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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 20

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                20 TOE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE- SUNDAY,. NOVEMBER 2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT- PAGES. in&tan Smxim$ (&hhb TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES. SUNDAY. NOT. 3, 1890. MnsnATtriua almanac. .Nov. 2 standard time. Sun Rises.... G 19 Sun Sets.....4 36 Length of Day.lO 17 High Wat} ��gT Moon Rises.. 9 00 pm Moon's Changes. Last quarter, Nov. 4, llh. 18m., morning, W Now Moon, Nov. 12, 8h. 38m., morning, 1. First quarter. Nov. 19, 7h. 4I5ni., morning-.E Full Moon, Nov. 26, 8h. 23m, morning, W Manuscript sent to The Glebe -will not be considered unless return postage is enclosed. Tlie average circulation of THE BOSTON DAIZT OX,OBE for the month of October, 1800, teas The average circulation of THE BOS-TON SVKIJAY GZOBE for the month of October, 1890, was THE GZpEE lias a larger, regular, paid, bona fide circulation than any other Boston newspaper, and will pay $3000 in cash to any man who will prove that this statement is not an absolute fact* SUBSCRIPTION BATES. 5� Tint Din.t Globe-One copy, per month, cents; per year, gfi.OO. Tostage prepaid. Tun Sunday Globe-By mall, �2.00 per year. Postage prepaid. The Weekly Globe-By mall, gl.00 per ye�r. Postage prepaid. The Globe Newspaper Co., , 242 Washington Street........................Bolton Entered at tho Post Office. Boston, Mass., as second class matter. making tho cost of livinir higher to ovory man, woman and child in tho country. Tho avcrago riso in prices is conservatively estimated at 15 per cent. Any intelligent head of a housohold enn figure out what that moans for himself. If ho has a salary of 520 .a wook it moans that ho can only buy as niuoh with it now as he could have bought for, S17 before tho Mc-Kinloy prices struck';'.*'10 storos. In other words, his wages have boon reduced $3 a wook. If ho earns out 810 a wook his wages will only puroha.se heroaftor what SS.GO would have 'purchased before. Tho Mc-Kinloy law is, in faot, a 15 per cent, cut-down of wages and incomes all over tho country. Jay Gould recognized that fact in his famous doclaration.'made in the Now York World about a fortnight ago, whon ho Baid that tho higher prices of wool, and hence of coats, would have to bo met by a man getting along with ono coat instead of two. The groat Republican financier and economist has beon mnoh railed at for saying thus bluntly that higher prices must bo met by less consumption, but he simply stated ono of those cold, 'hard, uu-get-around-able facts which,'however unpleasant, cannot be denied. Prices are higher, and it was the intent of tho McKinley "bill to make them higher. Wages nro not higher, and thoro is nothing in the McKinley bill to mako them so. If the avorago citizen likes this situation ho will voto noxt Tuesday for tho McKinley candidates and thus endorse the McKinley pricos. If, on tho contrary, ho feols that the screw of taxation has boon given an extra twist, M'hich is pressing him sovoroly and unjustly at tho counters of every store where ho goes to buy his necessary commodities, ho can, by electing tho Demooratic candidates, servo notice on Mr. McKinley that tho new duties and pricos created by his tariff mustcomo down.  -' f �'�       0. W. James, THE PIVOT OF THE CAMPAIGN. There is no doubt about tho point on which tho campaign which is now all but closed turns. Some popular interest no doubt is felt in other issues-tho force bill issue, the Tom Reed issuo and the local lobby issue-but tho issuo of issues this year is the sudden and sharp riso of prices all along tho line, and the increased cost of living to every family in the land. It is quite idle to say that the question is settled by the McKinley bill, and cannot bo ro-opened for 10 years. Hon. Henry L. Pierce's apt and forcible citation of tho historic parallel afforded by the passage of the compromise of 18G0, by which the Whig statesmen of that day insisted that the slavery question was finally and irre-vokably sottled, very effectively enforces the truth that for tho American people nothing is or can be settled beyond the reach of revision and reversal at the ballot box. So that, in spite of all assertions to the contrary, Mr. McKixley's  bill, with its train of higher pricos on nearly all tho necessaries of life, will have to be revised in favor of the great body of tho people if the great body of tho pooplo say emphatically by their votes on Tuesday next that they aro not pleased with it as it stands. Conscious of this fact, the strongest Republican efforts of those closing campaign hours are mado to show the voter that the McKinley tariff is not so very high after all; that prices have not really gone up; that food, clothing and comforts generally are not costing any more today than before the new schedules of import duties devised by Mr. McKinley went into effect. Unfortunately for these efforts, however, they are necessarily directed to prove what is obviously not true, and what, in tho very nature of things, cannot be true. To argue that higher taxes mako no difference in tho retail cost of the articles taxed is simply to 9out the common sense of tho avorago citizen. Mr. McICinley'b own outspoken declarations to tho effect that cheap prices made cheap men, and that a cheap country is tho logical outcome of cheap food and clothing, distinctly show that the author of tho new tariff neither believed nor intended that higher duties should bring a lower cost of living. Tho testimony of tho various trades affected by tho new duties, backed by the experience of every person who buys things from day to day at the retail stores, is all one way. Pricos have, without a doubt, gone up. Tho average increase in the cost of living is about G per oont. It is idle to quote the advertisements of this or that firm saying that their prices are so low, or lower, than before tho McKinley law went into effect. In most cases these advertisers are careful to saythat they are ableoff er their goods at the old prices because they had a large stock on hand before the new law ho-gan to operate. In tho few cases where this is not squarely stated tho retail purchaser may be quite sure that the assurance of the low prices is more shrewd than sincere. A few authoritative statements will suffice to clinch this point. The Dry Goods Economist says: The llrui cJTeL't of the new tariff haB been to harden values for all kinds of dry'gooiu,, and to advance prices for classes. Raw woul haa advanced, and all iimnulucturers are :lriner to higher. Tine dress guuds are 10 to 15 per cent, dealer, and flannel fabrics are firmer, with an upward tendency. Linens have advanced 10 per cent., and the tendency is upward, particularly for handkerchiefs. On all Kindt- of table linens, thirtiiigs, bollands, sheetings, builupt, toweling aud housekeeping linens generally, advances of 10 lu l-\--2 l*i cent, ore readily obtained. Blvmenth.'.l Brothers & Co., a wholesale firm ol high standing, sends this circular out to retail dealers in seal plushes: Dr.AH S11-..S--The McKinley bill as reported from conference committee will advance the price of seal plushes lroin HO to fiO per cent., tio that plushes by the yaid ivnieh have cost �5 will cost gd.OO to gO.75 under the new taritr law. We will be obliged, consequently, to advance the prices of all plush garments about 30 j�vr cent., fan that the cost ol a plrjth jacket, instead of �H formerly, will be �10 now; Hie cost of a plush tact, at $'M formerly, will bfc #5:2.oO now, etc. Bluailkthal IlJioTirita.t.i:. Co. Take, for another example, the advanced price of carpets. The American Woo lie porter said on tho 23d inst. in its report of the market: The amount of increase of duty on carpet wool by the now tariff is from 40 to Hit- per cent., according to the crad* of wool, and the result in a lar^e in-erenfco of cost to miinufactuieis and more cosf to ccnuumerf,. In accordance with that fact the wholesale carpet houses have given notice to the it tall dealers that lis soon as the stock or. hand is exhausted the prices of carpets, inch a* are used in every home, must be advanced all the w&y from G to 12V� cents ;�- yard. Thc-oe are but a few instances of what has hi-.S-punt-d in every line of goods touched by the M'.IUnley bill. Not only on clothing of lull kinds but on table ware of every dtocrip-lion ajid Oh Louie furuisliini^ of all kinds, iiuu Mm pwloi curtains to the kitchen pot: wid puii*. the huwvy hand I,.*;, UwiAii iiiiil. wxtii the mov THAT "ENLARGED TREE LIST." Not being able to meet the plain facts of a hoavy increase in tho pricos of necessities, tho protectionist organs aro constantly trying to make it appear that in the McKinley free list ample compensation is found for tho "incidental" increase of taxes on food, clothing and the genoral furnishings of tho homo. An authorized digest of tho tariff laws enacted by tho 61st Congress, showing the old and new rates, along with the administrative tariff act, can be purchased on tho streets for 10 cents. The entire freo list, with the provisos and qualifications which obscure it, would perhaps fill five columns of The Globe. What is called "tho enlarged freo list" is made up of such articles as have been added by tho McKinloy bill. It is this enlarged'free list that the protectionist organs are constantly boosting of as an offset to the tax on tho necessities of tho poor aud the comforts of tho homo. What is it? The only item of ordinary ' consumption which i t is not almost ridiculous to mention is sugar, not ahovo No. 10 Dutch standard in color-cheap yellow sugar, such as is used on no table until after it has passed through tho hands of tho refining monopolists and sugar trusts. Next to this may bo mentioned manilla, dates, beeswax, catgut, sowing and darning needles, rags aud one or two others, provisionally ,;but how little these items enter into tho ordinary ex� pensos of a family tho reader can judge for himself. Tho rest is an interesting collection, made up substantially of tho following articles: Acorns, ambergris, arsenic, nssafetldn, ashes, bahn gilond, bladders, Burgundy pitch, castoroum, ice, leeches, oudhear, excrescences, dried Insects, dlvi-di vi, seeds of morbid growth, weeds, eggs of birds (a him Is not n bird), fleh skins, fossils, broken glass, Baited guts, hoofs (unmanufactured), sausago skins, orange and lemon peel, sauerkraut, skeletons, Bnalls, spunk, natural teeth, turtles, mauua, sea weed and orudo opium. Tho workiugman who is accustomed to spend his wages largely for acorns, cudbear, salted guts, divi-divt, excrescences, orange and lemon peel, bladders and natural teeth may perhaps think this an ample compensation for an advance of 30 percent, on the price of hiB and the children's winter clothes aud a heavy advance on the cost of his tablo, but the bulk of workingmen will hardly view it in that light. Let us not bo deceived bv the boasted "enlarged freo list." It is only a device to load consumors into .tho woods and to escape meeting the unanswerable fact that tho McKinley bill has saddled the people with an added load of already crushing taxation upon their daily necessities. J. P. Curtis. ployment with some pay is better,than idleness. Tho "strike" of tho laboring classes is a movement of modern times, and it belongs especially to tho last half of tho igtji century. It is tho result or at least an incident of tho aggregation of wealth for groat undertakings, and of theso undertakings and thoir consequences tho railway and tho tolegraph systoms have been; at once conspicuous examples in themselves and tho efficient promoters of liko undertakings in others,   . All business is now dependent upon rapid communication and moderate charges for transportation. By theso moons markets aro so extondod that it is quite immaterial to the producer whether his establishment is fixed in ono part of tho country or another, and to the consumer the expense of transporting articles of light .weight and small valuo is a .fact of minor importance. Honco it is no longer necessary to establish ovory branch of manufactures in every community, and hence it is that kindrod industries flourish in socioty, whoro they create bodies of laborors and artisans of constantly increasing intelligence and capacity in thoir vocations. Those aggregations of business and wealth, which are the product of tho presont half century, couplod with unexampled prosperity, are tho conditions of our social and businoss life which have given, to tho laboring population the moans of asserting their power in those affairs which concern themselves, and with equal force in those affairs which concern the public generally, George S. Bodtwell. of higher d;iufc= TEE PHILOSOPHY OF STRIKES. It may appear paradoxical to say that general prosperity promotes discontont among tiie laboring population of a country, of which demands for larger wages and for fewer hours of work are tho outcome. These concessions being refused on tho part of employers tho next stop is the refusal of tho combined employes to continue in thoir oo-cupations. Without now considering tho wisdom of such a step under any circumstances, it is manifest that it -would nover be takon except upon tho concurrence of two real or supposed facts. First, that the laborers, while unemployed, could depend for the subsistence of themselves and their families upon their own accumulated means, or upon the voluntary contribution of their fellow-laborers who might be wago-earners elsewhere; aud, second, tho step would not be taken unless the laborers were confident that the employers, menaced by the loss of business and profits, would make concessions ultimately of nil or some part of the demands so exacted. Each and botlt of these facts imply a condition of genera) prosperity, inasmuch as in the absence of such prosperity the laborers engaged in a "strike" would be destitute of resouices in their accumulated earnings, aud for a like reason they would not rely upon contributions from needy fellow-laborers. Next, it is quite certain that concessions could not bo extorted from employers who could gain little or nothing by the prosecution of business. Indeed, in some cases thoi e havo been indications that cm -plovers have welcomed "strikes" as a means of checking a tendency to overproduction, and in other cases tho suggestion bus been made that they have even pro-meted them for the purpose of raising prices. Again, a "strike" would m the most desperate of all undertakings if the "strikers" did not feel that in caso of fail tire they could obtain employment else where. This condition of mind implies general prosperity. On the Mime basis it may be assumed that the tendency to engage in "strikes" in Great liritain and on the continent of Europe is evidence of increasing prosperity and of u proportionate advancement of tho laboring clas-.es. Nor is the soundness of the u-.ain proposition affected by the fact that a ".-Uiki:" may be precipitated by a reductiun id w;iyes cr by an increase in the bourn ol laour. These ehan^e^ arc the iu cidcuisof pruspeKico lim.s. When business is pK'SU-ated bl.wiu-.viy. o-s iu lh;i7 aud in lb.">7, "otrikt-s" ai� liuilo mil �-�--�>!t'ie. for cYtry labvutr it luiiy sensible tLMUuy riu- A PLEA FOR SCHOOL BULLETINS. Tho advanoes in telegraphy have brought all parts of the world so near to us that a man, to'be considered well informed, must have a knowledge of what is going on in every civilized country. Not infrequently a slur is cast on his intelligence if he fails to be acquainted with tho events of interest abroad as well as at homo. 1 How can he reach most easily the information which will onable him to take his place among the truly well educated? From tho newspapers. The man who aims to be a really "good" citizen must have a knowledge of current politics, must appreciate tho oconomio side of political questions, and must be willing to make use of his knowledge and express his intorest by voting intelligently. How can he obtain tho knowlodge which fits him to becomo in truth a "good" citizen? From the nowspapors. Since youth is the time in which to lay foundations for a liberal education and for intelligent citizenship, it seems imperative that young people should be taught how to uso tho newspapers which are of such great aid to that end. Tho parents, who would be tho host teachers of this department, frequently aro too busy to occupy themselves with it. The task devolves upon the schools. The necessity for such work is being, seen more and more by educators, but its introduction into schools is not common as yet. Iu tho Bridgeport, Conn., high school the journals aro brought into tho Iclass room, and a well-arrangod course of training in newspaper reading is carried out. It is successful and vory interesting. But many schools have not even an hour a week to devote to such work, and to them is recommended the daily bulletin prepared by the scholars and written upon tho blackboard. Lot it be tho duty of one boy or girl each morning, aud in a room of 40 scholars tho task will not be too arduous, coming as it does to each individual only once in eight weeks. Lot five minutes of the opening ox-otcises bo devoted to examination of tho bulletin, and tho teacher will he pleased at tho amount of information elicited, at the fund of genoral knowledge brought to light, at the intelligent reasoning, and, above all, at the growth in the interest shown. The teacher's supervision will be needed at first to shut out unimportant railway accidents and to moderate attractive "scare heads," but she will bo surprised in a low weeks at tho intelligent selections. This exercise is of especial importance for girls, who aro only too prone to imitate their mothers in giving to tho journals a cursory examination, if they give any at all. Girls are educated liko boys in other departments-why not in this preparation for intelligent socioty and for the field of public life which seems gradually to he opening to them? Every teacher can afford at least a trial of tho school bulletin, and it is safe to predict that sho will not be disappointed in the result, Mabell S. Clahkh. EDITORIAL POINTS. At this writing it looks very like Gov. Russell and a fairer division of congressional honors in this State. political campaigners wore numerously congrogatod-that Republican confidence in next Tuosday's result was by no moans ovorwholming. _ England 'was not always a free-trade country. Her peoplo once oujoyod tho blessings of high protection and universal taxation as highly as tho American people do now. It was of the. England of that day that Sidney Smith wrote his famous and of fc-quoted satire: "Tito schoolboy whips his taxed top; the boardloss youth manages his taxed horse with a taxod bridle on a taxed road; and tho dying Englishman, pouring his medicine which has paid 7 per cent, into a spoon which has paid 16 per cont., flings himself baok upon his chintz bed, which haspaid 22 percent., and expires in the arms of an apothecary who has paid a license of �100 for the privilege of putting him to death. His wliolo property is then immediately taxod from 2 to 10 percent. Largo fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues aro handed dbwn to posterity on taxed marble; and ho is then gathored to his fathers to bo taxod no more." Sidney Smith's generation of English evidently know what McKinley prices meant. Ex-Gov. Robinson says a congressman has no businoss "to forget all but his own district." Neither has ho any businoss to remember everything but his own district, as most of the Republican congressmen of Massachusetts have done. Pretty Subject for Who Think. [en Avenues of Employment Open lo li Charles R. Codman says he has not left tho Republican party, but the Republican party has -left him. Retribution is certain as sunrise. Tho Republican party has lett so many of its best men that it is bound to got left itself by and by. Col. Higginson's address at Cambridge the other night, like all his efforts, was distinguished alike for the cogonoy of argument aud the polish and brilliancy of its litorary style. We know of no orator, with tho possiblo oxcoption of George William Curtis, who has command of such an ornate and finishod platform style as Col. Hioginson.     _ We shall find out on Tuesday, among other things, whether it is proper to speak of Pennsylvania hereafter as the Quaystone State. _ Gen. Cogswell is not devoting much attontion to the fishory question just now. The fishermen's questions are all that he can attend tp. By tho way, the time is getting Bhort, and ho should hurry up his roplies. _ The large number of candidates who have announced themselves in favor of the government assuming control of tho railroads and telegraphs, and of cities assuming control of gas and electrio plants, shows what a radical advance has been mado in regard to theso questions in the last few years. Mr. Blaine said, in his South Bend, Ind., spooch, that during the period of 20 years of protection tho tendency of prices, for tho luxuries as well as the neoessaries of life, has boon stoadily downward. Of course Mr. Blaine knows that the decrease in prices af tor tho war was due entirely to the putting of our depreciated curroncy upon a more stable basis. But Mr. Blaine simply follows the other protective orators when he ascribes ovory good thing to the tariff, For tho past two months tho politicians have been telling the peoplo what they think. Noxt Tuesday the people will tell the politicians what they think. Mr. Blaine says reciprocity is a greater step of progress than tho Demooratio purty has taken in the last GO yearB. A reciprocity that is dependent upon tho arbitrary ruling of tho President, which transfers from the legislative branch of the government the power granted to it by the Constitution, and gives it to the executive branch, which is unwarranted by the constitution, is oertainly a greater stop than tho Democrats have taken for 60 years. But it is a step backward. . '_ Prof. Everett has made a fine fight in the sixth district. His work on tho stump has been well worthy of his reputation as one of the best logioians and foremost scholars of the country. Contending against such heavy odds he may not be elected, hut tho moral victory of the contest certainly rests with him. If Mr. Lodge is ro-olocted it will not be by the superior merits of his candidacy, but by tito bruto foreo of a big majority in a safely gerrymandered district. Igl Alhambra Sirens Sons of British Scions. on We want, in addition to coal and lumber from tho Provinces, thoir oats and potatoes, and their iron. . . . All of them aro, in a great measure, cut off from us by this greatest humbug of the times, tho tariff of the United States-[Speech of John W. Candler, April 20,18G9. _ Candidate Morse will bo elec'ted in the second district sure-and his first name ought to be Bushrod. Don't forget to vote tho whole tioket this time. To do that tho voter must put his cross against tho word "Democratic" whore-over it appears on tho printed ballot. The gallant John W. Corcoran has scored another series of oratorical triumphs on tho stump. There is nothing so popular as popularity, and John W. has got lots of it. Wherever he appears the Democratic masses are always glad to see and proud to hoar him. Ho would make a first class lieutenant-governor, too. Sherman Hoar is quite young, as his distinguished uncle, tho senator, says; but it looks as if he wero not too young, to beat Capt. Fox in the fifth district race. Wo can't tell, of course, till tho roturns come in, but at this writing it seems vory probable that tho Hoar family will be a tie in the next Congress. This will be our second election with the Australian ballot, and, whoever wins or loses, it will be by a free voto and a fair count. _ Mr. Gladstone is a dogged f roe trader at 81, and it is scarcely possiblo to dismiss him with a sneer at his youth. He is quite old enough to know better, but he doesn't. In the Boston Pilot of Nov. 1 the brilliant discourse recontly dolivored by Bishop Keane at Harvard College is given in full. Tomorrow night will witness the opening of the old comedy season at the Museum, to which so many theatre-goors have been eagerly looking forward. "The School for Scandal" is to be the first performance, and there is great curiosity to see tho Museum's new star, Mr. Eben Plympxon, as Charles Surface. It is safe to predict large houses at the Museum for tho coming week. Thero is much virtue in an "if." There is ill tho virtue of a Democratic victory next Tuesday in an "if." There will certainly bo one if every Democrat in Massachusetts comes out to tho polls and does his duty. Bangor (Mo.) Commercial: A correspondent writes to a Republican newspaper complaining because his grocer is charging more under the. new tariff than before. The newspaper sagely advises the correspondent, "Change your grocer." Inasmuch as all the dealers are doing the same the advantage of this course of conduct is not apparent. We should say that a much better piece of advice would be, "Change your party."__ Congressman Candler must be very hard pressed for campaign ammunition when liis managers feel it necessary to rake up the stale controversy over the appointment of a postmaster at Dedhatn by President Cleveland. Mr. Candler evidently hopes to win a few votes bv an appeal to the supposed prejudices of the Irish-American voters of IXsdlmm on this matter. He will find that he lias lost instead of won voles by this course. Mr. Williams lias no warmer friends iu the muih district than the men with whom he differed over the appointment of a postmaster by President C'LliViiLAND.       __ Texas steers usually run well, and Chak-i.i-:v lion's is running at the Tremont like lire ou a dry pn.iiic. it was noticea'liU- at Young's yesterday - j tviicu us usuul eu llu- (tv of ;;u ekctiea (he Even Republicans aro saying complimentary things of Hon. William E. Russell's campaign spooches. They have beon masterly, convincing and effective. If the people should call him on Tuosdayto the governor's chair Massachusetts will have a chiof magistrate to bo proud of, HOUSES IN a KINK. Prof. Gleason's Famous Exhibition to Open at Winslow's. Prof. 0, R. Gleason's famous horse exhibition will como to tho Winslow rink, cornor of St. James av. and Clarendon St., tomorrow evening. Extensive preparations havo .been mado for the ecpituo season. About 16,000 feet of lumber covers tho presont floor, aud on this surface will be sand ami sawdust, which will form a complete track, and a very largo ono at that. Thirty -wild and vicious horses have been booked for this week, and this numoer gives for each night six subjects, and some great excitement may bo expocted. The animals to be handled tomorrow evening include two vicious kickers, two nervous ciders, one runaway aud a horse that cannot be hiu'-nessed; all those will be brought before the public, and will, it is promised, be made perfect by doeiio.Since the professor wasjlost seen lie has made a new addition to his exhibition, 20 educated Indian horses, pronounced perfect specimens of beauty and docility, aud which accomplish marvellous fents. Theso will be assisted by Topsv, the queen of tho equine race, ahorse that drives without bridle, reins or word of command, and in fact docs everything but speak'. The seating arrangements will afford patrons a tine, view of the entire arena and a renvoi' boxes placed in front for choice seats and parties. During tho professor's stay he invites the owners ot all bud horses to bring them to him .and lie promises to handle aud subdue them froe of chargo.uo matter how vicious they may be. The Earth Good Enough for Him. A good story has leaked out on one uf tho ministers who tool: a very active pail iu tho redemption of sinners at tho late Fremont camp meeting, says the Fremont Tribune. It is said that at one ot the meetings tho customary invitation was given for all who wanted to go to heaven to rise up. All present rose to their feet with the exception of one young man who sat hack pretty well t,u the outskirts of the audience. Those who desired to e.o to heaven s-;it duwti. Tiieu all those \s\io uanted to p.o to hell were requested tu rise to their feet and the aforesaid young man was eyed with a good deal of inte.re.-t. Still lie sat as quiet and composed as a .stone. The minister went to liunaml asked hiui why lie did nut rise iu either instance. "Wall," replied the husky sui: uf toil, "J don't want tor tfo auyvvliar. Fremont's aood trnuif lor me." At.!, the vailrvi.eis arc off. ring U.\\ rap* U> Mia.!i.--l. .. ivt which tvmuiviice vit ,Noi\ K>. ;pecially New York, Nov. 1.-There are two fellows in this world whom I hate. Ono is everlastingly saying "I told you so," and the other, when grabbing you by tho button, invariably says, "When I was in Europe;" but for all that, if tho follow who says "When I was in Europe" is enabled to give you some thoughtful memoranda, and he who chuckles with his "I told you so" starts a train of thought as to whether you wore a donkey or not at some particular time in your experience, perhapsit is just as well not to kill them just yet. When 1 was in Europe- And by the way I want to say that my incomplete and utterly inadequate sketch in last Sunday's. Globe, apropos of tho very few of the things which struck me when I was away, has brought upon mo a very avalanche of query, of suggestion as to future work, so I am quite convinced that although Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jones may know all about it, don't you know, little Tommy and .Sarah Jones, his sister, are not so well informed, and will welcome a few more words from an old friend concerning matters which to me were as interesting as they wore novel. Whon I was abroad- And by the way, has it ever occurred to you how extromoly personal one's correspondence becomes after a sories of years, oven when in cold tvpe the letters make thoir appoarance at the Sunday breakfast tablo, in the study, in the studio, in the calm seclusion granted by the sitting-room, aud aftor service, or in the evening when the family gather about tho astral lamp-lighted table, I Often Wonder whether impersonal letters would be more interesting. It is an old subject, and not a very trite one at that. Writers have diffored from time immemorial as to personal intercourse, personal narrative and personal signature. I havo an idea myself that having beon born an individualistic baby, having gone to school and been thrashod in my own individual person, having taken my degrees in my own graduation, having Btruggled myself daily for the gratification of my individual palate and the satisfaction of my personal stomach, having achieved suoh success as I have in my own chosen profession, by my own labor, and being confronted by a slab on which my own name will bo neatly and appropriately carved in Greenwood cemetery, that it iB a good scheme for me to continue the lino of personality which through a beneficent Providence foreordained for mo, or luck, or ohance, or accident upheaved along the common highway for my individual feet- At all events my experience in The Boston Globe warrants me in. saying that if a, writer follows for any considerable number of years honestly, fairly, unprejudicedly, without hope of personal reward or favor, a course of instruction, entertainment, news-giving or timely comment, he must of necessity draw to him a large audience, a great congregation, a tremendous clientele, or must ropel from him tho vast body of readers of the journal to which he is a contributor. Unless Now England is a nest of liars, unless the rock-bound coaBt from Maine down is peopled by ninoompoops, unless the quarter Of a million men and women who every Sunday turn to the pages af this great metropolitan gazette for teaching, for news, for delights literary, my course has been successful. I say this becauso it is a very cold corro-spondontial day when my mail doesn't bring mo 25 letters, Written l>y XEeadors of The Ololio, from the various sections of New England, sometimes from Moxico, often from the West, three times from tho Sandwich Islands and a score of times from Great Britain beyond the sea. Such odd questions aro proposed, such curious insights of human nature are disclosed, such trust and confidonce in judgment and in good.will and iu humanitarian-ism aro photographed that I would be a blooming idiot if I didu't indorse tho line of personality first, last and all the time. When I was abroad- And by tho way what a totally different placo "abroad" is to mo. My conscience! Why "abroad" is no more liko our own than wp are like abroad. I found very little difference in dialogue. That was because I met men and women of culture I suppose. I dare say that in some of tho interior shires of England 1 could find pronunciations as absurd as those of Western Pennsylvania, or Georgia, or possibly Montana, but the men and women whom I met, ate, drank, walked, talked, dressod, behaved precisely as you or I. In tho individual I detected very little of interest, but in the great entity of Statu, in the marvellous recognition in tho public mind of the necessary and matter of course omnipotence of law, they are as far ahead of us as we are ahead of Sitting Bull. Speaking of Sitting Bull rominds me of squaws. _ Sijuaivs Aro Women. Women are the delight of the earth. You know how we treat women hero, how wo frown and scowl, how we tread on aud sit on them in this country, and I am free to say that our British cousins are quito as brutish and as rough and rude and as inconsiderate and as illiberal as we. But- Oh, there is a but then? Yes, there is a but then, and it is a question in my mind whether tho but is a good scheme or not. Women have their access to literary effort precisely as they have hero. There are stenographers, typewriters, saleswomen, governesses, doctors, precisely as there aro here. There are two other lines open to them, the bar and the theatre. The bar? Well I don't mean the kind of bar that you mean, not the bar before the bouch. but the bar behind tho glazed door; in other words.tho barmaids of London are a feature. Now, we have heard a great deal about the freedom and the license aud tho disrepute of the English barmaid. I want to say that while in the great hotels, such as tho Savoy, and in tho great restaurants, such us the Criterion, and in all the theatres, i ho bars are attended by women, yoiierally very comely and pretty women at that. I didn't see, and 1 was iu and mtuong them nearly every niyht - I didu't see one outre act. I didn't tuar   uiie   dUceuiiuytts phrase, i diun'l notice a solitary interchange of improper look, gesture, dialogue. There are thousands of barmaids in London. Tlioy dross noatly, thoy are comely and attractive in appearance, thoy aro deft and quick iu understanding the neods of customers, and they form a pleasant feature to the unthinking patron of the place. Tho thinking patron nocossarily says to himself, what is tho end of this sortof thing? Tlti) Girl Will Wot Always too a CHri. She cannot always hold her position, ergo," and it is the ergo which thoughtful men ponder. Ono of the most beautiful fflrjs I ovor saw in my life is a Miss Sherrington, appropriate name, in the billiard-room mid cafe of tho Savoy Hotel. '-Her face reminded me of the photographs of Maud Branscombo. Her costume was that of a young woman in moderate -circumstances, black, neat and attractive. Her manners wore gentle, refined. Sho stood or sat, as tho case might be, behind the bat', serving liquors, soft or hard, to all sorts and kinds of gentlemen-a gentleman being a man of sufficient financial status to warrant his patronizing the Savoy in its several departments. 1 was very muoh interested in Mjss Sherrington, as the first English barmaid I had ever seen. Subsequent utilization of opportunity convinced mo that she is a fair typo of the bettor grade of women who, in that un-A-merican but perfectly English line of effort, keeps the wolf from the door, preserves Her own self-respect because she attends to her own self-support and opens up an entirely novel fiold of usefulness to woman. I doubt vory much if the Sherrington idea could become popular in New York, because, While I didn't see one drunken man, ono gin-laden womanin the streets or in tho barrooms of London, I don't believe it would be possiblo for the Hoffman House, tho Astor Houso, the Brunswick in this city, pr for Young's Hotel, or i Parker's, or the Tromont, or any of your great restaurants in Boston to employ young women and ensure the respectful treatment and the courteous recognition whioh are taken as a matter of course on the other side, because there it is a custom of long standing aud no longer a novelty. And the Theatres t Yes, in the theatres they havo women as ushers. In the Lyric Theatre, as I passod from my box to that of Henry Rochefort, my eye fell upon the sweetly charming face of a woman whose features seemed perfectly natural and most familiar to me, Asking her for a programme, with which she was bountifully supplied, I Baid, "Why, how are you?" To which she replied? "Why, Joe Howard, who would think that We should meet here?" She is a widow of one of Wallack's leading mem Her husband was an Englishman of rare ability, of marked attainments, u resigned British officer, who was hurried to his death by the fast pace which so many of our professional aotors feel themselves compelled to adopt. With her two sons she left this country,: and found in the management of one of' the great London theatres friendly, helpful aid, and now, wellpaid as an usher, as a purveyor of programmes, as a director to tho various departments and compartments of tho great institution of which she is a part, sho earns a comfortable and entirely satisfactory subsistence. ' , .. Queer meet, wasn't it? But I don't care to discuss queer moetings specially. I am talking systems, and it seems to mo that the system of employing reputable young women as ushers and, as progBamme distributers and as information givers in the theatres of London is worthy of encouragement everywhere and of following here, because it opens up to woman an additional line of self-support, and'therefore self-respect. Nowhere in Now York we have at least 25 Iioubos of reputable en-tortainmont. That moans at tho very least 300 ushers and people -of that kind/ Who are they? What are they? As a rule, the ushers in our theatres are young men whose occupations afford thom employment during tho day, and who eke out their income by this easy style of work during the evening.                                         ;, Now. Why Not Women* Oh, I can tell you a thousand-reasoiis i why not women, but they all grow out of man's discourtesy, man's bestiality, man's imper-tinenco, man's unmanlinoss, and I cannot conooive of one solitary argument which is honestly based in woman's frailty, in woman's unfairness, in woman's disloyalty. But apropos of women. ' I didn't see in a solitary instance a hat or a bonnet or whatever you call it in the theatre. Now, take Irving's magnificent Lyceum, for instance. I paid four guineas for a box, and two days thereafter received a characteristic note from Irving, in which he blew mo up to the skies with indignation, catching rne on my return to earth in his hospitable arms, expressing his extreme annoyance at my discourtesy in presuming to pay for a box in his theatre. Well, that's all right. With my party I went to the Lyceum Theatro and- enjoyed a marvollous presentation of the "Master of Ravens-wood," in which Mr. Irving, Miss Terry, Mr Terriss and Misa Tony's young son, Mr. Craig, were at their best. It was a superb performance, and would run in Palmer's Theatre hero at least a year. But that's not the point. The houso was filled: ovory box had its quota. The orohestra and tho dress circle wero packed to their extremist capacity. The ladies were in full dress. I don't intend discussing the extreme immodesty of the present style of costume. If women havo an idea that to the pure all things are pure, and havo no objections to exhibit all things, that's their business, not mino; but tho sight of a theatre, which is a social gathering plaoe, fillod with gentlemen in evening costume, and with ladies without annoying obstructions in tho way of hats or bonnets or feathers or headgear, all apparently recognitionful of the proprieties and the niceties and the demands of occasion and place, was a contrast so marked to our overcoated. bonnettod, fur-wrapped, sealskin-coated, opora-cloaked, home-dressed men and women, as to be not only refreshing and delightful por se, but suggestive along a lino of social development. It's all nonsense to say that tho Women of London are not to be seen upon thostroets. They are. Thoy drive up and around the superb monument to the Prince Consort, where, by the way, the iron in the marble is doing its best with frequent rains and fog to destroy the body of the picture, and wliero the rusting iron of the railings is,contributing in no small degree to the same undesirable ond they drive through Hyde Park, they drive on tho Strand, they drive here, drive there, not only, but they walk hore and they wall, there. It isn't as it is in Havana, where no lady ever pute foot across tho threshold of store or bazaar. Shopping in London is just the samo as shopping iu New York or Boston or San Francisco. Aud so far a3 I could see tho mature woman, that is women over 30 years of age, is just the same there as sho is here. I was particularly pleased with the young women. Most men aro. But 1 was there as an observer rather than a participator, and it gratified mo to notice that the coming generation, by which I mean girls of 20 down to 15 and thence to 10, are bouyant. healthful, bright-eyed, athletic, with well-developed bodies, with physical capacities. Englishmen are divided, I should say, into twociusses-the tipper and the lower. There is a degree of jolly independence about the one, aud of despicable servility about the other. The former reminded me somewhat of our American men of the Western slope. They aro free and independent in their thought, and particularly manly and straight cut-clean cut, as it were-in thoir bearing; but the waiters and the servants and the drivers and the clerks and everybody who depends upon the whim and caprice and patronage, so to speak, of employers are so slavish, so uninauly, nu serio-comic in their abjectness as To bo JSeneuUi Contempt, and yet. how they do lov? to lord it over others. I have seen here, now and then, a rnau holding, we would say, a p jsition analogous to that of the lieutenant, the executive officer of a man-of-war, tyrannical, brutal, loud talking, profane, yelling, screaming, shouting, when dunlins with his inferiors, but plastic, liinyy, criniry, uu-Amcrk-sui iu his obsequious obedience to the utau who hirti him. That's the \yuy thoyHoemedtoniaon.tho other side, after you have prissod a cbrtain line. And the young mon? ; , Woll,, the young men aro, 1 regret to say, largely uhdof tlieirifiueiioe of petty vice, I can't say that,I., was pleased with their physical -appearance. I knpw . nothing about thorn morally, but they struck me as being largely (controlled by tho sirens of the Alhambra'and the Empire and the tobacco shop.: Many.of them have more money to spend than they'Reserve, and they throw it . away in course!) wliich aro certain to end as thoy end with our young. The cigarette gang go perfuming the streets in arm-and-arm companionship with tho pipe smokers, tho latter tho loss objectionable of tho two. You can find hundreds of them every night in tho magnirtcant Empire or the gorgeous Alhamtira, whoro first-class vaudeville, ballot and variety entertainments are provided at,comparatively low rates, where pretty bai- ihaids >oll liquors of every sort and'kind, and where the demimonde, discreetly, modestly dressed and behaved, ply their trade with ingenuity and apparent success. I don't take any stock in young Britain on the malo sido. The girls are full of evidences of health and exercise and good nature, and a brainy recognition of the advancements as woll as the opportunities of the time. At home, of courso, wo, as parents, guardians, friends, brothers, and so on, feel a very natural interest in the coming generation. So, when I was abroad-- And by tho way some day I will toll you what I saw and hoard and thought whon I was abroad. I think, it would be a good scheme, and possibly will rivet even more closely tlie corrospondontial chains that bind us together, particularly if I open a few doors, the handles of wliich were placed in my palm, and you may see with my eyes and hear with my oars and recognize with my understanding the peculiarities of our cousins, which mark thom so clearly as relations, and yet show thom so distinctly as born and bred in a land utterly foreign in climate, in development, in opportunity, as Great Britain is from the land of tho free and the homo of the brave. Points. Politicians aro greatly excited here as elsewhere, but to the groat bulk of our 1,600,000 peoplo the coming Tuesday brings no special significance. J. G. Bennett is not coming here, He drives a coach dally in Paris, wears a vory high hat and a coachman's coat with enormous buttons, Joseph Hasom, the distinguished journalist and author, is with us. His latest book by order of tho Czar is a Corker, . Palmer's company has scored a great hit in a "Pair of Spectacles." Stoddard makes up' too old; he should present a man of 60, Ho shows a.man of 70. The mount of the piece is simply charming. I saw John B. Sohoeffol, his wife, Agnes Booth, and Wll-lard.ln tho.first-niglit audience. Miss Ada- Rohan has scored a notable �triumph- in-Augustin Daly's "Last Word," I don't like, plays which are built for ono actor, but I must say tho fair Italian deserves all tho prominence awarded bar, and it might: incidentally bo said that Daly probably knows .his own business better than. any one else. He has a pronounced clientele who go to Daly's, and rarely anywhere else. Rehan is a positive picture.of lovolinoss in the "Last Word." You ought to see her. Her sister, .Miss Hattie Russell, has taken Mrs. Barrymoro's part in Crane's "Senator," and plays it with a joyous virility that is most engaging. Crane is rehearsing a new piece called On Probation.'! Tlie GardenTheatre has its full share of the best patronage in the city.and deservedly.. The other first-class attractions are doing well.   . So am 1. Weather glorious. Howard. FASHIONS IN FURS. to; Capes Will be Made to Suit Any Pocket-book-Styles that Will Suit all Faces and Shapes-Furs for Men, ITH the approach of -^ yv, winter comes tlie un- T \ packing of cedar U^}^_ x /"V chests, and the renovation of furs that have spelt awoy during the heated season. WOiat anxiety least ono of those pests, the Yankee moth, may have intruded himself upon sacred precincts and stolon away like Shylock more than his allotted share of sustenance. The best moans of procedure when furs are disinterred from their closely confined quarters is first to shako and beat them. For those who need to practice economy the following roceipt will remove the greasy look of furs: Put common sea sand in a tin dish-a pint or quart, according to tho size of tho garment to be treated-and set tho dish in the oven. When thoroughly heated dust the sand over tho fnr and rub well in with the hands. The beauty will be restored and the fur will assume that flufiiness peculiar to tuosoin the furrier's establishment. Caro must be taken to have the sand hot, the salt in,it working tho charm. When cold heat a��,in, and so on until you havo woll rubbed every part of the garment. A good plan is to divide the sand into two parts, so that while you are using one the other may be heating After all this done, take a silver comb, an ordinary ono being of no use whatever, and comb out the fur. Tho fine metal teeth penetrate tho skin, and thereby remove any dangerous substance that may adhere to it. Many families do not own a silver comb, but if they have frionds in the fur trade, that obstacle will be removed. Fur capes this season are made to suit all pocketbooks, and the new styles are exceedingly -becoming; especially the Medici and the Marie Antoinette collar effects. The fitted capes aro not as popular this year as those mado with points. Anothor good feature is that all tho linings in the handsomest garments are unquilted, Tho roason is twofold: First, the satin is of a heavy quality, and wears much better put in plain I second, the garment can be made to fit bettor with a plain liuing. The most expensive at first and economical in tho end ai-o the seal capes. It is puroly a matter of choice whether thoy aro trimmed with astracliun or Persian lamb. Many women prefer the plain seal, but the fit and finish must bo perfect. Those with tho "wired rolling collar," which can bo adjusted to one's fancy, are much sought aud are certainly the most becoming to slight figures. No woman inolined to embonpoint should wear a capo; there are niany styles more suited to her. For young women with a fresh, rosy complexion, the gray astrachan capes are the fittest framing for their youthful faces and bright eyes. Such a cape, muff and and small toque is quito fetching. Very handsome are the black marten capes, but these look well only on slight figures, owmg to the liuiimess of the fur, while the monkey skin capes are well adapted to stouter figures. What woman could fail to feel comfortable and look well in the English top coat, outlined in the initial above, so much the rage abroad and considered chic. Some of those beautiful coats havo tho Medici collar and vest effect, while others have the wired collar, rolling to the bottom of the garment. The same effects are carried out in the close-fitting ulsters; these garments are the very acme of comfort on a cold day, with umns and caps to match. Very elegant inulls are mado in camels' hair, cashmere and brocaded goods, lined with fur or musuiltod satin in contrasting shades. They are an especially welcome addition to the wardrobe of women who attend evening parties, as well as theatres. They are loose-fitting, so that they do not disarrange the gown beneath. hi fur trimmings there is variety enough to suit the most fastidious. These are made of American Kilile. which in reality is mink, Russian and Hudson bay sables. Lynx mukesa pretty rlat -trimming for gowns, as also dues the marten and Persian lamb. Jjtti-r in the season many tailor-made suits will be trnnined with fur and quite dainty hats will accompany such suits, made of the fur used in trimming. Persian lamb and se.-.lsltin make pretty little bonnets, to he trimmed with birds. Chatelaine bags are mud" i>f sealskin, and thero are shopping muffs with a pocket book attachment that will nud many a ready pure-lmser. The men arc not forgotten in this season ot J nr. Fur them there are cleguul lur-lined coats, fur-triuimud cuats and many s'.yles uf head gear, us well as collars and Cloves. The itn-s used fur adorning men's �v�u .u*s Kuisiaa table, uupluekt-d ouer, Leading Boston People Unqualifiedly Indorse For Malaria, And Every Form of INCLUDING- Lumbago, Neuralgia, Sciatica, Muscular Soreness, Bronchial Coughs And Influenza, One Dose Breaks Up a Cold. Indorsed by Leading Physicians. Sold by All Wholesale and Itotnll Druggists. Price 81.00 a Bottlo. To onr Patrons nml Friends: Tlje extensive alterations in tho front of our building lias rendered our rooms too Anvli. and unsuitable for line dental operations. Wo will therefore, about Nov. 1, open another office at      '    �' S50 at which we will be pleased to see our patrons and Mends. Thanking you for past favors, and soliciting a continuance ol the same, we are,     Tours respectfully, J)rs. B1UNBE and SOILE, . New England Dental Parlors. sea otter and natural beaver, with caps to match. About as pretty v, library rug as a manly heart could desire is one made of tho skin of a grizzly bear. These are very choice and rare. The fur is a ' dark brown with long silver hairs, Then thero are the red and yellow fox rugs, and what is callod tho "oross fox." This is a-very handsome fur in black and brown. In sloigh robes, tho black zennett is tho most popular now in use, as itis very warm, and the fur light in weight. PREACHES rOUS ONLY." Father Ignatius' WorkinCanaciaCrowned With Remarkable Success-He Draws Christians of Every Creed. , Rev. Father Ignatius, whoso services be-gin today at Horticultural Hall, recently held a mission at Magog, P. Q.,.Canada. The-prejudices awakened by the ecclesia.i-tioism of his garb wero entirely dispelled as it became apparent that the man's whole being- was one ontliusiast-ic devotion to "Jesus only." 'People of all denominations crowded the church, and by a marvellous power he won upon the hearts of all. The sublime grandeur and earnest simplicity of his eloquence, the felt spirituality of his presoneo, and the heart-melting1 power of his singing, made an impression upon tho community that can never die. Tho reverend father, though firm in his principles of apostolic order, is in glowing touch with devout Christians of all denominations, from the church of Rome on the ono hand to tho Salvation Army, on tho other. Ho is, indeed, a remarkable exemplification of his church's comprehensiveness, aud a living embodiment of her capacity for Christian unity. At his services seats had to be crowded in till thero was no room for kneeling, and tho preacher held his hearers spell-bound whilo with words .of fire and love he told of "J'e'sds only."   ' � His inspiring prosonce and heart-moving ministry have brought gladness to many Bouts, and devout Christians of all denominations have learned in him and his preaching more than ever before how real and beautiful is their oneness and common kinship m Jesus. One Thousand jjollare. I will forfeit tho above amount if I fail to prove that Floraplexdon is tho best medh oine in existence for dyspepain, indigestion, biliousness, sick headache, kidney and liver complaint, nervous debility and com sumption. It builds up the weak system,' and cures.whero other remedies fail. Ask your druggist for it and got well. Sampla bottle, also a valuable book, sent f roo. Ad� dress Franklin Hart, 88 Warren-st,, N. Y. MORTAR-SPOTTED SKIN. Covered Witli Scales. Awful Spectacle Cured in Five Weeks by the Cuti-cura Remedies. X am going to toll yon of tho extraordinary euro your CtiTiotiBA Hemedies performed on mo. About the lut ot April last I noticed some red pimples liko coming out :ill ovor my body, but thought nothing of It until Borne time later on, when It began to loolc liko Bnota of mortar spotted on, mid wnieh oamo off In layers, accompanied with Itching. 1 would scratch every night until I was raw, then the next rught the scales, being formed moanwlule, wero soratohed olf again. In vain did I consult all the doctors in the county, but without nld. After giving up all hopes of re* covcry, I happened to soe an advertisement in the newspaper about vour OunonnA BiiME-uiBS, and purchased them from my druggist, and obtained, almost immediate relief. I bo* Siu to uotlco that tb� scaly ropped off and disappeared ona by one, until I had beon fully cured. I had tho disease tlilrteen mouths before I began taking the Kkmgdieb, and In four or five weeks was entirely cured. My disease was eczema and psoriasis. I know of a great many who have taken the Heme-uiEa, and thank me for tbe knowledge of Uiein, especially mothers who have babes with scaly eruptions on their heads and bodies. I cannot express my thaalo to you. Jdy body was covered with Bcales. and j was an awful epoutaols to behold- Now nty skin la us clear as a-baby's.     ___      _j, geo. cotey, Merrill, Wis.  , Cuticura Resolvent 1 Tlie now Blood and 8kln purifier and greatest of Humor Remedies, Internally (to cleanse the blood of all Impurities, and thus remove tho cause), and Cctioliia, tho great Skin our*, nndCtmouitA Soap, an exquisite skin Beautluer, externally (to clear the skin and scalp and restore the lialrj, care every species of agonizing, itching, burning, scaly, ana pimply diseases of the skin, scalp, and blood. Sold everywhere. Price, OcnonitA, liOc; Soap, �5c.; Resolvent, Prepared by the Pottkb huro and Chemical Coiipokation, Boston. [aT'Send for "How to Cure Skin DIseaaeB," f* pages, CO Ulufitrations, and 100 testimonials. PLUS, black-heads, red, rough, chapped, an4 oily sklu cured by Cdiiltba Boat.__ PlfifT CAN'T BREATHE. Chest Taina, soreness. Weakness, . , Hacking Cough, Asthma, PleurUy, and InflainamitUon relieved lu one mluute by tlie I'utieiira A.uU-1'ulii i-luster. nothing like it for Weak: Lungs. _       WSSu u20 Klcord's Vital Itcs;te>i-� alive, a spei-itu- iur nervoua and physical ik-bililv.m*. Ceo, C. tloothvi.-i A tH'.AVluilt-sal^ Agts., Histoid!' ,t Co., ay 'in iiioiit St., Boston; iur coiiauk Utliuu 01 descriptive ctroelal address Dr. Bigesmoud,box litis, 5rv.- Yuri:. [i Ml  SuTTlitt SICK   KMAUlt'JlK!,, Heartburn, Sour SH'iu.'u'h, or uny Uis!ri-�s otter i-ii.fr : uig quickly t-urtii bv out- or two i A liartwk'bs Ve;,itabiu n-nu-dy iu lustily jfyim. Au i dr iiijjUb, SfSc, M>d 60*. u bus.   

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