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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1890 - Page 26

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                1 ->1 1    f t> 26 TOE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. DEISTS! MEDIATES txxe de groot 0 Is something absolutely new in medicine, n perfect little wonder, performing cures in tbo most obstiunte cases oi Lost or Failing Power, Nervous Oeliility, Atrophy of tho parts, oto., without trouble or attention on the part of the person using it. It is so plain and simple in its construction that anyone can apply it. Its effects are almost instantaneous, aud the pood results go on increasing from dav today. RELAPSES ABB NOT POSSIBLE because it retains its power for years, and anyone feeling the slightest weakness can at once apply it and quickly cut short suy ovil tendency and restore the parts to full health and strength. SN LOST OR For men, who feel that thoir virile strength is decreasing, this FA El E M!f* PHWR" E? electrical marvel is micqualed. 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IN HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, SCIATICA, RHEUMATISM, and all painful Narvons AfTentlons, the gentle current which flows from the ltcsonerator is truly a natural remedy. It is easily applied to any affected part, and its results are almost instantaneous. THE REGENERATOR RECOMMENDS ITSELF! We depend for the extension of our business upon the recommendations of grateful nnd pleased patients who havo used tho Kogonerator and are willing to acknowlndgo its merits. SEND 8S8 and get one of thes� little Medical Marvels, and if it is not exactly as represented, von ran have vour money back, for we can always find plenty of customers. MEN OTHERWISE SOUND who find their power lost or declining, will find in this upplianoe a most useful and worthy little instrument, and it will prove of the greatest value to all who are weak, nervous or debilitated, We number among our patrons and patients Doctors. LatvyevH, .Indprcs, Con� jrrpssmon, Clergyman, Bankers and Merchants. SENT POST-PAID, SECUREI.V SEALED, UPON RECEIPT OF PRICE, $2. Full Descriptive Circular FRISK oa application. THE BE GSOOT ELEWMC C01SPAHY, 06 Mbortjr St., Now Vorfo TOWKffl'S LITTER. Wealth of Our Leading Public Men. TMs Almost the Only Country That Makes it a Point Against Them. Mr. Cleveland's Book on the Sheep and Wool of New York, Washington, Nov. 1.-Whon ox-President Cleveland was speaking before the Supremo Court I thought it was a pretty scene, somewhat suggestive to mo of ex-President Adams coming to tho House of Representatives, am? thero, in spite of his remarkable career, joining in tho hot tusslo of riotous debato. Cleveland confronted two men of his own creation on that benjjh, and since he ceased to bo president tho judicial lender thereof had died. Samuel Miller was thoroughly in aooord with the decisions of John Marshall, who continued through a third of a eontury tho ideas of Washington and Hamilton in tho government. Only yesterday I was reading Grigsby's memoir of tho Virginia convention of 1788, which had bocomo so scarce and dear that it has been republished in Richmond. He there describes Chief Justice Marshall coming to the Virginia constitutional convention of about fit) years ago and making a terrific fight to prevent tho 5udiciary being put in disgrace, as had been Jefferson's bias alter he found that his capture of the government exempted tho Supreme Court from his mental control. As I noted tho honso of Speaker Blaine today nnd thought of Elaino with his now eldest son, and most successful living son, married in Chicago to tho daughter of a Virginian, I felt distinctly the over supremo power of the American frontier in our public affairs. The frontier continues to throw off the new men of genius; and the East, though not deficient in tho mercantile spirit, loses the physical spirit which seems to bo required to resuscitate and Oalviiiiiv.c lire Public ^liaracter. Aii exception to this is found in tho two States of Maine and Ohio, which seem to hold out remarkably well as frontier populations. Maine, by the naturo of its wilderness and its remoteness from centre, furnishes from timo to time leadors almost like Western men. and now and then this is tho oase in New Hampshire and Vermont. Ohio was predicted by Do Witt Clinton almost 70 years ago to be in destiny tho second SIato in population in America, and thin may yet be tho case, for Ohio is continually Growing, and will presently havo as many largo cities as New York. Tho Southerners now repose their hopes of extended population in Texas, which Air. Flanagan, who is now running as the Republican candidate for governor of Texas, told mo a fow months ago, would at tho next census bo tho second State in the Union to Now York in numbers. I have spoken of the true literature of America being in its localities, and Prof. Bryco has recently written or said that, the finest literature in America was that of the localities. No country has as much local literature now as ours. Almost every successful county in this country has boon described with its public, characters in books ns big as Shakespeare. You talco the Memorial History ol Boston as not an extraordinary instance of this bibliography. Tho republication of the writings of most of our great forerunners in politics has also Come about; tho works of Hamilton, IXclssucci Iby IfcEr. �,o*l�e, have appreciated in valuo like tho seven volumes of Hamilton's work edited by his son, which command about $70. I was in New Orleans perhaps lfi roars ago, and there I found Hamilton's works, the first complete set 1 had seen in an out-of-the-way place for several years, and, turning tho cover, found $10 marked. I presumed that might be the price of each volume, which would have been $70 for the set, but, inquiring of the clerk, who whs merely a boy, he enid that it was tho price of tho whole sot. Thereupon 1 carried the seven volumes to my hotel, with the twine btring.cutting my Laud sharply, considering that there might be some mistake when the proprietor should arrive, and strike my bargain out. ( Through these local histories the infinitude of variety in life is to be traced, just as Shakespeare made his immortal literature �upon reading the chronicles of various people who lived in Denmark or France, i'he story of Hamlet, ior instance, is too unique to have bet-n invented even by Shakespeare -his Uiiurl was ltd into that channel by pestling a Danish chronicler's sketch of tho semi mythological kings of Denmark, as published in Paris. We ui'.en n"te the ill success of our public manhood, and yet in the preM-nt day success is more hvquei:; among politicians than forjuwly. A\ ashingion felt his affairs becoming embarrassed before he died and �was very desirous to mjU His Virginia lauds and take an interest in West Virginia lands toward the Ohio. Ji-ii''-rson, Madison aud Monroe were last beemiing insolvent and two of them were thoroughly insolvent. DeWitt Clinton died insolvent and tho sheriff sold all his personal property. But in Our Immediate li'ay you find whole schools of able public men vindicating their rank as intellectual barons in the domain ci property; for instance, every one of the parties who figured in the preat Republican light of nine years ago had put his family affairs in first rats condition, namely, Colliding, Plait, Gailieid, Collector Robertson and Vice-President Arthur. Arthur's estate, from all that I i     li>;i�rue. is at the nvau el unr  �     1   l      o it c i.^t    f 1 i   L rtl   \ 1 lea, a! ways been u prutH-nt, lurriiy. uumustio UNCLE SAM'S JEWELS. Wonderful Cat's Eye From King of Siam. Relics of Grant in Oases Provided With Burglar Alarms. George Washington's Treasures-Van Buren's PrasentSi governor of Maine, and half-brotlior of Ruf us King, Wag So Important in the year 1812 that he made a special visit from Maino to Albany, which was much exploited at the timo, to affect Dewitt ClintOn personally against running for the presidency as Against Mr. Madison, upon the ground that, while Clinton was tho bettor man, ha ought not to antagonize tho war sentiment, which would drag him out of public life. I might instanoe Mr. Cleveland oa a very successful businoss man, and ho as his first public act compiled a hord book for his uncle living near Buffalo. Tho herd book would not have seemed at that timo to some persons as a groat occupation, but it contained tho history of wealth, for sheep and wool to somo extent rule tho oarth. When Chancellor Livingston died it was remarked in tho Senate of Now York that his greatest acts had not boon to help make the constitution, nor buy Louisiana, nor back up Robert Fulton with money, but that he had improved tho grade of slioep in Now York State by his importations till the State agriculturally was independent. At this moment perhaps tho bottom rock of Now York State is its dairy product, of which choose come-s near tho centra. Mr. Cloveland, as I hoard the Buffalo people say a month ago. has been fortunate in many things; his wife, whon ho married her, was not presumed to bo very rich, but by tho death of a relative the real estato loft hor in Omaha and other places turned out to be very valuable. Cleveland Follovrotl tine Example of Gen. Washington in buying a tract.of ground in tho District of Columbia, ami according to general report he sold it in fivo years at a profit of clear 8100,000, which was equal to a full torm of the presidential salary up to the timo of Gen. Grant. Wo are almost tho only people in tho world who mako it a point against our public men that they are woll to do. In England it is considered absolutely essential for a man embarking in public affairs to have property sufficient to Keep his dignity up, and the Queen said that she would not make noblemen out of any persons, howover woll considered otherwise, who could not sustain their worldly condition as poors. President Ovovy of France lost his control largely through his parsimony; ho was of tho Swiss type of Frenchmen and too fond of money, and when the French republic gave him an immense salary, up to that which should support a king, expecting him to spend it m entertainments to keep up the national prido of France, ho was hurled from power in groat part because he put tho money away. I havo noticed in Washington society that nearly all our really strong men think very anxiously on tho money side of things. One of Coupling's clerks told me thatwhon-ever he brought tho bank book from tho bank, Coukhng would scan it with a pinched brow, and would presently intimate that thero must bo something wrong in tho LTcasting of his book, for he knew ho had more balance than was set down. The clerk told him that there could bo no mistake about tho bank book, as every nigbtboforothe bank clerks were sent home they had to mako tho cash in the drawer come out square with tho trial balance. Tito Worlil Was Finally Sm-prlaetl to find that Conkling, instead of being a poor man, was worth nearly $800,000. Your plain Groton grocor from Massachu-cliusetts-Mr. Boutwoll--ono of tho most successful publio mon in Washington, has invariably looked to his solvency and fair commercial standing as an evidence of Ids ability to manago tho affairs of others. Boutwoll still livos bore, and whilo a groat many persons hardly remembor what ho was, a large minority is in tho habit of speaking of him as one of tho most wonderful of our public men. When tho war was over, and every sort of scheme was floated to repudiate tho bonds, to pay tho intorost in greenbacks, to do this and that, Boutwoll thought that perhaps the government might do just like an honest man aud begin to pay off its debt. And our vast credit is tho result of this plain grocer's notions of finance. Said a Washington lawyer, who knows Boutwoll woll. in a recent conversation with mo: "That man, with a somewhat narrow range, is ono of tho most genuino Democrats in America. His belief is in the people. He does not beliovu in any superior class. He has followed his convictions right straight, though to him they are perfectly consistent, however party lines may have changed." Blaine, too, has always been anxious and solicitous on the subject of tho standing of himself and family toward old ago. This has been tho principal Cause of Mis ISelne Trmluoort, as somo would say, and yet in spito of all that ho has suffered he resuscitated his family life. His father diod very poor from a want of attention to the celebrated rule of Mr. Micawber. Now that Blaiuo has again become secretary of state, tho political crios of campaign times cease to have any effect upon a man who has revived himself by a peculiar exhibition of vitality. Blaine owes to his vitality his present position in tho government, lie never got anything that he did not work for, and though no has attained the highest positions in the country, such as speaker, senator, presidential candidate, and secretary of state, ne has never received back the amount of his investment, and this is why people are now 6ayiug, for want of something else to say, that he has a bad color and looks as if lie would not live very long. Yet with independence men live longer than when, in old age, they are persecuted by apprehensions  � what will bocomo of their widow and children. In short, wo live in the ago of physics and not in the age oi philosophy. The old politicians of the 18th century who havo had so much to do with our existence and of tho first half of tho ltith century, are somehow passing out of serious reflection. They aro regarded as has-beens. Those men who put on foot great material works, stand higher wi'.li the present ago than those who cut subtleties thin, like the closet men of today, who are splitting old engravings with a knife so as to mako them dovetail into a I sheet of white pa per and thus illustrate their books, and ten to ono the books they are i illustrating are those of leaders in physics, i George Ai.it.ed ToWNSEND. J f   I L idi Dimuic-s of the liong Ago. 1 he Spaniards were the nest dressed men in L.urooe m tho lr,th century, according to the domier and Furnisher. Ihey were the ii i r i t> t n r fe 1' "h colors, as ;i:cv were termed, in men s aituo-an innovation that was accepted by well-dressed men t!;e world over. u !, n Ring Pmiip married Queen Mary c f 1        ill        j k ui the Span- ish voirai% wi.jch was maintained ior many wan. - ., As tins is a letter  d oi a Ver}' t \. the iriiiiKS to ail lo V t    irk. ii,  velvet suit ASHINGTON, Nov. 2.-Undo Sam has somo of the finest jcwols in tho United Statos/ Stored away in his National Museum at Washington are bushels of gold, quarts of precious stones, dozens of beautiful pearls, and china, and out glass which are worth thoir weight in gold. 'It takos four largo cases to contain the uncut goms belonging to our governmental uncle, and tho largest parlor in tho United States would bo crowded with the casos which contain his articles of carved gold. Tho goms aro kept in throo plato glass oasos, laid on bine volvot pads, and it dazzles one's oyes to look at them. Many of thorn como from America, somo are from India, and somo havo strange histories connocted with them, Tho jewels which lay so long in the Treasury Deportment at Washington aro among thorn. Prof. Clarko had theso removed to tho nvusomn not long ago. Among them aro tho jewels which tho Sultan of Muscat in Arabia gave to President Van Buren, but which, according to tho rules of our government, ho was not able to keep and had to hand over to tho Treasury Department. There was no provision thero ns to what should be done with them, and they lay unseen in the vaults for years. Among thorn are two largo poarls as big as pigeon's eggs. Theso aro unsot, and areas pretty as when they came from tho head of an oyster many generations ago. Besides them aro ICO small pearls, each as Dig around as a marrowfat pea, and each having a nolo pierced through it, Thoy were evidently intended for a necklace. On anothor pad there arel80 diamonds received at the 6ame timo. These aro not largo, but they aro very pure and white and look like big dew drops as thoy shine out upon the blue velvet, Near by is a wondor-ful cat's oyo ring, which weighs, I should judge, at loast two ounces. This came from Siam and it is sot in the purest of gold of exquisite workmanship. Among the other oat's oyes Bhown is a yellow cat's oyo from Ceylon and a valuable -green cat's oyo from Bavaria, and a native Indian necklace made of cat's eye beads. Thero are all sorts of cat's eyes from all Earts of tho world, and ono of tho most eautiful comes from Rhode Island. Karo American Stones. The United States is fast becoming a land of prooious stones. Diamonds havo been found in Georgia, pearls are now being picked up in Wisconsin, and Unolo Sam is making arrangements for an involoo of some of thorn for his collection. There aro somo beautiful turquoises in these oases, which wore brought by Maj. Powell from Now Mexico, and those aro quito as fine as tho blue turquoises which the government ban from Persia. Of loss expensive stones, tho berylB aro very boautiful, and thero is a pieco of aqua marine from Portland, Mo., which is as big as your fist, and which shines like a diamond. Thero is an amethyst whioh is wonderfully beautiful. It was found in North Carolina, and is supposed to havo been used by tho men of prehistoric times. It was originally in the shape of a turtle, but Prof. Clarke tolls mo that it was spoilod in tho cutting. Thero are also oriental amethysts, and tho amethysts from Brazil show all tho changes of that stono from a light pink to a dark purple. The models of all the great diamonds of tho world are hare, and there aro emeralds from New Mexico and from South America. Four long bottle groon Brazilinn emeralds of two carats ouch are very fine, aud another which Prof. Dana bought in Peru is over an inch long. Thero are topazes from Siberia, sapphires from North Carolina, and garnots from Bohemia, Coylon, South Africa and New Mexico. Now Mexico furnishes tho finest garnets in tho world in point of color, and it seems to bo tho precious stone region of tho United States. A curious stono exhibit has just been received from Siboria. It is a bowl of fruit made of precious stones carved out so naturally that one would mistake them-for the original. There aro red raspberries nnd luscious black cherries, strawberries and currants resting on leaves of green sorpentine, which are more natural in their appearance than tho famed cow of Soulptor Myron, whioh war, so lifelike that it imposed upon a living call Undo Sum's Gold Sllno. In another quarter of the museum Unole Sam keeps his gold in the rough. Under glass cases thero aro great lumps of quartz with tho gold shining out in moro or less delicate voins. Tho mines of the far West are woll illustrated, and in some of the specimens nuggets of gold are seen. In a great safe of steel bohind glass doors thero are dozens of little boxes containing gold dust and other boxes on which thero aro nuggets of pure gold of all sizes, from tho head of a pm to tho size of your fist. Some of this gold camo from plaoer mines, other plates contain tho products of noted leads, and on a shelf over all are two round pieces of gold as thick as your wrist and about two inches long. These aro quito valuable and thoy are made, of solid gold. They came from tho vaults of the treasury and no one knows how they over got thero. Thero are thousands of dollars worth of pure gold in this safe and I was shown quartz specimens in glass cases of less than tho sizo of your list which had 825 worth of gold imbedded in them. Fortruies in BScIics. The most'valuable of tho jewels of XTnolo Sam, however, aro those which oro found in tho relics of our great men near the entrance to tho museum. Theso aro worth tens of thousands of dollars in tho intrinsic value of tho gold and jewels of which they are made up, to say nothing of their costly workmanship. Thero are swords by the dozens, set with diamonds. Guns inlaid with precious stones, and canes which have heads of gold in which aro imbedded jewels which would shine at any White House reception. Those jowols aro so ,-aluablo that a guard is detailed to watch them night and day. Each case has a burglar alarm connected with it so that the least meddling with it would set. nn electric bell to ringing, and would call the museum army together from every direction. The Grunt collection alone is worth a fortune. It is made up of hundreds of gold artielos, exquisitely carved and brought together from all parts of the world, of rare stones, of china more valuable than though it were of solid gold, and of other articles which would if melted down fully pay the President's salary for a year and more. In ono caso thero is a oomplete collection of gold and silver coins of Japan., which has a wonderful numismatic value, as it is tho only complete set in existence, except ono in tho Japanese treasury. Somo of the gold coins are a quarter of an inch thick, and as big around as tho top of a dinner pail. Seven of them cost SfiOOO, and thero aro, perhaps, a hundred coins in the collodion. In another caso thero aro half a dozen large elephant tusks, which the Icing of Siam gave to Grant, and there are six pieces of cosily jade stone given him by ono of tho pri nces of China. All of the swords presented to him aro here, and many of these have diamonds set in their handles. The sword given to Grant by tho sanitary fair at New York has a solid gold head representing the Goddess of Liberty, which has two rubies, two diamonds and two sapphires tet in it. The sword of Chatia-� ox which he reetdved from the city of Lep-| don is a wonder ot nit;;.lie workmanship, ! beurmn ihe omrraviug of thoeupiinl on one i.,oiiuon UiululnUi on Uio which Loo's surrender was signed of solid gold, and a solid gold invitation card as big as a postal card and about four times as thick, which wns sont to Grant hi a solid silver envelope, inviting him to a masked ball at San Francisco. Thero aro a number of silver menus, a gold-handled knife which tho miners of Idaho gave him, gold-headed cants sot with diamonds, and medals and other artiolos of gold which beggar description. Somo Costly Sworils. In a caso noar Grant's are tho two sworas, with thoir scabbards of solid gold, which woro givon to Gen. Shields by South Carolina, and which Congress has just bought for $10,000. Those havo diamonds in their handles, and thoy aro very boautiful. Thero is a Damascus sword with a handle of gold, which was given to Cornmodoro (now admiral) Shufoldt, and other swords givon to Perry and Elliott, all of solid gold. Thero is a Mexican saddle mounted with gold, which the notocl Gon. Hnrnoy roceivod from a Mexican officer after tho battlo of Cerro Gordo, and there is ono case devoted to relies of Hancock. Among theso Is a gold-headed oano, with n diamond In its handle ns big ns tho head of a lend pencil. There aro swords .of gold and n dress sword brilliant with diamonds. Thomas Jefferson has left a golden sword hero. It camo from tho Orient, and was taken from tho patent office for tho museum. Tho Washington rolics havo only a few silver articles, but they contain many fine pieces of china and cut glass. The punch bowl is ns big as a half bushol moasuro.ttnd there aro decanters of all shapes and sizes. Somo of tho platoswero givon by Lafayotto to Mrs. Washington, nnd the museum has lately received from the family of Lev/is Washington a number of autograph letters which have never been published. His camp plates aro also here, and there is a letter in Washington's handwriting: in which ho invites some ladies to dino with him from theso plates. It is dated at West Point, and shows that Washington, though he appreciated tho good things of this life and lilted to cat his dinnor off of fino linen and liked to drink his wine out of cut glass, could got along with ham and grains and had the happy faculty of making the best of things. This letter reads: OAJir at west point. Sinco mir arrival at this happy spot wo Imvo had a ham and sometimes a shoulder of bacon to grace tho liend of tho taWo, a ploco of roust beef adorns tho foot, nnd a small dish of greens or beans, almost: imperceptible, decorates the centre, when tho coolc has n mind to cut n figure, and this, I presume, ho will attempt to do tomorrow. Of late ho had Lhn surprising lncte to dlsoovcr that apples will mnko pies, and It's a question that, amidst hli) efforts, wo don't get ono of apples instead of having both of beef. We havo two beofstoak pies or dishes of crabs In addition on each side of the centre dish, dividing tho space and reducing tho distance between dish and dlsli to about six foot, which, without them, would bo 12 foot apart. If thdiliidlos can put up with such an entertainment and will Biibmlt to partake of It on plates, onco tin, but now iron-become so by the labor of scouring-I shall bo happy to ooo them, oto. Gkouqb 'Wabiiiiiotoh. A Million Dollar Clonk. There are a vast number of flno dresses from all parts of tho world in the National Museum, and the most extraordinary article of this kind is tho $.1,000,000 feather cape. This capo is about as large as tho ordinary waterproof cloak. It comes from tho Sandwich Islands, and it is made up of rod and yellow feathers, so fastened together that they overlap each other and form a smooth surface. Theso feathers shino like tho finest of floss silk, and the rod feathers aro far prettier than tho yellow ones. It is tho yellow feathers, however, that are expensive. They aro about an inch long, and are worth in the country in whioh they are found CO cents apiece. They were in times past taken for taxes by tho Hawaiian kings. Thoy are taken from a littlo bird known as tho uho, which is very rare, and very shy, and very difficult to capture. Each bird has two of theso yollow feathers under his wing,and tho birds are caught in traps and tho feathers ore pulled out, and they are thon freod. Thero is a letter in tho musoum from tho prinoo of,tho Sandwich Islands, who states thnt it took moro than 100 years to make this coat, and the authorities of tho museum say that according to tho Sandwich Islands' estimate it is worth moro than the finest diamonds in the English regalia. This cloak bolongod to a chief of tho Sandwich Islands who rebelled when slavery was abolished thero in 1819. Ho owned this cloak, and when ho was killed in battlo it came into tho hands of the king, who gavo it to Com. Auliok in 1841. It still belongs to this man's grandchildren, but it is deposited in tho museum for exhibition. In anothor case thero aro two other capes of theso Bamo foathers, and in anothor part of the museum thero ore somo lino specimens of cashmere shawls. Ono of these is about 10 feet long and fivo feet wide, and it was given by the imaum of Muscat to tho wifo Of Lieut. Shields in 1840. It is made entirely with tho neodlo, and must havo taken years in its manufacture. The aesthetic dross of 1882, sont hero by somo dress reformers at that timo, is a fino costume of terra cotta satin, lined with whito enshmero. It is tlio same dress as that worn by tho ladies of today. fioniQ Jctvols of tho Sultan. The order of tho Shefokat which the Sultan gavo to Mrs. S. S. Cox is also kept in the National Museum. It is a star bigger around than a trade dollar which sparkles with more than a hundred diamonds. Those diamonds are set in gold on a brown, gold and green enamel. Tho star has fivo points and there are 20 diamonds on each point. It has a beautiful ribbon sash connected with it, and it was givon to Mrs. Cox ono night at the Sultan's palaco when sho went there with her husband to dinner and ato Turkish viands served up by a French cook on gold plates. After the dinner was over tho Sultan presented this to hor. She thought, I am told, that sho was to have it forover, but it seoms that his majesty only lends stich presents for life, and that when sho dies it is to be sent back to him. Tho wifo of Minister Straus was presented with this samo order and I suppose sho will havo to return it in tho distant future. The Sultan, I am told, has somo of the finest jewels in the worki. I met tho other day a lady who had visited his treasure chamber at Constantinople and she says she passed through room after room packed full of gold and precious stones. She described to mo a golden erndlo in which tho sultans of the past have been rocked, nudsttys that it'Wns of solid gold, net with precious stones, Sho describes a betlquilt set with poarls of oil shapes and sizes, and says that thero are at least two bushels of hand mirrors whoso frames blazo with diamonds which havo boon used by tho ladies of tho harem. Ono of the biggest emeralds in tho world is in the Sultan's vaults, and though His whole country is bankrupt lio has more than $100,000 tied up in worthless trinkets. Tito Jewels of Savatrcs. Unole Sam has a vast collection of tho jowols of savages. Ho has silverware made by tho Indians of Arizona, enrvod ornaments from Alaska, and great bracolets and anklets of gold, silver and brass from India. Ono of tho most curious necklaces in his collection is ono of human lingers, which tho medicine men of some of tho Indian tribes wear, and I looked at ono todav made of 07 human teeth, with holes pierced at their roots to string them. This uecklaco was 10 inches long and a number of the teeth evidently needed filling. It came from tho Fiji Islands, and was found there in 1840. Another necklace wns mado of human hair, into which tho tusk of the walrus was woven. It was about two inches thick and 20 inches long. Another savage necklace is one of human and dog teeth combined, and thcro uro necklaces of stone, of gold, silver, copper and brass of all shapes' nnd Sizes gathered from all parts of tho world. It is hard to appreciate the size of the National Museum. It is growing faster than Jonah's gourd, and it is now one of the best organized museums in the world. It surpasses any other museum in the line of Indian antiquities and matters connected with America, and vast additions from all parts of the world aro receiver! every year. Already the building which was constructed a few years ago for it is packed to bursting, and a new ono will have to bo buiit very soon. Miss Ghukdv, Jn. AN .IMPROMPTU ENGAGEMENT PATTI SAW HE  WAS UNEASY. 1 of tin I How Her Buffo with a Broken Coat Scored a Success. It is not every ono who can turn an accident to good account. But Ferranti, a buifo in Carlotta Putti's company, succeeded in doing this. Just as ho was leading tho prima donna out upon tbo stage somebody in tho anteroom behind cried out to him that his coat had burst at tho back. It was too Into to return. Tho audience had caught signt of tho two singers. They advanced to the footlights and began their duet. But Patti noticed that her companion was ucrvous and uneasy. Dropping tho text, sho fitted those words to the uir in Italian: "What is the matter with you tonight'.' I don't understand your nervousness.  Nobody laughs at you." Ferranti, in tlie same mellilluous Italian, responded: "By the saints, 1 have burst my coal! EveryW'dy will laugh when I go off the stage, if they don't now." At this unexpected dialogue. Max Mavet-zek aud his orchestra began to laugh. The peitormeis thcms;lves were luughiier. Tin: people.in the front seals joined in without knowing why. uud the merriment presently broKO out into appiauso all over A Story of Halloween. i tho lb I I J 1 t, 1 t anted Unit the South. My MAMIE  ADAMS. Tho Turners stayed down at their house on tho North shoi'o until the iirst weok of Novombor, and on tho last night of October they gavo a Halloween party. Mr. Tumor was in AVnshington, Mrs. Turner was in Germany with hor youngest danghtor, and Tom Tumor was at Harvard, and camo down as tho guost of his sisters. Tho Turners who gavo the party were tho three oldor girls, with thoir next-door noigh-bor as chaperon. Katharino, tho oldest, was engaged to bo married to hor father's law partner, Francis Carruth, but her sistera, Noll and Mattie, wero still on tho sunshiny side of 20, so they wero as curious to try all tho spells and charms of Halloween as any girls could be. It is truo that Tom's classmates woro unitedly willing to aid those protty young girls in thoir search for signs and tokens from tho gods that rule over tho affairs of tho affections, but no junior of them all was really responsible for tho extraordinarily romantic thing that happened at tho Turners' Hallow'een party. There woro fivo of Tom's classmates down from Cambridge with him, Cams, Murray, Hibbard, Morrison and Newburn. Francis Carruth took Mr. Turner's plaoe opposite Katharino at tho table, and thoro woro four women and girls, friends of tho family. Mrs. Volnoy, a gay littlo widow, called herself tho matron of the party. This honor was disputed with hor by Mrs. Collingham, whoso houso was next to tho Turners, both in Boston and on tho shore, and whose husband was absent with Mr. Tumor, � Her daughter Bella and Miss Alice Woth-eroll, a bright boauty, at whose shrine Tom Turner had worshipped since his Latin school days, mado up tho number. "Oh! there aro 13 at tablo, Miss Turner. Let mo havo my soup in the comer!" cried Georgo Murray, Tom's especial chum, as soon as he had unfolded his napkin at the dinner preceding the evening's mysterious rites and ceremonies. "lie takes science onlyl" "Murray can't count 1"  "Ho counts himself nobody!" "He ought to be made to go into a comer with a plate 1" ohorussed tho four Cambridge men. "Count again, Mr. Murray," laughed Katharino Turner. "I hopo that 'we are soven,' and that you superior creatures aro also sovon. I tried to get a multiplo of the weird numbers." "For luck!" said Mattio Turner, who was next to Murray. "And Katharino has succeeded, tool Can't you really count, Mr, Murray? Is counting an elective at Harvard?" "Mako fun of mo all you please, every one ofyoul" answered Murray with fino good-temper; "but I'm in tho right. Thero are only 13 at this table." "Como, come, count, manl" cried Tom Turner. "Mrs. Collingham and Bella are two. Mrs. Volney and Miss Wethorell aro two. Two and two mako four. My throe sisters mako sovon. Thero are oertainly six of us fellows, and Mr. Carruth makes seven. Twice seven are fourteen." . "Mr. Carruth isn't here,".said Murray. Francis Carruth was taking his soup. "If this bo not I, who the douoe bo 1?" he asked, laughing, "Well, I don't know," said Murray, "but I'll try and find out aftor dinner. I am now about to relate a witty story which woU't keop until the coffee." 'After dinnor Murray followed Carruth into tho library. "See hero," said he, "I didn't mean to bo rudo, but I see plainly you aro not hero. And though I didn't carry my superstition too far, I really didn't like to dine with IS at tablo. It wasn't the thing for you to do, to force it on people when they didn't know." "What aro you driving at?" asked the young lawyer, holpin'g himself to a oigar. "I'm Scotch," answered Murray. "I was born with tho mystio veil. I havo tho sift of socond sight/ "Rubbish I" replied tho Boston lawyer. "Kubbish, if you like," said Murray, firmly, "but you know as woll as I do that you were really a year in the future, I saw whon you looked around tho table that you woro thinking yourself at tho head of your own tablo, with us as your guests, this tima next year. You and Miss Turner were ono in your thoughts. Consequently there were only thirteen of us at tablo." Carruth laughod and oolored a littlo aa tho next instant Katharino came into tho room, followed by Nell. "Oh, must you smoke tonight, Frank?" criod Katharino. "Wo want you to como at onco and help us with the curtains for our play. Tlio things will bo cleared away from tho dining tablo directly. That is to be tho stage for some of Noll's experiments." Carruth looked at her curiously without replying for an instnnt. Then ho said: "No, I'm not going to smoke. I will como." He put down his oigar and walked out of tho robm. Noll tumod to Murray. "Thero's a modol fiance. Francis Carruth always obeys Katharine's slightest wish and word." "A model, eh?" said Murray. "Should you like to rule a man that way, Miss Nellie?" "It depends on tho man," returned Nell. "Say mo." Sho flashed a glance at him. "Why, I thought it was Mattie I" she ex-claimod, "not mo." "Your love was blind," said Murray | "it's you." "My love, indeodt the idea!" returned Miss Nell, with scorn. "If you would accent thoso words a little differently, I should liko to hoar you repeat them. Listen to mo. 'My lovo indeed!' " Murray's voico was very low and caressing. Ho took Noll's hand. "It sounds very pretty," sho murmured. "Say it again." "But aro you my love?" asked Murray. Nell snatched away her hand. "What's going on here?" asked Newburn, who pushed aside tho curtain and camo in, followed by Cams, Morrison and Hibbard. "Mr. Murray and I aro rehearsing our parts," said Nell. "We girls must all walk a mile at midnight and geta purple cabbage from a moonless Hold, and hang it over tlio door on our return. I was trying to coax Mr. Murray to walk under it, and ho won't." "I won't," said Murray. "I will go and get tho purplo cabbage, but wild horses shan't drag mo under if." "Murray 1" called Tom's voico from the hall, "You fellows como here a minute and help mo hang up theso jack o' lanterns for Miss Wotherell and Mattie." Murray, Hibbard, Morrison and Cams rushed out of the library. Newburn lingered with Nellie. "I'll walk under your purple cabbage if you'll let mo," he said. Noll looked at him critically. "Tho man who walks under is to meet his fate.". "Will you stand very noar and give him a chanco?" "It depends upon the man," repeated Nellie, dimpling. She pushed a little blonde curl back from one of her cars, as if to hear well his next words. "I'd like to be the man," said Newburn. "Tlio man? What man?" "The one who walks through a Halloween spell to find you," said Newburn. "Mo? Or Bella Collingham?" "You.'' Newburn tookherhand. "I've been .in lovo with you for some time." he said, "Oh, havo you? It sounds very pretty. Say it again," Nell spoke very low. "I waiit to bo engaged to you. I'll bo through college when I'm 21, and then I'm to have the management of-well of things. Vou know my father-" "Left you a fortuno? Exactly. But we girls all have so much. You must woo a doweiless maiden, Mr. Newburn-ono who loves you." "Don't you love me a bit?! I love you!" "Mercy, what a dull way of toying it!" Nell took away her hand. Her blue, eyes wero fiery, but she laughed. "Mako love to a girl when you lovo her, or you'll never oo loved 1 The idea of repeating those words in ihut tame fashion I" "It's gone out of fashion to go down on one's knees." Nell hurried out of tho library without a parting glance. On the thiv.-diold she mot Hibbard coming to look for Newburn. 'MissColHufcuaui sent tnoto say you aro to an.utge the brooiusiioks lor tho broom-stiel; datiee, Nuwburn." stud bo, "oh. Miss Nell, ju^t como back hur� a minute, 1 want t,i a-K y ou something-" lie lnul her back in tho library ia an UiMJiif; t!u< portiere fell into ulaee. "I'm air.-.iu 1 vtvu't uvt a chanco unless 1 IJllllte Hi. HJ1U   UiUVO   llx,      HftlU   lilUU^lll)      ijnv tho truth is. Nollie, I made up my mmd to ask you tonight if you will havo mo, I havo boon adoring you in soorot for years, and now I M'ant you to give me leave to adoro you openly. Will you be my wifo?" "No, 1 thank you," said Nellie, gravely: "and I think it is horribly boyish and bad taste of all of you."       1      ,      ,    , . "What do you mean?" cried Hibbard in the utmost astonishment. .        � "Go I" said Nollio, with tho air of an offended queen.      . .: Hibbard went, looking terribly crestfallen and perplexed. He had mado up his miud to offer himself to Nollio i'urnor tonight. Ho had drilled himself to do it in a very straightforward and manly fashion, as he thought, and now sho called him boyish. , Sho sat down upon a sofa with tears m her cyos. From tho other rooms camo tho merry nolao of preparation for tho Hal-loweon .frolic. Bella Collingham and Mattio wero laughing happily. "Good reason, ' thought poor Nelho; yet what havo I over dono more than they that tho boys should mako it up among themselves to attack.me."....... "Ah, aro you hero Miss Nelho, and alone? Mayloomein?"    .     , She looked up. Morrison stood in the doorway. "Certainly, como in," she said, "come m and make mo an offer of your heart and hand. I'd liko to meet my fate as often as nossible tonight." "I wish I woro yourfate," said Morrison, coming forward oagorly. Ho sat down, beside hor. "Whon is so good a time as Halloween for two hearts to recognize thoir-thoir-woll, for eaoh other-their-" "Their lovo," prompted Nollio; "you seom to stammer over your part." "Their love, yes love I" gasped Morrison, very red in tho face. "1 see you have guossod my secret. Ever since the first timo I saw you-" 'For heaven's sake!" cried Nollio. "Go away from mo this instant, and ask Mr. Cams to como hero, and have it over with, What a parody of mon you wretched creatures arol Go! �0,1 any, and toll Mr. Cams I want to soo him at once." Cams was engaged in festooning a small wreath of four-leafed clovers over thoohim-ney-pieeo, and it was iivo minutes before ho responded to the summons and entered the library, where NOIlie, now thoroughly roused to anger, sat alone, certain that she had been chosen as an object of ridicule for having a hand in this frolio of sentiment. She stood up as Cams came gayly in. "Morrison said you wanted mo," ho began. "Yes, get it over withl" commanded Nellie. "Thon I may go out and take part in tho cvouma''s entertainment. My commission as a private player for the amusement of Cambridge will be dono whon you aro dono." "What's tho row?" Cams stared at' tho pretty girl in sheer amazement. "Nothing. I am only waiting to hear what you havo to say." "Why, I haven't anything to say, mydear girl." What is tho matter?" "Don't temporize," sho returned. "Or did you posBibly bet against all the rest? Por-naps it is you I havo to thank for tho atrocious conduct of Mr. Murray, Mr. Newburn, Mr. Hibbard and Mr. Morrison? It was a noble scheme, a worthy, worthy thing to dol" "YOu are rehearsing that part of yours again-is that- it?" asked Cams. "It's Murray you want, not mo," "Coward 1" said Nellie, hor cheeks blazing. Cams winoed. Ho camo forward and took hold of hor wrist. "I can lot you say tbat word becausa I love you I" His voice waa as angry as hor own. "Good, goodl" said Nellie; "go on. Tell mo you have loved me ever since the first time you saw mo."    ..  "I can't. I never in my life thought of suoh a thing as loving you till this minute, you littlo fury I X never saw you so boautiful, I could shake you, as I did whon you were a littlo girl I" He took hold of her shoulders to shake her as he might a child, but his arms went around hor, and ho bent forward laughing, and looked down into her. angry eyes. "How daro you 1" she said; buthe kept his arms around her. "Don't rouse the party," he said, "speak low, my dear; we have only a moment for this bliss. May I?" Ho bent his faeo a little lower. "No, no, nol" Nellie hid hor face against his shoulder. rf'Let mo go, I say I" "Indeed I won't. You sont for me and told me to offer myself to you. Here I, am. Take mo, or, by Jupiter, I'll-I'll-" "Oh, yes; threaten mo," said Nollio. "Hold up your head I' "I won't." "Hold up your beadl" Ho whispered the words.bnt with so muoh of emphatic tenderness that Nollie, still held a prisoner, obeyed him from curiosity, and looking him in the eyes, saw that Bhe had met hor fate. Thoy stopped apart after they had kissed, and Btood looking at oaoh other again. "Tho absurdity of itl" said Nellie. "It's a very agreeable surprise to me," teased Cams. "Never dreamed that you loved mo, except as a sister." "I don't." "Lot's sit down hero and talk it ovor. Do you think it was quite fair to take me by such a violent stratagem?" "Stratagem, indeed!" cried Nellie,' "Violent!" "Cnlm your emotion, my littlo lovo. We must oome to an bnderstanding." Aftor an instant he added: "Though, tobosuro.to a oasual observer, that might look as If wo had arrived at one. I'll take another. "Now, if you pioaso, am I to understand that you intend to let mo announce our engagement when I go back to help Bella Collingham?" - "I'm not engaged toyoul" "Oh, aren't you? Woll, I'm engaged to you. That's why I am kissing you. I'm much obliged to you for sending for me," "How I hate you I" "May you never lovo mo, then?" "I will lovo you, maybe, perhaps, sometime, if you won't act as if anything had happened whon wo go out among tho others. I'll tell you all about it tomorrow, but do, do, do treat mo coldly tonight." "Hem, coldly I" said Cams. "Hush! Stopl Hero comes Kathorino." "Nellie, I wish you would como and help with tho decorations," said hor older sister pushing aside the portiero. "Mattio wants you to show Mr. Carruth how to get tho wishbones ready for the climax game." "I've been busy, Kathy," Baid Nollio, demurely. "Busy! You haven't lifted a finger to help on your fate. You don't deserve a fate," said Katharino, turning away. "Tell me you have always loved mo, Nell," whispered Cams as thoy rose. "I never did. I always liked you, but-" "And I always liked you, but you know I've been rathor a follower of Mrs. yolney." "Mrs. Volney 1" repeated Nellie, with spito. "And I think it is very agreeable that wo both foil in lovo at tlio same moment. I don't remember oven hearing of a situation just like ours. Let's colobrato once more-yes, just ono." Thoy went out among thoir friends and took part in tho I-Iallowe'on frolics with tho greatest zest. And Nellie, suddenly assured by love that lovo had boon noar liar several times tlitit night, looked kindly upon the four rejected ones, so kindly, indeed, that hopo rose in thoir hearts, and oaoh ono confirmed his appeal of tho evening with a letter from Cambridgo next day. Sho wrote tho same note of refusal to each one: My Dkab Fmr.nd-Iamsuro yoa wlilnlwayabe my friend whon I tell you of my engagement to our frlsnd, ilr. Corns. Your friend, Hulbn Tunxnn. HE LETS THEM STEAL. Privileso Enjoyed by Certain Eloh Customers. "It is remarkable," said a prominent dealer on AVashington St. tho other day, just after a sensational arrest of a shop-lifter had attracted a large crowd of persons before ono of tho stores, "how hard'7 it is to distinguish the professional snoak thief from tho respectablo.bnt loose-honored customer. Wo business men know what a risk we run in leaving small and attractive objects within easy reach of any ono who may oome in. * "Why, they disappear by tho dozon, and you don't know howl Now and thon you catch one person in tho act, but you can't say anything, or, at most, you can put it on their monthly bill, only to havo it struck out by tho indignant custonior, who don't understand how you possibly camo to mako such a mistake. "If you make a fuss you are sure to. loso ono or moro valuable customers who havo patronised your house for many years, and whose trade may amount to several hundred dollars a month. "Aud all for a trifle, often not worth moro than 3 or G cents! Maybe it is an elderly lady who quietly pockets a toy for her littlo girl, because she wants to getevon with you lor some bargain in which she considers herself outraged; or it is some swell young man who has long wanted just such a cigar holder and is ashamed or unwilling to submit to his chronic momentary lack of ready change. "At all events tho things evanesce, whether vou seo them go or not, aud the only remedy you havo is to put them into more inaccessible places the next time. "But it's the professional shoplifters that make me maduestl Now and then you seo them 'swipo' a valuable article, and you keep your mouth shut becanso you don't want to get an otherwise seemingly honest creature into jail whoso first offence it may havo been, and who may be dominated by the same curious but natural ideas of right mid wrong that children have who not for the world would touch n piece of money, but whoso conscience does not roboi at fastening to any piece of food they may rim across. "Next day you hear that your eminently respectable person has boon arroslud in tins i or that More aud proved to bo -ono of the I notorious crooks of Uie cuy.  1 (K-elaie, it uiaVcs one ievl liko hiriuv private detective*" THE FOUNTAIN OIP HEALTH, Guaranteed Purely Vegetable and Harmless and Not to Contain any Poisonous or Injurious Drug. Thc Great Strengthener of the nerves. The Finest of AH Stomach Medicines. Thc Best Blood Tonic and Irivigoraior .in the World. .Sure Restorer from iWeakness. Perfect Regulator of LSyer and Bowels, Are you nervous, restless, irritable ? Use Dr. Greene'a Nervura. Do you r/et nervous easily, lose your nerve ?� Use Dr. Greene's Xervtvro. Does your heart palpitate, your limbs tremble ? Use Dr. Greene's Nervura, Do you pass sleepless nights, wake tired mornings ? Use Dr. Greene'a Nervura. Have you strange, faint feelings, loss of memory ? Uso Dr. Groeuo's Nervura, Dp you feel blue, have sense of anxiety, foreboding ? Use Dr. Greene's Nervura. H^Dr. GREENE'S NERVURA. IS GUARAN-, TEED NOT TO CONTAIN ANY POISONOUS DRUG WHATEVER.' Any druggist who says otherwise Is guilty of malicious falsehood and criminal libel, nnd Information is solicited which will load to bis detection and prosecution to the full extent of, the law. " Are yon weak, titled, without ambition or energy ? Use Dr. Greene's Nervura. Is your blood poor, your vitality low ? Use Dr. Greene's Nervura. Are you bloodless, thin, and want to grow stout ? Uso Dr. Greene's Nervura. Do you have headache, dizziness, dull-feeling head? Use Dr. Greene's Kervura. Do you have dyspepsia, indi* gestion, gas, bloating ? Use Dr. Greene's Nervura. . A.re you bilious, your kidneys disordered, bowals'constipated 9 Use Dr. Greene's NeTvnm. U3?-Dr. greene of S-i Temple place, Boston, Mass, the well-known specialist in tho euro of all forma of nervous and clironto diseases, can bo coiw suited ImIeE OP charge, personally or by letter. Suflorors at a distance should send n description of their oases by mall. NEW LITERATURE. Ward McAllister as a Jester-Now Edition of "Jane Eyre"-Miss Jerome's Art Work-Our New England-Some Books on Africa, Etc. The most interest'mg'doscriptiou in Ward McAllister's "Society as I Have Found It" is oontainod between the lines, as the Baying goes, and tolls of tho author himaOlf. It shows him to bo a follow of infinite jest and most pleasing fancy, who cracks his jokes and jingles his bells for his own amusoment, in which he becomes tho peer of a philosopher who is obliged to bo content with his own satisfaction, and should never expect anything moro. ISHis biggest joke is in making the publio bolievo that he really is giving somo information about the society he knows. How boisterously ho must laugh, when ho pictures tho reader at his wit's end, when dono with his book to rind out hovt- much ho has learned about socioty thafltO'Uid not know before. Of course, New York society treasures in tollect, and enlivens its assemblies with wit and wisdom, and its men and women cultivate thoughtyas woll as manners, in �whatever association tBoy inay bo, but Mr. McAllister has heard nothing about it, or ho avoids mentioning; it. This may bo a great joke, but it is cruel all round. For no respect of individual members, by avoidance of discrimination, in wealth, boauty, dress, good living and good manners, can compensate for neglect to indicato that any ono of thorn has any brains. No subsequent explanation to tho witness of his neglect, tho reader of tho book, can euro this omission, and prevent suspicion that Now York society may not be brainy above i ts waistban ds. Mr. McAllister introduces himself with a joke. In the first page3 he consecrates him-solf to Venus, and then do votes himself to Bacchus in the remaining ones. This is discreet. We woultl know nothing of society lovo and intrigue, because it is improper, and wo can find something about it every day in the nowspapors. Wo would know of the quality, caro and service of society's wines, all of which has to do with every man's Baoohus,but wo still take it to heart that Mr. McAllister has compromised his readers by making them interested in Venus, when ho know well enough thoro would bo no satisfaction in it. But with all Mr. McAllister's solitary pleasure in poking fun at his readers, ho gives some serious help in tho way of information about good dinners and good form, aud tolls how to give and accept invitations. And ho throws in his portrait. New York: Cassoll & Co. Boston: Littlo, Brown & Co. _ A select edition of Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyro" is ono of the most desirable issues of tho holiday season. "Jane Eyre," aud "Wuthering Heights," by Emily Bronte, a sister, contain tho best sentiment and feeling of two of tho saddest lives told of English authors, and ono has become an English classic, aud tho other is gaining continuously the favor of critics. The two sisters had limited experience of life nnd manners, littlo knowledge of character, and not much of any art. Charlotte was more powerful than her sister, because she alone ponotrated tho gloom that surrounded both, and saw life and nature as they really were, and felt and illustrated tho passion of love. The human heart became unveiled to her, and she reproduced its strongest emotions, and .made all her readers feel them just as she did. One should read of Charlotte Bronto's life to estimate aright her literary power and character, and nowhere better than in Mrs, Gaskell's "Life of Charlotte Bronte," T. Womyss Reid's "Charlotte Bronte," and Ellen ISusjoy's "Koininiscences of the Brontes." In tho illustration of this new "Jano Eyre," the publishers have boon as careful as in the lotter-press and binding to make it tho best edition in the market. Thero are 48 very fine full-page drawings, engraved by Andrew. Tlio edition is in two 12 mo. volumes, printod from handsome type on calendered paper, cloth, gilt top. It is published in library stylo, and in an edition de luxe. Boston: Tliomau Y. Crowell Si Co. her monogram, havo illuminated designs in. tho style of oldmissals. Thoy illustrate her tasto and.art-in color, -with quite oil tho credit of hor drawings m black and white. The text, in fancy lettering:, issurrounded by an original design with gold to set off tho subiluod and harmonious colors made uso of with it., A bird, a butterfly, and a flower, here and there, suggest) ior work in previous years, but do not proven t her work ot this year from being held ns a bold, and what ia better, a remarkably successful departure. Miss Jerome may find bettor appreciation of .what sho has dono in theso pnges witlv artists than with tho public, butshe will nod fail of pleasing every ono who sees thorn. They aro beautiful and valuablo designs. Boston: Leo & Ghcpnrd. "Dear Daughter Dorothy," by A. G. Plimpton, adds a now figure to two or three charming children created in lato fiction. She is a little Lord Kauntleroy in a Mother Hubbard dress, with all of his brightness and self-eonii-denco. but more natural than ho was. Sho identifies herself with hor father in his business aud private cares, aud at last suo-oeeds in bettering his fortune. She is described with a humor and a pathos that moke her touching in her simple faith, and there will be few readers who will forget her influence. She appears in sovoral portraits by tho author. Beaton: ltuhem Brothers. Miss Irene E. Jerome, who gave in "Ono Year's Sketch Book" some of the best draw, lugs of broad landscape aud small.plant and animal life, and in decoration that had appeared at the timo, devotes herself exclusively to decorative work iu "i'roni an Old Love-Letter," her holiday annual for 1800, Nine -leaves, bound in thick covers tied with ilass andsuetuod with sealing Yfax beating Tb.0 travels of Herbert Ward, author ol "Five Years with the Congo Cannibals," began in 1884, when ho was appointed ta tho service of the Congo Free State,and continued, ho having become a member of tho expedition.for the relief of Stanley, to tha disasters, in 1889, of (Stanley's rear guard, of which ho was a leador. He sought travel in Africa from a desire to study barbaric] life, ns well as from lovo of adventure, and was qualified by naturo and training to en< dure its hardships nnd gain its pleasures, Most of tho time was passed among the savago tribes of tho Congo, on which ha mado his wonderful canoe journeyings covering 2fi00 miles. His book; which is just ready in a crown octavo volunio rich with engravings of original drawings, takes tho reader along the uppor and lower Congo to Stanley Falls, to poople and scenes that ho has not found dosoribed so vividly by any of tho well-known explorers. Mr. Word's loading interest anticipates that of tbo reader who would come, by tho description of another, as near as .possible to experience, with, opportunity to secure the general information that is wapting in books on tho interior of Africa. But he recognizes the common interest that seeks tho entertainment of tha; exhibition of personal prowess over physical conditions and animal hostility, nndl gratifies it from his personal record. 11a, does all this with a modest account of his own servico in exploration. It is a model book for tho general readoa in its narrative and its illustrations. Th� latter to the numbor of 91, with two maps,! reproduce scenery, nativo figures, and mode) of lifo, with some of tho very choices^ wood engravings. Thoy aro given unsparingly of spaoo to make tho pencil most helpful to tha pen. Thoy aro by W. B. Davis and VictoS 1'ertird. Tho book contains 308 pages andl< elegantly bouud.in library stylo; cut top. New YorlE I Robert Bonner's Bona. The text and illustrations of "Our New England," ono of Roberts Brothers' new. holiday issuos, join in a beautiful presentation of tho spirit and appearance of New England scenes on shore and by the sea. The sconos are typical and familiar, and named will recall to many somo pleasing as< sooiations of youth. They aro: "A New England Homo," Homo of the Puritan," "A Family of Rooks," "Happy Hollow," "Country Road in Winter," "On thq Exeter River," "Past Milking Time,'1 "Country Road in Summer," "Milkinfr Timo," "Eastern Point Beaoh," "A AVarm, Corner," and "Through the Pines," They aro reproduced by the photogravure prooess, which, next to tho etching, preserves soft* ness of tono and dolicaoy of expression,and whioh in this work shows its mOBt period examples from suoh subjeots. Mr. Ham� ilton Wright Mabie interprets New England naturo m itself and in its influence upon life, with no loss of any of the Bantimont ii communicates, and with graceful and Orna� mentod diction. A. W. Efion & Co. furnish the photogravures, and Frank T. Merrill decorates thoir margins with oharming bits of suggested scones. It is a largo oblonff volume, tastefully bound, and bearing on tho front oover a full-pairo photogravure ol a haylield scene. The late G. P. Putnam compiled for his cyclopaedia, "Tho World's Progress," some uniquo tables to arrange helpfully to memory the principal eventB of history. They now appear revised and brought down to tho close of 18S9, in a separate volume. "Tabular Viaws of Universal History." Chronologically, and sido by side in parallel columns named after tbo leading countries the events most influential upon the courstt of history are concisely designated. Students will approve its lorin as the bes4, for study or reference and compliment it for accuraoy and completeness. i New York: G, Pr Putnam's Sons. Boston: TV*. B* Clarke is Oo. Francis A. Nichols. ADAMEDA Sherry, That means the best California Eherry sold In Boston, at just two-tliivdB t)io price asked, elsewhere for the same quality. In otherj words, a dollar will] buy at our store a gallon ot bttter wine thanj you can buy elsewhere at gl.00. Is it word your while to test the! statement? We snail) be glad to bave you compart, lie soods for yourself. alaaieua CO., 104 Treaioo' St.', C B. Dow, il�i*5�. -............,.........-ci   

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