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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 25

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER  2, 1800-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 25 finish and polish Is (riven by sprinkling flno sand In the tube and drawing a leathern thontr saw fashion, bncli and forth, until a perfect bore Is produced. Some tribes use a peouliar spoolos of bamboo, very straight and light, but Imperfcofc, because It has what gunsmiths oall a "ohoke boroi". that is, one that tapers. This done,: tho two halves are trimmed down, tapering oxtornally toward the muzzle, fitted with a conical wooden mouthpiece, wound from end to end with strips of split rattan or tlioclimbiugpalm.and rubbed with tho black wax of tho Molipona bou. A good workman can make a blow-gun in two days, which is doing wonderfully, considering- the "tools at his disposal, and ho can soil tho linishod product of his skill for about $2. Tho arrows are 10 to 12 inches Ions', made from the stems of palm loaves driod, sharpened and notched at ono end, so as to break off in the wound. At tho other eivd is a conical ball or wad of fibros from the silk-cotton tree (Eriotlendrou Samauma) of a size to closely fit the baso of tho blow-gun, that is, about httlf an inch in diameter, so that it loaves the muzzle with a gentle pop, liko a cork from a bottle. With such an outfit an oxport.nativo will bring down game at an oxtreme r'ango of about 180 foot, but it is tho poison that does it, not the force of the missile.. In the draw- EDITED   BY FRANCES   HODGSON BURNETT THE LITTLE I"ATTN. Frances Hodgson Burnett's Pretty Story at a Boy Who Was Liko On*. PART I. HE boys and girls who have seen many piotures will be sure to have seen somewhere the picture of a faun. To those who have not chanced to see ono I will explain that a faun is a strange, beautiful, mythical creature, half a human being, half a happy, lawless, wild-woodland thing. No one over really saw a faun, except on canvas or In marble, but he is generally represented with a laughing, roguish faoe, ulightly pointed oars and quite unclothed body, the lower half of which is like that Of some slender wild animal, being covered with shaggy hair and having beautiful hoofs instead of feet, ; This figure of the imagination belongs to the old olassio days when gods and goddesses wore supposed to roam about the world and have all sorts of romantic adventures, such as one may read about in "Lem-priere's Classical Dictionary," whloh, by mbbt MVED  AS   THEIlt TBEES   DID.' fbiends   5chb the way. I aaorod when a little girl at Bohopl, and which I used to keep in a convenient corner of my desk, so that I could dip into It and snatch a legend while looking for pencils or geographies. A faun Is supposed to bo a sort of wild, happy god of woodland life and joys. At jeast that is, I think, the easiest way to de-eoribe It. .As .there were woodland nymphs who were called dryads, and water nymphs Who were called naiads, so there were f aims. It is a difficult matter to be definite in describing tilings living only in fancy and legends and piotures-but tho fauns of my imaginings were as free from evil as they Were from thought-thoy lived as 4heir friends the trees and little wild things did; thoy were happy in the warm sunshine, in the cold rain, in the softness of the thiolc, green moss, In tho damp fragrance of the earth and loaves after a storm; the rushing �wind pleased them, the patter of the raindrops in the trees, the swaying of the branohes and the bending of the grass, the light, tho green dimness of the forest's ehadow, the sounds of the birds going to Bleep or awakening, the ferns, the bushes. Everything that lived and grew and was part of nature won part of the fauns, too, and gave them their wild, careless, half human, half animal Joy. But the faun I am going to tell you about Aid not live among mountains and forests and wild strawberries and flowers and tumbling streams. He lived in a small house In lowered my eyes to a part of the Btreot be low. I could see through the branches, and thero was the tiny faun dancing on the favement before his own small front door, didiiot know he was a faun then. I only thought of that afterward, when I had seen him oi'toner, and knew more of his bright, gleeful ways. At that moment I only saw the most beautiful, unwashed, half-clothed little creature one could imagine. He was, perhaps, four or five years old; he had no hat and no shoes or stockings, inaoed, he had on nothing but a fluttering littlo calico slip. Fortunately it was a warm day in the earl:' Sart of summer, and.besides, beingafauu, are say he would not have been happy in ordinary clothes. His way of dancing was simply to hop lightly from one foot to the othor.and sometimes turn round, keeping time to tho musio of his own pretty laughs. As ho danced his dingy calico slip fluttered about, and I could see his round bare limbs, on which ho wore nothing at all. I saw him every day for several weeks and I never saw him with any more clothes on, and do not think I ever knew his curly hair to be brushed, though sometimes-very rarely- I suspected he had beon caught and washed. But his hair was so curly that perhaps it might have been brushed without ono's knowing it. It was such pretty hair, not long, but suoh a bright color, and all ono mass of soft curls and ringlets, which danced as he danced, As for his face, it waB the roundest, dimpled, lovely, laughing one. It looked as if it knew of nothing else but laughing, That is one reason I alwayB thought his mother must have loved him, even though she was too busy to take much care of him. If she had not loved him he would not always have been so gay. But he was always gay. I became as accustomed to watching him as I was to watching the bird families m the trees, indeed, I think I began to watch the birds less whenever the little faun was to bo seen. . . He did not seem to play with other chil dren. Ho was always by himself, always wore the one small calico garment, and was always enjoying himself. I do not remember ever having seen him stand quite still. He was nearly always dancing from one foot to tho other, and talking and laughing ito himself. I have seen him run out into the street when it rained, and dance about with tho raindrops falling on his curls, just as I am sure tho young fauns must have done in their forests alter the jiot days. Ho liked the rain as he liked tho sunshine, and I dare say each drop on his cheek or curls seemed like a little kiss. I am sure he had no toys, and I fancy he did not think of wantiug them, Ho used to amuse himself sometimes with leavos and pebbles and bits of grass. Perhaps he was more intimate than I was with the birds in tho maples, and when they perched on the dressmakors' fonoe and twittered they wore tolling him interesting things only a littlo faun could understand, and which T was too stupid and human to comprehend, Who knows but that thoy told him stories of birds who knew others, birds who had been in strange mythical countries where there were deep forest glades where fauns hid themselves still. At least it is certain ho was never at a loss for amusement, and never tired of talking to the sunshine and the summer wind and the raindrops and the leaves. Once quite an ordinary adventure betel him.but I am sure he not only did not mind it at all, buteujoyodlt very muoh. (CONTINUED NEXT SUNDAYj BORNEO WARRIOR. 127 , THE STREET RAINED." C Washington street, and I think his mother was a dressmaker. Poor, beautiful, happy little faun I I did not know his name and 1 could see no reason for his being happy at Rll, and yet I never saw anything so perfectly full of joy from morning until night, Washington has beon growing into a very beautiful city during tho last 10 years, but when I first went to live there it had one great peculiarity. In almost every nice Wide street one saw small shabby cottages or tumble-down shanties side by side with the largest and most comfortable houses that were to be found in tho city. Tho effect was not so beautiful as it was droll, but sometimes it was tho means of showing one contrasts in life. The house in which I lived then belonged to Gen. Grant, it having been presented to him by some of his friends and admirers! At tho corner of the same sido of tho street was a large brick house, where Gen. Garfield lived. Opposite in'y house was a small tow of frame nouses, ell occupied by col ored people, and opposite Gou. Gariield's Sornor was tho  small   brick   house in-abitod by tho dressmaker whoso little boy Was a faun. I never saw the dressmalcor. I only heard somehow that she existed, and that she was the littlo faun's mother. I tliink (ilio must have been a poor dre;.s maker. Perhaps she used to ait up (-'tail's in some back room aud cut out patterns and sow very hard. At least, that is tho picture I always made of her when i watched the darling little faun and wondered why lie Was so uncared-for and always ah-ne, 1 felt eure she must love him. and would have Washed and dressed him if she had had time. Only a few vanls from JroiH, door wero two bep.utiiul, thick-i'cjvid. full-branched manle trees These sociable branches were i'iost f r;t-nd-ly at the nursery windows and Um windows of my work-room on the third story. The work-room was called iho "den," nnd it was a very-pretty room, ami its windows look in the xuost familiar miitmer luii, the very nests of tho bsrd families who built in the tops of the two trees. I imod to hold my pen still to li.-ten wutch. I was always liMeniug and v, ing thetto birds aud it was while being like that ono day that 1 e.nuM my tirst gluiinstt ol tho littlo faun,   fur a lauuuit 1 SAVAGES' BLOW-GTJM3. Much Like Boys' Bean-Blowers, They Kill Every Time. bt CHARLES LEDTARD NORTON. MONO   the But Dyak head-hunters of Borneo, on one si do of the world, and among the Indians of the upper Amazon, on the other side, the blow-gun is the constant companion of eyery man and boy who nas a sound pair of lungs. "Zara-batana" it is called in its western home, and "sumpitan" in Jhe jungles of Borneo. Very wonderful It is that two savage races, who never heard of one another's existenoo, who are separated by near 12,000 miles of ocean and continent �they are almost the antipodes of one an-othor-should have evolved out of their wild surroundings weapons so nearly similar, and poisons for their arrow points that, so far as chemistry can discover, are nearly identical in composition and practically alike in their deadly effect. The blow-gun of South America is sometimes as much as 12 feet long and rarely less than six feet, the latter length being for the use of boys. Tho larger sizes aro necessarily heavy to prevent deflection and consequent inaccuraoy of aim, and it takes a strong arm to use ono effectively without a rest. Indeed, the most efficient position of a hunter, who is after birds and tho like, is at tho foot of tho troo where his game is perched. Standing thero he may silently bag an entire flock ono by one, without causing an alarm. Among tho South American tribes there aro famous zarabatana makers, just as wo have our noted gunsmiths. Tho recognized method of construction is to solect two straight-grained pieces of light wood, usually tho choritapalin, and after they are well seasoned scrape them down till two surfaces aro absolutely truo and flat, and fit ing are shown tho blow-gun, tho thimble-shaped quiver, and an arrow, the lattor somewhat enlarged for the sake of clearness. The quiver is worn attaohed to a belt slung over the shoulder. Now, having inspected the blow-gun of equatorial America, lot us fly due east or west-it makes little difference which- 12,000 miles or so and alight among the Dyaks of Borneo. If our coming is unexpected we may be saluted with a familiar pop, but it comes from a speor-headod sumpitan, not a zarabatana, and if the arrow does not do its work the owner will probably follow up the attack with hi� spear, and if he is on a sure-enough hunting trip he will probably cut off our hoads and carry them homo to add to tho collection of similar bric-a-brao suspended from tho rafters of his house. Tho Bornoan blow-gun Is made from a solid stick of ironwood about an inoh and a half in diameter. Tho Dyaks aro skilful metal workers and make their own tools, so they aro able to bore tho required hole with a long sharpened rod of iron. The sumpitnn is shorter than its American tfousin, rarely more than seven foot long, but it is a more formidable weapon for large game, being provided with an effective spear head. The arrows are made, of bamboo splints sharpened, and with a spiral score at the end to hold the poison. Instead of a silken wad, a conical hit of pith is stuck upon tho feathor end of tho shaft. Arrows and wads are carried separately, and the wads are affixed only when wanted. Of the two arrows shown, the one with the barbed iiead is for large game or for war. It may havo beon such a one that killed Com. Goodenough, B. N., a few years ago. The extreme range of the sumpitan is given at 150 feet, rather loss than that of the'South American weapon, Tho Dyak artisan, by the way, in finishing his work, uses for. sand-paper tho dried leaves of the Daun Amplas, a tree of the Malay poninsula, which has a gritty under surface and gives a good polish. Bo much for the weapons. Now for tho wonderful poison, urori of America, dyaksch of Borneo. Among the Xeberos and tho Ticunas of the upper Amazon, as among tho Dyaks of tho Bornean jungles, tho secret of its manufacture is preserved.   In both lands rlddlo of tho year boing an example of his skill in that lino: "Thoro is a father with twice six sons. These sons have 30 daughters apieoe, parti-colored, having one cheek white and the other blaok, who never see each other's faoo, or live above 24 hours." This is not very witty, hut what modiayval enigma is? Tho riddle was much cultivated In tho middle ages. An old book entitled "Demands Joyous," but which'wo should term amusing quostions, was printed by Wynken do Wordo, tho second export printer, in 1B11, From this book, of "which there is said to bo but ono copy extant, wo oull a few "Demands." "Who wero the persons who once made all, sold all, bought all and lost all?" Answer-"A smith made an awl, and sold it to a shooma,kor, who lost it." "What is tho worst bostowod charity that wo can give?" Answer-"Alms to a blind man, for ho would bo glad to see the person hanged who gave it to him." "What is that that never freezeth?" Answer-Boiling water. "What man gottoth his living backward?" Answer-Tho rope-maker. Tho Reformation put a stop to riddle-making for a while, but in tho 17th contury it rovived again, and in Franco it'soon rivallod in popularity the ohauson and madrigal. In some old ballads tho hero's chanoe' of winning his beloved is made to turn on his power of solving certain riddlos. In an old edition of "Halliwell's Popular Rhymes" is found this quaint song: I havo a true lovor over tho (sea, Parla mo tlixl mo dominie. Ho must solid mo lovc-tolcons, ono, two and thras, With a rotvum, notrum, trumpetorum, Parla me dixi me dominie. Ho must send mo a boolc that nono eon read, Parla mo dtort mo dominie; Ho mnst sond me a won without any thread; Ho must sond mo a cherry without any stonot He must send mo a bird without any hone. How onn thero he hook that none can read? How onn thero ho web without nny thread? How can there ho ohorry without any stouo? How can there be bird without any bono? When tho hook's unwritten none can road; When tho wob's in the fleeoe it has no thread; When tho cherry's in tho blossom it has no stone] When tho bird's hi tho ogg It 1ms no hone. Hero is a pretty riddle by Schiller, the great Gorman poet: A bridge weaves Its aroh with poorld High over tho tranquil sea; In a moment it unfurls Its span, unbounded, free. Tho tallost ships with Bwolllng sail May pass 'neath Jts arch with easel It carries no burdon, 'tis too frail, And when you approach it flees. With the flood it oomes, with tho rain It goes, � And what it Ib mado of nobody knows. Answer-The rainbow. Coming down to tho present century we find that some of our most learned men havo not disdained to ocoupy a leisure hour in constructing riddles full of ingenuity, letters that one finds quaint and curious things, though I imagine tho fireplace would bo the last place ono would think of looking for riddlos, but over the mantel-Jieoo of an old, old Inn In Lincolnshire, !sug, may bo found this droll quiz: man without eyos saw plums on a troo. Neither took rjluma or loft plums. Pray how can thnt bo? , Tho answor just below is of later date than tho onigmiv, as shown by tho wording: Tho man hadn't eyes, hut lie lind just ono oyo, "With whloh on tho troo two plums ho could spy; Ho neither took plums, nor plums did he leave, But took ono nnd left, one. ns wo mny conceive. One should not forgot Tom Hood's "Excursions Into Puraledom," so full of whimsical rhymes and jolly jokes, such as only Tom Hood could write, but with which tho youth of tho present clay arc not quito as familiar as the youth ol a generation ago. Tho funny illustrations which accompany tho puzzles aro not tho len.'jt amusing features of tho book. Tom Hood, too, is tho only "man of letters" whom wo find malting puzzles for a livelihood. WHAT DO YOU THINK? "Can a  Politician Christian?" 1)8 a tepew, Heal flow and Frances Willanl Answer tlio Question. REDFERN'S SIMPLE MODELS. 5-TNkw York, Nov. I-Having in otir previous cuts this fall catered to tho tastes of those who delight in ornate styles, in velvet and fur, and a plenitude of braiding, cm-broidery and tinsel ornaments, wo now go to tho other extreme and offer our roadors some severely simple clot'.i coats, suitable for shopping, travelling and general morning wear. But wo would call attention to tho fact that in fit and finish those plainer garments aro equal to any of tho moro showy ones. AEnOWS, QUIVER, PIRATIC AND PESTLE. south amep.icxn with blow gun. uu'l :eh- without a flaw when laid together. To do this with a carpenter's bench and a jack-plane takes a good mechanic. What then must be the patience and skill of an Indian who can do it equally well with the rude3t appliances. The next ope ration is still more delicate. A' half-round groove must be made in each of the flat fact* from end to end. For this the Indian artisan uses nature's tools in the fclmpe of tho incisor teeth of the puca or the outia, two rat-like animals that abound in the woods. Of course each groove must be exactly half-round or the boro of the cnui-pletud ?.arabaiauu will not bo true.  A fUuU nicotine and strychnine are among tho ingredients, and that is about all that chemistry has--thus far been ablo to learn. Its certain antidote is salt, one of sugar being also ono, but of loss potency. Its instant effect, hypodermically injected, as with a blow-gun arrow, is to paralyze the voluntary muscles, while breathing and tho action of tlio heart continue. In small animals death quickly follows a slight wound. Man and the larger animals may recover, unless the amount of injected poison is considerable. A victim's life may generally bo saved by keeping the mouth, or in case of birds, the bill, filled with salt or sugar until the effect passes, and these are the antidotes used in both these widely separated lands. In civilized countries the blow-gun is moroly a toy, but sportsmen and naturalists might well use it instead of the noisy and destructive firearms that disturb tlio quiet of tho woods and warn all game within hearing. It is a far moro sportsmanlike weapon than tho shotgun, that scatters its loadon pellets over a yard or two of surface. The appliances of skilled mechanics might easily furnish a light tube with steel-pointed arrows that would prove effective, even without the deadly urari poison, against such posts as rats, English sparrows, and the like, to whose natural increase there seems to be no reasonable limit. BOHEE FAMOUS KIDDLES. Curious Puzzles with Which Noted Men Have Amused Themselves. by elizabeth flint wade. In all ages of the world riddles havo provided amusement for tho ingenious, the wise and the witty. They arb found in all languages, andhave been and are a source of diversion to all classes of people, from the grave philosopher in his study to the merry clown in the circus, while anciently the guosser of riddles was supposed to bo gifted. And while this play upon words is only a sort of witty pastime with us, the riddle once held a far higher place. After inventing it, men began to make it into a kind of game. Bets werj made on the answer, and sides chosen, each side backing its champion, and it is related that King Solomon once won a large sum of money for his superior wit in guessing riddles. The oldest riddle on record, with whioh no doubt ever? one is familiar, may be found in tho book of Judges, chapter 14, verses 14-18. The riddle propounded by the fabled sphinx to the people of Thebes is probably the most celebrated in the long list of philosophical riddles, the solution of which won for CEdipus (son of Laius, long of Thebos) a kingdom. "What is that which goes on four legs in the morning, two in the daytimo, and in the evening on three?" The answer is "man," who creeps in infancy, walks erect in maturity, and in old age uses a stuff. Tho Germans ask, "What can go in tho faoo of the sun, and yet leave no ehadow?" Answor, "the wind." The African puts it in this way: "What flies forover and never rests?" and the Persian says, "What is wingless and legless, yet dies last, and is sever imprisoned?" Cleohmus, one of the "seven wise men of CiWiV was a famous riddle maker, his fertile in ideas, and graceful in language. One of. tho brightest is by Lord Maoaulay: Out off my head, and singular I am; Cut off my tail, and plural I appear; Cut off my head and tail, and wondrous feat, Although my middle's left there's nothing there, What is my head out off? a sounding sea, What is my tall out off ? a rushing rlvor, And in their mighty dopths I fearless play, Tarent of sweetest sounds, though mute forever. In "Notes and Queries" for 1872 may be found this rhymed solution | 0 I), must surely od bo, And ho that is odd Is a singular man. C. 0. will assuredly show, The plural if anything can, Mluus "0" and "D," alas, woe Is mo, 1 am naught to tho wise or the fool, So If 20 wero hero and two disappear, I've naught, as I loarnod at my suhool, An^l "0" to tho ear may bring very oleor The sound of the ocean's main, Wlillo tlio "Doe" can transport to h northern Or remove to a flat Welsh plain. In tho Northern sea, 1 love best to be, And to play In Its mighty wave, But I'm sometimes found, with my iwoetest sound, in the Northern Doe to lave. If tins long explanation should ulve yon vexation, Yet I pray you spare tho rod. You may boll me or fry me, Then dish mo and try me, Ahl you'll eat mo, I am but a cod. A riddle ascribed to Canning, where, by tho addition of a lotter, tho word "cares" is chanced into one of the sweetest words in the English language, is Vic line. It runs as follows: A word thoro Is of plural numboiv Foo to ease nnd tranquil slumber, Any othor word you take, And add "s" 'twill plural mako. But If you add an "s" to this, So strange tho metamorphosis, I'lural is plural now no moro And sweot what hitter was hoforo. Could we imagine the statolv Charles James Fox indulging in riddle-making? Yet hero is ono of which ho is tho author, and whioh has long been included in Mother Goose's rhymes: Formed long ago, yet mado today, Employed while othei-B sleep- "What none would like to give away,      t And none would Uke to keep. You arose from the answer this morningl And LotitiaBarbauld! Fanoy her sitting down gravely to propound enigmas. She did, howovoi\ and very cleverly, too, asseen by tho following, on a river: I nlwayB murmur, yet I never weep, I always He In bed, but novor sleep, My mouth Is wide and larger than my head, And much disgorges, though 'tis novor fed. I have no legs or feet, yet swiftly run, And the mora falls I get move fastor on.   ' Another hardly less  clover, also in a lottor, is by Lord Byron. We quote only the first and last stanzas: I am not In youth, nor in manhood or age, But in infancy ever am known, I'm n stranger alike to the fool and the sage, And though I'm distinguished on history's po^e, I always am greatest alone. Though disease may possess me, and DlalmoB* and pain, I am liover in sorrow or gloom, Though in wit and In wisdom I equally rolgn, I'm tho heart of all sin, and havo long livod In vain, Yet I ne'er shall bo found in the tomb. Mark Lemon, an English humorist, and formor editor of Punch, was fond of making charades which wero both bright and witty, as witness tliis on u "barrow": Old Charlie Brown, who a big rogue was reckoned, Was brought up at my first, for malting my second. Ho was fined, and because ho no money could pay, Had to work with my whole on tho Queen's highway. An amusing enigma much talked of at Oxford a number of yoars ago, is said to havo been written by Archbishop Whately. who offered �50 to any one who could guess it: When from the Ark's capacious round, The world came forth In pairs, Who was it that first heard tho sound Of boots upon tho stairs? Many attempts wero made to solve this. These three solutions, though disagreeing in rosult, show much cleverness and wit. The first suggests that the "sound of boots upon tho stairs" was first audible to him who drove the kine and heard their "high-lows" as they emerged from the ark. Number two says that: When from the ark's capacious round, The world camo forth in pairs, Thy "calf " wns flrBt to hear the sound Of boots upon the stairs. While Number Three asserts thatt To him who cone tho manor o'er A little thought roveola. He heard It first who went before- A pair of soles and (h)eols? What say you, my bright-eyed lassie? or you, my quick-witted laddie? Can you give a better solution still? A search through old letters has often revealed many a curious riddle. Evidently the writers thought it added zest to their letters to puzulo the recipients. Among tho correspondence of tho Rev. John Newton, an English divine, was found a lettor from Cowper, the poet, bearing data July 30,1780. The contents show that: A little nonsense now and then Ib relished by tlio best of men. I am Just two and two, I am warm, I am cold, And the parent of numbers that cannot be told; I am lawful, unlawful, a duty, a fault; I am often sold dear-good for nothing when bought; An extraordinary boon nnd a matter-of-courso, And yielded with pleasure when taken by force. *T!s a kiss. Horace Walpole, in a letter to Lady Ossory, writes: "I send you a very old riddle, but if you never saw it you will like it and revere the riddle-maker, which was one Sir Isaaa Newton, a star-gazer and conjurer: Four people sat down to a table to play; Tlity played all Unit night, and parted next day. Could you thluk when you're told tlmt as they all set No other played with them, nor was there a bet? Yet when lh-^y roiie up each was winner one guinea, Tho' none of them lost the amount of a penny. Walpole could not guess it, but Lady Ossory did, and sent him this answer! Four merry ttddiere played lUl night To many a dancing ninny. And the new morning went bhj, And each received a guinea. It is uul altoaethar in old manuscripts and Senator Ingalls: "Everything is Possible with God," 'Can a man. use tobacco^and bo a Christian?" was onco asked a vonorablo clergyman. "Yes, a filthy ono," was tho quick retort. Can a politician bo a Christian? That question, howovor, remains to bo answered-.rind is answered with marked unanimity below. There is no analogy in the two answers- bo it far from us to insinuate that-but tho two questions soom each as capablo of interesting answers us tho othor. If politicians, who, it sooms to bo current opinion, manage thq.affairs of the country, aro not Christians,' how can thoy, why should they command tho support of Christian voters? Or, can a man be a politician and a statesman? Or, again, to suggest onothor idea, can a statesman bo a Christian, whilo a politician may not? Does a man by engaging in politics necessary debar himsolf from the communion table? How far is American politics removed from Christianity, if at all? The following answors to tho question, "Can a politician bo a Christian?" written by men and women ominont in church or Stato, may throw exceedingly muoh-neoded light on tho subject. Highest of all ia Leaveaiag Power.-U. a Gov't Repoit, Aag. Mr. Depew'B Mind Easy. Chauncey M. Depow, railroad prosidont, something of a politician himself and a "good follow" anyway, thus answers tho question: , Can a politician bo a Christian? I bellovo that he can. Tho question is equivalent to saying that tho administration of government is Hostile io tho teachings and preoopts of Christianity. Tho'n tho only pcoplo who could liold oIVIco would bo atheists and pagans. If you admit that tho politician cannot ho a Christian, you at onco destroy tho wholo foundation of our govemmont; you would lose It tho support of the churches and of tho Christian people of tho country, and, ns they constitute tlio vast majorltyof tho people,thoywould adopt somo government wharo Christians could consistently manngo affairs, I do not seo what thoro 1b in a politician advocating the claims of tho party In whloh ho bolloves, and working for lis success in promulgating tlio doctrines whioh lie thinks essuntial to good Government, in sooklug olUcenud In exercising public functions, which aro not in the diroct lino of Christian Injunction and duty. If Unit is not so, then you must pass all public affairs, which mean the cunclmont of laws and their administration, and that mean public order, safety, morality, protootion for life and property aud wiso measures whioh tiro for tho bonoilt of the business of tlio count ry, Into tho tianda aololy of the,saloons and tho Chinese, Cuauncuy M. Dnri'.w, Simplicity. This is a rnthor long coat of brown cloth, made with a high, flaring collar arid narrow lapels, running its wholo length. Tho loose fronts opon widely over a close fitting vest of fawn colored cloth, which has a straight collar, and is fastoued with small brown buttons. The only vestige of trimming is in the rows of tailor-slitohing on collar, lapels and pockot flaps. To mako up, however, for the simplicity of tho coat, tho hat is rather drossy, being of brown velvet, with a full trimming of shaded ostrich tips and a small aigrette in which is a bright little touch of tho fashionable Spanish yellow. Tho dainty little muff of volvot and feathers matches tho hat, but if tho coat were to form part of a travelling costume, the muff-should bo of cloth with perhaps a hint of fur, and the hat chould bo a very compact turban. This coat Is even moro Bovoro in �ffoct, but eminently calculatud to set off a ilno figure. It ia all black, a heavy diagonal bison cloth, made double breasted, with two rows of rather largro buttons. Tho collar is high and cmite straight and tho sleeves are not much raised on tho shoulders. Tho skirts are made to lit more snugly ovor tho hlpB by meuns of a cross seam. Redjtern. Didn't Know His Own Child. Gedeon married a wife who, In course of time, presented him with 18 children. One evening he found in the street in which lie lived a little boy of 5 or 0, weeping- bitterly. "What is tlio matter with tho littlo man, ebV" inquired Gedeon, caressing him. "I havo lost my way," .sobbed tho youngster. "Then come home with me, and I'll frive you something to eat mid take earc oi' you," Accordingly, our kind-hearted friend took the little follow home, and naid to his wife: "See, wife, I have brought you this child that 1 found all alone m the street. One moro or Jess won't make much diiloronco; wo will treat him as if ho were our own." "Why, you stupid, don't you know him? It's our Joaquhiitol" Large Sale of Boulevard Property. Another largo transaction in Koacon st. boulevard land was effected Friday, through which Mr. William II. Allen of C7 Chauncy st. becomes tho possessor of a tract of 3 70,-000 square feet, with long frontages on Beacon St., tho new Corey liill road and Prospect av. This tract is on tho southerly slope of Corey hill, and besido* the advantage of its southern outlook gives a range of building lots than which no finer are to be found along the entire stretch of tho beautiful avenue. Almost adjoining are the new and elegant residences of Messrs. Caleb Chace and Charles I). Hiaa. Mr. Allen's plans for the development of his now acquisition are not yet made public, but it is unlikely that he will permit such desirable property to remain long unimproved. "What Asain-Tliat Pin? -The presence of a scarf-pin in tho Teck scarf or any other stylo of palpably made-up neckwear, where no fast euhig is required to .hold it in place, is a solecism of the rankest type. Tho offence is so often committed, and bo frequently advised by unthinking writers, thnt one finds a periodical protest to bo necessary, Cloiniurand Furnisher declares.______ Though Middlesboro, Ky., is not yet 30 months old, her industries, manufactures and busiuosA aggrurato tho sum of :,55i.-000, without counting r^h-oad-* built aud buildins. Says Boom   for   Moro   CMstianity, Gibbons. Carditial Gibbons, ono of the ablest and most distinguished prelates of tho day, evidently sees room for improvement in politicians. Ho writes: Aa luunnii affaire nro oonfltltutcd, thoro must needs bo parUos and politics, Thoro being politics, there must nocds bo politicians. That la the ciuio and larger nnd noblor soaso of tho words polities nnd noMMolima. Thoro Is no hostility to tho spirit of Chrlatlunity, but rather ontlro harmony with It; nnd thut whilo there have boon many no bio Chvigtinns who wovo alao great politlciauH, it Id to bo doplored tlmt at proaont thoro sooma to bo bo many politicians who are not CUi-Minns. Jamks, Cardinal Gnmoxa, Archbishop of llultlmora, famous "Maine law," is nothing if not unequivocal in most of his public uttorancos, and tho following is characteristically to tho point: A politician, "Webster says (1) is a man versed in tho science of government, ft person skilled in or devoted to polities; (2) a man of artUlco or deep coritrlvanao; (3) politic, cunning, artful. In common piirlnuco, when tho word politician to used it ia never undoratood to apply to Ko. 1. Wo call such a man a statesman; and ho may bo, and such often aro, honest men and Christians, as tho world measures such people. Hut such men In our time, I fear, aro very few, while politicians Nos. 2 and 3 swarm everywhere; men Incapfiblo of living by honest Industry, and so aro driven to llvo by their wits, and polities seems to afford tho largest (leld /or suoh people. Henry Ward needier classed this sort of politicians with tlio devil. 'The devil and his poll- , tlcinns," was his phrnao, putting, as was .lit, tho I teacher and master first. 1       | I havo known somo politicians of tho first class : whom I havo honored as upright and noblomen, who could never, for any temptation of party Interest or any other, swerro onu hAir'H breadth from tho lino of reetltudo and honor. I havo known a swarm of politicians of the clatia 2 and 3, who would not steal or He or cheat In private lifo, but In nny matter touching party ad vantage or party policy wore thoroughly unscrupulous. Somo of thoso men pass in society as honest, many of them aro church members In good standing; but in party matters thoy will without soruplo lie, cheat, perjuro themselves, brtbo votera,mtHcount votes, stuff ballot-boxes, falsify votimr lists or do anything which thoy thlnlc advantageous to "tho party." Thl3 sort of work is by no means confined to Boston, Now York, Chicago, St, Louis or the South; but it may bo found everywhere that men make a living by running ward caucuses and hoodwinking or befooling tho peoplo. This is so common everywhere that �lio standing of such men in society or tho church is not In tho least affected by being false to duty In any way and every way or any oxtont, ovou to that .of violating oponly and notoriously thoir ofilolal oaths.    ' What will bo dono about it? What can bo done about it? Nothing I so long as suoh men find refuge In our churches, and tit companionship thoro. _ KttAi Dow. Tho Blind Chaplain's G-entlo Words. The blind chaplain who daily prays for the congressmen at "Washington certainly should bo authority ou this topic, if religion admits of a standard of judgment, and his kindly words aro indeed encouraging': It wero, indeed, a sad caso if the mon moat deeply concerned In the affairs whloh affect tho weal of cities, States and the nation wero shut out from tho mercy and grnoo of our blensod Lord, and from membership in Ills body and churoh. Kvory public man lias groat and soro temptations, but so havo all other men, whatevor their sphero of lifo. Our Lord's help Is promised to ail who seek It, and f nowhere read that Christ puts a politician under tho ban; although, from your propounding tho query, it would seem somo ignorant and narrow people do. I havo known in the past, and still Know, aa devout ami noblo Christian men engaged in puhlio business as lu any other walk of lifo. Willi au Hjemuy Milbuum. some who will not call themselves Christians aro in a fair way of becoming ouch through their manly devotion to tho political Issues of tho day. All ara agreed as to what constltues a real Christian. Tho term Is about Identical with tho highest standard of manhood. Of course, there is no question horo about doctrinal or ecclesiastical Chrietlnnity. Such differences aro impertinent to this discussion; and If tho higher manhood nlonn is considered, an engagement in political activity would seem to bo imperative, for politics Is simply humanity applied to tlio State. 0. B. FaoTHiNanAM. Senator Ingalls Perhaps Sarcastic The noted president of the United States Senate emits tliis flash of light upon the question: Can a politician bo ft Christian? Everything is possible with God. _ John J. Ikoallo. Booaovelt's High Ideal. That aggressive young civil service commissioner aud idol of the young Kepubli-caus, Theodore Roosevelt, holds up this high ideal: Of oouvsQ a politician can bo a Christian; ho will never do really ureditaMo work in politics unless ho applies tho rules of morality and Christianity as rigidly, In pubUo aa in private life. Thkodoius Roosevelt. The Olergyman-Editor'sPointed Answer. This answer of the New York clergyman-editor will be read with interest and aamilo: I should bo vory sorry to hurt tho i'uollngs of the politicians by replying In tho negative, and I am unwilling to compromise Christianity by replying in tho aiurmatlvc. rerhaps I had hotter say,Yes, tho politician can bo a Christian; but If ho under takes botli jobs ho 1ms* terrible contract on hand. My Impression is, if ho Is very much of a politician with his right hand, and wains to bo a good deal of a Christian with his left hand, he had bettor be mighty careful not to let that left hand know what uw right hand finds it noceu. oary to do. To acquire office, a man, in 00% cases out of 100 must donate money, which ho knows will bo uaed for tho purchase of votes. Politics aro mado thut way, and if ho has conscientious scruples, his opponent, who probably got rid of his conscience long ago, will run ahead oi' him with a big majority, I have not seen onough Christianity lu the politics of the rlay to rim an infant claus In a Sunday tfohool. But then I am neat-sighted. geoiige IX. IiEl'WOKTn. It Is a Strain, However, Bays Garland. President Cleveland's attorney-general argues tho point and concludes with a dignified "yes" in these words: All*tho groat preachers and divines discuss poll-ties and political obligations in their sermons and writings. We havo hud in our legislative halls, and now have, preachers of tho goHpel, skilled, apt ami doxtorons politicians, and If they are not ulwnys "Christian statesmen" they may bu called Christian politicians. It would bo a withering, un appalling reflection that, in a business in which so many nro engaged, they havo not tlio comfort and support of Christian teaching horo, its well as its hopos in ft future Btato, a belief lu which, "if cradl. catod," in tho language of the philosophic Uucklo, "would drive most of us to despair." It mny boa heavy demand, and, in fact, n severe strain on the nerves and faculties, for a politician at times to bo u Christian. Yet tho dilllculty in ono thing and the actual being is another; tint dilllculty is not insurmountable. Many people affect to bellovo there are no honest men in that time-honored profession, the law, and actually say Imt few of them get to heaven, and those few slip In sideways, as it were, ltldlcu-luusl by this aimie inude of talking, riot reasoning, the word demagogue has been broughtdown from its once high and moBt lofty place and sot In the company of base, tricky, artful, and all that. Often words run away thus, and doubtless much of this now ails tlio word politician. Uut it is too broad and too Important a i/&oxdt and concerns too much that is vital far It to diift away and become a synonym for moanncHB In political management or party chicanery, in this light I could not diucasa thu qut'Ulion, nor could you ask It. It cannot be admitted that the direction and control of these affairs in which every person in this country la so deeply hi! terestfd, and in which almost every one to somo extent taken a part, are in the hands of uutlaws, roh-bC'i'o ami corwiiru. Considering tho words politician and Christian, us defined by Web3t^r, and as wo practically know them, I do not think they aro irreconcilable or even inconsistent, and tho propoaiUon tjubmitted is answered in thy afllrmativo. A. II. OAItLANU, li^c-TJidted SUiteB Attorney-General, Misa Willard Agrees with Ingalls. Tho opinion of the noble chief of tho W. C. T. U. rings Quaintly on tho ear.   She writes: In Lho early history of a parly, I believe a politician can be a CUrUtlun,' for he has contradlcUon, curses and contumely euougb to throw him back upon u higher power. In Uie lenhh of u party's fume, perhaps; for the momentum of umdeuensu just referred to holds over lor u whilo; in the decadence of a party and humanly speaking, 1 bhuuld i-:iy, he cunnot; for wealth, puv/er niid preferment hecuiuo aboil tuid chuin to every high and tnered aspiration, nnd when professional puTUdans see their day of doom approaching, a desperation seii-.es upon (hem, aud Clod U Uiu lust being in their ihouijhUJ. But with lluu oil things aro possible- even that a down-grade poUUiuuii may bo umwUvd lu bid tnttd ciUeur ttud luiulo a, C'hrbUiiu of. PhUiGUi K. WllXXttB. From "One of the Beechera." Tho colobrated family of whioh the writer quoted below is a representative has been, as a family, more noted for its expression of weighty opinion than perhaps any othor in tho country. The following ia characteristic : If a "politician" means what Is sometimes called tha"ward politician," the man who trades in politics, nnd whoao touch helps to corrupt them, tha answer Is easy-that such a man cannot he a Christian. His conduct is unworthy of a citizen of a frea government, and tho fewer we liavo of them tha better for our country in every respect. But if hy a politician is meant tho man who feels a deep Interest in polities, and carries Into them a considerable share of his time and energies, then, I say, not only that suoh a man may bo a Christian, but thrift ovory Christian man ought to be, so far as ho Is able, just what this politician is. Thero can bo no cartldy subject more Important than our politics, none to which every Christian citizen owes higher duties. l8A.liKt.la liEECUXa IlOOKKB. Wcai Bow's Jxotdo Thrust. NeallXnv. thf? foremost apostlo of fieov peruaoe Ut Ota country, emd ktuthox ot tu# Minister Straus' Waive Answor. This naive answer of a man who has been honored in politics and successful in life in peculiarly interesting; A politician can bo a Christian, a Jew, a Mahometan, and an honest man. Thora are times In tho history of all nations when a Christian not only can bo a politician, but when every true Christian, Jew Agnostic, or whatever bo his creed, must he a politician and a patriot. We witnessed- such times ih 1861 to 18G5, 1 can conceive of every good Christian being In favor of civil servieo reform; it la moro difficult to concelvo them aa opposed thereto and In favor of the spoils system. Religion, fn Its higher sense, has to do with tho relations of man with tho God ho worships, nnd politics, in its higher sense, has to do with tho relations of man to tho, Slate. In tho time of Christ It was commanded not to confound these relations, but to render unto each what is due. Tho samo command 1ms, by the wisdom of BtJitosmen and through tho enlightenment ol tho people, been made practical in all constitutional governments by the separation of church and State. Shortly after tho adoption of onr Constitution tha Presbyterians of ICew Hampshire complained, In a lettor to Washington, that religion, evidently meaning Christianity, had been omitted from tho document:'hlB answer was, "Hoeauae it belongs to tha churches, and not to tho State." Oscar S. Straus, Ex-United States Minister to Turkey. [Copyright, lUHQ, by the Uok Syndicate Vteaa, Uew York.] Hp Should be, Gen. 3?ryor Tlunlrs. Roger A. Pry or, whilom Confederate son-oral and now an honorable- judge, through tho appointment of Gov. David B. Hill, has decided ideas in tho matter, as the following" shows: Not only may a politician bo a Christian, but I bellovo ho should bo. Indeed, ono cannot be an Ideal politician without being a Christian-namely, In tho sense that ho applies tho morality of tho Clospcl In the conduct of government, and the relations of eitlKons to tho government. For example, tho fundamental procopt of tho Gospel, "Lovo thy neighbor as thyself," is as applicable and aa operative In' the relations of government as of individuals, nnd should interdict nil war. So tho othor procopt, 'T)o unto others as you would that thoy should do unto you," should control tho relations of governments. So tho maxim, "Konder unto Ca'sar tho things that are Caisur's," obliges the citizen to tho faithful dlsnhargo of his duty to tho govemmont,!, Theso aro more illustrations of how tho obligations and precepts of Christ lu public affairs would*purify ami exalt politics; so that a true politician Is Indeed a true Christian, in the sctiHo wo aro now using tho word. Hence, In my Judemont, It is a prime function and duty of clergymen to Inculcate morality in all political relations, aa well as In Individual conduct. If by politician ia meant, lu tho current sense of Iho term, namely, ono who resorts to ovory sort of dishonest and nefarious art to climb Into power, I atiswm- that such a man cannot bo a Christian.      ItooKit A. PaYoa. ITrom "The Praying General." The "praying General of tho Plains" expresses his opinion thus: The question depends on two things: First, the definition of .Christian, and, second, tho definition of a politician. Supposing you mean by a Christian a consistent believer In and follower of our Lord, and by a politician ono who devotes his lifo conscientiously to tho solution of political problems, tho answer Is plainly, yes. Ouvr.n Oris Howard, Major-Gcnorai U. S. Army. BiBhop Huntington's Earnest Words. Tho eminent Episcopalian bishop whoso namo appears below thus makes sturdy answer : Wo hear of practical politics. When will wo loam Unit man's practice comes always and forever out of the faith that is in him, that what Is strong and fruitful and prosperous in his doing, bo It handicraft or statecraft, must first bo Btiong, and clear, and righteous lu his will; that nothing "works well" which In not in agreement with tho Muster Workman of all man's work? A civilisation made by material and oven intellectual polities, without tho balance of moral and spiritual support, when the winds blow and tho Hoods rise, as thoy blew aud rose around tho Itastile when the national guard joined uandii with the mob, brain conspiring with passion, tho walls will go to pieces and revolution begin. The most impractical politics that ever deluded a nation or beguiled Us rulers was a political dexterity without principle, without conscience, without fear of tho everlasting justice, without obedience to tho law of Christ. Who shall lead us Into the strong city? Only llo who "makes oillcers peace and cxucU ors righteousness," who "teaches senutoru wisdom" and Christhui prophuts fearlessness. l'\ U. IlLNTINGMOH, Bishop, From Vonorablo Dr. McCosh. Tho venerable ex-president of Princeton Univoraity, in a fow siinplo linos, advances this patriotic idea: Every politician should bn a Christian, and ho will thereby bo u better politician, as actuated by moral principle, and every Christian should be a politician, watching over the moral welfare of the country, and saving tut from abounding evils.   Jasics AlcCosn. A Great Theologian's View. Certainly if "practice makes perfect," Dr. Schaff should bo well qualified to jrive an opinion upon this novel subject. Ho writes: I believe a politician can be a Christian moat certainly !�-that is, if ho renders to Cwsar what Is Cwsar's, and to God what ia Uod's, end obeys Cod moro than man.        _    Vmii? SoiuJry. A Governor Who Can't Seo "Why Not. Publio oillcers ought to havo readable ideas on tho subject. This is what a governor thinks: I cannot oeu why a politician should not embrace tho Christiau religion. * Politics ought always to be a matter of conscience. True, a politician has much to contend with, but with a lli-m adherence to fils religious principles ho will triumph over every obstacle, and his activity lit politics u-iU serve to show to the world by a consistent course that Uie moat zealous poliUclan can be a living representation of a Christian gentleman. b. V. Biucus, Governor of Delaware. From a Local Clergyman. A few men around Boston may scan this answer of an esteemed Boston clori^yinan with interest: Ceruiuly, why cannot a politician be & Christian? -uidesi a politician is regarded aa a mere our.uing leader or party manager; a man without patriotism, ur public spirit, or moral sentiment, or social principle. Such a put�e-ucaii have noue but an outride connection with bums popidar church for tho sake vt respectability-y, surt of Pharisee, who goes through tha form of worililp tn order that he mny b tu lie wishes to doeelvo. Bus If by a politician we uiwui, as the term U coudug more and more to mean, one who is pruedcaUy lutertsU'd lu good government, uud endeavor* to promote It by using poUU'-'iil mueluuery, no wort seems to me to bo ai'Jr� peculiarly that of au earnest Christian luan. It requires the noblest ChrUtuui virtue.*!, ivuriigu, bopcf ulnw& r^r*i'V5r.t-u.tte*>> s*?U-d<*" votion, sympatic, unv^a^aaiStfcAP* fcouie �f tfco beat CtuUUAt* I iu*te known e&^^c4 in j^iiUc*, *nd NEWS BY SCISSORS. Odd artd Humorous Happenings Chronicled in New England Newspapers-Lots of Old Folks at Home. [Kenneboo Journal.] There aro now living in one house just outside the village of St. George, a family oi four persons whose combined ages food up 374 years, as follows: Miss Lizzie Mann, 100; Robert Mann, 00; Deacon John Mann, 92; Miss Catherine McBoan, 02. These four people are in excollont health. A Hunting Trip. [Cambridge (Mo.) Lettor lu Dexter Gazette.}' George Leighton, Harry Packard and Walter Wilder havo roturned from a hunting trip to Bald mountain. They borrowed a dog to take with them. After making part of the trip ho was suddenly seized with homosioknoss and "skedaddled." Tliogaino they did not bring homo was much mora than what thoy did bring. A Grand Timo. CKnw ItiiiUord Sfcintliu-do The Boston Journal tolls of a little Maine girl, in whoso family thero came an addition, who remarked, with a sigh, "Now we will have to cut the pie in six pieces." Wo can match this with a young gentleman who, visiting a family of two relatives in Springfield, wroto homo that he was having a grand timo, and that they cut the pie in three pieces.       _ Tho Editor's Great Grief. C.Uelfnst Age.] It Is said of a one-time editor of this Stato, now doad, that he learned of a mau in his town carrying eggs to bod with him. to hatch, and felt badly on learning who it was, as ho could not mako an item of it because they were of the same political belief. Tho item was so good that there was serious thought of changing th8 politics of the paper in ordor to make comments upon tho originality of the man. Traoks. [Bangor News.] One of our prominent young business men had the floor of ono room in his house painted ono day last week, and late that night, when he went homo, he took off his shoos and walkod across the floor, forgetting tho paint. In tho morning his surprise and his wile's indignation may better be imagined than doscribod when they discovered the "painted" footrnrints upon the carpets. Tlio victim oi tho accidont said ho thought his fcot folt damp when ho wont upstairs, but h'e did not discover the causa until the next morning. Turtle Had Been Caught Before. COM Colony Memorial.] On Monday, at Holmes & Whiting's map. Uot, a turtle weighing lfl pounds was on exhibition. It was caught by Engineer Jones of tho pumping station, he havinff discovered it crossing the road. The reptile was  ow, won't you tell me. pray, How do you make them look so clo&af I lout' to learn the way. "It ts not powder? Nol ^oxpasteT What can this secreL bel "Tia SOZODOXT!' Oh, uow, ma&e b&itv Lt't me ililx wonder ate. A tooth-wash 1  'Tis uot strange It gnosd Your teeth 1  AU must agree. To cure bud breath and Ua'Lh dsfaoo4 lu eyual eaniiot be." Anion? the Follies of tlie Age Which the introduction or BOSODONT long uLaes exploded, w-.ts tho uw of abraitive aui.l corrosive tooth preparations, which either contained uiUwr*is which scratched their cuauiel, or acids which dissolved iL SO�Ol>ONT, a health-promoting substitute tor lhea;i eluj4rlc:d articles, is a liotftuio, 9fcil� rally prewired, highly sanctioned pj*p*rttttoii, whieh uot only Ue&uuues, cleanses one} uivlgosa&asi su-Hrea-colored and deducKivo teeth, bat divtulift Ifesj breath oC u.i cbjots&iu&hi* ojUk w4 ttsitturw 10 U ���(J IksAlUi.   

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