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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1890 - Page 27

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                ' . THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. k MODERN CIIDERELUL It was perfectly patent to Lucia Caldwell's maid that her mistress was not Only spending a much longer time than usual over her toilet, hut that she was also anxious to create an impression.  in the first place, she was net sure tohot Bown was tho most becoming;, and had them all laid out before her, until the dainty boudoir was as full of color as a garden houquet, and the Ions Pflasses reflected heaps of laces like drifts of snow, airy cloudlike . Bossamors and shining silks. .. She Hold up first a nile green. "Ma foil" exclaimed tho maid; "how it Bets off your eyes. Blue eyes and blabk lashes aro-" But Lucia had flung away the unsatisfactory gown. This time it was with a Pink crepe-de-chino that she stood before the mirror, "The very color of your cheeks-so like a rose loaf"-and again Antoinette's adulations were unheeded. "Perhaps this would please mademoiselle bettor-yellow is the color black hair always-" "Hero, Antoinette take them away-leave the white tulle-that is always becoming.'' and Lucia stood surveying the gown with a critical look. "You think so?" she asked, appealing to the moid, who had returned to kelp her dress. "It is perfect; mademoiselle is a dream in white." But now Antoinette's mind was busy with speculations. This was .to be only a dinner party, one of the last of the season, and she had come to tho conclusion, after talking with Mr. Jefferson's valet, that Luoia's heart was utterly fanoy free-as safe and sound asthe day she made her debut in society-arid, � more than that, as the season drew to its close, her mistross had grown indifferent to the gnyeties that had never proved particularly intoxicating. , Then, too, in spite of its being Luoia's second season, she was as undisputed a belle ns on her first night. Antoinette was determined to fathom the mystery. After the task of dressing was over, Lucia trailed hack and forth before the long pier glass, then stood with her shapely head a little on one side, very well pleased by the reflection. She looked at her soft hair and Rearranged tho curling locks-she picked the cascade of lace at her corsage, thon patted it-she pushed'back the draperies and, with a little movement settled herself in her gOWn, th,en thrust out the small-toed dainty slipper with Its rosette, its shining buckle and high heel � t -certainly she was looking very well, and she walked back and forth waving her'fiin, feeling withal a thrill of satisfaction. "James has been walking the horses up and down for many minutes,'!1 prompted Antoinette as she put the. white silk and down-trimmed cloak over Lucia's fair shoulders, "and your mama wishes you to come soon, immediately, lest you are not in early time for tho dinner." "Yes I" Lucia absently answered, taking a last long glance at tho reflection in tho mirror. And as she entered , Mrs. Pickering's brilliant halls she felt a sharp, sudden pang lest he should not be there. "He" was in town sho knew, for he had loft cards for her and her . mother while . thoy were out that afternoon; besides, he had arrived in New York tho week'before- indeed it was really for him that the dinner was given. How much she had heard about him, for he was her cousin Dick's ohum in college, and travelling companion abroad. If she had not missed the steamer she would have seen Mr. Lawrence at Dick's oominenoe-meat.  - Sh e wondered if he looked like his pioture -that was certainly handsome enough to please the most fastidious mind, It was only in rare moments that she acknowledged, evon to herself, that sho had cherished a decidedly sentimental adnilra-tion for that face from a very tender ago, Mrs. Caldwell and Luoia were a little late when they walked across the drawing-room -to be received by Mrs. Piokoring. Dinner was to be served at 7, and the hands of the clock in tho hall pointed at 10 minutes post that hour. - "My dear Mrs. Pickering,''mtrrmured Mrs. Caldwell, "you really must pardon us-Ore we your last guests?-but wa were unfortunately delayed a little." After Mrs. Pickering had received her guests sho turned to a tall, blond man Standing noar and asked him to take Lucia out to dinner. "I dare sayyou and Miss Caldwell already feel like old friends after so long an acquaintance with Dick"-and tin toward the dining-room. ' Lucia had swept Mr. Laurence from head to feet with a direct yet swift glance, and had found him, indeed, far handsomer than the various representations her cousin had made of him. He was tall, strong and manly looking, with a fine head, deep blue eyes, rather a heavy chin and a light mustache. His face lighted up wonderfully when ho smiled, otherwise it was rather sloepy-looking, not unbecomingly so, but enough to suggest he was no novice in the world,, and there was not overmuch to interest him nor impress him. He had heard a great deal about Luoia- sho was certainly very charming to look at -he, too, had seen her picture, but that was years ago, when ho was in college and she was a dainty maiden, not quite 10. He could trace the girlish looks in the self-possessed society woman, as he stood before ' her, and. offering his arm, smilingly led her to tho table. They found a good deal to talk about. Luoia asked many questions about Dick's travels, and laughed softly at Mr. Lau-tence'B sleepy way of saying Witty things. Lucia was enjoying her partner immensely when suddenly forgetting herself she inadvertently arched her instep so that the heol was raised, and in an instant her foot had slipped out of its narrow priBon. with a quick movement her foot sought tho slipper and found it only to push it further away. "Oh, dear!" she thought, "what shall I do, but of course it is just hero and if I slide a little in my ohair I can roach it." Mr. Laurence had asked her a question, but in her perplexity she hadnot notioed it. She could just touch the heel of h6T slipper with her toe-and wriggle as best she could it was utterly impossible, after a moment, to even find the little shoo. She tried to talk, she tried not to seem distrait. But how vexing this was, and how was sho going to bring baok herTef rao-tory slipper I Her conversation wasTather spasmodic and Mr, Lawrence began to think she was like 6o many other girls-pretty and attrao-tivo for a few minutes, and flat and Insipid ever after. Before the courses were half served he felt a decided disappointment In the cousin Dick had told him so much about and was so anxious for him to meet. He did not understand it and he wondered what there was about Lucia Oaldwell that should have made her a belle. She was pretty enough; he could not help acknowledging that, but as soon as she had exhausted a stock of questions about Dick she seemed utterly unable to follow when he led the conversation. Sho was not self-possessed-a society woman should always be that-and she blushed and fidgeted if he looked at her. Was she enamored of him or did she fancy him her victim? Bah I Certainly, it was a long dinner, and Mr. Laurence tried to interest Luoia In the various subjects girls usually find entertaining-but with what success? Aftor'she had gone to the drawlngroom ho lingered to smoke with the others and drew a breath of relief. After Lucia had slowly and carefully- and naturally as possible-walked from the dining-room, it was an easy matter to escape to tho dressing room and send her maid to one of the servants for her wretched Blipper. But alas! she had to wait there until the men had finished Jheir cigars and wine before it was found, then with flushed cheeks and almost tearful eyes she descended tr, ti.o I'.raw'ing room, but no opportunity was given in which she could recover lost Kfound.and make a better impression upon Mr. Lawrence. He was talking with some one who presumably bored him less, and came to Lucia only at the last to escort her and her mother to the. carriage. Lucia leaned back among the cushions angry and chagrined, and tnat night wept to very shame of hergaucherie. what will ho think of me 1" she sobbed, hothing very flattering, she was forced to acknowledge, for he left Now York in a few days without even culling upon her. I will liuuish him lor that!" she exclaimed. Tho months went by, and there rras still a sore place in her heart at the uiMuury of th:n night, and when Dick came homo she would not let ium speak oi Mr. Lawrence. "I di-ti-st him," nhe said, in �no scorn. Xhvy mct-by chance-utNewport the following season. But Lucia wily smiled ovur Mr Liunvnc-e'o head ut u-Uivy of young admirers, wlio, to his surprise, constantly surrounded her. Why sho was a belle was as much a mystery us ever. To bc sure, she \vas     try, bill so stupid. �.1     end of the suasan he begsMi to find key all moved that sho was oooupying his thoughts in a way that quite astonished him, though of oourso ho was wondorlng all tho timo what there was about her that so attractod men. Then lie grew perplexed that he should waste time m thinking of her at all; then the season was over, and he heard of Miss Caldwell at Lenox, and, as usual, the reigning belle. �        � It may be imagined to what surprise of both they found themselves face to laoo on Mr. Jackson's yaoht, bound for a voyage to the Bermudas in February. Mr. Lawrence had accepted the invitation without noticing- what other names Mr. Jackson repeated, and Lucia's maid had carelessly lost tho list; but sho thought that only the Hunters, Miss James, Mr. Stephenson and Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, besides the Jacksons, herself and her cousin Dick, were to be tho yachting party. Try, as best she could, Lucia could not meet Mr. Lawrence without a feeling of consciousness-and he-woll ho was always self-possessed. Mr. Stephenson's place seemed always by Lucia's side, but this did not especially trouble Mr. Lawrence until the voyage was nearly over, and indeed tho visit at Bermuda endod, and the yacht was on its way homo-then he began to question Arthur Stephenson's right to be forever near Lucia, and to cherish ' a secret determination to place his own steamer chair there occasionally. But he did not succeed very well. At last Mr. Lawrence know very well why Luoia was admired. Ho could not bo on board ship many days without seeing that she was not only beautiful, but vory charming and interesting as well-tho only thing tliat puzzled him was her lack of wit and sparkle the night he first mot her. Sho was so very ordinary then-but for her beauty of course. 1 Now it was all so different, and he would give a good deal to feel sure of her favor and friendship, hut she seemed to repel all advanoes. She was, indeed, tho life of tho party.    ... She played the guitar and sang Spanish love songs on deok moonlight nights. Sho arranged impromptu dramatics in the saloon when the weather was not suitable for sitting upstairs. She know all games, was the most graceful partner in danoinc, and the best sailor he ever knew, and grow more beautiful each day. The mutinous fooling against Arthur Stephenson swelled-thoy were only three days out from Bermuda, and they deoided to sail to Nassau. Happy opportunity! Now he would see her, but she was always surrounded. One night tho skipper oamo up and said a few hurried words to Mr. Joekson, " MONEY BY MACHINERY. mere gold m all our pold pieces is worth a dollar for overv dollar innrkod on tho faces of tlie coins, tiio 10 per cent, of copper ana the co3t of minting being a free gift to the people, the yaoht seemed to go Thon a Shock came, she had struck a How the Philadelphia Mint Turns Out Dollars. Interesting Processes by Which Metals arc Prepared* for Minting. Gold and Silver Bricks-Eow Coins are Punolied Out, Milled and Stamped, ____._    _.. .._____________________ No one noticed it until tin slower  and slowor. and it was known that bar. Fortunately Cape Fear had been passed- then something wont wrong with the engines and the skipper had steered for some near port, but had gone aground. There was no need to fear-the sea was calm, and plenty of ships and "wreckers" passed near every day. . But two days had gone by, and they had seen no vessel. The clouds were growing blaolc, a storm was near. It broke in fury at midnight, and those on board the yacht could only watch and wait and hope.,. The waves dashod ovor the deck and beat heavily against the sides,then someway thoy saw the yacht had been -driven off the bar, and they were drifting helplessly out to sea. , It was a fearful night, and it seemed as if morning would never come-that every moment the yacht would bo wrecked- when a shock camo, and they knew they were either driven upon some reof or had collidod with an ocean ship. Mr. Lawronoe went swiftly to Luoia and took her by the arm, saying; "Come with mo-the Boat is filling with water I" The confusion was horrible; the sailors were shouting, running to and fro; tho women were pale and weeping. Lucia alone was calm. . Mr. Lawrence half carried her to the deck, and in the darkness they saw a great ship- tho one that had run them down. But oh, joy! it had stopped and even in the fury of the storm was sending boats to rescue those on board the yacht. It was none too soon, and it was a perilous journey in the life boats, but in spita of wind and wave all were saved, and takon on board the ship, which proved tobeasteamer from Jacksonville to New York. The rest of the journey it was no longer Mr. Stephenson who was always at Lucia's side, but Mr. Lawrence. Tho last night before home was reaahed Lucia was standing by the side of tho vessel when Mr. Lawrence came towards her. Her color rose and she softly asked; "Are you sorry the journey is over?" He was struck by her new expression. Hoi' eyes had a dreamy look and there was a touoh of sadness in her face. The moonlight was shining upon them- then suddenly a cloud veiled the light, and he bout noar, looking down at her tenderly. "It has been the happiest and tho most wretched month of my life, as indeed has the whole year, since I met you," he whispered. Her head drooped a little. "Look at me, Luoia, I love "you sol Look at me. If I could nope-do not treat me so proudly. I have loved you from the first," But her light laugh rang out, "No! no! do not perjure yourself." "But I did I Idol" he cried impetuously, taking her in his arms. .... "Oh, don't speak of that first night; It was dreadful. I lost my slipper, and was so stupid," she exclaimed a little later. "What!" he asked in astonishment, and then the story was all told, and he calls her his Cinderella, and keeps the slipper safe in a little glass case in his smoking room. [Washington Star.] One can see any amount of cash oxhibitod any day at the Treasury Department, but tho fascinating thing is to see the money in process of manufacture, as a reporter saw it in Philadelphia tfie other day. If you cavo to visit tho bureau of engraving and printing you may behold tho probess of stamping paper dollars and certificates. This, however, is comparatively unsatisfactory,'partly because the dollars thus made are not worth a penny until they havo subsequently rocoived the treasury's seal and also for tho reason that thoy aro not really money thomsolvos but merely promises to pay. Now, it is very difTorent with tho cash one sous stampod out from tho actual precious metal at tho parent mint of the United States in Philadelphia. At the treasury yon can behold thousands of bags full of silver and gold. All you see, however, is tho bags or boxes. In the mint, on tho contrary-supposing that you aro a favored visitor-you may view'the actual precious metal, walls of gold bricks and pure silver. Tho representative of tho Star was shown a little book-case arrangement behind a sort of cago, in which was stored $17,000,000 worth of gold bricks. It was astonishing how little room-so enormous an accumuln. tion of valuo took up, One got a notion from the sight of how it is that all the gold that has ever been dug. out of tho earth would not more than fill a room 25 feet cube, A gold brick of something the shape of an ordinary brick for building purposes and about the same size, is worth $8000, You could not carry very many of them, because gold is heavier than lead, and tho weight of one such gold brick is astonishing, it would not pay to rob the mint unless you had a cart. Only one attempt has been made to steal from this institution within the last 26 years. A lot of silver bars of considerable magnitude wore oxposed in the ontryway for tho benefit of sightseers, one of them was soooped into a barrel of refuse by a porter, tho barrel being subsequently sent down the elevator and tossed into a cart that was ready waiting.   .        , Unfortunately, the thief, upon reaching New York with his ill-acquired prize, found It an inoubus impossible to dispose' of. Consequently ho was caught and the ingot recovered. . ... A part of tho.mint's business is to manufacture what ate called "merchants'bars," for sale to jewellers, dentists and others, including goldloaf makors, who need for their trade . virgin metal. Such bars, whether of gold or silver, are made 990 fine-that is to say, 990 parts puro out of 1000. How fine this is may bo judged from the fact that our gold and Bilver piocos are only Josn Billings' Philosophy. [Hew Tori: Weokly.] About the most wo kan hope in our old age is tew endure the thoughts ov what wo enjoyed when we waz young. There iz only one good substitute for tho endearments ova sister, and that Iz the endearments ov some othor pheller's sister. Misplaoed oharlty iz a good blunder tew make. Thare iz a grate deal of rezolushun in gin, but kussid little judgment. A nikname will not only outllv a man, bat outlast even hiz tombstun. What iz the chief ond ov man? To foot his wife's bills and foot tho man who Insults her. A gonial old man iz pleasant tew look upon, but a frisky old man Is too mutch like on uproarious wake to be captivating. A man who kant fiddle but one tune, I don't kare how well he kan do it, ain't a permanent suokoess. After all, I don't know as thare iz enny-thing in this world that pays much better than being a natral born pliool. A literary reputashun is hard tew git and eazy tew loose, and when onoe lost La lost forever, If a man haz a good reputashun, ho'd better git it inuured, for they aro dreadful risky. It you want tow git a general good Idee ov a man's karacter, find out from him what hiz opinion ov hiz nabor iz. She Deserved a New One, [Judge.] Little Jennie, who had prayed for a now doll for two years, came to tho conclusion that her prayers were got heard, so she wrote the following lines and addressed them to Heaven:     _ . "deer god, plees grosum wings on mi ole dol an fli it a wa befor momma dresos it up a gin for nex trismus. yoors respekfely. Jennie." "p. m,-T>leoa don't forgit to sen a now won.__ Xiove and Money. [Judge] He said, "I know I am poor and Helen is rioh, but she loves me and is ready to overlook my poverty." She said, "John Is a good man, and I have enough money for both. Love without riches is better than marriage where tbero Is no affeotion." And the world said afterward m a whisper, "Poor fools 1 Money will always buy love, but I understand ho has to ask several times before he gets 16 oents." The Problem Solved. [New York Weokly.] Wife (looking up from a book)-This writer says that half the miseries of married life come from the faot that wives do not havo a certain, regular sum per week to spend as they please. Husband-True; and the other half of the misery comes from tho fact that husbands do not have a certaiu, regular sum per week to spend as they please. faithful to the End. [New York World.] Hardryder-By jiminie, this horse is something dreadful. I shall nevah be able to sit down at the hunt dinner. Wobbleton-Never mind, old chappie. I shall stand by you. The Original Statement. [Springfield Jester.] Adam-Come on, Eve; the flaming sword is right behind us. Eve-Really, I can't this evening, Adam, my dear; I-I-haven't anything to wear. Boo-hoo {weeps!) Something of a Lie. [Judge.] * She-Isn't Dr. Anderson very absent-minded '! He-Yes, That's why he never married He went to kiss his sweetheart'* baud once <*�d vacuiuAtijd her instead. 910-1000 pure, such being the legal constitution of British coins. Therefore, when you get sterling silver you are buying a slightly superior article Tho mint derives its supplies of gold and silver mainly from the mines. Such preoious metals as it .gets in thiB way come direct from tho mines through tho United States assay, offices. V pon 'their receipt at the mint the silver or tho gold is separated, refined, melted and molded into bricks, A good deal of gold and silver is all the time coming on from private souroes, jewellers, pawnbrokers and others selling tnoir stock of suoh sort in this way, the rule being that not less than 8100 worth will bo purchased. Throe days after deposits of this sort have boon made payment is returned to tho depositors. All of tho $100,000,000 in gold and silver bricks whioh tho Star man saw at tho mint had gone through most surprising transmogrifications. To begin with, the silver, dissolved with nitrlo acid, appeared in an enormous tank that was stirred about by a huge ladle. Precipitated frorn this mixture, the silver appoarod in a great trough, looking like nothing else In the world but bo much plaster of paris. This was shovelled into another trough filled with a zinc solution, and the silver, thus exposed to tho action of a baser metal, became like so much earthy gravel In ap-pearanoo. From this last trough it was taken and pressed under an hydraulic squeezer into thick round disks. Then it was ready to go down to another department to bo molted. Ab for tho gold, it had been separated from tho silver early in the game, and had all the appearanoe, m the crude stato, of so much fine red gravel, and not so very red oither. If you had seen a pile of it by the gutter's side you would not have been disposed to pick up a handful of it; supposing you had done so, you would have thrown it-away at once. A comparatively small amount of the stuff in tho bottom of a brass receptacle on wheels, an official in charge said was worth 8220,000. The silver and gold thus made � ready in the "separating room" wont down stairs to bo meltod in crucibles of black lead banked in among tho reddest of hot coals. Alchemists at Sts.EO a day reduced the metals to a molten state in the crucibles, from which tho precious fluid waB dipped out by ladle-fuls and poured into iron moulds. Incidentally to tho melting, however, 10 per oent. of ooppor was mixed with the gold or silver, such being the proportion of that baser metal in United States coins. Our coinB are 200parts silver or gold, as tho case may bo, and aro called for this reason "900 fine." As soon as the gold and silver bricks have had time to pet cold and solid, thoy are taken out of the molds and sliced in to thick strips. Eaoh silver brick, for example, is cut into half a dozen strips of its own length and thickness. These strips aro passed under a powerful roller, which squeezes them out so as to inako them about twioo as long and half tho thickness. At tho same time it compresses the siib-Btance of the metal so much that it becomes almost as hard and dense us steal. Next the strips are annealed or softened by putting them into a red-hot oven, tho heat of which Is 1000 degroes. Finally they aro taken out of the oven, passed throe times beneath another roller, and are then ready to have the disks which are to bo coins punched out of them. This punching business is porformed with much simplicity by passing tho strips through beneath punches that work rapidly up and down, the disks as they are punched out fulling into receptacles bolow. In this way each punch cuts out 100 silvor dollars or 200 dimes every minute. The blanks thus made are washed and then milled. This latter process is simply to glvo each coin its raised edge, and it iB performed with great rapidity by machines that compress tho edges of tho coins toward their centres as tlioy revolve about a circular plane. At this point the blank pieces are ready for another process of annealing, to soften them, in order that thoy may receive properly tho impress' of tho die. They are put by big pansful into an oven and heated red hot. Then they aro stirred abont with scoops in a big chemioal bath to make them bright again, tho annealing having turned them biack, and upon being taken out of tha bath they are poured into a revolving cyclinder full of bass-wood sawdust. When they come out of the bath they look white, like so many celluloid poker chips, but of tor being turned about in tho cylinder with the sawdust they are might and shiny. Now tho blanks aro at lust ready to be stamped with Uncle Sum's designs, which make them worth 100 oents on the dollar, though their actual intrinsic value is only 88 cents at the present market rates for silver. The dies striko off 90 coins a minute, printing both sides at once, and at tho samo time corrugating the edges prettily. Women with deft ringers fcod tiie blanks to tho machines, which strike them oil and automatically dispose of one while thoy receive another, dropping tho complete dollars or halves or quarters or dimes into boxes beneath. All that remains to be done is tho counting of the coins, which is performed with a celerity Dimply marvellous by girl who thinks nothing of counting $1600 in ;J0 seconds. Gold coin are turned out in pretty much the same way. Tho eyes of the average visitor to the mint is attracted in the room where the counting is done by great boxes filled to overflowing with beautiful shiny yellow disks as yet unstamped. Usually the people say something to the effect that they wish thoy could only be permitted to carry oil their pockets full and t.o bo rich f";r life. Were the permission given then, they would not bo able to live very long on the proceeds, inasmuch as the disks are in reality only bright copper pennies, or rather blanks for pennies. Those blanks are made by contract, a firm in Connecticut supplying the government with them at a iriiio k-.ss that one-tenth of a cent apiece. Tlioy come to the mint and are stamped there with the Indian's head and the obverse inscription. Thus you see that our pennies aiv im-i-ely tokens, and not worth anything like face value. Blanks for iivo-cout pieces utu turned out in like muiuit-r by contract, and it only cost Um-lt Sam a cuit and u half to product" a nickel. Kilter dolhmn, halvt'i,  ,03U; the sum of those digits is 27, and 7 and 2 is 9. This soems startling enongh. Yet there are othor nueer exa-mplos of the samo form of porslstonce. It was M. do Maivan who discovered that if you take any row of figures, and, reversing their ordor, mako a subtraction sum of obverse and revorso, tlie final result of adding up the digits of the answer will always bo 9. Ab, for example: 2941 Roverso, 1492 1449 Now 1 iilna i plus 4 plus 9, equals IS; and 1 plus 8, oqunlH 9. Tho same result is obtained if you raise the liVtmbers so changed to their squares or cubes', Start anew, for example, with 02, and, rovorse it, you get 20. Now .02 minus 2U equals 00, and 3 plus 0 equals 0. The squares of. 2(1 and 02 are respectively 07 G and 8844. Subtract one from the other and you get 8108 equals 18, and 1 plus 8 equals 9. So with tho cubes of 2G and 02, which are 17,E70 and 238.328. Subtracted thoy leave 220,702 equals 18, and l'plus 8 equals 9, Again, you are confronted with the same puzzling peculiarity in another form. Writo down auy number, as, for example, 7,04.9,-132; subtract therefrom tho sum of its digits, and, no matter what figures you start with, tho digits of the products will always oome too. 7,049,132, sum of digits equals 31. Only in Chicago. [New fork Woriil.] Chicago man-I am going to bring a friend of yours homo tu dinner tonight. He ttdls in.! lit! was once married to >vu. Wife-Haw delightful! 1 wonder who it can U-. 1 7,5-10,101, sum of digits equals 27, and Si plus 7 (iquuls 0. Here is a diff oront property of the samo number. If you arrange in a row the cardinal numbers from one to nine, with the single omission of eight, and multiply tho sum so represented by any ono of tho figuros multiplied by nine, tho result will present a succession of figures identical with that which was multiplied by nine Thus, if you wish a Series of fives, you tako 0x0-45 for a multiplier, with this result: 12345070 45 and to othor religions than the Christian. The number seven still remains its mystic character. Pythagoras pronounced tho number to belong especially to sacred things. Hippocrates divided tho ages ol man into seven, an arrangemont afterward adopted by Shakespeare Long boforo them, however, the Egyptian priests had enjoined rest on tho seventh day, bocause it was an,unluoky day; and still further hack in tho mists of antiquity wo find tho institution of a Sabbath, or day of rest, ovory sovon days, existing in a rudlmoiRary form among tho Chaldeans.     . Tho Egyptians knew tho sovon nlanots, hence tho seven days of the week, each ruled and named after its proper constellation. It is singular that the anoient Peruvians also had a seven-day weok, though without planetary patronage or planotary names. Thoy also had a tradition of a groat deluge wherefore soven peoplo saved themselves in a cavo and repeoplcd tho earth. This tradition existed also in Mexico, but there the soven survivors woro each hidden in a separate oavo until the subsidence of tlte wators. But sovon was not, and is not, tho only mystic number. Tho number throe and tho number nine also find their votaries. The Chinese havo a great rovorenco for tho latter. Thoy prostrate themselves nino times boforo their emperor. Some African tribes havo tho same form of salutation for their chiefs. Throe was lookod upon with groat vonora-,; tion by tho early Christians, and, indeed, almost rivalled therevcroncogivontoseven, for it was tho symbol of tho Trinity, and It was found over and ovor again in tlie Scriptures. When the world was created wo find land, water and sky! sun, moon and stars. Noah had three sons; Jonah was throo days in tho whale's bolly; Christ throe days in the tomb. Thoro woro throo patriarchs-Abraham, Isaao and Jacob. Abraham entertained three angels. Job had tliren friends. Samuel was called throe times. Daniel was thrown into a don with throo lions for praying throo times a day. Sliadrnoh, Moscluioh and Abodncgo woro rescued from tho fiery furnaco. Tho commandments were dolivorod on tho third day. St. Paul snoaks of faith, hone and charity, these throo. And so on and so on. It woro tedious to continue tho enumeration. In classic mythology the gracos and tho furies woro throo, the muses wore originally throe, and Corberus' throe heads, Neptune's trident, tho tripod of Delphi, are a few more instances of tho sacred character of tho number. Nay, does not lifo itself and nature proclaim tho samo truth? Have wo not morning, noon and night; fish, flesh and fowl; water, ioe and snow; boll, earth and heaven? No wonder tho witohos in "Macbeth" ask, "Whon shall wo three meet again?" It will bo soon that, saored numbers aro always odd. Hence may arise that modern superstition among gamblers that there is luck in odd numbers. But among the ancient heathens, also, ovon numbers wore slimmed bocauso eaoh oan be divided into two, a number that Pythagoras and otliors denounced as the symbol of don.th and dissolution and evil augury generally. 01728305 40383718 bdggg55bg A very ourious number is 142,8fi7, which, multiplied by 1, 2, 3, 4, 0 or G. given tho same figures in tho same order, beginning ot a different point, but if multiplod by 7 gives all ninos. Multiplied by 1 it equals 142,8�7;multiplied by 2 equals 280,714; multiplied by 3 equals 428,701; multiplied by 4 equals 071,428; multiplied by 0 oquals 714,280; multiplied by C equals 807,142; multiplied by 7 oquals 999,909. Multiply 142.8G7 by 8 and you havo 1,142,300. Thon add the first figure to tho laBt and you have 142,807, tho original number, the figures exactly tho same as at tho start. The nuinbor 37 thas this strange peculiarity: Multiplied by 3, or any multiple of 3 up to 27, it gives three figures all alike. Thus, throe times 87 will givo 111. Twice throe times (0 times) 87 will give 222; throe times three times (9 times) 87 glvos three threos; four times threo times (12 times) 37, throo fours; and so on. Tho wonderfully procrcatlvo power of figures, or, rather, their accumulative growth, has been,exemplified in that familiar story of tho farmer, who, undertaking to pay his farrier one grain of wheat for the first nail, two for the second, and so on, found that ho had bargained to give tho farrier rnoro whoat than was raisod in r.ll England. My boloved young friend who loves to frequent the roulette tablo, do you know that if you began with a dime and were allowed to leavo your winnings on the would or, Yet that would he tho result of winning 30 for ono five times hand running. Hero is another example: Tako the number 10, we will sny. Multiply that by itself, and you cot 220. Now multiply 220 by itself, and so on until 10 products have beon multiplied by themselves in turn. You don't think that is a difficult problem? Woll, you may be a elovor mathema-ti clan, but it would take you about a quarter of a century to work out this simple littlo sum. Tho final product called for contains 88,-080 figures, tho first of which is 1442. Allowing throe figures to an inch, tho answer would bo over 1070 feot long. To perform tho operation would require about 000,000,000 figuros. If they can bo made at the rate of one a minuto, a person working 10 hours a day for 300 days m each year would be 28 years about it. If, in multiplying, ho should malco a row of ciphers, as he does In other figures, the number of figures would bo more than 023,930,228. This would bo tho precise number of figures used if the product of tho loft-hand figure in each multiplicand, by eacli figure of tho multiplier was always a slnglofigure; but, as is most frequent, and yet not always, two figures, the method employed to obtain tlie foregoing result cannot bo accurately applied. Assuming that the cipher is used on an average once in ten times, 470,000,-000,000 approximates tho actual number, Tbero is a clover Persian story about the wealthy Oriental who, dying, left 17 camols to be divided as follows; His eldest son to havo half; his second son, a third; and his youngest, a ninth. But how divide camels into fractions? Tho threo sons, in despair, consulted Mohammed AH. "Nothing easier," said the wise man. "I'll lend you another camel to make 18, and now divido thorn yourselves." Tho consequence was each brother got from one-eighth to one-half more than ho was ontitlodio, and Ali received his camel back again; the oldest brother getting nine camels, the second six and tho third two. We have spoken of tlie number nine us a sort of Old Man of tho Sea in mathematics. But nino is not tlie only number that is dowered witli a strong and self-assertive will. In history and legend the numbur seven turns up with the sanio frequency that nine displays in the multiplication table. Take tho Bible, for example: There aro soven days of creation; after seven days' rospito the flood ouiue; the years of famine and plenty were In cycles of seven; every seventh day was a Sabbath; every seventh year the Sabbath of rest; after every seven times seven years came tho .Hibileo; the feastsof unleavened bread and of tabernacles were observed seven days; tho golden candlestick had seven branches; seven prit-sts with sovon trumpets surrounded Jericho seven timt�s, and seven times on the seventh day; Jacob obtained his wives by servitude of seven years: Samson kept his nuptials seven days, and on tlie seventh day he put a riddle to his wile, and lie was bound with seven green withes, and seven looks of his hair wore shaved off; Nebuchadnezzar was seven years a beast; Shadrach and his two companions in luisfort-uue were cast into a furnace heatod sovon times more than it was wont. in the Now Testament nearly everything occurs by sevens, and ut. tho end of tho sacjed volume wo read of seven churches, i>even candlesticks, seven npirits, seven irutupt-ts, gt>vou seuls. sovon stare, seven thmidfei'.t, seven vial-;, -suvon plagues, sovon un^els, mid a sovoit-hendod mou-dor. Tho Jews oou-iiiloivd this number tho embodiment of perfection ami unity. Thus tliL-y claimed that iholU-bivw letters i'hiu-poiiug tho name of Suinuvl have the valuo of st*vou--u roooirtotiuti <�i vlu- i.-toutncss und pvrtui'don of his tdiarut'tvv. Turn now tw other lutfiww tU:ui the Jv-wa CIRCUS REHEARSAL. Mickey Finn, Jr., as a Ringmaster Proved a Failure.' Some of the Curiosities flo Was to Exiiibit in Doolan's Bam. His Billy Goat Ended the Keaearsal With a Plunge Through a Mirror. THE WESTERNER'S PROPOSAL. Three Chapters from Two Lives-the Longest in a Dictionary Letter from Boston. C Arlstlno Anderson In Judgo,} I,' Mtu westerner's proposax. Bliss Ponolope Bunkorhlll: Dkar Madame-The dude of the oamp told me this fur; but now I'm a-goin' to sail In on my own tack, and say-I dunuo how the mino'll pan out fur I ain't never struck a lead liko this afore. But what I'm a-glttin' at is that I want to git hitched; and I ain't never lit on any girl but you, as I thought ud pull as evon. If you're onto the racket similar with mo, now, let's splloo. What say? And bo all-Ured quick about It. too, fur I ain't used tor many motions. When I do a thing I do it-bans I And if you say the word I'rnwid you on the vory first stroak of lightning that railroads East arterwards. Yourn in dead oarnost. Jrw Gbtthehb, II.   TICKl BOSTON MAID'S KEPLY. Mr. J. Gotthero: DitAit li'iuEND-Upon the perusal of your epistle tho various emotions that agitated my somowhat easily ngitatible mentality render it extremoly difficult for mo to command the moohanical processes of my doxtor phalangos sufficiently to Indite upon the surface spread before my ocular organs (whioh, doom mo not weak with a maiden graduato's weak sentimentalism, aro somi-irociuontly dimmod with a lachrymal fluid) tho sentiments whioh find an abiding-place In my aurioulo-ventricular pulsator. I would that I could vocally communicate to your tympanum the adequate syllables which should formulate my reply to your proposal, wluch my esotorio instinct informs mo is prompted by motives whioh nobility of soul and loftiness of sentiment render indigenous only to natures like your own. While the language of tho westom portion of our fragment of this planotary universe is at times a littlo farther from grammatical and orthoeplcai exactness and rhetorioal oleganco than I have hitherto boen accustomed to having made audible or visible to my senses, I shall consider only the emotions wldch I prognosticate woro abiding within your soulego, and in my answer I would state that the matter to which you refor -tho hymeneal oonnubintion yclept marriage-is not distasteful to my mentality in tho abstract, and that as a personality, I may say, en passant, I fool that yours would be as harmoniously altruistic as I could hope to obtain in this exceedingly egoistio century. Shall I thon rooelvo a tolegraphio communication to inform me at what fragment of tho hours that aro speeding us togotherwards I may oxpect your presonco-no unforeseen concatenation of unassiinilated circumstancos arising to prevent? Yours for altruistic matrimony, PkniMjOpe BuNKicBiarji, m. ins suspr/r to hide reply. Woll, 'twas your innings, and I'm knocked out in tho first round. I can't catch onto what you mean to Bave my gizzard, and though what you say's white enough as Boston goes, I s'poso, ohuok mo ftu' a deader if I can see your raise. Let's call the match off. Say. 'n' If I's you, I'd call a pill-sllfiger, and soo if ho can't fix up that mentality of your'n bo's it won't fool so no more. Such talk, it strikes mo. shows a screw loose somewhere, and I'd hate to always have to think of you us an out and out loon, like the most on 'cm in Boston. Yourn, hopin' you'll git shot of It. jr. o. A Prison Bill of'Fare. [Novombor Century.] The ration for the earlier months consisted of about four ounoes of meat and a section of com broad four inches square by throe inches tldolc. Tho broad, of unbolted meal, was bakod vory hard to tho depth of one-half Inoh, while the oentre was raw. The broad would often bo as full of flies as a plum pudding' is of fruit As a large portion of our number drow rations after dark the ingredients wero not wasted. During tho later months yams, rice or pease wero issued in iiou of moat, and meal of grits instead of bread. Wo had no vessels to receive these, and tho steaming rloo was shovelled from the wagon box into blankets; or a man would tako off his trousers, knot one of tho logs, and thus rooelvo tho portion for his moss. The samo method was used in tho distribution of the yams and poaso, except somottmes tho receptacle was a pieoo of underclothing. Perfectly Satisfactory. [Fltcgendo Hluottor.] "In heaven's name, children, oome and help me hunt for baby, il don't know what has bocomo of him. Ho is not in the room where I loft him." "Oh, he's all right, mamma; wo are having a beautiful time playing tho finding of Moses with him. Just come and see bow lovely he looks In his basket floating on tho liver." Cheaper to Borrow, CMuiiaoy's Weekly.] Mrs. Bingo-I want to get some pie piatej? Salesman-Yes, ma'am. How will these do? I have just sold half a dozen to your next door neighbor. Mrs. Bingo-If that's the case, I iruoaa I won't noed any. Wasting a "Word. [Life.] Editor (to reporter)-Mr. Ponnibs, I must caution you to avoid tautology. Reporter-Have I used a tautological expression, sh-? "Yes; in this article you speak of 'female shoppers.'"____ Tho Dear Girls. [Muiisey'b Weekly.] Ethol-It is not good form to throw kisses at a man, however wall acquainted you may be. Maud-No, and besides thore is no fun in throwing lasses. The Distinction. [Munaey'i Weekly,] "Papa, is a chef a cook?" "Oh, no, my boy." "What's the difference?" "About $10 u month." Gross Materialism. iAiuua^y'ii Weekly.] She-Ah, Mr. itussett, there is one thing that money can't buy. Ho-What is that-�icirl who bus plenty oi it LoriuUi' [Now York Sun.] It was a boautif til Saturday, lata in October. Autumn, foremost of nature's soenio artists, had paintod the woods with a marvellous prodigality of color. A brooding hush was over all the landscape, which filled the bosom ot Mickey Finn's billy goat with sadness as ho stood on tho sunny slope of Stumpy Field and heard the rustle of the dried corn loaves and watched the palo sroon beauty fade from tho mullein stalks and jimson weeds as tlioy woro smitten by tho cold breath of annual decay. Tho grass, too, tho billy noticed with signs of uneasinoss, was getting dry and tastoless. Ho lookod off toward the Finn cabbago patoh. Tho large heads still stood unplucked on tholr stalks. Great tears ran down tho goat's checks as ho realized that tho feast of cabbago was not for him. Ho was roused from his painful reverie by a belated bluebird, which lit on the fenoe and sang him a parting seronado ore the musical bunch of feathers flow southward to tho orange groves in the land of tropical dolights. A chipmunk whisked by him on tho stono wall, nodded with tantalizing froodom to tho goat anfl disappeared. A loud cawing overhoad deepened the bitterness in tho heart of tho goat as he realized that ho only was tiod with tho clothes line. These reflections had reduced tho four-footed captive to a condition of mute despair, whon on tho brooding bush above alluded to there broke a cheory whistle. Tho billy turned tail on the saddening scenery, and was about to seek surceaso of sorrow in sleep in his barrow, but whon that familiar whistle smoto upon his oar ho stopped short, liko "Grandfather's Olock," and listened. The whistle sounded nearer, and uncertainty .changed to assurance in the goat's oloquent eyes as a small boy leaped ovor tho fonco and camo toward him. Those who huvo been confined in a gloomy cel.! know what joy there is in hearing tho key of deliveranoo grate in the lock. Suoh joy the goat felt. His deliverer had come. If the goat could have sung, his happiness would undoubtedly have found expression in tho words: He's after me, nftor rao; I'm the Individual ho requires. Little Mike loosoned tho galling clothes lino from tho nook of tho goat, and together thoy strolled leisurely up tho Old Point road, tho goat stopping now and then to pick up a stray pioce of brown papor and an occasional bit of old corsot whalebone. Little Miko lovod the goat tendbrly. In deed, his affection rivalled that of Mary for Iter lamb. Ho would no doubt havo taken tho goat to school with him but for tho fact that tlie teacher might have acted ruddy to the animal. In that event tho teacher would no doubt iiavo triod to put tho goat out of tho sohoolhouso, when-but let us return to the boy and tho goat. Mickey whispored to the billy as thoy wont along that his mother had gone down to Ponckhockio to buy his fatlior a new pallet overalls; that ho had boen loft alone in tho shanty, and that as he was lonesome he had come to got tho billy to cheer him up. Tho billy wagged tho short joy barometer at the southeast end of his body, and seomed to understand every word his companion sold. And so, like two bosom friends as thoy wore, they wandered up the road and into tho shanty; It must bo understood that Mickoy had a doeper motive than that of merely amusing himself whon ho brought tho goat into tho kitchen. It was not because tho goat was notgpod company. Oh, nol On tho contrary, tho billy was always a follow of humor, resource and coarse jest in tho hour of ennui. But thin time it was with a specific objeot in view that ho had asked tho goat to join him during his mother's absence. To reliovo the harrowing suspense of tho reader, it may as woll bo said that Mickoy was going to open a cirous in Dooian's barn. Tho idea had boon in his mind for a long timo, but during tho past weok it had ns-sumed a tangible shape, and ho had begun the oollootion of curiosities for tho menagerie, whioh is always the Inseparable adjunct of a circus. He had even progrossod so far In tho preparations as to have drafted out a rude programme on tho smooth sldo of a shingle. This programme had oivnsod Mickoy a good deal of thought, but wf ion complotod it was a thing of beauty as well as expressive brevity. This is a sample copy, slightly revised: a....................................... J MICKEY FINN'S ANIMAI- SHOW A2TD : i SIUIUJ8I : I Next Monday Night In Dooian's Bnrn 1  I Oome anil Bee the Uoltlcu Crested Cuspidor ; I fi-om'Ai-nblal ;Come find Soe Mrs. Mulonor'sDuck Lay nn Egg I;  A. Trained Billy Gout WldWlilsltora Will Ato Hay ! and Perform Othor Wondered Tlu-lcksl ; . Mlokey Flnn-s Orow Will Ato Wan Hundred  ; Gocltroaolies I ; . Tiio Biggest Bullfrog hi Ooouey Island Will  ;                      Ata Files! :  2 A Fight Botune Two (2) Blianghat RoostersI 2-;2 Two Snapping Turtles from Nrown's ; l'ond will Fight a Dool? 3 it toshisndon jer bind leg* and. m^tto believe buck at yor pictttr. in the frame, Btrtf mind ye. don't break it, or rilT�eftfc.yw�y head with the spado.'' Tho goat listened gravely and walked toV ward tlie min-or. He saw a gray-beMdedi ugly-looking Billy approaching htm. ami fld quickened his pace. .He backed up a ra-W feet to get a good headway, and started for1 the mirror cm a run,-Little Miko realized what he had'dono and made a rash to graBy tlie Billy.around the neck. :! But it was too, late. There -was ft rush oSi norns, hide and hoofs through tho air, tatV awful crash of glass, and the goat's head j was thrust through tho baok of tho mirror, and he was tearing out of the kltohen vita   Down on tho hearth, and ten tusytWrnatk There let It lie, whore day by o>ay My heart lies, shattorod, at ytrazttrtp A Missed Summer. [All the Year Eoand.] White rose-leaves star the grassy"Hg^ She takes among the flowers today! Her morning task Is done I J JTrom sapphire sides, through UtaocgMIH* Of bending branches, sumnier-grMty Looks down the August (uo. j Along the flowcrsfencod alley flostt A melody of blackbird note% i A carol from tho thrash ( ' Then golden Bllencs touches �D� &o sound except the waterfall Disturbs the noontide hash, Ehe plucks a rose with weary graw She drops the rose; across harf&o* A tendor shadow falls. What Is a fuu-hlown rose to hex, Jor whom no summer pulses stir, No summer song-bird calls? Ko rammer-thore the story lies, (Told dumbly by those asking ejef) fioft, with a touch of flame- She hod her happy, nhlldlsh hoars, Her radiant spring-time, sun and thspgugf But summer never cams. She waited where the seasons meet, She said farewell to childhood sweet. Her spring's young blossoms dledl put when she looked for stunmejglai�k with rose-red garlands all o-Ucrat Poor heart! she was denied. She waited as the ysaii went bff Sho bore her burden patiently, And walked her way apart| She saw her playmates, ons by oo% Pull joy's bright blossoms In the safe With sweet, sngradging hsast. Ehe missed her snmmen Yea, but lev Me.llilnVs, she missed Che share of WO* That blends with snmmar bliss, She missed love's sunshine-aa& lts-Brttsfc TlBd thousand gnawing canes ttlai ts&s The honey from a Uss. She missed love's ruses-and SIS thOEM She thunder-clouds of passion, ben Touched not her aale6t Uf�i Her eyes are sad with loneliness. But ta'l w Ule of wild dlaM No story of strong sulfa. Ehe mhued hit summer, hot h&QEtMMl Conwntmtnt la her daily sobsA Of duty tlo&s, up*it; l; waltcth for hor oUwrwosts� In eosue ft? tow, osha sod 
                            

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