Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 21

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                - ,    THE BOSTOK SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. 21 The 0R1FLAMME was the ancient royal standard of France. Where floated the fiery, flame-pointed flag, there fled defeat. OUR  STANDARD Leads against High Prices and preserves Ihe sound system of CASH TRANSACTIONS. Are the talk of the town. 	GAffPETS 1 DRAPERIES;').'^;	 	WALLPAPER URGEST-STOCMN THE CITY A Fair Sample: THE GASH HOUSE FURNISHERS. 744-756 .Washington St. Should have a set off the PUBIISIIED BY-..' Per Set. GRAY'S ELEGY, OLD OAKEN" BUCKET, VILLAGE BLACKSMITH. Tliree of the most charming compositions In the English language; elegant little booklots, beautifully illus-trated with numerous steel engraving!., and printed upon the finest paper, worth three times the price we ask. By mail, 12c, Washington Street, cor. Temple Place. AT EEBUCED PRICES, HBJHT i. BURR I 490 Washington-St. Mnnufaetuvod speclnlly for Boston trade. GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND BANJOS. Hayncs* Excelsfar and the Tilton Cold Medal GtTITARS. Stewart's MUSIC �od flue BANJOS. Trade Hark r... VIOLINS-Pupil, Amateur ana Soloist JOHN GL HAYMES & CO., 88 Court St. and (104 Washington St., BO&TOST...    SuThlSt 118 5o. Cigar Suits Bast of Judges. L. BRAYTON & CO. . . BOSTON. LOTHKOP'S COUGH ELIXIR Is ihe bust iviuedy in Xew Ensluiul forcouglil, colds mid lirouuhlnl treiiWc Uomymir druggls' mnl b'.'y > SCe. bottle. lJ.n.-iil;s i:i> :i recall cold In lSIiouva. Fur tkillm; iiuukIi it Ins no tmunl. Insist ujkiii biLvlnc the littl. l.iithrii|j'b C..ul'U tliii!1, iirejian-il l>y K.1-. LOTHKOlM'nivldcm.t'.it.I. dsu7t "',10 CHARLES F. BELCHER, SESTACUASr. fOXFECtlOSEtt AX1) CATEttEB, Lyceum Unilditiy. llavvanl Sq. Weddings and Fni-tle* a'Specialty. Tlu; v.;ry bcKt of Ir�> Creum itml Kvs ef ,'vt-ryUe-.L-iq-Uou Kiuut' Co tudei'.  isiliuts and luuev dlshna. TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. ' SUNDAY, NOT. 2, 1890. TABLE, GOSSIP. ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHER. �S.a> Winter  JSt. -The week lies'been rather dull in point of social happenings, save a fow out-of-town woddings mnl tho racos at the Country Club, which latter wore anything but cheerful, Wednosday, in tho way of wcathor, but tho beautiful day yesterday made up for all that discomfort, and brought out an immense crowd. But one engagement, that of Miss Morse and Dr. Lee, to koop up the pleasant excitement of the previous week, whqn the announcements of Miss Shaw's and Miss Bartlott's wore received with such approval by the society world. Per contra, the three all-absorbing topics for the Now York smart set, tho horse show, Mr. McAllister's book and the engagement of Miss Holon Beckwith, one of the best known women in that charmed circle, to tho Hon. Dudley Leigh, have given that contingent plenty to talk over; and as by Nov. 10 that city will bo the gayest known at that early season for years, there will be small chance for a dull moment with that pleasure-loving, ploasuro-sccking crowd. The Von-dome subscription concert, Thursday night, made a welcome ripple of excitement, and tho Verestehpgin pictures continue to be tho rallying point of society during tho afternoon hours specially. -Tho sta'to banquet suito and hall of the Veridome, Thursday night, was a scene of one of the most successful subscription concerts ever given in Boston. Both musically and socially it took first rank, and Mr. Frank Morse, to whoso indefatigable efforts the audienco were indebted for their enjoymontof the programme, should feel very much gratified by tho entire success of the affair. The hall where tho ooncert took place was very effectively decorated by Galvin with tall palms and potted plants, chrysanthemums boina: the flower most used, and the chandeliers were twined with pinks and green vinos. That the instrumental music was of the highest order, with such performers as Mr. Adamowski, Mr. Foote and Mr, Goisa, goes without saying. Mr, Adamowski's playing of the Chopin valse was deliriously bright and witohing. Mr, Foote's difficult octavo pas-sagos in his Rubinstein waltz were brilliantly done, and elicited genuine applause. Miss Edmands, who looked extremely protty in a dainty rose-pink satin gown, the front of which was of white embroidered satin, sang oharmingly. Her ease of manner on the platform so utterly free from all taint of salf-conscious-ness( was delightful. Mr. Lamson's "Bod-ouin Love Song" rang out superbly, his rich, powerful voice being just suited to the famous composition. Ono of the many pleasant features of the evening was tho absence of all encores, and still'more refreshing (and rare) was tho absolute stillness of tho audience while the artists wore on tho platform. One ,could have heard a pin drop so perfect was mo quiet. There needed no other indication to prove it a well bred sooiety audience, and what a joy to the performers it must have been I Among tho 300 or more present were Mr. and Mrs, John It. Gardner, Mrs. Francis S. Watson, Mrs. Lithgow Devens, Mrs. James H, Boal, Dr. and Mrs. AVillmm Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fairchild, Mr. and. Mrs. J. H. Hecht, Mr. and Mrs, Reginald H. -Ward, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Aldrlch, Mrs. Augustus Flagg, Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Evans, Mrs. C. E. Hodges, Mrs. Eustace Fitz, Mr. and Mrs. S. A.' Bigolow, Mrs. Kbenozer Gay, 'Mrs. D. i>. Slade, Mr. Frank Jackson, Mr. Isadoro Brug-giotti, Mr. J. Adamowski, Mr. Arthur Dox-ter, Mr. Arthur Austin and the Misses Austin, Mr. and Mrs. Elliott W. Pratt, Curtis, Guild, Jr., Mr. J.'E. Addicks, Mr. W. P. Blake, Mr. Gaugci\Kifirl,'Mr. Schroeder and Mr. Arthur Donner. -It is rarely that a more beautiful group of society girls than Miss Eliso "West, Miss Caroline Bartlett and Miss Pauline Shaw become engaged at so nearly the same time, and Mr. Oliver Ames, Mr. Herbert Sears and Mr. Arthur Butler, their respective fiances, are exceptionally fine-looking men. -The Countess Reno de Coetlogon, formerly Miss Georglo Blake of Boston, has recently arrived from Europe, and is visiting her sister, Mrs. Charles J. \Vhitmore of Beacon st. Her niece, Miss Ma'�':AVhitinoro, who has been spending tho summer abroad, returned with her. �.�>.'.�'' -Mrs. Alanson Bigolow -gave a ladies' luncheon at her home ph Hamilton st., Chestnut Hill, on Wednesday. Covers were laid for 18. -Mr. Rollins Morse and Mr. John H. Bradford, who went over to New'York last Saturday after the Country Club races, were entertained at dinner Sunday .night by Capt. William Conner of the St. James Hotel. There wore 10 guests. -Mr. and Mrs.. Louisi Curtis (Fanny Richardson), Mr. Laurence Curtis, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Merrlam.. and 'Sir Lyon and Lady Playfair(EdithRusseli),sniled Wednesday from New York in tho Majestic for Europe. --Prof. G. M. Lane has returned from his summer in Europe whither ho went with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard Van Rensselaer of Albany. --Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Chanler of New York are visiting Mrs. Julia Ward Howe at Newport. -Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Reynolds of Clarendon st. and Miss Reynolds are to spend the winter in Italy. They will sail in a fortnight. -The Minot-Olnoy wedding at Falmouth on Thursday was a pretty although very simple one. Tho sun was not as bright as could be desired, but in these days of frequent showers it was something to be thankful for that the raindrops wero withheld. Rev. William Lawrence officiated, assisted by Rev. H. H. Smyths of Falmouth. A wedding breakfast was served after the ceremony. A largo party, including various members of tho Minot and Olney families, went down by special train. -Mrs. F. Stanhope Hill gave the last of hor receptions for her daughter, Mrs. Stanton of New York, at her home on�Bucking-ham St., Cambridge, Tuesday afternoon. Miss May Whitmore of Beacon st. pourod tea. The Countess do Coetlogon was ono of the guests. She looked charming in a costume of black and gold. Among others present wore Mrs. Whitmore, Mrs. John E. Lodge, Mrs, Rufus Ellis and daughter, Col. T. W. Higginson, Prof. G. M. Lime, Prof. J. M. Pierce, Mrs. Arthur W. Blake, Mrs. C. E. Hodges, Mrs. Charles Theodore Russell. Mrs. Lothrop Thorndike, Prof, and Mrs. J. P. Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. H. 0. Houghton, Mrs. George Dexter, Rev. Dr. A. P. Peabody and daughters, and Prof, and Mrs. J. H. Thayer. -Mr. Lawrence Barrett is to build a fine house and stable for his daughter, who is soon to wed Mr. Marshall Williams, at Hyde Park. -Mr. and Mrs. R. 0. Dixoy and family of Beacon St., who have been at their cottage in Lenox all summer, sailed Wednesday from New York for Bremen in tho Lahn. They will spend the winter in Borlin. Their loss in the musical and sooiety set will be seriously felt. --Mr. Parkman Dexter is not to play in "Old Love Letters," to be given at Union Hall on the night of Nov. 18. His withdrawal from the cast will bo a great loss, as his talent for fine comedy actinij" placed him several years ago among the leading amateurs in Boston. -Dr. Richard Spraguo, who returned this summer from Europe, where he has been perfecting his medical studios for several years, isut the Copley, where he has taken an apartment for the winter. His mother, Mrs. Seth Sprugue, is still at her house in Ashwirton pi., her oldest sou, Mr. Charles F. Sprnsue, making- his home with her. -If yon want a good house, see the bargain" advertised today on jingo 13. -"The  Recollection* of  George W. Childs," published bv the J. B. Lippincott eouip.uiy, has ranched the enormous sale of over sw.OOD copies, and there is yet active, demand lor the book. Mr. Childs has received personal loiters of congratulation on the work from the most distinguished hiatesmen, authors, and poets of this country and tuivpu, The volume sliould be m every library, and, should be a rsivomu with tin.' y..�.ui$ men ul every eotwwr. wwl w ivtitj' eoituiiwu. TABLE GOSSIP. ]'-The great event of tho year for the Lenox Chtb is the annual dinner.which took place last Saturday night, Mr. W. R. Robeson of Beacon St., the president, at tho head of tho table. ;--Messrs. Peabody'and Stearns, tho well-known architects, wero in Newport, on Tuesday. ' --Mr. Arthur H. Dodd, who has boon in New York recently, was a .guest of the Fol-lowcraft Club at its plonsant Sunday evening gathering. -Dr. Honry Jacob Bigelow, whoso death occurred on Thursday ut his home at Oak Hill, Newton, was tho brother-in-law of Francis Parkman, tho historian. -'-The Gardner Brewer villa at Newport is being torn down, and ere long a stately villa for Mrs. H. M. Brooks of New York, will take tho place occupied so long- by "Finisterro."   , -Miss Lilian Everett, daughter of Mr. Sidney Everett, and granddaughter of Edward Everett, Miss Constonco. Lodge, daughter of Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, with Miss Sybil Pauneefoto, second daughter of the British minister, aro to be three of the prettiest dobutantos in Washington this wintor. --Mr. Prescott Lawrence and Mr. John H. Bradford will both entertain Boston guests in their boxes at tho horse show to open at the Madison Squaro Gardens aweek from tomorrow night. The rich, the. smart and the sporting sot have all been box purchasing, and "over S400 lins boon cheerfully paid for some of them. It will be a most brilliant opening of tho season. --Mine. Plnault's delightful and hoaling almond soap is .distributed at the fair with circulars of her exquisite preparations. -One of the prettiest homo weddings of the many last week was that of Miss Mabel Holloway, daughter of Mr. W. II. Holloway, of the well-known Tramontst.flrmof Jackson & Co., and Mr. Victor F. Walker, formerly of Now York. It took placo at Mr. Holloway's houso on Waumbeck st,Rox-bury, Tuesday night, at 7.80. The relatives and immediate friends only witnessed tho ceremony, which was performed by the family pastor, Rov. Dr. A. A. Miner. Tho bride, who is tall, slender and exceedingly pretty, was a picture of girlish loveliness, iu an imported gown of white brocaded satin, with an ovordress of silk not, ombroiderod in floral designs with fine white fibben. The high corsage was similarly ornamented, and the sleoves wero made long, according to tho protty English fashion for brides. The tulle veil was fastened with white rose buds and lilies of the valley, also English style, and very girlish and dainty. A diamond ornament, heart-shape, tho gift of the groom, was the only jowolry worn. Mrs. Holloway, .the bride's mother, wore a heliotrope satin trimmed with .white point laoe, and a panel of gold and white embroidery formed ono sido of the skirt. The wearer with her fresh, handsome face and wonderfully youthful figure, looked muoh more like the oldor sistor of the bride, than tho mother of nine children. Miss Susan Holloway was in pale blue faille, and Miss Lizzie Holloway in an artistic gown of canary colored orepe. The youngest sister.Graco, as maid of honor,wore a rose-pink frock. Mrs. Hallett, the older sister of the bride was in peach-blow crepe and satin. From 8 to 10 a large reception w'as held, at which the ushers were: Mr. J. L. Damon, Mr. George B. Smith, and Mr., R. H. Farrington, There was musio, arid Blunt served the supper. The presents were very handsome and numerous. Tho young couple departed for their new home on Columbus av. at tho closo of the reooption amid lonsure to all present that he has been asked to give two more, one in Deoember ana one in February. -Mrs. George Woods Rice of Eliot St., Jamaica Plain and her daughter, Miss Nellie Rice, were passengers on the Lahn, which sailed yesterday from New York for Bremen. Thoy will be absent all winter.   , -Thero have Deen several very jolly dinners at the Oounory Club the past week. -The painful tidings came yestorday of the very oritical illness from brum fever of Julia Marlowe at the house of Col. McClure in Plnladeljihia. Hor physicians pronounce her case almost hopeless. -Two of Mr. Clyde Fitch's plays,written for the Voices company, will bo glvon for tho first time during their engagement at theTremont. Mr. Fitch's immense success as the author of "Beau Bruminel" has given him an enviablo reputation on both sides of tho water. Ho will be in Boston to witness the production of his plays and will bo the guest of his mother, Mrs. W. G. Fitch at tho Berkeley. --Among tliOj-Cambridgo poople present at the Vendomo on Monday evening, for the first dinner of the soason of tho Episcopa^ lian Club, wore Rov. Mr. Perry, rector of St. Peter's ohurch; Dr. E. R. Cogswell, Mr. A. B. Tobey, Mr. Charles R. Woods, Mr. Mnson G. Parker and Mr. F. Stanhope Hill. Tho 'subject for discussion was "Church Architecture," and papers wero road by Mr. Arthur Rotch, architect of the now ohurch of the Messiah iu Boston; Mr. R. C. Sturgls and Rev. H. G. Wood. -Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Grossman will spend tho wintor on 18th St., New York. -Tho second in tho course of concerts by tho Boston Symphony orchostra at Cambridge will bo given Thursday night. Mrs. Wyman will bo the soloist. --On Tuesday morning, Oct. 21, in Grace church, Denver, Col., Miss Nellie B, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Ailing, was married to Mr. Hubert A. Thayer. After a short trip to Mimitou, Mr. and Mrs. Thayer will leave for tho East, and will live on Vernon St., Brooklino. Mr. Thayer is well known in Boston musical circles. -Mr. A. II. Cnnby, managor for Francis Wilson and dompany in the "Morry Monarch," accompanied by his charming wife, will arrive in Boston, Wednesday, to make arrangements for tho engagement of his company, which opens at the Globe Theatre Nov. 17. -A most useful toilet artiolo is Lady Grey Toilet Cream. --The chrysanthemum season is now at its best, and during tho coining week Gal-vin's windows will bo filled with tho new varieties: Mrs. Alpheus Hardy, Mrs. Gilbert E, Thornton, Mrs. Thomas Mack, Mrs. Phythlan. Klota, Holon Galvin, Culling-fordii, Domination and Dragon. Galvin is having a groat run on their hardy cstibule plants.and have excellent specimens at their Tremont st. and Vendome stores. -The first of the six chamber concerts in Union Hall, to be given by Mr. Carl Baer-man, is announcod for tomorrow evening. Mr. Baermau will be assisted by Mr. C. M. Loefiier and Mr. Fritz Giese. The arrangements have been in the hands of Mr. T. M. Seabury. and a most excellent series is assured. The list contains tho names of many society people. -Mrs. W. A. Presby of New York is visiting friends in town. She will spend the winter in Southern California. -Mr. Charles Barton, businoss manager of the Now York Casino, is registered at the Parker House. --Mrs. Edward C. Pickering gave a tea on Monday at tho observatory in Cambridge. -Doyle's windows on Tremont st. are a bed of delicious bloom with the rich-tinted chrysanthemums and fragrantlviolots. The latter flower is moro the rage than ever.and for the street is the only proper ornamentation. -Mr. J. J. Hayes will give selections from John Boyle O'Reilly's brilliant poems in "An Evening with Catholic Authors" in the Boston College scrie3 uf lectures. -While at Homburg the Prince of Wales sat almost daily to Mons. F. E. Bertier. the portrait j>ainter, wl�> has mado New York his home for the past three years. M. Bertier is now on the top wave of success, having no luss than four portraits of tho prince under way, two being iu uniform for different regiments and the other two in plain clothe.-i. -Franz Ebert, the I'S-inoh-high comedian of the Liliputiaus, looks like a 0-year-old boy. He jumped into immediate favor iu the metropolis, where he was christened a vest-pocket edition of Coqucliu. He is as greiit an artist in his way as Joo Jefferson or Kat Goodwin. He has a drunkeu scene that is uiuiplv irrCHiistiblboud reminds old timers of tho glorious days of "Toodle Toodles." iu another scene ho disrobes in a parlor to take a bath; th� dusrohitw is r�ully comical and ] yivca Uut th.it ttlghtttt oiHwts. TABLE GOSSIP. --Mrs. S. C. Tryon, tho landscape artist, is at the Rovero House for a month, aftor spending tho autumn with. Miss Sarah Johnstone in Dorchostor. , --Many faoes familiar to tho Symphony patrons aro soon at tho Sunday night concerts at tho Music Hall. They are admirably managed by Mr. Ellis and Mr. Thayer, and Pauline Hall tonight will bo a brilliant attraction. Besides having a voice admirably adapted to concort singing, she is a beautiful woman in face and figure.        ( --Mr. and Mrs. Joan Paul Solingor have sent, out cards for a roception at their studio Thursday, from d, to 0, to moot Mr. Henry Neville, the loading man in the "Soudan." Thore will be dramatic recitations and musio. -Mr. Clayton Johns has been ontertain- ing his brother, Mr. Francis Johns, of Philadelphia. -Mr. B. C. Portor's medallion lvoad of his boautifulwifo (Miss Clarke of Bridgeport, Conn.) is tho gom of his season's work at Newport. Its frame ofwhito and gold exquisitely sots off the fair faco, crowned with its golden hair, and tho sovero simplicity of tho background is very effective. All tho Newport beauties havo bogged to be painted in tho. samb way, but, as the artist justly observes, "it is a style that would suit vory fow." Among other of Mr. Porter's portraits recoritly finished that of Mrs. George Peabody Wotmore in evening dress is perhaps tho most striking, as it admirably reproduces tho mature beauty and stately dignity of tho original, although a, three-quarter length of Mrs. James A. Burden is also extremely lovely. The artist is now putting the finishing touohos to a portrait of MissCouisoShopard, daughter of Mr. Elliott F. Shopard, which has been painted for her mother's boudoir. It represents her with a star in hor hair, and is called "Lo Soir." Tho background is clouds, and the face is vory ethoroal.    v --Tho orders for seats for., the Rosma Voices engagement which pour in at the Tremont are a gratifying indication of the popularity of that incomparable artist and her splendid oomody company. Mr. Court-enay Thorpe, Miss Voices' leading man, is to give some readings during the engagement, whioh will bo good newsforhis many friends and admirers in Boston. --Mr. G. Waldon Smith's exhibit at the Moohanio's fair is ono of tho most attractive there. A vory large, number of Boston sooiety peoiile's portraits are included in the collection. -The marriage of Mr. Sumner Coolidge and Miss Alice Mnguire will take place next Wednesday evening at tho Austin Street ohurch, Cambridge. -Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Ward, who havo been at tho Vendomo for a fortnight or more, leave for Now York on Tuesday, -Mrs. H. S. Mann of Dartmouth st, gave a dinner Thursday evening. -Tho Club of Sixty's performance at Union Hall Thursday night called out plaudits from a largo and cultivated audience. Mrs. C. AV. Lewis, Mrs. H. J. Whit-akor, Mrs. N. A. Thompson, Mrs. J. P. Frost, Mrs, S. E. Corey, Mrs. John Reynolds, Mrs. A. D. Peck and. Mrs. D. B. Hallett wero tho lndy patrons. Rotho had ohargo of the make-tips, which wore vory artistic. -Mrs. Erving Winslow had a fine and- ionce at Mrs. Harris' houso at AVoroestor, Wednesday evening, when she read selections from Rutlyard Kipling's Tales. It was a most interesting programme, and delightfully interpreted. Mrs. Bullook, Mrs. G. F. Hoar, Mrs, J. H.Walker, Mrs. AV. E. Rioe, Mrs. Niohols, Mrs. Throop, Mrs. Calvin, Mrs. Barton and MiBS Barnard wore among the sooiety ladies of that olty prominent in the fashionable audionoe. Mrs. Winslow roads in Springfield this week. -MIsb Sallte Hargous, tho famed New York boauty, is recovering from a broken collar bono at MrB. Van RonBselaer Cruger's oountry placo at Oystor Bay. Miss Hargous is just now encased in a plaster oast, which cannot'bo removed for soma days, though it is expected that she will be removod to town shortly. -Mr.   A. T. Hamilton  and family started on Wednesday for a short trip to Norfolk, Ara., Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia, New York and Albany, and will return home next Saturday. -Mrs. William Lincoln, Mrs. Alpheus Hardy, Mrs. Thomas Mack and other Boston ladies are fortunate in having chrysanthe mums named aftor them. Galvin's window on Tremont St. will be filled with them today. -Mr. Nelson Crane and Mr. Percy Brooks of Augusta, Me., aro passing a few days with friends in the oltv. -Mr. Fred AV. Angier of Brunswick, Gn., is passing Sunday with his sister, Mrs. II. F. Jenks. Ho is on his way to Albany, N. Y., where, on Wednesday, ho will marry Miss Luke. -A set of the "Little Classics," published by Boal, Higgins & Henderson, delights all the children. These compositions aro unique, entertaining and instructive. Sent by mail for 12 cents. -Mr. Prescott Lawrence has rented Mr. David King's cottage on Bellevue av., Newport, known as Rhua House, for the season of 1801. Mr. Lawronco is ono of the Now York Coaching Club group of mon who have offered prizes for tho coming horse show, which will rango from Sf>0 to SEOO. -The Mushroom Club met at tho Parker House last night for their second dinner of tho season, Mr. Henry D. Dupeo, tho president, at tho head of the tablo. -"The Grand Duchess," with handsome, stately Camille Darville in the titlo role, will be something to onjoy with ears and eyes at tho Globe tomorrow night. In the first act Mine. Darville wears a gorgeous Hussar costume, and in tho second act a re-coption dress and a ball costumo. Both of these aro gems. The scenery is like that of all tho Casino productions, rich and elegant. -Mr. R. M. Field has mndo special arrangements with Mr. Sidney Woollott to S'lvo at the Boston Musoum a series of his poetic reoitals during November and December, on Tuesday afternoons, the pnrticu-lnrs of which will be fully announcod. Mr. AVoollott has many friends in Boston, who remember his successful reoitals in this city, but he has not made any public appearance hero for some years. His annual series of poetic recitals at the Madison Squaro Theatre In NewrYork have long been recognized as a feature of intellectual entertainment in that city, and his audiences thero are always large and fashionable distinctly. In London for several seasons during May and June Mr. Woollett has boon listenod to by large audiences in the Princess Hall and at tho Criterion Theatre. The Pall Mall Gazette refers to him as "a phenomenal recitor,"and the London Times as "tho best dramatic reciter of the day." Mr. Gladstone, Sir Theodore and Lady Martin, Lord and Lady AVhariiecliffe, Alma Tadema, the artist, and the most prominent people in England attended his reoitals. Mr. AVoollett will recite at tho Museum "Almymers Field," a poem specially recommended to him by Lord Tennyson, and his subjects will be made from those selections which have found so much favor at his recitals under Mr. A. M. Palmer's directions in Now York. -Mr. G. AValdon Smith has been selected thus early in the season as class photographer by Phillips Academy of Andover, Boston Lutin, Boston Normal, Mt. Holyoke Seminary, St. Mark's of Southboro and Chelsoa high schools. Mr. Smith's success in class work tho past two years has given hiui a most enviable reputation. -Miss Helene Lowell of Miss Helen Dauvray's company, which closed a successful week at tha Hollis last night, is a cousin of Mrs. Fred Bradlee Abbott, daughter-in-law of Mrs. Henry W. Abbott of Commonwealth av. -Mr. Alexander Pope has .nearly completed his "Truant" dog. and is at work on a portrait of a horse belonging to Mr. C. A. ICiug of Roxbury, whoso racer, Boulanger. he is also going to paint. Mr. Pope has planned a huge work for which he has already mado the model and small sketch. It is to be called "The Giadiator.-i," and will represent a lion and tiger iightiuii in the arena at Rome. -The Ladies' Club are arranging to give a reception to Mr. and Mrs. KeudiU, at their new clubhouse iu East 2Ud st. The date set is Nov. 11. YAffiEE, YETSKIHT QUEEN Amelia Glover's   Dancing Triumphs. Most Refined Exponent of the Poetry of Motion. Edith and Birdie May Also Out-Eiok Gay Otero. UR own ' ics.Glover is, Amelia today, in some ways, tho greatest ot American dancers, says tho World. She is young-only ID -she is boautifu), talented and she has already won a reputation which assures for hor a brilliant future. She hasnovor had a lesson, boyond tho ballot drill, and her art is as natural and as much a part of herself as the voioo with which- she speaks of it. Just now sho is laboring undor tho disadvantage of boing a dancer in her own country, when, seemingly, dancers from other countries alone have honor in tho hind. But she is stoadlly and persistently dancing her way into popularity. amelia olover. GLOVKR IS A IfAIBT. Thore are more possibilities in Glover's method than m those of either Carmencita or Otero, whose great specialties aro spine movements and posing. Glover is as ljght and graceful as a bit of thistle-down; thero are times whon sho sooms literally suspended in the air. She throws heart and soul into hor art and is carried out of herself by hor own motions. Glover is tho personification of refinement in skirt danoing; eyory look and motion of tho Spaniards contains a more or less pointed suggestion. Even the wonderful danoe of the American, in which she again and again kioks tho tamborlne held high above her head, is infinitely less suggestive than tho little wiggio of the hips with whioh Otero nightly brings her audience to hor feet. Glover is a fairy. Glover is constantly surprising her audiences with something now and original. Her mind Is always busy, and every bar of music boars to her a host of possibilities. She is novor the same twice in succession. Now it Is tho slow, languorous waltz movement in whioh sho drifts about tho stago, the very personification of beautyand grace in motion. Again it is the wild Hungarian step, danced with a fira and spirit equal if not superior to Oarmenolta at hor best. In the spine movements she is wonderfully graceful, rivalling both Oarmenolta ana itero In their great specialty. In the kiok she is superior to both of them, having, but one or two competitors in tho Gaiety dancers after whom she has to some slight extent patterned. Her time, like Otoro's, isporfect; in thisrespeot Oarmenolta falls behind both. Glovor on joys her own danoing probably as much ns any one in her audionpo. 'Tl feel it ns I would a song, if I wore singing ono," she once said to the writer. "And I enter into tho spirit of tho musio whether it is grave or gay with all my heart. I forget tho attdienoe and the thoatreand am simply conscious that I am personifying and giving expression to tho music whiohlls around mo." bho wont on tho stago whon a moro baby, making her first appearance nine years ugo at tho Academy of Musio in Maplesou's children's ballet. To the pleasing performances of the two Spanish boauties have recently been added "thbowk iiisAet and soux into it." the enticing and diverse dancing of lively Miss Edith Kenward of the Garden Theatre compnny, and Miss Birdie Irving, the dauc-ing star of MisslTenipest'scompany, says tho Sun. AVhat in many respects is tho most remarkable achievement of all tho varied dancing, and for that matter tho most bewildering terpsichorean entertainment that has ever astonished tho town, is the uniquely odd pedal gymnastics of Miss Kenward, who appeared on tho stage but ten minutes on the occasion of tho reoont opouirig of the Garden Theatre, but In that brief opportunity accomplished a dnyco that has become the wonderment of tho Garden Thoatro visitors. Tho thing that thus swiftly captivated tho town was "The Kangaroo Dance." An interesting fact about this soubrette that is not generally known is that she is not English, as everybody who sees her for the first time surmises, but Irish, She was born near the Lakes of Killarney, and made her debut on tho stago just eight years ago ace cur services at yourdisposaly Sizes 4, 6, B9 iO ASS at These Cloaks are worth S8.0O. 9 o'clock, as before that mo use m a they will not r. 531 mid 533 Washington St. (restive, alluring and insinuating style than the old-fashionod ballot, or short-skirted business, for that strove to compol attention while this aims to persuade. Her foot is, 'SOMKTHINO FASCINATING ABOUT BIRDIE." KKNWARD'S KANaAHOO DANCK. This foreign steel and iron men, who have just cumtdoted a tour of thu South, State that they wero mure pleased with the prospects of Middlcsbtiro, Ky., than any other place ;Uey visited. last AVednesday night at the Princess Theatre, London, she appeared as Miss Fuuutlcroy in the original London cast on Feb. 1, and is imported by Mr. French of the Garden Theatre as part of the play, being under contract to Iter London manager while she is iu Now York. "I learned gymnastics iu Gunnany while studying to be a ^painter and writing for the japera," Miss Kenward said, as she sat iu her dje&siiiif-ruoiu waiting to put on the black and white stookiugH. "but I never like Fanny Ellolor's, long and thin, but shapely. Sho does no pirouetting or toe business, nor high kicking, either; yet there Is something fascinating about Birdie. The Growth of the Typewriter. "America leads; in faot she is without a rival In this business." The speaker was Mr. II. V. Rowell, Now England manager for AVyokoff, Sonmans & Benedict, manufacturers of the "Remington" typewriter. Mr. Rowell was the founder of one of tho first schools for teaching' stenography and typewriting over started in Boston. A G 1.01112 reporter, inter ested in tho widely extendod uso of tho typewriter, sought out Mr. Rowoll and learned from him many interesting bits of information. "The growth of tho typewriter is wonderful." said ho. "Tako our own business for instance. Eight yer.rs ago, whon I took phnrgo of tho New England district for tho Remington,' I had one girl to help me, and we used to look up tho office at 200 Washington st. when we went to lunch." Now note tho difl'oronoo," and ho smiled as his eye swept over tho spacious rooms ut 15 Sohool St., whoro about 20 employos wero buBlly at work. "Our growth lias been regular, not sjias-modio. In 1880 wo moved to 300 Washington st, and In 1887 moved into larger quarters In tho Sears building, whoro wo remained until tho fire last February oausod our removal to Sohool st. That fire was a much mitigated evil to us for the growing business neodod moro room, whioh wo have beon able to seouro hero. AVe uso this ground floor as you see it, and havo the large basement for the storage of machines and oabinots, as they aro shipped from either tho typewriter factory at Illon, N. Y., or tho furniture factory at Herkimer, N. Y. "Our cabinets all come from the latter place. AVo are now making an elegant cabinet as a roll top desk of most convenient pattoni, with sunken typewriter roady to spring up boforo you at tho lifting'of, a finger. "AVo make five patterns of maohines for this country, and aro now sending maohines all over Europe on which Russian, Bmuiish, Bohemian, Italian, French and German diameters can bo written. Tho 'Roming-ton' was the first to uso a foreign lanuruage, and wus thus the first American machine to bo sold abroad." AMONG THE FIREMEN. Mrs. Cleveland's Favorite Handing. Send 20 cents to tho Ladies' Homo Magazine, Philadelphia, Peim., and thoy will send you tho magazino for a whole yearnnd a premium, worth neurly $2 monthly. It is the most wonderful offer yet made. Rivals in The Globe's Voting Carnivaf Putting in Good Work-Notes from) All Parts of the Country. Who will receive the appointmont of in^ spoctor of electric wires, which will includ& the firo alarm telegraph, is a question whlcb, is becoming more interesting as tho tima. approaches for tho mayor to send in tha: nomination to tho Board of Aldermen. At tho last meeting of the Citv Council the full ordinance was passod. It is understood that thore aro no applicants from export 0I00V trie) ans, consequently Mayor Hart's nomuj nation may pass. Tho superintendent of publio building^ has beon roauested to report to the City" Council what ohanges aro necessary and the cost to improve tho sanitary condition! ot 1110 windings now oocupiod by hose 7* and truck 12. The firemen throughout New England ara taking great Interest in The G lobe's voting: contest, and every mail brings votes for some popular firo company. Capt, McCarthy of engine 12 is making an effort among his friends to seouro tho popular vote, while tho Volunteer hose of AVako-fiold, S. P. E. 1 of AValtham, engine 3 ot Concord and hoso 1 of Natick are near tho 1 top and will strivo to win. , As Hudson has an oxoollent system ot; water works it has no use for the oncofa-i mous Eurokn 1. If the AVorcester A'oterana.' intend purchasing a first-class hand engine., they should seouro this ono. The Firemen's Relief Association ot Gloucester has been presented with .a pea-and ink skotch of all trie fires that have oo�' currod in that city from 1830 to the present, time. A now truck, mado by Abbott & Downing!' of Concord, N.H,,for Cambridge, niTiveill hist week. It will tako the place of the old Franklin, whioh was in commission during I tho palmy days of Chief Raymond, in ISGfi.'' Tho new truck has all tho modem miprovo* ments, is (50 feet in length, and carries BOO, foot of ladders. It will carry all tho implev. ments necessary, and respond to all alarma; in that city, i The salary of the chief engineer of Ips�! wioh is Slfi per annum. J Gloucester's roliof association had a fair? i last week and renlizod a handsome sum fop its firemen's fund. | Truck companies Eureka and Hardscrab. bio of Weymouth havo been supplied with extension ladders. Tho Providence and Pawtuckot voteransw have forgotten all previous difficulties anou will have a bauquot together this week In: Providonce. Tho annual ooncert and ball of the Biok* nell hose and Eureka truok of East AVey? mouth will bo given Deo. 19. Chief Chaso of AVestboro has a bulletin ia his store announcing that the Rcsouo truok : is in Tint Globe contest, and requests the! general publio to leave their coupons for the*. champion truck company of New England.1 Chief Coombs of AVorcester visited Man-' Chester, N. H., yesterday and with Super-! intondent Endicott of the Atnoskoag works � determined on a plan to reconstruct thai Lincoln steamer of AVorcester. 1 The San Francisco department is under.' the control of firo commissioner!]; Th� operating force comprises 80 permanent and. 2.t() call mon. They havo 17 engines, 7 hoso carts, 5 trucks and a firo boat. The supply: of hose is about 10,000 feet. David Soon-nell is chief engineer. At present thore aro. no funds available to pay expenses, In fact tho department is much in dobt with no prospect of any immediate reliof. Tha' Barry" ordinance, which allows aspeoial tax levy by the board of supervisors for fire, department purposes, is now before tha courts, and if the decision is favorable to its? legality thero will bo a way out of the di-! lemma. The officials owe at tho prosentsi timo $14,000. Theric is mora coal and iron in tho im�! mediate vicinity of Middlosboro, Ky, than' anywhere olso in tho South. GIAL ATTENTION Is called to a large line of Of "Veiourdu liord," EMBROIDERED IIAJfD, winch we bare just imported, and which surpass In richness of design and texture anything we have shown this season. The prices range front was taught dancing. I picked that ut> my self ami introduced my own ideas of eiiig method." i>i...u. *____ . Birdie Irving has danced and coimuerod us a feuturoiu the comic opera, "The Red Hussar." Sho Is a blonde, a genuine bkuido, while Curuiouoibi and Otero aro hi nut ties. Birdie is a skirt dauuer of a Iw more uus- Whlch Is fully OXE-TWBD LESS than their actual value. COMING WEEK WE SHALL OFFEB A LAME PURCHASE -OF- Misses' & Children's Ages C to 10 years, 82 & 83 Boylsfou St. And Park Sq. In styles and qualities usually soldi for $18 to $30. . This Sale is oue of the most; important that we shall offer this season. 82 k S3 Boylstoa St Ana Park Sq.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication