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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 2

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                2 THE BOSTON SUNDAT GLOBE-SUNDAY,7 NOVEMBER 2.; 1890~TWENT�-E'IGHT? PAG-ES, IcGEOUGH ON THE STOMP Russell at Turne Hall and Jamaica Plain. Eloquent Speeches by O'Seil, Lee and BleDonoiisli. Godfrey Morse Urges the Re-election of Andrew. At Washington Hall, South Boston, List evening-, a fair-sized audience was present to liston to eloquent speakers who ad vooated the re-eloction of Hon. John F. Andrew for Congress. The meeting: �was called to order shortly after S o'clock t>y Col. Henrv A. Wilson. He introduced Hon. James R. McGcougii, who mot with an enthusiastic reception. Ex-Senator McGeough said: vThatis the issuo between the parties? Well, the Republicans say: A tax is a good thing. The more you pay the better. It is true the present high tariff is not all needed for the support of the government, but it 5rotects American industries and labor, 'herofore we won't reduce tho tariff. The Democrats! say: We also believe in the promotion of Amorican industries and the protection of Amorican labor. That is the common concern and interest of the "whole people. But a tax of any kind is a burden. The less wo have to pay the better. The present increased war tariff on the necessaries of life and raw materials is equally !. a burden to the industries of the country .and to labor. Therefore our watchword is, "Tariff reform." Protection. This doctrine of protection, so �'far as the stability of our industries and the permanent welfare of the country are concerned, is a dolusion and a snare. Twenty-fivo or 30 years of tho highest protective tariff ever known prove it. The idle hands and iron mills of Now England prove it. Individual fortunes have been made. Yes, but the out-throat policy of the thing kills the protected industries in the end. This war tariff, unequal in its benefits and Its burdens, and unconstitutional, only serves to pile up idle millions in the United States Treasury, and add to the already colossal fortunes of the rich at the expense of the 'jpoor. As a protection to Amorican labor, it is a cheat and a humbug. I don't behove in this baby guardianship of tho Republican Iparty. Tako your dead, paralytic, protecting : hands off the people., Take tho war taxes off the necessaries of Oife. Give our manufacturers free raw material. Put new life into our New England industries, now languishing or protected to death. ;   Let the homomarket and the foroignmar-ket, too, bo open to our home industries. Let our sliips be afloat, and let the stars '�and stripes bo seen once more on every sea. Don't fret about foreign competition. I believe in the skill and intelligence of tho American people. Only give them liberty of action, freedom from this legislative interference, and in everything that goes to make up a great, independent and prosperous people, thoy can stand alone and coni-f.pote with the world. Then followed J. Mitchell Galvin, Hon. 1-tibseph H. O'Neil and others with rousing � (Speeches. efforts in tho Legislature against the dlvi-Bion of Beverly, and stated that Senator Onrberry had refused to liston to a petition signed by tho poor pooplo of Buverly., Tho rally closed With hearty choors for Cronan, Rnssoll and Hoar. PUTS THE POOR MAN DOWN. "William E. Hussell and Godfrey Morso Speak in Curtis Hail. From 7.  until S.15 last ovoning a steady flow of peoplowcnt. into Curtis Hall, till that auditorium was crowded. It was a Democratic rally. Tho mention of John F. Andrew's name was the signal for lusty cheers and the stamping of foot. But it was from tho time of Hon. W. E. Russell's appoarance that tho tumultuous enthusiasm unbound itself and was not spent until he had left tho hall. Godfrey Morse made his only speech of the campaign. Thomas \Y. Proctor called tho mooting to order, and said: "During the past two yoars the Republicans have had control of tho Senate and House of Representatives, and it is to their legislation in tho last Congress that wo look to dotorniine their policy. Wo aro told that the Republican party was the party that loved the laboring man, whereas tho Democrats oarod nothing for thorn, and all the love for them was centrod in tho grand old   party.   What   has  the   Mclvittley pill done for   the   laboring  man?    I am    told    that    it   has   raised   the duties 12 and 13 per cent, above what, they wore boforo. and this previous tariff bill was passed with precisely tho same claim. The laboring man who buys his coal by tho basket and the man who carries his tin dinner pail is the man affeotod by this bill. This tariff bill has raised duties in the interest of monopolists, raised prices upon all tho necessities of life, upon coal and everything exeopt sugar, at the expense of tho laboring man." Godfrey Morse said: Fbllo w-CrrizitNS-The Domoorats of this district have Bought to make no personal issue in the choice of a representative in Congress. Thoy propose to elect Mr. Andrew upon tho broad issue of a revision of the tariff, which shall mean bettor clothes nnd better food, and higher wages for ovory man who works with his hands or with his brain. Wo believed, and we still believe, that this issue is potent enough to give us this district by twice tho 1500 majority which it gave to the Democratic candidate two years ago. The candidate of our opponents evidently believes so, too, for he has boon prompt to put himself on the tariff reform platform. No member of Congress of either party has made a more manly record as tho do-fonder of the interests of Massachusetts than he whom we are mot to honor tonight, Hon. John P. Andrew. Mr. Pierce has had bad counsellors in attacking the record of Mr. Andrew upon the question of a sound currencj', and it seems that he now acknowledges it. He will get no thanks for it from the Republican members of Congress who voted for tho infamous legal tender silver act. The vote of Mr. Andrew had its full weight against free coinage, and all forms of silver inflation on every roll call. He was either voting or paired overy time the ST AMU BY THE P.ARTY. 1 democrats of Ward 10 .Listen to Advice ' from Leaders. For two hours last evening as many of the , Democrats of ward 16 as could comfortably : gather in Turn Hall gave vont to their exuberant spirits in vociferous manifestations of their approval of tho principles of their chosen party, as expounded by their gallant chieftain and others of tho flower of Democracy. It was a ratification of their faith and of their party nominees in all that tho word implies. Isaac Rosnosky lod tho march onto the stage at S o'clock, and immediately introduced David F. Barry, ex-president of the Common Council, as the presiding officer of the evening. Mr. Barry said that he was satisfied that the Democratic ticket would bo elected by a majority ot 5000 votes or upwards. He closed by introducing Hon, Edward J. Donovan. Mr. Donovan said he had come to speak in tho interests of the senatorial candidate, Hon. James Donovan, and in an earnest and eulogistic speooli he besoechod tho voters of ward 10 to support ' him at the polls. "You owe it," he Baid. "to your party and your political faith to stand as stanch ly by the nominees of your ward caucus for the Legislature, Thomas J, Keliher and Isaac Rosnosky." Rov. Dr. Laskor of tiio school board was the nest speaker. He wont into a discussion of the national issues of tho campaign, in which ho was interrupted by the tumultuous applause and cheering by the entrance of the Democratic candidate for governor. Mr. Russell was warmly greeted on stepping to the front of the platlorm. ; Alter thanking his audience for their i.eplendid greeting, ho said that he had ricom-e more to mako the acquaintance of [the people of ward 10 than to do much .talking for ho had already mado one ' speech and had two more to mako. He said that if he didn't represent something he did not want the vote of any man, but if he represented the principles of Democracy he wanted tho �voteB of those who could conscientiously support him. Ho represented freedom of American liberty, and for that reason he believed in license against tho hypocrisy of the Republican party and he would bo ashamed, as a candidate for governor, with-,out he could openly state his position on that question or upon all others. He then went on briefly to discuss tho tariff, and to show how the new bill was a burden upon the people and a blow at our industries. "We charge, and we have a right to charge, every Republican representative that they have beon disloyal to -Massachusetts interests. May God forgive "them, but I don't believe old Massachusetts will. (Applause.) Those selfish men that gave up their fat in the last campaign are 'today reapiugthe reward of a tariff imposed for their remuneration." ; Hon. Joseph H. O'Neil was introduced as one who had no fences to put up, and one who could bo elected to Congress from Hong Kong. He was rtcolved with groat applause. Ho said that ho had placed himself in the Lands of the Scale central committee, and that they hud bundled him all over the State, and it gave liim groat pleasure for the first time in tho campaign to address his own constituents, who had honored him over and over again. lie outlined the passage of tho McKinlcv bill, and cited the dire results of the same to Massachusetts, in which connection he paid that every man in Massachusetts, be be Republican or Democrat, should discriminate against the party which, by tho pas-page of that bill, had made it harder for him to make a living. This bill discriminates ugainBt Massachusetts in favor of the West, it is an acknowledged fact in Congress that Massachusetts is disliked. The representative lrom the great Northwest cannot bear to hear of her prosperity, and overs- chance they got they give her industries a slap in the face. The results of the tests made upon tho (Steel manufactured at Weymouth, equalling tliat made at Pennsylvania, proved that, not withstanding it had been said that New England could not match the steel tnade by Carnegie, there was nothing .New England ingenuity could not do under lair play and equi;] right?. (.Applause). With anything like a lull vote next Tuesday, he said, ho believed that William .E. Russell would be the next governor, and John Corcoran the lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts. i Hon. Owen A. Galvin was the last speaker. He Kiid a iew kind words of Hon. Joseph H. O'Neil. and repeated the words oi Mr. Crisp of  e honor, Mr. Jonklns has had a surfeit and no other can didato dares to aspire to so much. Gentlemen, as the candidate ofyour party, I. gladly and heartily accept the Democratic standard, satisfied of your support, with no fear of the result. .Crusting that I may be deemed worthy in the future, as in the past, of the confidence and honor imposed. Your obedient servant. Jambs Donovan. Boston, Nov. 1. THIS IS QBE VOTE FOR Name.*. Town. State.. [OceirpaMen here.] GIGANTIC FRAUD. JAMES DONOVAN REPLIES, DEHOCEAT FROM YOUTH. Speech the of Candidate Cronan of Eighth District. John F. Cronan. the rtgular Democratic Candidate for senator in the eighth Suffolk dictrict, received a rousing send-off from the voters of ward 25 in the court room on Washington St., Brighton, last evening. Morris Hickey presided, and after a few remarks introduced candidate Cronan. Mr. Groiitin s.ud: "My opponent has refused to accept the chl:ih;Ji|i<; J tosu�l to him to mwi on tht-P'j'.k'.i- piriform and there discus* hit. record m the oenate. I hiive offered him every in-d.'.cement, but he hob reiused to accept my <..ff . "V,'i;�'ij I was Hi years old I took my stand v.i:i.' the Democratic party. Of late the iin- )iaL been hostile to me becju_-.e c.o'.lid no: comm. me. 1 f-taud up -� niks/at, it is the very tiling 11; ruinii;;.; the Democratic party hi w; 1>" (. cuiaji I'ltdgec! himself, if elected, to Mii>i�Ti >'��>� i.'ieiesU'i of the working people lit ti.e dittrirl PttUrick O'.N'tU U Beverly spoke ft his Accepts Nomination and' Has a Few Words to Say of Mr. Jenkins. Hon. James Donovan in his letter of acceptance of the Democratic nomination for senator in the fourth Suffolk district, takes occasion to reply to Hon. Edward J. Jenkins. The letter here is published in full: Hon. John H. Sullivan, Chairman, and Abraham Levi, Secretary of tho Fourth Suffolk Democratic Senatorial Convention : Gfntlkmun-I sincerely appreciate tho distinguished honor which your convention has conferred upon ino in again placing mo in nomination as your candidate for the Senate. It is all the more appreciated because it comes to mo unsolicited, as the voice of Democratic delegates chosen not by any clique or faction, but in a full and open caucus, by the people of the entire district. As your standard bearer, I accept the nomination. It could not be otherwise. Had tho nomination come to me from any other source than that of a Democratic convention 1 could not have accepted, believing as I do, loyalty and allegiance to our party to be tho first duty of every Democrat, It has pleased my opponent of a year ago, Mr. Jenkins, who so eloquently and cautiously refers to himself, to devote his attention at this time to my record, both as a representative and a senator. In his letter to a convention of his adherents, not chosen by the people, and representing no one. but themselves, he declares that he accepts an independent Democratic nomination. In that letter he says: "1 accept the nomination to light your battle again with tho nominee of the machine." It is only a year ago that he knocked at the door of the Democratic city committed and begged to be readmitted to the party fold. The Democratic party of Boston, jn convention assembled, considered his appeal, and by a vote of more than three to one repudiated him. Further on, he declares that "under the Australian ballot system, every man ran vole as his conscience dictates, without fear or favor, and I am sure that tho voters of tliis district are. wise enough and honest enough to seloct the candidate they really prefer." In that sentiment I most heartily concur. The history of the last senatorial contest demonstrates th at fact. But, says Mr. Jenkins, "last year our records were :.o fully set forth in circulars and letters that I need not repeat the details, but will give the results, and those statement* have never been refuted." Vi hat does the gentleman mean? Does lit mean that the verdict of the people at the polls was a Justification or a vindication of Lis record, or of his candidacy ? Does he loivet that the justification and vindication of his record then brought with it to Mr. Jenkins naught but overwhelming driest? lias no forgotten that in the city election, a month lujser, when he nosed as a candidate lor the Common Council, he was again defiled, uud'tids lime by the voters ot his own ward? He say, speaking of my record : "As a senator in Ifctif', he was absent on the vote fur tile Australian ballot, and on that to allow veterans to vute.!' The Australian ballot law was enacted in 3h86, and went into operation in issu. and under its operation J:-;st year 1 ivas elected to the Senate. 1 always voted for the interests of the soldiers, and his statement to the contrary in reference to the veterans U utterly false, us every vt-t- McKinley Bill and Bepubllconism Scored at Milton. Milton, Nov. 1.-The fact that this is the homo of Hon. Edward L. Pierce, candidate for Congress from the third district, did not prevent a large attendance at the Democratic rally in Associates' Hall tonight. Among those present were Col. Poabody of the firm of Kidder, Peabody & Co. George R. Rivens presided, and in a brief speechintroduced as the first speaker Councillor Edward J. Flvnn. Councillor Flynn referred to tho opponents of the Democratic party, and said they claimed that there was no issue in tho beginning of this campaign, but soon found, to their bitter sorrow, that thoir idol, Tom Reed, had nevor been invested with right Divine. He branded the McKinloy bill as the most gigantic fraud ever perpetrated upon a sovereign people, begotten, as it was, of fraud and corruption, and passed only to pay political debts. He claimed that the McKinloy bill was in great contrast with ;he policy of Grover Cleveland, who said jhatnigh taxation and robbery were synonymous, and that there should only bo enough taxation to moet the expenses of tho government. Under such a policy no monopolies could survive. Councillor Flynn claimed that the Republican party, like Shylock, wants to extract theipound of flesh from the people by increasing the duties on the necessaries of life, and predicted that on next Tuesday they would meet Inglorious defeat. Ho closed by paying tribute to Congress man Andrew and implored the voters to do-feat tho Republican candidate, who had already pledged himself to the support of Speaker Reed and the monopolists, against tho traditions of the old Commonwealth. Hon. William N. Osgood, candidate for secretary of State during the years 1888 and 1880, was the next speaker, Ho was greeted with tremendous applause when he told of his visit to tho Republican mass meeting at Faneuil Hall yostorday and how the gilded oaglo in tho rear of the hall turned his head in disgust. Ho said that that worthy and profound thinker, John Fisko, did not agreo with Senator In-galls in the claim that the golden rule and decalogue had no place in politics. Hon. P. A. Collins followed with a denunciation of Candidate Pierce. "Why," said the speaker, "ho has told of the great progress made in the South, and offers that as a reason for the passago of tho force bill. He has no convictions and wants simply to bolster up the Republican majority in Congress. "He favors, too, the Blair bill, which puts the States under the power of the Foderal government and demoralizes local control and responsibility. He claimed that there were two kinds of independence-ono of strong and earnest conviction that was represented ;Jby Hon. Henry L. Pierce. "His brother," said the speoker, "represents the other kind, and throws aside all conviction for a paltry honor," Mr. Collins discussed tho tariff, which ho claimed was not settled, despite tho claims of the Republicans. He claimod that tho McICinley bill made an increase in burden of over 80 percent, on tho Mills bill, and that the Republican party had driven the Amorican flag from the seas. Ho paid his rospocts to Lodge and Reed, and, passing to State issues, denounced the Republican party for violating local self-government by foistiug upon tho city of Boston a foreign police commission. Henry W. Putnam eulogized Congressman Andrew, and Candidate Russell appeared just a few minutes past 11 o'clock. Ho was given three cheers and a tigor when he mislied his brief address, SOUTH BOSTOBT GATHERINGS. Peninsula Speakers Loudly Applauded at Two Kallies. Two rallies were held in South Boston last evening in the interests of the regular Democratic ticket, and to ratify the nomination of William S. McNary for senator and tho regular Democratic nominees for the Legislature. In Gray's Hall, ward 14, the meeting was called to order by John A. Collins, who introduced Representative John II. Mc-Donough, who contradicted articles in tho Labor leader referring to himself and Representative McNary*. Representative McNary mado an elonuent ilea in behalf of tho Democratic candidates tor the Legislature from ward 14. Mr. McNary read various letters from members of the Legislature and others, referring to Ids labor record and participation in tho passage of certain bills. Hon. F. W. Jones of Lynn, tho noxt speaker, was followed by Charles C. Lynch, who rcierred to tho senatorial vote in the district last year, and stated that if tho vote of Messrs. Moore and McNary was nearly equal next.Tuesday, th� senatorslup would go to Dr. Davison,the Republican candidate. He severely criticised the campaign of Mr. McNary's opponents, and was loudly applauded. Spehuan Hall, ward lft, was well filled when Chairman J. J. Tnevausintroduced as the first speaker Hon. F. W. Jones of Lynn, who was followed by A. A. Pillar, cx-nresi-dent of the Cigarmakers' Union, Charles C. Lynch, Edward F. Hoynes and others. LODGE HELPING PIEB.CE. Candidate Saya He Would Opposo a Bill Without Pairing. A well attended Republican rally was hold in Music. Hall, Dorchester, last evening. E. B. Callender explained tho object of the meeting and introduced Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, who dwelt at length ou the tariff.If it is a failure, he said, the party which made it should pay the penalty, out if it is successful we ought to got tlie praise, and we deservo it. 'iho speaker then went on to praise Speaker Reed for bis rulings, and explained his election bill. S.J. Elder of Winchester next spoke at length on the tariff. Hon. Edward L. Pierce followed, and among other tilings said: "Tho brains of the Democratic part}' are found in a few men coming from the South, and Knowing nothing of the Interests of the North. If the next Congress should lie Democratic aid I a member, and a measure which I hink wrong be put before the House, I hall oppose it without te;tr of constituents, without a pair. And should I be beaten, I will come homo and make my protest to you from whom I have been sent." �WARD CHABGES HIS MIND. Would  Consolidate Under Certain Conditions. Belief That a Crisis in Base Ball is Noar at Hand. Clyde Parle Eaoing-Shooting at Wellington and Walnut Hill, " New York, Nov. 1.-Some of the players' loague capitalists and players held a conferonoe today on the baso ball situation. Early in the day Messrs. J. Earlo Wagner of the Philadelphia club andF. C. Riphter of the Sporting Life proceeded to President MoAlpin's office, where thoy endeavored to find what position they hold and what their Now York and Brooklyn clubs were doing-in regard-to consolidation. Later in the day the Quaker City men had a long interview with E, B. Talcott of the New York club. They also met in consultation with John M. Ward, John Addison, president of tho Chicago club, also appeared on the scene, and in the evening a meeting was held, at which most of these gontiemon were present, Just what occurred at these conferenoos tho parties interested were loth to communicate, but tho dotailB can be given pretty accurately. The Philadelphia men came here to discover, if possible, just how far the consolidation negotiations have gone. Tho Chicago president came on to explain his recent change of base. He showed his associates tho scheme proposed by Mr. Spalding, and incidontly demonstrated that his acquisconae in the plan was both necessary and advantageous. Mr. Riohtor stated that the Philadelphia men were satisfied that the New York people were not intending to do anything unfair or-dishonorable. Ho also remarked that the players wore talking too much; that they had been treated finely; that they or stump ^n the first Mo.nl* the name, ,[e]phia pooplo would receive fair treat-address anil oor.upiUion or olaaxiflcaUnn  ment. of the person of your choice. In voting     Mr. Wagner eohoed the words of Mr. for a Fire or �W. c^�^J^,Te ^JohnM. Ward, when seeni had very little nameornumherofitanathetawnvthere to say at,out t(i0 conference, but lie was it belongs.   Unless some other name is emphatic in stating that he had been mis- wrttten in the blank space below tJie first represented when no was arrayed against a vote as tliG onost popular person among all the classes admitted to the carnival. The term person ivM, for convenience, be held to cover a fire or tihilitia company. and was now in favor o3 it, under certain conditions, and those were that the fundamental principles . of the players league should be perpetuated. By this he meant the abolition of the sales system, the profit-sharing clauses, an equal division of all receipts, to place tho weaker clubs on an equal footing with tho strong ones, and the abolition of the reserve rule. Mr. Ward insisted that the brotherhood was in no way responsible, and neither wero the players, for the breaking off of the recent offiotal peace negotiations. In spite of their assertions to the contrary, it is said that the gentlemen from the Quaker city were anything but satisfied Tim globe proposes n grand Cliristmna voting with the state of affairs, and returned home cr.uVHl.wHiohwnibettecldea oyvote just before  l^S^VI^^&t^S^Z Christmas, the day to lie named later. to hustle to esoape being left in the impend- ing deal. l. To the most POP1TX.a.r 8CHOO! TJie silence and absence of the Boston TEAOlfJEit in New England, malb ok people In andfrom these conferences caused Ti-WM-AYTn' .TKTPTn vTriEni�i!i to bo considerable remark, and their apparent hbjiale, a TKfP BOBorH, to oe gioepmess Tvhile the deals are in progress made next Bummer^ivltU the annual party which Is has oreated much surprise, so ably conducted by.Mrs. M. D. Friuer, 70 Olobe     Mr. TalcoM said,that the statement that threw Mackey, his rider, and. rolled over him, while Mr. Ponnycuick very narrowly escaped jumping on tho �unconscious lad. It was a common gallop for De Do, which outclassed his field, BKVliSin ltACE. Tolo pony hurdle race; five f iirlongs. J. C. Barnard'sU g\ Do ])c, uged, 140 lbB., Mr. Barnard.................................1 TV. P. Weld's b. g. Antclopa, 0 years, ISO lbs., Mr. I'onnyoulck.............................. 2 Clarence Donuv's eh. g, Baby McKeo, 0 years, 137 lbs., Mr. Magoun......................3 I'hldo fell; Time-1.33. BLAINE'S PET HOBSE." Reciprocity Shouldered on the Republicans. WDSTD BY THE COOK. W. P. Thompson's 'Wonderful Score at Walnut Hill. Walnut Him,, Nov. 1.-Tho regular wookly shoot of the Massachusets Associ ation was held at thoir range today, under good weather conditions, with a light 9 to 11 o'clock wind. W. P. Thompson's groat scoro of 118 at rest was what brought do�m the houso. This score has only been equalled by ono other shooter on record The next highest score made this year at Walnut Hill is 110 out of a possible 120. Next Wednesday the range will be opened at 12.80o'clock p.m., for rifle and pistol shooting. Following are the best scores made today, distance 200 yards, standard American tar get: . (R.)   Al.t-COMMtS' BEST MATCH. W. P. Thompson, 12 12 12 11 12 13 11 12 12 12-118 a. h. Ilnllard............................104 M. It. Barter..........................103 M.T. Bay...............................102 J.B.Hoblis..............................102 a. n. Mann......................,.......101 E. Lowell.......................... John French....................... F, 0. Towno....................... J. W. French....................... S. I'. Martin..............,........ L. Downes......................... 0. Moore.......................... tBKCORD OTl'-BAND MATCH. S. C. Sydney........................ H.L.Leo.. ,....................... 1C. II. Comey....................... tKBCOItD BEST MATCH. W. P. Thompson..........................108 A. IT. Bnllnrd................,..... M. It. Barter....................... OIIAMriON OFF-HAND MATCH, H.Ii.Loo.......................... 8. C. Sydney....................... 'CHAMPION BEST MATCH. A. H. Ballard............................105 M. Ii. Barter............................,103 TV. Peters...............................60 (It) ALL-COMEBS OmnAND MATCH. H. L. Lee................................ 78 S.O.Sydney............................. 70 1. B. Thomas......................i......75 M. T. Day...............................7B O. Moore..................�... A. K. Mann..................... 8.1>. Martin...................i Carnival. the New York players had not reooived their salaries was untrue. He had paid all, and some of them ho paid out of nis own pooket. He says that he has not been making presents to the players. Danny Richardson came to him and asked him where he oould buy a watch chain. Ho took Riohardson to a jeweller's where SAUESBrAJf, local or travelling, nnd tho Danny picked out a chain that suited him. most roPTJiLAit lettek OAK- ,MF; Talcpttt told the jeweller to send the ���T-..       ,    , -kt bill to him, and that was all there was to ItIE.lt anywhere in New England (able to pass  the sioty of hls maEing gifts wholesale, tho necessary medical examination) will   each building, Boston. It will bo a 70-days' tour with a 8eleot and ugreeablo party. Full particulars later. 2, 3,4, 5. The MOST P01�T)XAIt MM-CHADflO, the MOST POrDXAK rOMCEMABC, the MOST TOPtlXAK BEAUTY SAW SPOBT. receive a glOOO paid-up 120-year endowment life | Insurance policy In tho Ponn Mutual Life Insurance Company or Philadelphia, tho policies to I Country Olub Closing Day Attracts-Bos- bo issued through Messrs. Plympton & Bunting, the New England general managers, 20 Milk St., Boston, 0. To   the   MOST   roPOTAE ETltB! ton'B Bluest Blood. With seven events on tho card, a glorious autumn afternoon and tho last chanoo of the season to see the horses run, it was no COMPANY In Mow England, a splendid 8300 wonder that Boston was well represented at library of Hooks, such as the company which leads the Country Olub races at Clyde Club yes-may select; or a pool table If preferred. ri-�ay'       ii        t. ,    ��i Thoro must have been 3000 pooplo atthe 7. To the MOST POPBU.B It Alt- protty hali-milo ring when the first race was koa1v EMJPXOY3D In Now England, an open called, and during tho afternoon fully 5000 face, heavy gold casoft Id-carat railroad and sport, pooplo saw tho raoing. Boston's bluo blood lug watch costing #300. It is ono of tho latest and was well represented: the number of ladlos finest Swiss productions, and nothing equal to it was large and the contests well worth hns been produced In this country, owing to Its s0^ln�' -, x, ,,,.,,, . . T. , Two accidents slightly marred the sport, delicate machinery and numerous parts. It is ono mtboI s6rious, The latter proved that furnlslied aud warranted by George H. Blchards, hurdle racing ou a half-mile ring is rather a Jr.,  Alt COMPANY IN TDB MILITIA of any State In Now England, a war library and war pictures worth 8300, 10. To the MOST POPrriAlt NEWS-BEAILEK, sew8papek CARRIER oe NEWS bot In New England, a cash credit of 8300 In any general merchandise store in Now England whioh the successful candidate may select 11. To the MOST POPULAR waoe-EARNER, MALE OR PEMALE, not a mechanic, and not Included in any of tho above cIosbob, a oaBh credit of 83001nanystorowhichthe successful candidate may seloot. 12. JLASTJCr, AN� ABOVE All, A several others came off uninjured. The ponies wore ridden at full racing speed at the start, and it looked as if thoy would all be hurt. The traok was very heavy, especially on the stretch in front of tho grand stand. Tho turf was the best part of the field, and the pink coat steeplechase was the event of the day. Tho first event was the match raoe between Hilltop and Hamilton. Tho former fell at the brush jump, and Hamilton had practically a walkover. mtST RACE- Match at 115 pounds, over the regSar steeplechase course, about 2% mtleB. Sagamore Btables' b. g. Hamilton, Oyeors, 145 lbs.. Grlflii..................................   X G. It. Wale's b. g. HUltop, aged, 115 lbs., Coughlin. 2 Time-0.81. The open pony race resolved into a match as Fizz and Phlea were tho only starters. The latter pony was not in racing condition, and at no time made the contest at all in doubt. He was beaten by the mare in a gallop. SECOND RAOE. Open pony race of 85 each, p. p., with 860 added, of which 815 to Becond; minimum weight 140 lbs.; half-mile flat, HOUSE VAMKK AT $11500 to any per sonororganlZatlon In any of the above classes re.   "^h?;.1.'0^'? .b>. .m: f ^^^C.a.\1.B� 1 :tving the liu-gest niunber of votes on tho ballots   C. II. Thayer's' \>,' g. Phie'a, ns�i, iio lbs'., Mr. printed for that purpose on the second page dally     Time--1 02V� beneath the ballots to bo employed In voting for any Alchemist"'was thought to have a good of the 11 cIobsos first named. The house will bo thing in the lightweight handicap sweep, built, at a cost of ff3500, in any city or town in New ^^^tX^MX England which tho successful candidate may solect. ai011K up to his clip from tho fall of tho flag. If ho or she prefers a farm, one will be seloctod In Eastorbok did the most of the running, and that, section of New England whore the successful   �^�0S l�^lZ% candidate may wiBii it. sou 0f Springbok. It was a well-ridden finish, Tnino BAOE. Open handicap sweenstakes of 810 eaoli, p. p., I with 8100 added, of which 825 to second; minimum weight 137 pounds; one mile flat. J. H. Lewis, ,Tr.'s,ch. g. B1U Bond, 0 years.Bt. Mar- tin-ICln)oolt, 100 lbs., Mr. Lewis..............1 W. A. Peck's ch. g. liustcrbok, 5 years, Sprlng- bolc-Eastor rhvnet. 150 lbs., Mr. AVlUls.........2 GeorKO Loo's ch. g. Alchemist, 3 years, Itayon d' LUiy R., 185 lbs., Mr. Wright............... Pondleton, Ba-Ba and Billy Crane also ran. Time -1.66.    - The three horses camp tolhe post for the FOR. JOHN P. ANDREW. Grove Hall Debating Union Formed and Shows Colors. The Debating Union of Grove Hall was formed last evening at Dorchester. P.J. Brophy acted as temporary ohalrman and the following ofliccrs were elected: President, W. Brophy; vice-president, B. G _______ Hayes; board of directors, ,1. j.Higgins, j, Meroney, D. Tobin, M. Rogers and D. Maggen. It was voted to support .John F. Andrew for Congress and John E. Galvin and W. V. Swan for representatives from this district. Biddinc for Popular Favor. Electioneering extraordinary was witnessed in ward 13 last evening. One of the independent candidates for the Legislature, mounted on a wagon, and accompanied by trrity; secrotary.M. Colman; treasurer, j | ^^MSpI^^S winner in tho mud, and this was another easy win. He laid away to the three-quarters and then put on a rush that landed him an easy winner under a pull. rOCHTH KACE. Hulf-bred handicap sween, S10, with 8100 added; one mile Hat. Warren Baker's b. g. Tcddlo, aged, 172 lbs., Mr. Lewii'....................�..............1 Franklin's b. g. Jack, aged, 154 lbs., Mr. Hopkins.2 (i. H. Wlile's b. g. Hilltop, aged, 1*8 lbs., Mr. Pcimy-culk....................................3 E. Lowell.....................,.., J.B.Hobbs........................ L, Downes......................... (R.)'DItLITAhT MEDAL MATCH. .T.L.Fowlo.............................. U, E.L. Fltzhenry........................... 42 A. B. Fry................................. *0 M.T.Bay..,,____,...................... 38 S. 0. Sydney............................. 37 J. B. JiobbB............*............... 30 A.S. Field............................... 35 (11.)   000 SHOT OEU-HAKD MATCH. S. 0. Sydney............................. 8i ILL. Lee.....................,.......... 81 M. T.Day.................,..�,..,...,.. 78 S. D. Martin...............I............. 77 A.8.Field..........................�., 75 J. B, Holibs.............................. 70 (Ii.)   500 SHOT IIEST MATOll, M. E. Barter.............................103 A. V. Harrison...........................103 M.T. Dny...................... 98 (E.)   MILITARY PRACTICE MATCH. A. B. Fry... .....id.. A.S. Fiel (H.)   M8TOI. MATCH, CO .YARDS, Mrs. J. 1. Fowle...............,..........81 Mrs. J.L. Fowle........ ,........... 80 A. G. Stevens..........................80 A. G. Stevens............................ 70 M.T.Day............____,............,. 70 A.S. Hunt.......!...................... 70 fOnly ono entry allowed each week. 'Only one entry allowed each shoot day. (It.) Be-entrles allowed. SERC1T. RUSSELL'S QUALIFICATION SCORES FOR 1800. The shooting year of the Massachusetts State Mllltta closed on Oct. 31, and probably, the highest soores recorded wore those of Sergt. George R. Russell of the 1st Regiment, who succeeded In scoring the highest posslblo at enoh distance, as follows 200 xabdb. Sergt. ltussoll.................5 6 e00 YARDS, 000 YARDS. c c 6-35 6-25 6-26 5-25 6-25 6-25 6-25 6-25 C 6-25 WITHOT THE SHOT CHICLE. Unfortunate Clay Birds Whose Progress Was Stopped by Leaden Pellets. Wellington, Nov. 1.-The merchandise match for November was opened today at the grounds of the Wellington Olub, and the score made in this match follows: Bond, 27; Stanton, 23; Perry, 2C: Cowee, 22; Dill, 1C.      . The winners in the sevoral events follow: Six standards-Bond nnd Coweo first, Moore -second, Brown and Stanton third. Six standards-Moore first, Cowee second. Six standards-Bond first, Cowee and Stanton second, Leonard, Moore and Snow third. Six days-Cowee, Stanton and Bond first, Leonard socoud. Moore third. Three pair standards-Stanton, Bond and Pratt first, Snow second. Six standards-Bond and Pratt first, Cowee, Stan-ton and Leonard second. Swain third. Six clays-Stanton, Bond, Loonard and Curtis first, Cowee and Brown second, Pratt and Snow third. Six clays-Cnrtlss first, Moore and Leonard Becond, Cowee third. Six elayo-Mooro, Curtis and Leonard first, Cowee Becond. Nine standards-Stanton first, Bond second. Six clays-Bond first, Cowee and Brown second, Snow and Prntt third. Six standards-Stanton and Snow first, Cowee and Pratt seoond, Bond and Perry third. Five pair standards-Perry first, Bond second. Ton standards, merchandise match-Cowee, Stan-ton.und Bond first, Perry second,',Pratt and DM third. Six clays-Stanton and Perry first, Swain and Cowee Becond. Six clays-Bond and Perry first, Stanton and Snow second, Cowee third. Six clay plgeoiiB-Stanton first. S Six stanaards-Stanton, Perry and Dill first, Bond and Coweo second, Snow and Swain third. Six standards-Stanton and Bond.first, Forry second, Pratt and Swiiln third. Says Democrats Patted His Back Hoping to Split His Party. Tells How He Conquered Leaders to Get It in Tariff Bill. Philadelphia, Nov. 1.-James G. Blaine came to town today. The man o� tho Mulligan letters, the politician who has boen opposed by Matthew Stanley Quay duriner the post three years'; tho Republican whom the boss of Pennsylvania has metaphorically kicked aud buffotod, today prostrated himself on his knees to the fetish of Quay-ism. He made an address at the Academy of Music this afternoon, and in the evemnff spoke before the Union League. Pennsylvania, he said, is not only the keystone State of the Union, but even in a greater sense she is the koystono of tho oause of protection. If she falls back now, when the tariff is on its severest trial, the free traders see, or think thoy see, an easy road to the presidency in 1892. Pennsylvania, with the surrounding States, tho six States that border upon her, can settle the presidency. I have a little personal gnovanco myself, but not against Republicans. During the consideration of the tariff law, a discussion before elsewhere, for the little part I took in that, for the first four or five weeks, I was the most popular Republican with theDemo-oratlo party in this country. (Laughter.) They thought I was trying to divide the Republican party on tho doctrine of protection, and I was soon pattod on the back and encouraged by theDomocratic party. (Continued laughter.) Woll, I could stand that sort of thing while I was laboring, as others were laboring more earnestly than myself, to bring the Republican party together, and finally, as one man, we incorporated the doctrine of reciprocity in the tariff bill. Just as soon as the Domoorats found that that had been done, they did not want1 any reciprocity at all; they said in effect, "Reciprocity is an excellent measure if it will divide the protectionists in two, but if you go to incorporate it into the Republican platform and make it a part of the political system; we do not want any of it; and besides that, it is unconstitutional." (Laughter.) Did you ever stop to reflect, my friends, what this country would have been todayii we had been balked by tho cry of unconstitutionality every time that It was made by tho Demoorats? We should not have been able to defend the Union when It was assaulted, we should not have been able to issue greenbacks for its support, we should not have been able to organize a national bank, we should not have been able to improve a river that did not have salt water in it, we should not have been able to improve a harbor in the interior States, we should not have been able to give freedom to a slave, and as the next point we should not be able to secure reciprocity in our international trade. CHEERS FOB SHEB3VLo.Br HOAB. CAKE'S" A BEOOKD BREAKER. Time-2.00, The heavyweight handicap sweep had band   drove through the streets,   and MlSffiS^R^ modestly advanced Ins claim,for votes as distance was hardly long enough to suit the ndnts      Bathered at the various stopping son ofJVilful,_ ami Mr. Lewis pulled1 it off At City Point about 200 young men h�Tlc�?^ I �PT hnn 'iUul Mr. J.L. Fire in Pinkerton's Plaoe. The alarm from box SO at midnight was for a fire in a room on the second floor of 20 Court st., occupied by Pinkerton's detective agency. The fire originated in a room in J. II. Lewis, Jr's ch. m. Delaware, used, Little Jim -Aveuiore, 180 luu., Mr. Lewie..'..... 1 D. W. lllanrtmrd s u. R. Dlofc Tmpln, 5 years, Wi'l-ful-My lilrl, 15C lbs., .Mr. Wright........ ..   " Siroeco and Ills Grace also ran. Time-1.27. King was not fast enough; Gipsy fell aud Baronet could not stand training, so waB in ISouth BoBton Man Badly Cut. n0 condition to run. About 11 o'clock last evening a tohtid- ,. ,      l        ?''Yn ?,i0E' nvm riii ir,rn K.-,(i,,r, n  c J ti  d   . Pv?k c�at hunter'b handicap steeplochaae, for a manian into station 0, boutn Boston, his challenge cup presented by U.H. Warren, for qualu head covered with blood from a cut ex'end- ned hatfbrea hunters owned by member* of the ing from the temple to the lower end of the M>'�P^ Hunt Club; gp to first, entries (86) to car   He cave his u-'Tne -iB lirrViL w second; ceutleiiien riders allowed 10 lbs., ton vmm rv'ti t7 YiWi hit   .',,,.1 .??i *' SuIh; weilfut l{io lbB-i ub0,lt "� and a half miles, over jano* 14 * ing, with Kelly to jump in if necessary. "Mat" Kilroy will be engaged for another season, as Capt. Kelly thinks he will come round all right,  "Ktd" Madden will be re- taken to the City Hospital. Saeauiore stables' g. g. Silver King, aged, 100 lbs. Grm'm....................... F. granary's b. g. llaroiat. aged, 182 lbs., Wr.' Sea-bury .................................. Gipsy fell. Time-S.bV/?. .1 Sailor with a Broken Leg. Axel Olson, a sailor on board the schooner Plymouth Rock, lying  at T wharf, was brought to station S last evening, suffering with a broken leg. which he claimed was ,_____________. ....., vt, K1)c, uy the result of a light among the crow of the, the Country Club. The field smarted at the schooner. Dr. Elliott wWdhiii removal  first hurdle,at breakneck^.Sedl^d Phido which acted badly at tho start, plundered, Four ponies started in the hurdle race, and it shouldjje.thejust one over given by to the City Hospital, leased, and George Haddock, late of tho Buffalo club, will uo engaged, if his terms are reasonable. Billy Daley will be retained, as will also Ad Gurabert. It is not so certam about Charley Rad-bourn. The "old boss" did about as he pleased the past season, and received a very lurge Balary for doing only a fair share of tho work. Tom Brown, Joe Qmnn, Harry Stovoy and Billy Nash deserve a raise in salary, and will most likely get it. Arthur -Irwin has been made treasurer of the club .at agood salary, and may till in as extra man. When well and in good condition Irwin is a valuable man, but he has been rather uncertain tho last two years. This would make a team, including manager, of only 14 men, and strong in every department_ Out on the Ocean Wave. Tho City of Savannah, sailing yesterday for Savannah, carried tho following passengers : Mis Amos Sawyer -Miss SuwvtT , Mr and Mrs IIk Eaatman I Mrs.) M Uwts Miss HnvneB Mrs West Miss .Stephens iilss Anute Johnson Mrs A T SeSdera Mrs A K Omnia iistler ChiijiUi Miss Tenny Sawyer Mrs Hannah Cox Mary �. Hoey i> Oulabese -Miss Stark Paul A Peters MJ Tracer Alice SutcUSo Annie Siitc-MIe Joseph St. Peter UkU' uui ilx� Z iUsecii Congressman O'Neil Addresess the Democrats of East Cambridge. Sherman Hoar was givtm a grand reception by the Democrats of East Cambridge in Institute Hall, last evening. It has been rumored and still is that James A. Fox will seoure a largo Demooratio voto in East Cambridge, but tho reception given Sherman Hoar last evening proves beyond a doubt the fallacy of the claim. Ex-Alderman Joseph J. Kelley presided, and speeches were made by Sherman Hoar, Alderman James F. Aylward, John H. Ponce, John W. Covenoy, Congressman Joseph H. O'Neil and Senator Edward J. Donovan. Mr. Ponoe confined his remarks principally to the managers of tho Fox campaign, more particularly L. M. Hannum. When Fox was running for mayor he had no more bitter opponent than this same. Hannum, who is now around nightly soliciting votes. Mr. Ponoe then called attention to the manner in which the regular nominees of the last municipal caucus had been treated by Mr. Hannum, especially in so far as it referred to East Cambridge. Tho Library Hall party was formed through him and one or two others, and the voters of ward S know with what results. A Democrat of East Cambridgo who will voto for James A. Fox on next Tuesday, the spoaker claimed, would bo untrue to nimsolf, to his manhood and his family. John W. Covenoy spoke at some length I upon his record on Beacon Hill. In nis opening remarks, however, he called attention to the circulars that wero being scattered about the ward purely for the purpose of maligning him. Ono William Burns, he claimed, was the author, and to him and his sooond Mr. Coveney paid his respects in terms more eloquent than flattering. He also referred to Master Workman Mellon. The hero of the evening, apart from Sherman Hoar, was Congressman O'Neil. He did not arrive until after 10 o'clock, but when he did present himself upon the stage, the audience broke as with one accord into round after round of applause. Congressman O'Neil spoke principally upon the necessity of electing a Democratic representative to Washington from the fifth district. After paying Mr.  Hoar a Slowing tribute as an orator and statesman, e said: "Why even ex-Gov. Robinson had to come from the Berkshire hills to Boston is talk ot this young man whom the Democrats havt nominated in the fifth district. When thoy are pressed to talk about Mr. Hoar you may rest assured they have reasons to tear this very same young man. (Applause.) They havo good reasons to fear that the tide is coming in and that Sherman Hoar is on top of the wave. When Mr. Robinson says that Mr. Hoar doesn't know much about tariff he forgets what Candidate Fox said about hides in Arlington a few nights ago. (Laughter and applause.) Fox is a strict party man, and when Thomas Brackott Reed cracks the whip, should he bo in Washington, Candidate Fox will fall in line without a murmur." In speaking of the McKinloy bill. Congressman O Neil referred to ono occasion while in Washington that he asked for beans. The proprietor said, "Go it, Joe. while you can, for after the MolCinlev bill is passed only dudes can eat them." Fox will do just as tho Republican caucus dictates and no more. If the Democratic caucus told me or Mr. Andrew to do anything injurious or misrepresenting the people who sent us we would bolt It, and I can pledge you my word so would Sherman Hoar. (Applause.) They say he is too young. Wilhain . Pitt and Alexander Hamilton were' younger when thoy achieved fame. I wilt say this that, young as ho is, if he didn't know moro than some on tho other sido stumping the State twice his age I wouldn't be here tonight. They say that Fox cannot bo elected unless he gets Democratic votes, but no man who loves his home and firesido will vote for other than Mr. Hoar. You will voto for the latter if you are loyal to yourselves and have any regard for me and Mr. Andrew. (Prolonged applause.) Senator Edward J. Donovan'was the last speaker and during the course of his remarks paid glowing tributes to both John W. Coveney and Sherman Hoar. The meeting adjourned with cheers for Mr. Hoar. patrons of amusements. Yet, despite thesi handicaps, "Tho Soudan" had moro auditor? and brought larger reooipts than on any-preceding week since it was produced. Thij fact attests tho merited popularity of ths great play, and gives to Mr. Tompkins the gratifying assurance that Boston and New England warmly appreciate his earnest and liberal efforts to keep tho Boston the first theatroin tho land. QTJTJJTCY/ AND GABGABT. Territorial Aristocracy, Tariff and Candidates. Qvixcy, Nov. 1.-The first Democratic rally of tho campaign was held in Hancock Hall this evening. Councilman Burke presided, and introduced as the first speaker Josiah Quincy. Mr. Quincy said that ho considered tha office of representative to tho House in Massachusetts more of a burden and responsibility than a pleasure. He spoke on the desirability of a change of government, and thought tho office of governor was bocoming a cipher. The change, he considered, would not only bo a benefit to the Democratic party, but to tho people of the State in general, Thomas J. Gargan was recoivedwith prolonged applause, and quoted the following from DeTocauoville, which made a decided hit: ' 'The territorial aristocracy of former ages was cither bound by law, or thought itself bound by usage, to come to the relief of its serving men and to the succor of their distresses.' But the manufacturing aristocracy of our ago first impoverishes and debases the men who servo, and then abandons them to be supported by the �charity of tho public. Between the corporations and its servants there are frequent relations, but no reallassocio'tlon. "I am of the opinion upon the whole that tho manufacturing aristocracy whioh is growingiup under our eyes is one of tho harshest which ever existed in the world. "Tito friends of democracy should keep their eyes anxiously fixed in this direction, for if evjr a permanent inecruality of conditions an I aristocracy again penetrate into the world, it may bo predicted that this is the gateby which they will enter." Mr. Gcrgan continued at length discussing tho BtarirE question and the qualities of the differed; candidates for Congress. Frank K. Foster of Boston followed. FOX, HOA.B, GBEEWHALGE. Speakers  at  a   Republican  Rally at -1 Winter Hill. TheJRopublicans held a rally in Odd Fellows' Han, Winter Hill, last evening. There was a iapge attendance, including quite a number {of ladies. Boardman's band fur-nlshodausic. J. Frank Wellington, president oil ho Republican ward and city committee, tilled the meeting to order and introduce! Hon. Edward Glines as presiding officer. J On the platform, in addition to lie speakers, were Mayor Charles G. Pope, President Osgood of the Common CounciSFranlcHodgkins,Henry F. Woods, Joseph J. Giles, Rev. A. E. Winship, W. C. MentziS Dr. Sanford Hanscom, Newell F. CasweiJ Francis H. Raymond, Charles W. Sawyer|T. O. Hayden, Alderman Edmonds, Hon. Sit. Bowman.. Afterfoeaking in high terms of praise of Candidfte Fox, the chairman introduced the goiuoman amid applause. He spoko brienyls he had two other rallies to attend. Thret cheers wore given for Senator Georgef. Hoar of Worcester when he was introdtaed. He spoke of tho doings of tho forefathers and said that the Republican party of this year was doing some thing vSrthy?of great sons of groat fathers.' We ha* beta deolaring independence of Americm manufacturers and of American workinflneri We want to make him comfortables to lave his wife and children well clothed,! an't. to give the workingman leisure ti stnny. Congristttn Greenhalgo in his customary enefeeic manner condemned everything that ?ias Democratic and painted in vermillidujlietoric everything-the Republican party ias done or intends to do. HAD AtTDDSNOE OF'-HOTE. WorkinKreri of BrookUne Discover � Tiok of the Republicans. Tho BroKline Lower Town Hall was engaged laStovening ostensibly for the pur-, pose of jblding a workingmen's rally. It . was, bowver, a meeting under the auspices; of the Reiiblican party, although the posters and Jiadbills circulated about the town did not ^ration that fact. At 8 o'lock, when the ohairmon, Andrew Noland, ailed the meeting to order, there were ,iusl2 persons, In the hall besides the: presidih officer and the two gentlemen ''blithe platjrm who were to address the meeting, r Mr.,'Wand made a very brief address ...id inraduced P. O'Neill Larkin of Boston as he first speaker of the evening. Mr. Ljirin commenced on the tariff and finally ranched out Into a contradiction of staterriuts made by George Fred Williams and Hi'vey N. Colfison at tho Domocratio ally o'jFriday evening.-It Wothen that half of the dozen work-ingmgiipreseut discovered that they were at a iipublican rally, and as they were good?3imocrats, they aroso and left tho all.S'his left only nine men in the hall, incltidig those on tho stago. Chaws McLean was the next spoaker, but ashe audience was not very enthusi* astlo 'Is remarks wero very brief, and th� meeti? adjourned at an early hour. World of Recreation. The fall trotting meeting, which was to havo beon held at Palmer next Wednesday and Thursday, has been declared off. The meeting will be held at East Hampton. The fight between Denny Kelliher of Boston and the "Black Pearl" of Minneapolis will be held next Tuesday evening. Kelliher is the favorite in the betting. The interest in trap shooting is on the increase. Crowds attend the weekly shoot of the Wellington Gun Club, and some first-class shots are being developed. Death of Mrs. C. T. Dow. Wobukn, Nov. 1,-Mrs. Celinda Thompson Dow, widow of Stephen Dow, died at 4 o'clock this afternoon. Mrs. Dow was born in Woburn, Feb.13,3 810, and was a daughter of the lato Gen. Thompson. Her surviving children are Alfred A. and Edward A. Dow and Mrs. Ellen T. Ellis. HjBiDICS AND CARS ENOUGH. HeariB ton. Proposed Street Extension . for. Elevated. Ththearing on the petition for the extension*: Harrison av. and Hawley at. was : contiued before the street commissioners : this lorning. Eeionstrances were received from various states affected throxigh Charles E. Grinell, J. H. Benton, Jr., Nathan Matliews and others its counsel. Liub M. Chllds, representing the Old Sotit Society, presented a plan made by W. T.'iSars, architect, showing;tho proposed builings of the Old South Sooiety with from on Washington and Milk sts. and Sprig lane. _Maes Merrill was the next witness. Mr. Merill is clerk of the standing committee on te Old South Society. It has long been tlj;e>urpose of the society to put a building sudl as tho one proposed on the site of tho OldSouth property. M. Russell, counsel for the Wost End, a$t d witness if it would not bo a good reliefs crowded streets if all these people cpud be carried in the air, over the he�is of the pedestrians, to which witness repied that it might be a reliof. Ho in-sistd, however, that the herdics and horse car were enough. Jr., Childs said that he didn't oppose any oleated road, but ho did opposo having tho � strats widened and property damaged for thfbenefit of a private corporation, the city paing a large part of tho expense. IBVEY AROUSES APPLAUSE. Wiburn Demoorats DiseUBS the Present Prospects. { 'Voburn, Nov. 1.-The Democrats held thj'r last rally this evening, and Lyceum Hal. was taxed to its utmost capacity. JPiovious to the meeting there wasatorch-ijgifc parade, headed by tho National band, f tpon tho platform were a largo number of ;rominent members of the party. : liot L. Packard called tho assembly to orisr, made a brief but spirited spoech, and intoduced David F. Moreland as chairman.  He said tho Republican part)' had made prenises that the wages of laboring men wedd be protected, and hia hearersiknew Wl whether this was true or not. .'lichael J. McKttrick of Boston said the pa-: 20 years under Republican rule had n te admitted: W. O. Blaney, Ezra Forris-Joseph J. Bennett. Lewis E. Morgan, "alter Gilman Page, G. Wood Taylor. The committee for tho selection of pic-ires for the annual exhibition in oi! are as I'llows: Frank H. Tompkins, Walter L. bean. Daniel Strain, J. J. Enneking, Rich-id Wagner. Tho committee appointed for the monthly i-'.formal exhibition is composed of C. H. Turner,! J. J. Enneking and Richard Wag. _._ High Moss and Requiem. A high mass of requiem will bo celebrated '�a tho morning of All Souls' day, which i'Ocurs tomorrow, at St. Augustine's ceme-i.'ry, South Boston, for the lepo'seof the mis of tho faithful departed of the parish, i-ev. D. O'Cailashanoiruiatiiigascelebrant. Immediately after the services a meeting ii'ill be heid by those interested in the uesQzvation and goo^i order of the country. ,   

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