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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 24

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                24 THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE -S'UTOAT,::NOVEMBER . % 1890~TWENT�rEIGI-HTC';:PAaES. WHY FOR ANDREW? Reasons Presented in a Cogent Manner. Practical Illustrations for Husband and Housewife. Young Men of the Third District and the Democratic Candidate, The third congressional district linstliroo times been carried for the cauao of tariff re-reform. In 18P4 a Republican convention in this district passed a resolution culling for a reduction ot the tariff and a consequent cheapening to the people of tho nooessarlos of life. Mr. Kunney's course in refusing to vote to consider the Morrison hill led to tho election of Mr. Leopold Morse in 1886, and in 1SSS tho district attain (showed its desire for a real reform of the tariff by electing John F. Andrew as its representative. The Tariff Issue K>'ot Settled. In this campaign tho voters are again Called on to render their verdict upon this Sssuo. The Republican loaders declare that the tariff Question is now settlod for a period of 10 years, and that the voice of the people will not bo listened toby tho new Republican senators from the recently made States. But Massachusetts lias nover considered a public question settled mail it was settled right. The Boston Port bill, tho Stamp .Act and the Fugitive Slave law worn all engrossed upon the statute hooks, and the promoters of these measures declared the questions settled and deprecated further debate upon these subjscts, hut Massachusetts said otherwise. Tito Question Is 5,'ot Settled. The MeKinley tariff bill has settled the burden of high war taxes with a still heavier weight upon our people, but the question is not settled. Tho Effects of High War Taxes and the MeKinley Kill. It is our claim that the MeKinley tariff bill has already greatly increased tho cost of living, and that it will still further increase it. Tho Republicans, recognizing their mistake in making the tariff bill operative a month before election, are now claiming that tho tariff, which they devised to make prices higher, does not do so. But you and your wife know better. Take out �i slato and pencil and make a calculation. Put down to the credit of tho new tariff any increase in wages or salary, any saving from the cheaper prices of sugar, after April 1, '81. Put down to its debit tho increaso of firices on necessaries of lifo which you now lave to pay. And remember that when ox-sting stocks bought undor the old tariff are exhausted, you will feel the full force of tho new bill, loti are now under tho lee of the old tariff. When you get out of this loo you will feel tho hreozo. No ono knows this hotter than Postmaster-General John Wana-rnaker. Hero is his advertisement: [From tho Philadelphia Itr-conn of Sept. 30, 18U0.-An Exact Copy.] Tinware is advancing in cost, and very soon the manufacturers will have their way, and you and we will have to pay very much more. In view of this state of things, we made some time since a large purchase of Kitchen Tinware at what was a low price then, and would be far lower now in the face of two advances in makers' price-lists. lllslng pans plain- lOnmirt 15c, 1-i-qcnrt 20c, 17-quart 2Bo. Dlsti puns, reunited- 10-ipiiut 25c, 1-t-Quart 30c, 17-quart 35c. Bread niisors- 10-tpiart,wltli cover and ventilator in lid, 58c. Lipped soucepang- from 1 to G-cpiart, 8,10,12, 13, ID, IS, 20, 22, 25c. Pic plates- 8-iiicli 3c, fi-lnch 3VaC, 10-lnch 4c. fl-quart mil!; puns 5c. Tin inline flour Rievrs flc. J.'irge Wash Basins. 10c. idly Moulds, 10, ID, 20, 25c. *u'lii'd Cake -Moulds, 10c. Cream Cans, 1 quart, lor. Covi red P.uel'.elH. 5 and 10c. Oval llutt-T Kettles, 10, 15, 20c. fen Kettles, small, 20c. ''^panned Toot TubB. won't leal;, 25a. .ti,panned Slop Palls. 25c. Japanned Bread Poxes, -15, 55, 05c. Japanned CandlestlcHs, 5e. Japanned ^'uttney Gran-is, lc. Japanned Nests of Spice Poxes, 30c. Japanned Tea or Coffee Caddies, 3c. This lot goes on sale today at prices that will not be seen ajrain for a long time to come. You will find it in the Main Aisle, Basement. Ample arrangements are made for correct and prompt delivery. BftEeme.nl, north of centre stairs. Men's White Merino, Natural Wool, and Camel Hair Underwear, shirts and drawers. One lot nt a uniform price of STVn cents-worth 75 cents. One lot at a uniform price of 75 cents-worth �1.60. The bare facts are enough. Market street side, middle entrance. j OHN  WaNAM akkr. In pome branches of iradc stocks are purchased long in advance. Most, merchants have loaded up iiu.Ut old prices. "When they have lo replner tlii'.ir go,,els. you will fee; sur  rata*, lift this stork is ubuiit (/one. JVoi'' 'we will luiee to Inry ],lushes and otlutr u'-vOx at ft.'f/W prlir*. ���:!:>,. Jt'M-n^, ,V*i- i\,ri-  rl Cf-tvoineri.'  . ;tf <-,,fi ,, ,,,,, ffion. tU'Ln ll,-\i d , 7i'.,."' �.:/;,,"      .,..,, .�;  :t, j.,/' card.. Ou: bl'.lok � "'� ','.'( ood. ei {':�! 1. 2 2 J'' / (e/: t., the blue/:, nil fill.-, i-i pir e�?(/., ami the hinlit'M tirade of ;r.i- ,/ 10per cont. ,'n r,'.. ;':,o- ,�,.((/,,. r>i, 77,. clt.CatA.it ribbing ;n.o:', ,n ,',,,S';.'/;,'/'/,,:.-.. a couple of nn,i- the      r !)r,i'j,,� ad- vance less. There: > o reaoiar n:\o.wdlon��-the duties 'jo'vnti d^.en u-xwUlu'j lo the higher value of t-he I-inenh A  cents at 33 cents. Tho two or three manufacturers who had instigated this increaso had already given notioo that all prices would bo ndvnncod. I�o Tour Stiiri ICuttouR Mvor Fly Off? Upon some of tho commoner sorts of pearl buttons, of which thousands of grosses were sold in this country, and wore not made hero at all, tho increaso in tariff was equal to 1400 per cent. Tho medium sizo of pearl buttons, which cost SO cents a gross to land, rotailod lit 5 cents� dozen. Undor the old tariff the duty was 4 cents per gross. Under the now tariff, in addition to the 4 cents, n. duty of 2'A cents per lino'ihad been imposoa, which was equal to Cfi cents per gross, or, with the previous 4 cents, a total duty of fit* cents. Tho fivo-conts-a-dozen buttons would now be sold at 15 cents a dozen. Hosiery. Another interview read as follows: In relation to hosiery, the domestic manufacturers have, advanced the prices on cotton hosiery fi per cent, to 10 per cent, all round. Some of them aro honest enough to state thai, there is no necessity to advance tho prices, but as a matter of business they mean to take advantage of tho new increased tariff. On foreign hosiery all the importing houses of any standing have increased their prices 2C cents to SI a dozen, and in most cases to tho full difference between the new tariff and the old. They did this within 24 hoars of the signing of tho bill, as they were obliged to do to protect themselves, the source of supply being entirely cut off. That is how the jobbing prices have been advanced. Now, let us take the retailers. Many of them have already put; up the retail price to correspond with the advances mado by tho jobbers, as follows: Cotton hosier}': Old price. 25 cenis pair. 37Vc cents pair. 50 cents pall'. New price. 37Va cents pair. 50 cents pair. 05-75 cents pair. I.e. . i 1  Those grades quoted above, bo said, practically covered all the hosiery ordinarily worn. He would _ guarantoe that 80 per cent, of all the hosiery sold at retail was within these prices. The New York Evening Post publishes, with many other facts of the increase in the price of dry goods, tho following clear statement: Corsets. Our budget oflra cle circulars today announcing an advance in prices due to the. MeKinley bill includes one on the subject of corsets from Ottenhcimcr Brothers, Nos. 440 and -US Broadway. The. style known as C. P. a la Uirene, IVo. 360, formerly selling at Sl.CO at retail, will hereafter sell at SI.75; No. 203, formerly $2.25, jioio 2.50; jVb. 473, formerly $2.50, noio S3; No. 1, formerly $2.75, now S3.25. Children's sizes and styles are, aduanced in the same ratio. It is thus that we "make, foreigners pay the tax," and it is thus that the tariff "brings down the prices of goods to the consumer," XiicluclLun; tlie Wardrobe of tlio * 'Summer Girl." Hear Sirs-On and after Oct. 9,1890, the price of ouh' .2li-2"-meft French serge twill flannel wilt be 52 1-2 cents per yard, present price 42 1-2 crat1;!; 20-27 inch French plain printed striped and dotted flannel 57 1-2 cents, present price 52 1-2 cents; 20-27-racA French fancy printed striped Jktnncl will be 60 cents per yard, present 'price 55 cents. Your.; truly.-[Arnold, Constable & Co.'s Trado Circular. Even llor "I,ovo of a ISomiot" Will Cost More!! The new tariff lato went into effect Oct. 0. It increases the cost of millinery goods from 10 to GO per cent.-Advertisement of a Dos Moines (la.) firm. �u You Wear �loves! If so, you'll have to pay more for them. Head this. Henry M. Peyser & Co., importers and manufacturers of gloves, writes: The now tariff on leather gloves having gone inlo effect this day, wo aro reluctantly compelled to advance prices on various lines of kid gloves. As the tendency of tho tariff is to.increase the cost of the cheaper grades of gloves, the principal advances have been made in these lines. On tho finer qualities wo will not advance prices, except in a fow lines. We regret that wo are so suddenly called upon to change prices during the season,but the fact that the tariff goes into effect within so short:a period after its passage loaves no other course open 10 us, It's going to be a cold winter and you will wear gloves, and it may be so cold for somo Republican orators that they will regret the war taxes, and sigh for cheaper imitation astracban and sealskin. Mr. MuKinlcy, for instance, may desire a warm outlit after Nov. 4 next. The lailies all know that prices have gone up, but they can't voto. Hut their husbands, fathers, brothers, sweethearts can. And all articles have gone up. Even the poor parson will fiudthisout. liead this copy of a letter to one.: 12. O. THOMPSON, CLKMCAL    OUTFITTER    AND    VESTMENT MAKER. PtttLADEr.PUIA, Oct. 21, 1S00. Rev. and Dear Sih: The cost of cloths and clothing has been raised at least 25 per cent, by tlie passage of the MeKinley tariff bill. We shall disnoso of our present stock without any advance an wo received them before the bill bad passed. .bulging from the present demand our stock may not last very long, therefore wo deem it advisable that you take advantage of our oiler, as when we replace these goods the price may liavo to be considerably advanced. Yours truly,   E. O. Thompson. Ffyi"(lLKif.  cents pound; cheese, o cents pound: poultry, 5 cents pound; bacon ati'i he.ui, 5 cents pound; l.ieef, miuton and pork, 2 coins pound: lard, 2 cents pound; � cents loo pounds; rice, 2 ocms pound : Hour, 25 i,er cent.; eabbny.es, :: cents lead: Jish, salted or pickled,! c,.'lit pound ; vincf-'ar, 7'� cents gallon; raisins and tiBS, 21c teiils pound. What ituvs "Free Snirar" Jteiui i The Republican orators will tell you that in the bright future, which is to come after next April Fool's day, you will get your sugar 2 cents cheaper than you how do. It is too bad this bcnclit did not go inlo effect with the other features of the bill, lor with increased prices for your winter clothes, your children's socks and your baby's china niu^. you will need that 2 cents badly. The s.iviic' mi sugar will be pleasant, however. wi:,'1! it comes, and it is rather remarkable that ii iaval'itm is a ^'ood thing end makes tn.";.'.'.. cheap, and tariff reduction is a bad thiny, the rule works so differently on sugar. I! is remarkable. loo, that tlie ICe-publlcanK lay i>o luuLeli stress ovi "i'ree fcuirar."' Can it be tl).:tt that is the only feeture of their bill ivlsit'h they tttink ivlll really lieip tJie !> - than si ior each inhabitant of the 1'i.h- 'i State-. Y,,u can calculate the an,',".in  - 'n, cause nearly all your h-v e-o' i- i;r,i"d'te,i ::o:n iorei^n countries �.::'! ^ ,'\tv at ;! - , eeiom house. It i>. no-. .-.".',,'ii ii ,e     ...! ,,j' ;',',ii;e'ci! dutit> on C1Ai1:e.'.';ue.    \V,"!),.;. i',.',;;.   ;oid  e!i;n;i   iil'C lie, ..� ,i, t;,';> ...... :ry R. v., j! !!(. abroad, and dny, tho Republicans have put tho bono out on the sidowalk "with a string tied to it," The President has power to put the duty back again when lie wants to. If Mr. Quay wore president andwantod to carry another election without CoL. Dudley's help, bow easy it would be to raiso SI,000,000 by ad-vnnoo information to tho right men that ho was going to put tho duty on. The Constitution says that Congress shall lay tho taxes, but tho Republican Senato thought President Harrison ought to bo given this power and tbey gave it to him. In England Charles I. tried to exereiso this power and lost his head. Tho Republican Senato sooitis to have lost its head when it granted the power. Senator Hoar thought so, at least, for this is wdiat ho said; I vol od with some hesitation for that proposition a.s it came from the committee on finance, after being modified, with tho consent of tho committee in accordanco with tho suggestion which I m.Tdo in tho Senato. I should not have voted for it if I had thought tho scliomo doiinod in that provision wiis all that was likely to come of entering upon this policy. There are somo grave constitutional difficulties which have been very ably stated by the senator from New York (Mr. Evans) in regard to the discretion deposited with the President, tinned ooodh. Deliberately and. arbitrarily to add from 10 to 15 per cent to tlie cost of canned goods is as wanton in its inception, as it will prove restrictive and ruinous in its application. There is no subterfuge about, such reasoning. The. tariff programme will restrict consumption 33 per cent., uml will weed out 30 per cent, of packers now in the business. Wantonly to restrict the markets when the emergency calls for their extension, and arbitrarily to advance the price of canned vro-duets lohen the consumer is justly demanding lower prices, seems to be the consummation of a policy vihich ignores the very existence of packers, farmers and consumers. -[T. L. Bunting, president of the Now York Packers' Association (canned goods), All tliis is to protect an unborn infant industry. What will it demand when it grows tip? "Why continue this list further? The list will soon, if it does not already, contain every article on which duties aro raised, and rich and poor, 'especially the wage earners, tho men of small Incomes, will have carefully to revise their household budgets. Thoy will find that today, with tho funds at their disposal, they must content themselves with 15 to 25 per cent, less of the necessaries and comforts of life than before tho MeKinley tariff made MeKinley prices. The rich, of course, can manage to get on, but tho poor will keenly feel bow truly Mr. Wanamnlcer spoke when ho said that "tho manufacturers have their way and we shall have to pay much more." Wages and Salaries Jllave IVot lSecu Increased, Read this interview with a member otthe Central. Labor Union in the New York Commercial Advertiser: Just now tvo aro wnit.inc: to liiail out Clio general effects of tlie new protection. '1'iie balance sheet Is autalnst it up to.uatc. . Several unfavorable reports Have come In, and not. a singlo favoraMo one. 2Vo trado connected with our union lias received a dollar more in wastes in consequence of tbo operation of tlie law, wliile prospective reductions have been told of at all tlso meetings tnis montZi. the net result. You have had a chance to iigtiro your own accounts. Read the result of tho calculations of the New York Times: 27ie f/;'ea/. body of wage and salart/ earners tn the cities get from S4-50 to )BI20Q a year, and it is reasonably certain from the statistics that the average is nearer SGOO than to any other round figure.... It. is on this class that the taxes in the Mc-Kin lev tariff rest most heavily... .Based on the prices now prevailing and, on the statements of dealers, a moderate estimate of the. increased cost of LiviNa in this city for the year 1801 is one-fifth. That is to �my, it. will take $1.20 to buy'what, has been got for Si. A man who gets $SOO a year will be no BKTTEit off than he would have been last, year with $500; a man with $900 no better than he would have been last year with S750. 'Sto Tion Itoop UlToiiiso? If you do, you will have to pay increased prices for all the furnishings of your homo instead of paying tliem to your hoarding mistress. If you are just setting tip your own modest establishment, you will find it will cost you more for carpets, for hangings, for chinawarc, and evon for the curious variety of tins and kettles that Bridget says she must have "to cook a decent dinner." Carpets. Tho duties on carpet wool have been increased so much that carpets are going up with a rush. Our Now England manufacturers were willing to accept reduced duties on wool, but there was some sheep in Ohio and Texas who would starve if tbey wero not protected by 32 and 50 per cent, ad valorem. These sheep must he protected even if your floors go uncarpeted. Tliis is the summing; up of Mr. Arthur T. Lyman, treasurer of the Lowell ManufacturingCon;.-panv. respecting the workings of the new tariff law in relation to tho carpet industry: "Consumers will soon have to pay higher prices, or else they must buy inferior qualities of carpets at the, old prices. One object of the MeKinley bill is to reduce revenues, which it will do by shutting off importations. Another of its aims is to stimulate home production, which, in our case, it seems to hope to do by placing raw materials beyond our reach. Chiefly, however, it seems to be intended to pay off old debts and Jill presidential contracts." ditna and Riu'thciiwaro. The Republicans will tell you the duties on earthen mid chinaware aro rnisod only 5 percent. They aro really increased from 50 to 00 per cent, abovo the existing duties. This is not all dono directly. The Republicans like to work by indirection. So tbey passed an "administrative bill" ninny pages long before they passed tho tariff bill, reviving two old law's which we.ro repealed in 1883. Ono is known as the "cover-inns clause," and makes the cases which cover goods a part of tho value of tho goods, and dutiable at the same rate. It a dozen plates, worth 50 cents apiece, are in a box which costs �2, and the plates are dutiable tit 00 per cent., the case pays .51.20 in duties and the plates 3.00. making the entire duty 84.HO, where perhaps beloreil was.S3.30. The lower the class of goods tho biggi'i'tbo proportion which the valueottho coverings bears towards the whole value and the bigger the tax on the poor man by this innocent administrative bill. The other old law which has been revived is that for restricting the allowance for damage on imported goods. This adds probably 10 per cent, on the average to the duty on a consignment of goods. 'Ait, you sec, you must niialio souse ailowuuecH bmfoio believing' tlie Jtc-publican �tory that tho duties on your table wore Itave been advanced only a l\ev cent. Here is what Mr. Jerome .Tones of tho big Boston linn of .lones, Mcllul'feo & Stratum, says about the effect of tho new law on Chilian are: finch tirni, as fast as it gets a new importation, adds the increase in duty to the sell-iugprice, which of course makes the duty come out of tlie pocket of tho consumer. The domestic manufacturers have a combination, and if any one manufacturer violates the rules lie is subject to a penally. On the other baud, the importers bave no such combination and have not had for ninny years. The combination of domestic producers had the power and doubt-lc.-'i would raise prices. The ware-produced at home had never had any large sale, as it vv.is so lialdelo glaxe and crack when put into service, rendering it worthless; and until some means had been discovered ot making sound ware the supply would continue lo come from foreign sources, ilr. Jmiessaiil that the range ol in-ci'iae-e on ail glass and crockery ware was Iroin 5 to 1 5 per cent. The cheaper qualities would .suffer most liom the inerea.se, because the p.'.t cent, in cost of packing was greater than on tine ware. The lino g'oods pay the leasl duly, be said, and illustrated his point by saying the duty is the same on ibe richest Sevres porcelain as on lb,- commonest blue-edged baking plate, namely, no per cm., to which is added the duty  !i ictcl'ie.ue^. The home producer would not be beiielited in the least, (.'lays are taxed, borax is taxed, and so are colors and brushes, in fact, all bis materials are taxed, l'lveryiliing rue domestic munufac-tunrsand workmen live on. except sugar, will cost more liom ever, and even if the luannlactiirer doe> get tile ditTerene'e in duly in ibe way of protection lie will be no better oil. Silvcs- <;eocts Oo t'l*. Iloyoii think silver will be cheaper than new law".'  You willhodis-Ml". Ree'l'st'tiliui'l'Ss passed abill ' iiierea.MMiH' priecof silA'ci'. The plis'u anything except to �dt limi.voul dollars in the 11 llliiie o'.'.'Iiel.-g hill silver in:-:. _ A i. irei.iar issued in Chicago lietu.se of Lapp ilvtid wire ANUIffABRAHTED ATTACK John T. Wheelwright' Takes Pierce to Task. Had So Authority to Criticise as Ho Did John F. Andrew. Eecords Speak for Themselves and They Mean Volumes, I'bina under tin appoint,- inteie.ou to ill, bill d.d lioi uci put several liii J.oekcNo!' YV," goods arc advaman S,'pt,-inliter by the & rioi's'.icim says: T.'ie mi'aufad.erers of ; ,;�!../ ;�','. / i:n,e,x d f. el', I'll i" iii t or 5100 �' Oil j. When Edwin R, DoLong arose to ad-dross tho meeting in Winthrop Hall, Dor-choster, atyS o'clock Saturday evening, ho faced ono of tho largest and what proved to bo also ono of the most onthusiastic gatherings ever assembled in this hall. The meeting was called as a rally for John F. Andrew, and addresses were made by Chairman DeLong, Mr. T. E. Hatch and Mr. John T. Wheelwright. Mr. Wheelwright's speech follows; Tho Republicans try to toll us that the tariff is not an issue in the present campaign, but if you look carefully at the question you will see the utter falsity of such an assertion. This measure is an oppressive one on every young and old man in this hall. Under tho Republican rule of the last 30 years they have almost destroyed the agricultural industry of'this country. The same fate has befallen the wool and iron industries. The Republican press testify falsely when they charge that Mi'. Andrew's term in the House has been Ono of Absenteeism. Mr. Edward L. Pierce, in his speech at Upham's Corner on Friday, Oct. 2i, made the statement that Mr. Andrew, a member of Congress in the third district, had voted but once in 10 times on the most important question ever brought before the American people, the silver question; We a.ssume that the report of that speech in tho Boston Journal is correct. Mr. Pierce gives the result of 16 ballots in the Honse upon different forms of the free coinage question. Ho admits that Mr. Andrew voted nay on the 16th vote, which was on tho final passage of tho bill, but on the 15 other occasions ho did not voto at all. This is repeated, as every voto occurred, reiterated and emphasized in almost evory form of language. "He asked all there during the' remaining days to inform the voters whom tbey met in the cars, in the stores, at tho railroad stations, or anywhere else, that the gentleman nominated by the Democratic party for a high office stayed away 15 out of 10 votes. He was told that his record on other measures was a similar one. On Tuesday, Oct. 2S, at Pierce Hall, Mr. Pierce, inclosing, said: I have avoidod in all I have had the honor to say, any personal reference to tho gentleman from this district who is tho candidate oi the Democratic party. I remember that home, when lie was a child, as I sat at the table of an honored father who sleeps beneath the sod at Hirighain. I cannot be unjust to any ono who hears his name and carries his blood. I only said the other day that 22 Democrats left their party on the silver question and 22 Republicans left theirs; and the organ of the candidate from this district asked me, implying that I was not fair and that I was gmlty of a. supprossio veri, to say how ho voted, and to tell all the facts. I had not prowled in his record. I know nothing about his absences; I cared nothing about them whatever. I. never referrod to him except as I referred to all the numbers of tho Democratic party, including by emphasis tho ones from Boston. They asked me to tell all the facts, and I took my McPhe.rson and I went over the record of 10 votes on the silver' bill. Fifteen absences and one voto. But it seems I gnvo thoorgan more than it desired, and, therefore, it isnot content. I pass from that subject. I investigate no records, I prowl among none of those things. But Edward L, Pierce thus Iftclterated SEis Cliargo of "15 absences and one vote" after Mr. Lowell of his committee bad recoivod a letter from Mr. Andrew, compiled from the Congressional Record, giving exactly his pairs on tho silver question every time against all forms of silver inflation, and once with Rockwell of Massachusetts, wdio with the rest of tho Republican delegation of Massachusetts voted for the present silver bill. Mr. Andrew bad also in an intorview.pub-lished in the Herald, on Monday, Oct. 2S, stated these facts. Hon. Frank W. Bird, an old friend oE Mr. Edward L. Pierce, in a public letter published in the Herald, Wednesday, Oct. 20. said among other things: Upon reading the report of Mr. Pierce's speech in tho paper. Saturday morning, I said at once that Mr. Pierce, in my opinion, never made such statemen ts; that he could not have made thorn, knowing them to be false, and that he could not have beeti mistaken as to their truth, for the absolute facts in the case wero distinctly stated in tho Congressional Record, and if he made these charges without verifying them there, ho was just as guilty us if he had known them to bo false. "I have, therefore, waited four days to give him the opportunity to apologize for such charges made against such a man as ,'lohn 1�\ Andrew. Not a word from Mr. Pierce, though I am informed that his friends have given assurances that ho shall withdraw the charges and make a full apology for them. "Tho Herald of yesterday morning contained an interview with Mr. Andrew, in which ho statod that at the time the votes were taken to which Mr. Pierce refers, he was occupied elsewhere on public duties, and that on every one of tho 15 votes ho was paired with somo member who would have voted for the bill, and that this fact of his being thus paired in every ease was distinctly stated in tho Record. "Of course, 1 need not say that this pair with a friend of the bill was a voto against the hill just as readily as if ho had recorded his voto against it without, being paired. 1 rcpoat, emphatically, that if these charges made by Mr. Pierce aro true, Mr. Andrew ought not to go to Congress again. If tbey are not true, hist as certainly, in my judgment, Mr. Pierce ought not to go to Congress." A letter was on Wednesday, Oct. 20, despatched to Mr. Lowell calling attention to Mr. Pierce's reiteration of his charges after having been informed that they wero unfounded. Another member of Mr. E. L. Pierce's district committee received from a well-known Republican of the eleventh ward, in response to a circular sent out bv tho committee to ward 11, asking the political status of the voters, a card complaining of these continued. HZ tsstatcmcnts of Mr. Pierce's, and finally, on Oct. 30, appeared this appology from Hon. Edward L. Pierce: "At a meeting held in ward 20 last Friday evening I stated, on tlie authority of McPherson's Handbook of Politics for 1890, that Mr. Andrew, during the consideration oi'!tlie:silver bill by the llouso of Representatives, had been absent on 15 votes, and bad voted but once. McPberson says nothing on the subject of pairs, except as to the last vote of the 10, on which occasion he mentions tltatonly , er.ain ftentlenien were unpaired, thereby implying that Mr. Andrew was paired on that. voto. I understand that Mr. Andrew states that he was paired on all the other votes, and i have no disposition to contest his .statement.. I certainly should be unwilling to do Mr. Andrew an injustice or to misrepresent his adieu." This is a partial apology for this Friday night speech. It does not cover bis Pierce Hall speech, when lie repeated his misstatements after fttllknowledgeof the facts. Mr. Francis C. Lowell will testify that Air. fierce knew these facts when ho spoke at Pierce Hall on Tuesday. Mr. E. L. Pierce, is an author, a writer on Charles Sumner's life. When he gave his record on a public question did be disdain to "prowl in records" anil rely unon a condensed manual published by a. politician for his fuels'.' Mr. Edward Mcpherson, who gets out the "Handbook of Polities for 18P0," is the same Edward Meldierson who, as secretary of the Republican committee, issued in the presidential campaign of 18SO this circular to the government employes: lIi;,M,orAi:Ti:as, Pr.rcisi.xe.'.x t'e.n'Ua.-rieiN.vL Committee, lSSei. 1317 V St., Northwest, W.,Maiil'.'."li, i>. C. Jay'a. HuUljell, e'hainaan. Ed.vui'd Mcl'hei'doa, Seeietary. Jlx-.-eutive e'oain.itlee. lien. iv. IS. A1!1m,!i. Ilea, i at mini ii. IMlins, ilea. Frank lies ',"',;, lieu. .Mark 11. Danuell, Hun. Uu.Uon-(Mirth. Ilea Horatio  rt:e l:. I (avis. Y,'.'..-im-uTu-s, il. C, April 1, 18S0. MU- Th:s eeaueaue- is caiaue-.l K.r llu- pt'otec- tieil ot li.e laU'l. I'.S et   thr   P, !.,'.biU.,a pally ill till'll -�: it.,- e..e,,';,.-'aea.a Uc'.iie;,-, of in- I'aaei. ji; uivi, r d-'eiaa ".'.-� .ie.o'.i.aa.s Ik--' .-�.'.�.o e'ii'.:!: iLiUe.^e.L.a the Republican party from every otlior, and may meet all proper expenses incident to the campaign, the commltteo feeli authorized to apply to all cltlzena wboao Interests or principles are involved In the struggle Under the olrouni8tanoos In whtoh the country finds ltaolf placed, tho commltteo believes that yon will CBteem It both a privilege and a pleasure, to make to Its fund n contribution, which, it Is hoped, may not bo less thnn 337.60. Tho committee is authorized to stale (liar wich voluntary contribution from persons employed in the service of the Unltod States will not bo objected to in any official quarter. The labor of the committee will affect the result of tho presidential as well as the congressional struggle, and it may theroforo reasonably hopo to have tho Rj-mputhy and assistance of all who look w'ith dread upon the possibility of tho restoration of the Democratic party to the control of the government. Please make prompt and favorable responBO to this letter by bank check or draft, or postal money order, payable to the order of Goorgo F. Dawson, treasurer, V. 0. lock box 723, Washington, D. C. By order of tho committee. Kow. M. McFnrcnsoN, Secretary. "Mr. McPherson," aocordingtoMr. Pierce, "says nothing on the subject of pairs except as to the last.vote of tho 16, on which occasion ho mentions that only certain gentlemen woro unpairod, thereby implying that Mr. Andrew was paired on that voto. Did Mr. Pierce suppose that no members were paired in Congress during all these votes? In his legislative einerlonce B Id Mo Kvcr Know votes to be taken on an important subject when the "yons and nays" were calling without the announcement of pairs? Why did ho jump at. the conclusion that Mr. A.ndrow had dodged these votes, when he knew nothing of the "pairs?" Was it fair? Mr. McPhorson, on page 1 EG of his manual, in referring to tho last vote of the 10, says, "The following members not voting were not paired;. Messrs. Blanchard, J. B. Brown Clarke of Alabama: Covert, Dickerson, Fowler, Lee, .Mansur, McCarthy, Phelan, Rowland, Stahlnocker, Tarsnoy of Missouri; Taylor of Tennessee; Vaux and1 Wilkinson. The others, hot voting were paired. Mr. John F. Androw is not mentioned on pages 1EG. in the "Yea" or "Nay" column; anil therefore was not voting, hence, according to McPherson, he was pairoa. It is more thu.ii an implication that Mr. Andrew was paired, it. is a direct statement. And so, even according to the imperfect information which ho would obtain from McPherson, Mr. Androw is recorded as voting ngalLSt free silver on Juno 24, and as pairoa on the vote on the final bill, which is now a law. He was paired against its passage. So Mr. Pierce, looking into McPherson, could only have found Mr. Androw unrecorded on 14 votes on the silver question. His statements are not supported by tho authority,ho was careless enough to use when he asked his auditors in ward 20 to inform the voters everywhere that the gentleman nominated by tho Democratic party for a high office stayed away 15 out of 16 votes, and that his record oil other measures was a similar one. Mr. Edward L. Pierce was, wo are told, a guest at Gov. Andrew's table. He has done scant justioo in requesting the public to disseminate statements against Joiin F. Andrew for which he had no authority whatever. Will you voto for such a man as your representative? You must all admit on studying his term that Mr. Andrew's XCecord has been a brilliant one, and I hope that after the next election you may again say : "John F. Andrew represents us in Congress." At this point George Fred Williams entered the hall, and was greeted with a storm of applause. He delivered a brilliant speech on tho tariff, and tn this connection said: Here is some stove polish logic for you. Mr. Morse votes for a bill in Congress in order to sottle tlie tariff question, but says at tho samo time that he hopes that some future Congress will undo the wrongs done his party by the bill. (Laughter.)' I eanuqt understand how New England can send such men as the Republican candidate to Congress any more than I can understand why she should take tho sacrificial knife and plango it into her vitals; nor can I understand how she can reject such tried and true mon as the candidate for whom I speak tonight as the most fitting representative this district can possibly have, tho Hon. John F. Andrew. At the close of the meeting three cheors were given for Andrew and Williams. O'EIL ON ANDREW. Praise for His Colleague's Devotion to Measures Near and Dear to the People-Delivered at Tremotit Temple, Oct. 23. I regret very much that Mr. Andrew is prevented by illness from addressing you tonight, and I may bo pardonod for saying a few words in relation to the contost in the third district, which is represented by him, In his course in Congress ho has made a record of which any man might well be proud. He stands today as one of tho best posted men on questions of tariff and finance in the National House of Representatives. I make tho .assertion now, that when a dozon men of the national House aro elected who are host posted on the tariff question.my honored colleague, John F. Andrew, will be found among the number. Mr. Andrew has for his opponent Mr. Edward L. Pierce, a very estimable gentleman, and ono who, if he voted as he spoke, would represent the district well. In his speech at the banquet of tbo Chica-tawbtit Club ho severely criticised many of the provisions of the MeKinley bill, but so did most of tho Republican representatives from Massachusetts, but they voted for the bill just the same. Ho is in favor of admitting Canadian coal freo because New England needs i i. But it was not free in the MeKinley bill, yet the Republican representatives from Massachusetts believed as Mr. Pierce does, and they voted for that bill. Mr. Pierce favors the free admission of term products, particularly potatoes, but the MeKinley bill not only did not admit them free, but increased the duty on them. I have every reason to believo that tho Republican representatives from this Stato agreed with Mr. Pierce, but they voted for that bill. Mr. Pierce favors free eggs-so do wo all; but his party representatives favored the bill, though it imposed a duty of five cents a dozen on that product of tho farm. Mr. Pierce favors reciprocity with Canada, but the distinguished gentleman from Maine, Mr. Dingley, who represents or misrepresents New England on the committee on ways and means, throws oold water on reciprocity with that country, and says wo have always lost when wo tried it. Mr. Pierce favors all these things, I have no doubt, for he lias said so. What lie suggests is no more than could bo expectod of a mini who aspires to represent tlie State at Washington: but Mr. Andrew favors them also, and has made a good representative. More thantbat, Mr. Andrew tried to incorporate llietii in tho McKmlev bill. When Massachusetts and New England wero ignored by tho Republican party, Mr. Andrew, like tlie loyal son he was, voted against the bill. Would Sir. Pierce do this? Would he vote against such a bill? Will be vote for its repeal" Or will ho stand by that other statement in his speech, that he is a Republican, anil when the party caucus says, notwithstanding this bill taxos coal and iron ore, potatoes, cabbages and eggs, and threatens to put a tax on coffee, tea and hides, as a Republican you must vote for this bill, wdio is there who doubts that he would imitate the example of his party representatives in the present Congress and fall in line under the lash of Drover Reed? Mr. Pierce is held up as a sound mau on questions of linance.   I do not doubt it. But not more so titan Mr. Andrew. On every question of public interest Mr. .Andrew is the peer of .Mr. Pierce, and, having shown lis independence by voting a.s ho believed iho right dictated lie should, he can be safely trusted to represent in the 52d Congress the district which honored itself and honored him two years ago. rather than the man who prefaces all his liberal views with the qualification, "But I am a Republican."       __ Senator Plumb on the Tariff. Extracts from the Congressional Record of Aug. 15,1800, of Senator Plumb's speech in the Senate on the tariff: I know it is heretical, Mr. President, to doubt the propriety of conceding anything that the manufacturers ask. Bui I also know that not one. .--ingle consumer of tin on this contimnt has asked fur this increase of duty. The volume of testimony taken does not disclose one, the newspapers of the country have not brought him to view, and public opinion docs not demand it. JOHN I. AHDEIW'S RECORD His Devotion to the Great Reforms. Champion of Tariff Reductions and of Honest Money. Friend of Civil Servioe, of Soldier and Colored Man, It might be said of Mr. Androw, as was saidofGrovor Cleveland, that he has "a short record, but a good'ono." The career of Air. Andrew, however, although ho is only 40 years old, embraces along record of faithful public service and courageous devotion to high, principle Ho has not, like his Republican opponent, been out of public life since 1876, but has been one of the workers and leaders in the groat reform movements of the day. Born in Boston, Nov. 24, 1850, he graduated from Harvard College in 1872, and received the degree of LL.B. from the Harvard Law School in 1875. He was admitted to tho Suffolk bar, and is a practising lawyer. He served five yearsin tho Legislature, beginning in 1880, being one of tho youngest membersof theHouse,andin 1884 and 18S5 being a member of the Senato. He wns offered the Democratic nomination for Congiess in his district in 1884, but declined. He was the Democratic candidate for governor in 188G, and came nearer an election than any other candidate for many years. He declined a renomination in 1887. Ho was elected to the House of Representatives by tho Democrats and tariff reformers of the third district in 1888, and is now candidate for re-election. He was a member of the judiciary committee iu both'Houses of tho Legislature during his service, and is a member of tho committee on foreign affairs and on civil service reform in the present Congress. Mr. Andrew was for several years a member of the hoard of park commissioners of the city of Boston, and did much to establish our splendid system of breathing places for tho people. He is much interested in charitable work, and gives largely of his means to those who are deserving. An Ardent Tariff Iteformer. Mr. Andrew's firm stand for a tariff re form, which shall moan free raw material for Massachusetts' manufacturers and cheaper food and clothing for her consuming masses, has been made apparent by his action all through the session. His speech for free wool on the 10th of May was one of the most forcible of the session. Tariff reformers throughout New England havo seemed to look upon Mr. Andrews as their special representative in the House, and petitions for free wool, for free coal, for free iron ore and for reduced taxes on the products ofthG farm have.come to-him to be presented in great numbers. Mr. Bennett of the American Wool Reporter, the Republican who has been conducting suclf an active campaign for freo wool, chase Mr. Andrew as the member who should present his monster petition in the House. The petition for free lime,which ex-Representative Sayward and others signed, was presented by Mr. Andrew, and petitions for free eggs and freo sumac were presented through him. Mr. Andrew offers, on OlO 'floor of the IHonsc, ftne nm
                            

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