from tho field. Both the rushers and Trafford succeeded in doing what they wanted to, and as a rosult Trafford kicked five goals from the field during tho second half of the Same. Harvard aid not try for touchdowns uring this half. Tliero was one good feature about Harvard's play during the first half. Instead of trying to run around the end as in most of tho games this year, tho half-backs wont tlu-ough tho rush line. Cumnock has learned that Yale sends her runners through tho centre, and ho has determined to do tho same thing himself. This is tho style of game Harvard must play against Yale if aho expects to win on tho 22a. In this respect yesterday's gaino was satisfactory to the Harvard supporters. Lake bucked up against tho Cornell line and Curried It Around the Field as though tho men bad been babies. They woro not, howover; on the contrary they wore strong, heavy men, and at the beginning of the game Cornell broke through Harvard's line frequently. But when Cranston and his aids settled down to work they were immovable. Fearing got through tho rush line well for so tall a man and ho played a good game in general, returning punts like a veteran. Ho had few opportunities to use his peculiar "cuttle-fish" tackle, but when he did use it, the runner wont down. But Lake's playing was tho feature of the game; it was simply wonderful. When ho walked off tho field in the second half he was applauded again arid again. Leo took his place back of tho lino and ran brilliantly around the end, but was of little use in going through tho lino. One thing must be learned by all the Harvard half-backs. Lako as woll as the1 others, and that is the necessity of looking more carefully for tho holes made by the rushers. All tho men are inclined to run into the crowd at random. Doan on the whole played woll, but he had Beveral poor passes to his discredit, and only by tho purest luck did Harvard fail to loan the ball. The rush lino was perfection at times and at others it was miserable. Blanchurd had his hands full with Collon and Cranston had no easy timo with Galbroath. In the beginning of tho gamo and again in tho second half the Cornell l-nshers broke through the Harvard line and wero on Dean before ho had timo to pass the ball. Tho weak point was plainly at guard. F0X0R0FT FARM DAIRY, ! MJL AID CREAM, \ i'r -h T-L's. I.iititT, Cheese. , !.!:.'.fit! >M.. t AMliiilli i;.t about his kicking was that his punts were not so longtluu liU null ould not Bi-t under the ball before it land. d. There was little tacking; done outside ibe rush line. Another thing to he !e..n,ed lev ih,. Jiar-vard players is a way v .-t..i. iln- V. Every time thut Ctirneli formed on, > estertlaj, somewhere f rout r to 1 u yards was gained before the ball v, lis dovt in ii. Harvard's jjayius yesterday u ^ encour- aging, then, because tho rush lino wns worked more than over bofore atid fowor attempts woro made to sprint clear across the field for tho sako of gaining five yards. Cornell was simply not in the game. The men know nothing about foot ball. They could not tackle. In fact, tho only tiling the rush line could do was to Break Throua-li when Harvard Mad the It nil. When tho ball wns in Cornell's possession her rush line was useless. There vverp three good men back of tho lino. Yawprer, the captain and quarterback phiyed. a good, strong game, although somo of his passes were wild. Osgood was the star of the team; ho ran beautifully and kicked well. Ho alono made any substantial gains for Cornoll, and if bo had been hacked up in any sort of stylo ho might have mado a point or two. Bacon was the othor playor who distinguished Himself. Like all tho rest he could not tackle, but ho could punt, and ho did somo of the best kicking seen this year on Jarvis. No matter how or where he got the ball ho was cortain to got his foot on it and send it to Trafford or If oaring. Cornell showed her ignoranco of tho game by trying to kick at the send off during tho first half when the wind was against her. Every timo that this play was tried Cornell lost ground. Tho teams were composod of the following players; HAllVAlU). COUKlitt. Mnaon____1. e..................r. e.....Stratth Upton____1.1................., .. .r. t____Burr !e.8v.i;g::}.......... ...........Centre...........Gall Bhaw Goldthwotte Cninaton............ Blimobitrd... .r. g.. > [....r.g.;' Grlllltli Gnlbrnlth .1. g... .Collon .Johnson Newell.... r. t.. 1 , , Davla____r. t.../..............l- &::.'r.ro0'.-.}...............l.e....Sl,ejmrd Iloan......;.....Quarter-uncle..........Yawgor Lake...........) C.........Osgood Lee............>IIalt-baelcs-J Fearing.........) (............Itay B. Trfttford........Full-back............Uncoil O. Wadsworth, Harvard, '90, was referee, and J. H. Morse, Harvard Law school, umpire. Cornell started with the ball, but soon dropped it, and Harvard forced the ball down. Newell, Lake and Fearing gained. Lake mado a touchdown; no goal. Harvard, 4, Again Fearing and Lako went through the lino, and Lake scored. Goal. Harvard, 10. Dean got tho next touchdown by a beautiful run of 60 yards. Goal. Harvard, It). Cornell oould do nothing. Lake made two long runs, one of 18 yards, tho other of 45. Fearing scored. No goal. Harvard 20. There was no more interest in the game except to seo how much Harvard would score. Fearing carried the ball over from the 30-yard lino. Goal. Harvard, 20, Tho next touchdown was longer in coming ; but Lake and Foaring began to run around the end and at last Lako made 20 yardB and a touchdown; goal. Harvard, 32. Only a moment later Lako made tho run of the game; he broke through tho Cornell oentre, ran 40 yards and was tacklod, but kept right on until he crossed tho lino; goal. Harvard, 38. Fearing and Upton got gains; Harvard mado 25 yards on Cornell's foul tackle, and then Lako went across. No goal; Harvard, 42. Fearing, Davis and Lake made short runs and tho last snored. No goal: Harvard,   and made a beautiful run of 20 yards. The bull was now at the 10-yard line, Crocker mado a touchdown from which Cutler kicked a goal.  Scare, 10 to 0. "Tech" could make no holes through the rush line, and was unable to get around the ends, so was forced to kick. Raley, '03, made a good game for Amherst. Clark was disqualified; Burroughs went on the left end, Noblit playing quarter-back. Amherst broke through the centre, and good, rushes by Allen, Lewis and Cutler landed the ball at the live-yard line; Pratt carried the ball over for a touchdown. Cutler failed to goal. Score, 14 to O. Crane kicked from the centre, and Kales made, a good run and tackled Pratt at Amherst 16-yard line. Pratt made, a high punt and Amherst secured the ball. Kaby, '03, was now given tho ball and succeeded in getting through all tho "Tech" men, made u beautitul run of 75 yards, and made a touchdown. Cutler kicked n, goal: Score, 20-0. "Tech" now made a pood brace and succeeded iu keeping their opponents from scoring the remainder of tho half.   The ball was now on Amherst ground most of the time.  "Tech" received the hall several times on account of interference; Crnno tried a goal twice from the field, but was unsuccessful, the ball being carried out to the 25-yard line e*eh time.   Meade and Andrews made good rushes, but could only advance the ball to Andrews' 10-yard line. Kaley. '93. and Crocker made good cross runs, but were well tackled by Tech's bacKs. Near the end of the half "Tech" got the ball for the interference; Burroughs carried the ball to the 3 5-yard line.  Crane failed to kick a goal from the field, Amherst receiving the ball.  Pratt made a good punt , but it was well returned by Crime; Kaley. , 03, catching the hall, and made another I good run, but was larkh-d at "Tech's'1 15-I yard line.  This closed the first half, i " At the beginning  ol   the second half ; "Tech" strengthened up very much, played much better hall, and succeeded in getting j through Amherst's line. Meade, Wi-'ik and I Noblit gained       Muds.  Oane kicked to Pratt, who failed toc.t'.rh the ball :il lhe.'tfl-| yard line, and v.'i^soon droj rd on by sev ! elal player-,,  hut  it bounced ufl and was �captured by  Nohlii, who made an elegant run and succeeded in eariyiii^ the hall o\'cr Amherst's goal for the tnst time.  Crane 1 tailed to itoal.  Scoie. 20 to 4. )    AioUeiNt formed a V, but only e;,ailed live i yuid*.  Italey. 'V3. made hit third Ivua juu, scoring a touchdown, Cutler, lacking the goal. Score, 2(i to 0. �   Tech now guinod ground from tho contro, I and were greatly encouraged by Amherst's poor kicking, and succoeded in getting tho 1 ball to Amhorst's 25-yard line. Crane mado : a good run, but was tackled at tho threo-1 yard   lino by   Raley,   '08,   both    men ' being    disabled    for    some    minutes, Tech    could    not    carry    tho    ball any farther, so tho ball went to Amherst on four downs. Morse of Amherst was disqualified for slugging, which was very conspicuous at this part of tho gamo. Morse was replaced by Knight. Crocker wns hurt and was replacod by Dclabarro; Moacio of Tech was replaced by Chase. Amherst's blocking enabled her backs to make good gains, and Cutler socurod a touchdown for Amhorst and kicked a goal. Score, 32 to 4. Only iivo minutes remained of tho half, and Amherst playod hard. Two rushes by Raloy, '93, gamed 40 yards, and mado a touchdown from which Cutler kicked a goal, making tho score 38 to 4. Raley, '03, Crocker, Cutler and Allen did tho best work for Amherst, while Kales, Crane and Nohlo did good work for "Toch." Tho teams lined up as follows; Tech. AwnnnsT. Nobltt. . . .1. o................r. o.. . .Italoy, '02 Wels____1. t...'..................r. t____Allen HonUln.. . .1. g.................r. g____Wright Hammond..........Contro..............Lewis Evans....)'. g...................1. g.,. .Morse Voice.... r. t................... 1.1... . Crocker Kales (Capt.).... r. e...........1. Clark............Quarter-back. .. Andrews.......�}     ull-uncks Crane............Full-bnok , Iteferee-Cottrtenbery or. Yalo. Umpire-Morgan of Trinity. {:::: .Hamilton .....bynll , Italoy, '03 .... Cutler . Pratt NOT A WAIfKOVEK. Dartmouth Defeats Bowdoin, but Not Easily. Hanover, N. H., Nov. 1.-Dartmouth playod Bowdoin bore this afternoon in tho first foot ball game of the league series. The former won by a scoro of 42 to 0. Tho game was hotly contested from start to finish, and Dartmouth had by no means such a walkover as tho score would eeem to indicate. Bowdoin seemed to put a great deal of dependence in the weight and strength of her team and its ability to force its backs through tho contro, but in this she lost almost as much as sho gained Tho gamo was called at 15 minutes bofore 3. Bowdoin secured the kick off, and gained about 15 yards by the V play. After ineffectual attempts to advance the ball, she lostit on tho fourth down. Weeks then advanced the ball 25' yards by a pretty rush, but the ball wont to Bowdoin on an off side play for Dartmouth. After four downs Dartmouth again secured the ball, and by a brilliant rush on the part of Weston, a touchdown was secured in just seven minutes after the game began. Norton kicked a goal. Score, 0 to 0. Bowdoin again formed a wedgo and gained flvo yards. Aftor sovoral short rushes the ball went to Dartmouth on four downs, and rushos by Weeks, Norton and Weston advanced the ball 20 yards. After several rushes, in one of which Weeks was injured and Ide substituted, Weston secured a touchdown. Score, 12 to 0. Bowdoin then attempted to rush tho ball, but lost it on a fumble, The ball was then rushed by Weston by a 20-yard run, but came back to the centre on an off-side play for Dartmouth. After several short rushes by Bowdoin, Dartmouth secured the ball, and runs by Norton,Weston, Ide, Fulsotn and Lakemans secured another touchdown. No goal. Scoro, 10 to 0. Bowdoin again formed a wedge and gained considerable ground, but lost the ball on the fourth down to Dartmouth. Ido them made 30 yards, but Dartmouth, being unablo to advance the ball farther, it went to Bowdoin on four downs. Bowdoin advanced the ball two yards in three downs, and on the fourth fumblod and. lost it. Finally after several rushes and after tho ball had changed hands several times Dartmouth forced her opponents to make a safety. Score, 18-0.     ,, .     �   , The ball was thon brought out to tho 25-yard lino and kicked by W. L. Hilton. Norton rushed it baok 20 yards. Dartmouth then made several snort rushes, and on tho third down Norton carried the ball back' 20 yards, and it was first down for Dartmouth. Dartmouth then succeeded in getting tho ball within a few feet of Bowdoiu's goal lino, whore it was forced over and a touchdown made. Goal by Norton. Score, 24 to 0. Bowdoin again formed a wedge but made no gain, and on four downs tho ball went to Dartmouth when time was called, with the ball in tho contro of the fiold. Scoro at end of first half, 24 to 0. Tho ball was Dartmouth's at tho beginning of tho second half. She formed a wedge and gained fivo yards. Aftor advancing tho ball several yards she lost seven yards on the third down and the ball was taken back 20 yards, and it was first down. Ide then made a brilliant rush, but was hurt so that ho had to retire, and Geiger was substituted. Dartmouth fumblod and Bowdoin secured the ball. Sho soon lost it on four downs, and after soveral rushes Weston got a touchdown and Norton kicked a goal. Score, 30 to 0. Bowdoin made fivo yards by tho wedge play, but being unable to gain moro on the third down she carried the ball back, and doing this her full-back miscalculated the distance and went back 10 yards further than necossary. The ball then went to Dartmouth, after Bowdoin had gained 20 yards, because of fouling by tho latter. The ball then advanced up the field and came back according as Dartmouth or Bowdoin secured it, until finally AVost, u'v an excellent rush, Boctvred a touchdown. Goal. Scoro, 3d too. The last touchdown camo tho hardest of all, out was finally socurod by a brilliant rush of Norton's, in which ho camo half the length of tho field. Goal. Score, 42 to 0. About three minutes later timo was called, and Dartmouth had won tho hardest game of foot ball seen here for some time. The men lined up as follows: ' Bowdoin. DARTMOUTrt. Cothrtne.... 1. o..................r. o, . .. 1'rtoo TnUey.... 1.1..................r. t,.... Fulsom Parker.... 1. g.....v............r. g.... Stanley Jackson............Contro..............Jones Hastings____r. g.................1. g____Little Home. . .. r. g.................1.1.. .. Lakeuian Onrloton.. . ,r. o..................1. o.....Hail E. Hilton.........Quarter-backs..........Allen Newman.......)   TIn!f hnrk-      (......Weeks Font,.........-.1  "iH-nncfcs.     |____-.Weston w. I,. Hilton........Full-back...........Korion Umpire-Bates of Harvard. Referee-Ranney of Hanover. A GRAND  BRACE. Yale is Now Right in the Fight for the Championship. New Haven Nov. 1.-Yalo stock has risen 50 per cent, in tho last 24 hours, and is now away above par. Eight to nothing, 34 to 0, and 76 to 0, represents tho scores Yale has made in her throe games with Wesleyan this fall, and thero is much food for reflection in the improvement which has boon mado by the wearers of the blue. ' Yalo's game today was a big improvement over anything sho lins shown this year. In short time, Yale scored two points more tlinn she scored in her last year's gamo with Wesleyan. It was a team gamo throughout, and it may fairly be stud that every momber of the team deserves credit for every play that was mado. Yalo played an all-around game, but paid a great deal of attention to jamming men through the centre, as that is believed to bo Harvard's weak point. Wesleyan was minus the services of Slay-back at half-back, and this doubtless hurt hor game. Still, no one man could have stemmed the tide of Yale's fierce rushers. McClmig and Heffeliinger were not in the game, hut Williams covered himself with glorv and Adams proved himself a very acceptable guard. The teams lined up as follows: YALK. Wr.fit.KTAN. . lialston Hartwell. . . .1. e......... Waliis____1. t........... Adams.... 1. g.......... Ilolcoiiib...........Cent. S. -Morrtson . .. .r. g...... lttiodes... .r. t.......... Pope. . . . r. e ... � r. t.....Howard ... . r. g. ,. . >,'e\vlon .............l'ogp ��!� H----lllckf.ird ... .1. t----Utldreili ..he.... Leo Barbour.........Quarter-back........t. I'arslilev K. Morrison.....)      ,, .    k    (........Meredith Williams.......S il'1"-"'uks |........Gordon Harvey............Full-back.............Hall Yale chose tho westerly side, with tho wind at her back, and gave Wesleyan the kick-oJT. At first the. Wesleyan boys made a great spurt, and by clear rushing straight through Yale's centre, drove the ball down to Yale's 20-yard line. Here the Yale lads made a brace and held their opponents, but Hall was near enough to try a goal from the field. The Yale rushers got through, however, and stopped the kick. This was the only time during tho game that Wesleyan bad a chance to score. Yale soon got the ball, and 10 minutes from the call of time Williams went across tiie line with the first touchdown. From this time to the end of tho first half Yale scored about every live minutes on the average. Waliis' rushing was especially strong, and ho rarely failed to make s yards. Rhodes, S. Morison, B. Morison and Williams were continually gaining ground for Yale, and Hartwell was conspicuous all through the game, following the bull closely, and taking advantage of every misplay of bis opponents. The best leal nit- ol Wesleyan's game, was the rushing of the qt;ari.cr-bnck irom the wedge. J.co's tackling and Newton's blocking were noticeable. Hall minted fully us well as Harvey, while Meredith made the star rush ol bis side lor ;>o yards around the right end. ]>;;�sUi� till but Harvey ol the Yale team, lhekfoid was sent through the centre irviiUeidly, and iu general Wesleyan excelled at bucking the centie. Once four ci'hs'-ctiti\c o!ov,'j;> iH'ticd If Yard-, tor the Middlctowu kicker.--, ail of it being (Jean gam ihroatsli the centre. Va!,--- �r.t! l!ll\fS -aN i'r, m toca-'idov, us, tluv.-   toiud.Ji.vrns   lUliuyr ilva!^ ,m4 a safety in tho first half of 45 minutes, netting her 32 prints. B. Morison kicked the goals in the first half, but did not try very hard. In tho second half Wesleyan/ was tired out, and Yale scored as she pleased, making 44 points in 25 minutes, whon the reforoo callod timo on account of approaching darkness. Williams tried goal-kicking in the second half, and from 10 touch-downs managed to make two goals. Mr. Coffin of Wesleyan was roforeo, and Heffolfingor of Yale was um-piro in the first half and Wallaco of Yale in the second. Summary: Yalo, 70; Wesleyan, 0. Touchdowns. Wlllinms............................8       32 U. Morison..........................5        20 Hartwell............................a        8 Wnllls..............................1        4 Goals. n. Morison..........................3 0 Williams.........i...................2        4 Safety. Wesleyan...........................1        2 Toints. 30-MHVUTE  HALVES. .. centre.. B. A. A. ... r. o... . Burns . r. t.... Stlokiioy ... ,r. g----Kin . Churchill ... .1. gy . .Houghton Boston Athletic Eleven Go Throttah Brown's Line for Touchdowns. Providence, R. I., ^Nov. 1.-Boston Athletics, 20; Brown, 12., This afternoon the Brown and Boston Athletic elevens mot in a very stubborn and closely contested gamo, which resulted finally in a victory for tho Athletics. Tho game was played in 30-minuto halves. Following is tho makeup of tho teams: BnowN. Casey.... 1. o., Eaaton., . .1. t. Webb----1. g.. MatteBon...... Beers____r. g.. ,...... Fllmer... .r. t.................1.1... .Codman Drawbridge.... r. e...............I.e.... Clark Lindsoy..........Quarter-back...........Beals Aldrloh........1   rllllf f ........ Waters Dowd.........S J""""10T- \.......Boyden Peirco..............Full-back........Atkinson Referee-Goddord. Umpire-J. Mender. Tho game began a 3 o'clock. Brown had the ball. Dowd and Pierce, by good running, advanced the bail to tho 20-yard line. Aldrich next took it, and by a beautiful run half way across the field mado the first touchdown. No goal. Score: Brown, 4; B. A. A., 0. The B. A. A., after three downs, attempted to kick, >but lost tho ball to Casey, who mado the second touchdown. No goal. Score 8 to 0. The B. A. A. now advanced the ball near the Brown goal, and by a good run by Atkinson made their first touchdown. Goal kicked by Atkinson. Score-Brown, 8; B. A. A, G. In the last throe minutes the B. A. A. managod to make another touchdown through the good runs of Stickney and Boyden. Goal kicked. Score-Browns, 8; B. A. A., 12.  In the second half J. Stickney was substituted for Burns, who Was hurt. The B. A. A. started off with tho ball, and by good running and blocking made another touoh-down. No goal kicked. Scoro-'B.A. A.,16; Brown, 8. Dowd now advanced tho ball 10 yards for Brown, a foul gave them five yards more, and a pretty run by Filner 10 additional yards. Tho ball was then lost to B. A. A. on four downs. B. A. A. also lost the ball to Brown on four downs. The ball was then advanced 25 yards by a Iqng run by Aldrich and 10 more yards by Dowd. At this point Bowen was substituted for Drawbridge, who was accidentally kicked in the head. Brown now failed to advance tho ball tho required distance, and had three downs with six yards to gain. Aldrich made a good run and advanced the ball at least nine yards, but the referee called four downs, and tho ball went to B. A. A. This decision at a critical point of the game was a "dead roast" for tho Brown team, as the ball was within 10 yards of B. A. A. goal. The B. A. A. now advanood the ball rapidly toward the Brown goal, and by a hard run of Stioknoy's scored another touchdown. Goal kicked. Score-B. A. A., 22; Brown, 8. In the last part of the second half Casey and Wobb, by hard rushing, advanced the ball 20 yards. Dowd.af ter advancing tho ball 10 yards, made a pretty pass to Aldrich, who scored a touchdown. No goal kicked. Score-B. A. A., 22; Brown, 12. In tho last few minutes remaining B.. A. A. managed to scoro another touohdown. No goal. Score-B. A. A., 26; Brown, 12. OH, WHAT   A ROAST 1 Virginians Met Princeton But Will Meet Them No More. Baltimore, Md., Nov. 1.-All of fashionable Baltimore turned out at Oriole Park today to see the foot - ball g�me between Princeton and the University of Virginia. Thero are Baltimoreans on both teams, including Capt. Pee of the Princetons. Tho teams woro as follows: Phinckton. University or Vircikia. Furness.. .. r. o...............r. o., .. Greomvny Gallway... .r. t................r. t.....Abbott Jefferson.... r. g.................r. g.....Smith .1. Rigs..............Centra..............Heay Thomas... .1. g.................1. g.....Atuslte Wood____1, t...................1.1.....Pnrrlsh Davis.... 1. o.................l,o.....Whltakor Poo..............Qunrtor-back.........Daggett King........)      lime lmpira      S----Marshall Bploer.......S      H'ur-bncka      t .. McDonald lfoinans...........Full-back............Elliott Ecferee-Soy. Umpire-Dashiell. From the first the game was a picnio for Princeton, whose men clearly out-matched and out-generaled the Virginians at every point. The score was 116 too. The features were tho brilliant work of Poo and King of the Princetons, and of Daggott of tho Virginians. The Virginians have been aching to play Princeton for soveral years, but tonight they say thoy have had enough, and take some consolation in the belief that tho University of Pennsylvania will defeat Princeton next Saturday. Yale Freshmen Downed, Andover, Nov. 1.-The Yalo freshmen eleven was defeated here this afternoon by tho Phillips Academy team, tho scoro being 17 to 4, Tho teams were about evenly matched in weight, and both worked hard. Tho Andover boys played a fine game in the first half, their work being quick, sharp and effective. Tho teams lined up as follows: rmi.Lirs. yale. Coxo.... 1. o....................r. c.... James Townsend.... 1.1............r. t.... Van Huyclc Ogilvlo.. . .1...................r. g... , Winters i'orklnB............Centre............McDuffee Taylor----r. g...............1. g____Dunkerson ...1. t____Miller 1. o..., Jenkins . Quarter-back..........Word Woodruff. Hopkins.. Knapp...........Full-back....".......Buckley Colt.....r. t, Hltikey... .r. o Sheffield .....Vi'i.iiueuwjK..........yvoiu , ( ... .McCormick *' > Half-backs   n tlit European plan.  Rooms SI per day each person. Miwtord, Nov. 1.-The Democrats held the first rally of the season tonight. Music Hall was filled to repletion. Tho Milford brass band furnished music.  The speakers were Goorge Fred Williams, Dr. George P. Cooke, ox-Senator E. J. Slat-tory and candidate for representative from this district, J. T. McLaughlin. . Tho meeting was called to order by Dr. Cook, who, after giving an account of. his stewardship as a representative from .this district in the Legislature last year, asked that if tho people in his district were satisfied that ho had done his duty by them that thoy stand by him in his present fight for senator. Ho gave Senator Field's irecord in the Senate last year, which, he said, judging from a Democratic and labor standpoint, was anything but flattering to Mr. Field. He closed by .introducing Mr. Williams. George Fred Williams Said: I come to the town of Milford with feel ings of tho warmest gratitude, not only to my friends, hut to my enemies. My cause should certainly not be foreign to you, when working earnestly - in my campaign is one of your excellent citizens who has been three times your representative in tho General Court, and another who will represent your town in the next session. I wish to gratefully recognize the faithful and disinterested devotion of these gentlemen to tho cause which is not only mine, but yours. Nor do I forget tho able efforts of tho Milford News in the Bame behalf. I may as woll dispose at tho outset of the. only unpleasant matter I have to deal with-I. have made a statement concerning the attempts of the editor of the Milford Times to sell his editorial support. I made this statement upon the authority of another gentleman, and I merely ask you to examine the affidavit which has been circulated in this hall to give you conclusive proof of the truth of my statement. The affidavit which Mr. Williams refers to reads as follows: '   �'    . Commonwealth Company's ..   .  Shoe Shop. MARt.Bono, Oct. 30,1890. Tho underslgnod, Michael Quirk of Marlboro Mnss,, testifies as follows: On Oct. 12,1890,1 wns mot by Josiah Golligher on tho main Btreet in Milford and asked by him what Williams' friends intended to do for him In this tight, that tho Republicans had offered him glOOO, and unless ho received. $800 that ho "would give It to Williams In tho neck." I reported tho above to H. B. Endlcott and Robert M. Burnett and told them I considered it robbery, and the man could not hurt Williams, and to have nothing to do with him. . M. Quirk. Mnrlboro, MasB., Middlesex ss. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of October, A. D. 1890. . John S. Fay, Justice of the Peace. Mr. Williams then discussed the lobby question, the position of the Democratic Jtarty on the issue and the attitude of the lopublican party and campaign orators until very recenty on tho matter. Continuing he said, If I now present a new phase of tho lobby issuo, it is merely because Gov. Brackett hag delayed so long to make known his stand upon the question and has refused to make any statement in behalf of his party. My assertion now is that his party is not only unwilling to make any pledges against the lobby, but that it stands m the Attitude of Apology, explanation or defence of the lobby itself, and that of defiant attack upon every ono who has assailed the lobby as an evil. I desire to call the attention of the nooplo of Massachusetts to tho absolute hoplessness of any reform from the Republican party in the Legislature. I cannot, in presenting this question, ignore my own personality, as I would like to do, but the significance of the. attitude of Republican leaders toward me, as' the promoter of tho West End investigation, I ought not to belittle. In the last week it has been a part of the Republican plan of campaign to send into the ninth district Republican associates of mine in the last Legislature for the purpose of discrediting my efforts to expose the lobby. ' One of these gentlemen is Mr. Wardwell, the Republican leader of the last House and present secrotary of the Republican State committee. Another, Mr. Rowland, is tho defeated candidate for the secretaryship of state; another, Mr. Murray of Fitchburg, was the chairman of an important committee in the last House; another, Mr. Kittrodge of Boston is the man who was soleeted after the report of the committee of investigation to make a personal attack upon me on tho floor of tho House. These men have, with ono exception, been renominated, and may bo taken to express the purpose of the Republican majority in tho next Legislature. Mr. Barrett, speaker of the last House and candidate for the speakership of tho next, has oxtolled the lobby as a sot of able men and joined these other gentlemen in unqualified criticism of my conduct during the investigation. Mr. Marden, the Republican candidate for treasurer or the State, declares that I should have bopn censured and expelled from the lost Legislature. Mr. Lodge called the lobby issue "ajpitiful issuo at best," and declared that the Republican party did not present it to the people of Masfachusetts because it presented no candidate for their votes. He said this in connection with the corporations that retained tho lobby. He says this in tho face of tho fact that no lawyer in the State of Massachusetts has had more connection with the corporations that. Retain the ILobby, excepting, perhaps, Mr. Goorge A. Bruce, than Hon. A. E. PillBbury, tho Republican candidate for the attorney-generalship. Mr. Bruce suid Mr. Pills-uury havo been for years the leading counsel at the bar, having charge of legislative matters. I need not hesitate to sav that Mr. Pillsbury comes within tho report of the investigating committee when it deplores the practice of graduating from the Legislature into the business of managing legislative work. There is probably no man in this State who can testify better to the shameful work of tho lobby than the Republican candidate f or the attorney-generalship ; yet these are tho words in which he discusses this question: "Tho lobby issue is a false one, and no ono knows this better than the man who brought it up. I charge him with a deliberate attempt to cheat the people for the sake of a little political capital. He had.every opportunity at his command for investigation, and the rosult of it all was that ho was unablo to find the least practical evidence that the lobby had anything to do with the passage of tiny bill." So it seems, upon the authority of the man who is likely to be the next law adviser of the Commonwealth, that in tho West End' investigation I not only fail to show corruption, but fail to produce the least practical evidence that the lobby had anything to do with tho passage of the West End bill or any other. Mr. Long belittled the lobby issue in this manner: "I do not suppose, in his sober senses, that any man in thisConimouwealth is going to vote in this campaign with reference to the.Democratic or Republican lobbyists who infested the State House last season." Numerous members of the last Legislature, who voted and worked for the West End bill, had been renominated by the Republicans, and oven the senator from Essex, whose sou testified that he was a professional member of tlie lobby, has been, . without criticism, renominated by the Republican party. I now submit that the concentration of the Republican leaders in an attack upon me has been simply and sololy in defence of the lobby, and that that party stands today, as it stood at the beginning of the campaign, in sullen defiance of our challenge that it join us in an effort to exterminate this vermin. Mr. AVilliamsthen discussed the campaign in the ninth district, and closed by pointing out the errors in a letter of Gen. William F. Draper regarding the McKinley tariff schedules. J, 6. McLaughlin was the next speaker, and made some telling points in favor of Mr. Williams. He was followed by Senator Slatiery. The reception that was given Milford's former citizen was a magnificent tribute. Mr. Mattery spoke for over an hour, and was listened to with tho closest attention. He concluded by asking the voters of Milford to cast their ballot for George Fred AYil-liams and reform. LETTER FROM W. L. DOUGLAS. $10,000 ill premiums given away. See runtj'Mvl in each package of SaVBKA. Couldn't Attend Rally, but Indorses Mr. Williams. Mn.ioun, Nov. l.-The following letter was read at tho rally tonight: I'.EocitTos, Oct. SI, 18ft0. James F. Stration, E�q., Mtlfoid, Mass.: My Dr.\u Km-1 exceedingly r'gret that my t>u*i-M-is and family attuin prevent me ttout attending the rally in Milford Saturday, becauso nothing would give mp moro pleasure than to meet so many Democratic friends and speak to them on tho. Issues of the campaign whloh nro Important to every mnn, regardless of party. As one of those Democrats who have watched and followed the progress of tho party from my boyhood, I can truly say that this Is a momentous occasion In tho hlBtory of tho country. Tho people of this State are called upon to elect representatives to tho national Congress, and In doing so tho voters, regardless of party, should soo that men are elected who will truly represont tho wishes of the people, and protect their Interests when In peril. - In regard to Mr. Williams' candidacy, I congratulate the people of the ninth district. He Is worthy of their confidence, their esteom .and their votes. I have Watched your stnndard hearer's career as a member of tho Legislature and I greatly admire tho stand he took in favor of honest legislation and pure politics. I sincerely trnst the cltlzons of the ninth district will seo their way clear and rebuke tho candidacy of a man who was false, ub wore his party associates, to the Interests of Massachusetts, whon tho McKinley tariff bill was under consideration. Tito ninth district needs a man In tho national Congress who will be true to hiB constituents, by securing for them legislation for their benefit, and 1 am qulto sure Mr, Williams, tho cholco of tho ninth district DomoorntB, will not bo blind to tho lntorcats of Milford and tho othor prosperous flhoo towns of tho district, The time calls for courageous men; not men who wilfully sacrifice tho Intorosts of New England in order to appease the greed of monopolies and trusts. The McKinloy tarlil hill is n monBtrous outrage, and if tho thinking peoplo of tho ninth district tire true to themsolves, they will elect the candidate who has tho courage of his convictions and never fails to express and uphold them. Our Republican friends who believe in a protection to labor which falls to protect, howover, tell us Hint the tariff measure is settled. That Is not so. "Nothing is over settled unless It is settled right." The Republican OongrcBS, with the consent of 10 qt the Massachusetts delegation, threatened the safety of the shoe industry of this State by giving President Harrison tho power nt any timo, at the request of the cattle raisers of the West, to place a duty on hides. '�'.' Did the gentlemen, who olaim to bo all that Is noble and pure In politics, realizo what they were doing?      � � Whether they did ornot tho fact remains tho same, and the great boot and shoe industry of Massachusetts Is threatened with a protection on hides any time some campaign contributor for tho Republican party demands It. Whore .were the Wilsons and tho Stunners of the Republican congressmen from thiB State? Thoy woro looking for national reputations by supporting a law that threatens the peace and prosperity of the South, by protecting their own individual iutercBts and leaving trio people tp tho mercy of tho Carnegios, Goulds-and Quays. It is timo such men were rebuked by being told next Tuesday, in no uncertain sounds, to stay nt home. Citizens of the ninth district, be loyal to your interests and the State In which you live by Baying on election day that the McKinley bill must be rebuked. I hopo that at some future time I may bo able to meet tho citizens of Milford, and wishing for the triumph of' right ovor wrong, I am, my dear sir, very truly yours, William L. Douglas. Williams Indorses McLaughlin. The following is self-explanatory: John A.' Armstrong, Secretary of tho Indepondent Democratic Committee, third Senatorial District: Mt Dear Sir-I am In receipt of your letter of the 2Tth Inst., inquiring if I will Inform you, over my signature, whether Mr. Daniel McLaughlin, member of the General Court of 1890, did not vote on all the- phases of the West End Railway Company's bill in the interest of the people. -1 gladly answer tills question, as Mr. McLaughlin voted hi every instance in accordance with what seemed to mo to be the interests of tho people. I take it, that your question is dlreotod to the point whether Mr, McLaughlin supported mo in my offorts to amend and defeat that bill. Ho did, from beginning to end I am, very respectfully, Gboroe Fbed Williams. Boston, Oot. SO. REPLY  TO   "COUSIN  BUSHROD.' Mr. Morse of Canton Contradicts Mr. Morse of Sharon. North Abington, Nov. 1.-The Republicans held a rally here this evening. Congressman Morse addressed the meeting, and in course of his Temarks, said : Cousin Bushrod, in his speech at Brockton, contrasts the growth and prosperity of the shoe manufacturing towns of Massachusetts with those of the iron industries, and deduces an argument thereform in favor of free trade. So far as their prosperity is due to any policy of free trade, I claim exactly the opposite is true. No ono knows better than Mr. Morse the true cause, of the decadence of the hoavier iron industries, in tho second district, and New England. Tho duty on coal and iron has little or nothing to do with it. The discovery of natural gas and lime in close proximity to the great coal and iron mountains of Pennsylvania and Alabama is tho causo of the loss of this business to New England. This natural advantage which the Almighty gave to the great coal and iron producing States, for the manufacture of the heavier iron products, car wheels, axles, heavy forg-mgs, etc., is tho cause of the decline of the rolling mills at Canton, South Boston and Bridgowater; but the duty or freight on Pennsylvania coal and iron is not a serious drawback to tho manufacture of tho smaller iron products-tacks, rivots, printing pressos, etc.-in which the principal item of cost is labor. I will say for the information of my Sharon namesake that these smaller iron industries of the second district, tacks, rivets, printing presses, etc., are at present enjoying the ceneral prosperity of the country, running on full time, and probably were never more prosperous than-now. I will tell him another thing. Did the Democratic policy of free trade provail these smaller iron manufacturers, who omploy thousands of men in the second district, could not pay the wages now paid and run ono month and would have no alternative except to reduce the wages of their operatives to those paid in Europe or closo thoir establishments. While this country produces coal and iron enough to supply the world for thousands of years, wo do not and cannot, owing to our climate, produce a fit thick sole leather hide, which grow upon animals in tropical climates where the hair is short. Earnest as wo were for free hides, tho question of its importance to tho hoot and shoe industry has been undoubtedly largely overestimated, and I deny that the prosperity of this groat industry has been or would be seriously crippled by a duty on hides. - He thon discussed the McKinley bill in detail and reciprocity. LABOR PARTY'S PLANK. Charles E.  Marks Willing to be Governor that Wrongs be Righted. The following will bo read with intorest: Messrs. Charles K. IIUIb, president, and Albert e. Webster, acctetary, Labor party convention: Gkktlkmkk-Your notice of Sept. 16, announcing my unanimous nominal Ion for the fourth consecutive time to the high office of governor of Massachusetts lias been received. I highly appreclato tho honor conferred and the undoubted confidence reposed in me. Tt shall be my ilrst duty to see that the great trust shall not be betrayed. Tlie'great questions involving noble principles aro the vital points to be gained. The labor question la now bofore the people for settlement. It must, be heard. Independent labor is ill the political arena to take charge of 115 own business, and will thus relievo the politician of a great deal of care, as tliey seem to have little else to talk about just before election, but after election it is tho last question thought of, We have come to that period of advancement when labor mtiRt stand in a dignified manner, ami tta, question of friends and foes allko must come to a detlnlte understanding if we would be a happy and prosperous people. On . one hand wealth is centralising its power Into powerful pools and trusts; and labor Is organizing its trade unions. TheBO organizations offer trlald of strength nnd terms of gar-retidcr like two hostile armies. When industries combine to forco down production, it means increased cost of liviug, and that working people are to be thrown out of employment while prices are forced up. Whon the necessaries of life arc too easily obtained, combinations declare war on plenty; production Is stopped, and thousands are forbidden to earn while prices rise. Thus in a land of plenty a few men may at their own pleasure order a famine in thousands of homes. They close tho factory and the mine and the working people are forced Into unwilling Idleness. The capitalist can arbitrarily raise the price of the necessaries of life, can prevent men working, but has no responsibility though the worker and his family starve. Here is taxation without representation with a vengeance. We have developed a ilespoiism far more exasperating than that which the 13 colonics rebelled, which is one of the darkest clouds lu our political horizon. Party tactics can no longer keep the minds of the people divided with the question of high and low tarltf. The qnesUous that are engaging tlie minds of thoughtful people ts that of eight hours us a legal (lay's work; the two-dollnr pre-reqtuslte to voting; the enforcement of tlie weekly payment law; the .-'late control of ru 11-c.ads auu telegraph and gus companies; the abolition of the liquor truffle, these arc the gi cat ipios-tkwis that have come up lor tieUIemenl. Ill behalf of these great principles for the people ol yi:e*achu-st-tta 1 accept the Humiliation. Cu.u:l.!:s 1'. Mai::.?. Scots Charitable Festival. Thepreparations for the �c!3cl annual festival of the Scots Charitable Society.in Music Hall aro nearly completed.   The bale of tickets is very large. The triple attraction of a concert by tho best exponents of Scotch music, a supper and ball, constituting a pro* gramme of the most inviting nature..      ; RECOGNIZE HIS LABORS. Portrait of Father Toomey Presented That Gentlemen at Newburyport. Newburyport, Nov. 1.-The Coltunbiq Catholic Union celebrated on Thursday evening its first anniversary. Speech and song gave to all an enjoyable night. The special feature of the evening was the presentation from the union to its reverend president, Father Toomey, of a handsome crayon portrait of himself. The vice-president, William C. O'Connell, in pre-ronting the portrait, spoke of the wonderful growth of the union m its first years of existence, attributing this to the untiring labors and devotion of Father Toomey< lho union, he continued, in appreciation of its founder and his Work, had the pleasure of presenting to the reverend gentleman this mark of its esteem and CTatittrfie. Three rousing cheers for Father Toomey followed the unveiling of the portrait. . ine reverend president responded in feeling and earnest tones, giving promise of greater endeavors for the future of the union. On all sides complimentary remarks were passed upon the work of the artist, P. E. Duffee of Boston. \ A Iflsonso Unaccbuntalily rrovalent. The prevalence, of ailments attributable to miasmatic poison in the air that people breathe, and tho water tliey drink, is well nigh unaccountable. Not alono In pestilential swamps, badly drained suburban districts and. marshes oxposod to tho sun's rays by.the receding tide, Is this scourge of humanity found. Evon In groat oltles, healthfully located, Blulfully sowerod, weU looked aftor in every respeot In a sanitary way, we find malaria. Its presence is ofton Inexplicable, but its nttaoks ore always preventable. The protootor la Hosteller's Stomaoh Bitters. The erndlcator bears tho same name-a name known to thousands throughout our broad land and elsewhere as n synonym of relief, prevention and cure of the insidious disorders In. Its abominable phases-chills and fever, bilious remits tent, dumb ague and ague cake, as wcH as others. Nor is the Blttors less effective for indigestion, kidney complaint, billouBness and rheumatism._ 20 Years' Praotioe. 10 Tears at the Bame Offloo. Facts for Men of Ail Ages, Young, Middle-aged and Old Men who are broken down from tlio effects of disease, through any cause, will find in Drs. i & S. S Over 7000 cases treated in 3 years. successfully 1243 Washington,,-' BOSTON,  AEASS. The following cases are only a very few of the many thousands cured by tho 3% o. 1-Varicocele of 10 years' Btanding.accitoi-panied with Rroat despondency, perfectly and permanently cured, without un operation, by tlio Now Method. xVo. 2-Sypl&llift-A sufferer for 20 yeni-g, frequently no rest dny or night, cured without the \\m or mercury or other poisonous medicines by tho Wow Metliotl. No. a~8crofula-A sight to behold, a terrible sufferer for 11 years, perfectly cured by the New Mo tlio d. No. 4-Nervous Uebllity-V/hy, ho tvns a complete wreck; loss of memory, unable to conduct his business, a strong deelro to put an end to his life-, such was his condition for the last 8 veavs; perfectly cured by the New Method. No. 5-IHalietes-In a wretched condition for 4c years, never expected to be cured, but, thank God, lam a well man today; cured by tho New Method. No. 6-Stricture of the Urethra, with an unhealthy discharge, a sufferer for 10 years, completely cured without an operation by the Nevr Method. No. 7-Inflammation at the neck of the hladder, a constant deBirc to empty the bladder. A Btifferor for 5 yearn cured by the New Method. No. 8-Oloet-Afflicted for 11 years, perfectly and permanently cured by tho New Method. No. O-Nightly disturbance, with unnatural emiBBions,.very nervous, unable to attond to business, badly afflicted for 7 years, perfectly cured by the Now Method. No. lO-Impotency, JLost Manhood, afflicted for 0 years, paid out thousands of dollnra without any relief, at last perfectly and permanently cured by the New Method. "Wo should advise rhoso afhlcted to waste no timo, but consult these geutlomen, either personally or t;j letter. Kidney and all Urinary troubles speedily cured. Unhealthy Discharges, Irritation, Scalding and In fiammarion quickly removed, lty their ire:itmou| the blood is thoroughly eleanaod of all inipurl tics, and In a remarkably short period of timo lho patient is restored to perfect, health. Thoso subject to Nervous Debility, Seminal Weakness, Want of Energy or Vital Force can be cured. If you aro suffering from the effects of any disease, now is your opportunity to get rid of it. The treatment is pleasant, and does not prevent yon from working. You will gain strength every day. It has been their greatest effort to cure without the use of disgust-lug medicines. This they certainly havo accomplished. Thousands who have been under their treatment, can positively verify tho above statement. Many physicians in their practice employ medicines which aro so thoroughly disgusting, both In smell and taste, that the pnuent would rather face death than to undertake such treatment. I can assure you if such remedies poison tho mind they must certainly poison the body; and how can you expect to bo cured under such circumstances? Remember, the office is a short distance above Dover st. Notice-All business strictly private and confidential. No names made use ol. CONSULTATION  FREE. Every sufferer from Maine to California should either consult him personally or by letter. Special attentiou given lo lSrl(rht's IHsense and Diabetes. If you cannot call write for terms, (iivo a clear description of your case. Medicines safely packed and expressed to nnv part of the United States and Canada.   Cxit this Out. Hours-Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. 8 a. in. to 7.30 p.m.; Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 8 a. in. to y p. in.; Sunday, 8 a. ni. to 'J p. m. N. it. WorkUifr people should take advantage of the Huuday JHours._ IMPORTANT TO IADSES!!! Women Buffering from diseases peculiar to theii sex should avail themselves of a treatment that can be used by themselves in the privacy of their own home. DR. ELIZA PRESTON'S MEDICATED UTERINE WAFERS. have been used in actual practice for over 20 years with the most satisfactory results, for the nosltlvt and permanent cure of the worst forms of FhMALB WKAKXK.SS, MCUCORRHiKA or WIUTKS, lit-iriCdULAK, SinTKICSSEJ) or I'AINFITL .MKX-STWATION*, BKAJHNG DOWN PAINS. WEAK BACK. ETC.EVKItV LADY CAN Bli IIKit OWN PHYSICIAN and thoroughly cure herself if the Wafers are applied in the manner directed, Tlw renicdv is quickly absorbed and ACTS BY STIMU-LATI N<; THE HYPOGASTRIC PLEXUS OF NERVES, restoring and maintaining tliti healthv 1 [millions of the orguns to which this 'plexus of nerves is distributed. REMEMBER YOU WILL COMMENCE TO FEKL BETTER AFTER FJRST TREATMENT. Price SI for il months treatment.. St nt securely scaJei: by mail on reccipl of price. All lett'is of inquiry or symnt ins, should comum a siumn to insuren reply.. All letters are strictly eor> fidcminl and answered by ladv clerks. The Dr. Eliza Preston Medical Co., I�. O. hox IQT, Maidyu, Mass. The following dispatch has Just beer, recriveil: (natt'J) 312\ K1SCO, X. V. To J^ttrant Jirant'ttsf The Area a, 401 Ti'tiiiont St., JSostou: A ay fins i>oliJ in I'aris  meven  Jatmtfrea and fifty thousand /rwuc-l.   Only short time loiiycr in .lioston, j JT.1S. J**. SUZTQA\  > 7829   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication