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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 19

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                fir, ------ THE BOSTON � SUNDAY. GLOBE- SUNDAY,' NOVEMBER  2, 1890-TWENTY-EIGHT : PAGES. 19 HOPEFUL SM Closing Hours of the )aign. Bractett Neels Fair Weather to Win. Democratic   Registration Local Politics from All Over tfis State. OMETHING is in the politioal atmosphere that favors the notion of a Domooratio victory on Tuesday. The Republican barometer is registering fearfully low and the conservative observers are admitting that Brackett's re-election is dependent upon good election day weather. The idea has been rapidly gaining ground in the last -week that the total vote of the State would'run Surprisingly high this year, until now it is generally conceded that it will take at least i35,000 votes to oarry the governorship. This estimate was ridiculed not overa week ago at the Republican State headquarters, but tho revelations of the energetic work done by tho Democrats in tho way of registration gave them a, timely pointer. Tho character of their fight upon the ptump was immediately revolutionized. Ix>dge and the other congressional candidates flew to their own districts, and Gov. Brackett, thus forsaken, realized the emergency sufficiently to come out of bis dignified retirement. Analyzing the Outlook. ' "Even with a presidential vote," declared pno of the Democratic managers yesterday, "the Republicans will not be able to hold their own with two years ago. The tariff Issue alone will out down thoir plurality to 15,000. That is a ohauge of only 7500 votes, and their lead in '88 was 80,000. But it is entirely impossible to poll a presidential vote. The Democratic vote on the other hand is easily aroused, being centred in the large oities so that it's a mere matter of registration. "On national issues alone there is no chance of tho Republicans carrying the State by over 10,000. This must of necessity be lowered by Stata complications. There is no enthusiasm personally lor Brackett this year as there was last, and the aggressive features of this campaign lia.ve been furnished by the Democrats. There are certainly 2500 men in the State who voted for Brackett last year but who will vote for Russell this, be-causo of tho Governor's attitude on the lobby question and the Mai. Gould conspiracy." An Official Estimate. Chairman Matthews of tho Domooratio executive committee said yesterday: "We shall, boyond any question, get our vote out this year. We will poll 135,000 �votes sure and probably 140,000. That number, I believe, will be sufficient to carry tho State, Of the total increased vote of 20,000, we shall got 12,000, and the Republicans 8000. We shall gain 3000 in Boston, making our vote here 80,000 in a total oi 60,000. Mr. Brackett wilL I think, run j.0,000 behind his ticket." Chairman Burdett Tollcs. Chairman J. O. Burdett of the Republican State committee was seen last evening after tho adjournment of the Norfolk Club, and, when asked for his opinion on the political outlook, said: "I have been all through tho Stato, and I can truthfully say that the Republicans are aroused over the misrepresentations of the Democrats on the tariff issue. "If they do their duty next Tuesday, Gov Brackett will be re-elected by a handsome majority, and we shall also1 send back to Congress, ll[congreiSinon." Trouble on tho Cnpo, In southeastern Massachusetts there is a general fear tha't should Brackett be re elected by a good majority ho would look for a third term next year, and while the Capo men have kept fairly quiet of late it is not to bo denied that there are hopes still treasured among them of retrieving the day they lost in 1889. Tho Governor's appointments this year havo more than dis appointed many of the oitizens in Barn-stable county. Onius in XEegistration. Tho Democratic registration in the oities has been plicnomonal. A party gain of 300 voters is reported from Lawrence, 100 at Lowell, 500 in the oities of Essex county, 100 at Lynn, BOO at Brockton, 100 at New Bedford, 500 in Fall River, and 100 in Springfield. This Bame proportion kept up throughout the State gives a most encouraging total. _. HARRIS ANSWERS ATWOOD. ou the succcBsof your procatttloijto Olla oncl. -The press is ahvnys n snfo roposltory idr political (jecrets. Your anxiety not to injurs irio aa niiMiitestod by. your liurry to got into print, la truly touching. I desire to show my appreciation of your kindness by replying In tho Bamo careful and cautious manner and through the sumo medium. You nrp also quoted ns charging tomomhers of the: bar the defeat of the Republican candidate for clerk. Lotus look backward a littlu and review matters. Tho nomination of Mr. Hatbaway. ns.,:olork':was" brought about by a certain Bcntleirianlnithiscounty, who, a few years ago having been defeated in .tho Republican county convention for tho office of register of probate, immediately sought the Democratic nomination, * and falling to got that run as an Independent candidate and � succoeded in defeating tho Republican nominee and electing the Democratic candidate. Tho gentleman who did this is nn earnest and "true P.epubUcan," whoso soul iQ deeply moved because somo Republicans voted against his candlduto for clerk. His disgust and horror at such depravity is: very moving to witness, and leads him to declare all who did this wicked act to be how Demo-'crats. Upon his basis and from his view tho Republican party must bo now in tho minority.of this county, because tho Democratic candidate for clerk was elected and i3 now performing his duties efficiently. I may say In passing that ho had provionsly boon appointed to fill the vacancy caused by tho death of Mr. Whitman, by Chlof Justice Marcus Morton, who I submit was a person very competent to pass upon the quality of his fitness. 1 did vote for him and was pleased at his election, because I considered him eminently well fitted for the place, and did not think it well to lot politics alone control my judgment in regard to filling so important a non-political office. You aro also quoted ns saying that the connty is now run by "a ring composed of lawyers and deputy sheriffs," apparently meaning to imply that I am an influential member of tho "ring." What a strange man lam for "ring master," whon I used my machine to defeat myself and ground myself into pieces. If your opinion is that my defeat was for tlie good of tho county, you should give mo credit for the purest kind of patriotism, instead of "condemning" me as a traitor. Such perfect self-sacrlilco is very rare, t suggest to you tho wisdom of revising your judgment and trying to see if you cannot find tho reason for present Republican troubles In the county, in tho action of the before-mentioned bolter, rather than In my great treason. To come to the real issue, lam not assisting Mr. Pratt or opposing' Mr. Wentworth. I know I have never shown a "sore head." While I always claimed the right to oppose any candidate whom I thought really unlit, my political oreed contains nn articlo that forbids a bolt, when it happens that I am a defeated candidate. Trusting that whenever you may wantto know my position in the future you may find it convenient to consult me, and not take the say so of persons not noW� even known to me, I will close this part of the subject by saying that notwithstanding the newspaper account, I urn informed that it was not a unanimous meeting, and that some of my Whitman friends put more faith In me than to believe so readily street rumors. You also charge "tho ring" with having run tho county In debt $80,000 for a new court house'In Brockton and apparently mean to hold, mo responsible for that. You do me too much honor. I am only partly responsible. If I am not very much mistaken Whitman de sired to have Plymouth abandoned as a ahlre .town, and to havo a now court houso, jail, registry, � sheriff's house; oto., erected at Whitman at an expense to the county of not less than gSSO.OOO, probably. I, with others, Baw a couuty war Impaneling, and deemed it wiser to provide for a new registry in Plymouth, and a new court houso at Brockton, thus providing for all the needs of the county for a generation to come, and avoiding an expenditure) muoh greater than tho ono yon find fault with. While I might liko to claim all the honor of obtaining a now courthouse I must admit that there were others interested whoso Influence was greater than mine. Hoping that my position on all the points involved in your argument Is now reasonably certain and not likely to be mistaken, 1 remain, Yours very truly, Eoiiekt 0. Haileis. THIS WEEK ONLY RICES REDUC FROM 25% to 50% LESS THAN TJKDER THE OLD TARIFF. Read Prices Advertised and Compare With Those Asked by Other Stores. Call early In the day if possible, ns In the afternoon the store will be too crowded for comfortable shopping. NO MAIL ORDERSllLLED DURING THIS SALE. Sarcastic Letter Bearing on Plymouth and Norfolk Politics.' Whitman, Mass., Nov. 1.-The corre-erontlenco be tweon the loading: Republicans of this place and Kobort O. Harris of East Bridpowater has made interesting leading for the voters in Plymouth and Norfolk counties, and anything new in regard to the district attorney contest is received with a decree of interest before which tho Statu issues fall into insignificance. .b. S. Atwood's letter to Mr. Harris was answered by that gentleman to tho satisfaction of his friends, who knew perfectly well his attitude upon the questions at issue. The matter has caused widespread attention in Plymouth and Norfolk counties, and the latest correspondence upon this important topic is very interesting: to the thousands who bolted the refuilar Republican nomination for district attorney last year. Mr. Harris' latest letter is giveu to the press as iiollows: KAST liUIIJGKWAlTll, Nov. 1, 1S00. Benjamin S. At wood, Esq.: i-tLAit Snt-In The lute edition of Tin: Boston Glouk of Oct.'JS. nppeiirert an article headed "Condemnation for Traitors." Said article purports to he it report, ot a meeting of "Whitman Uc publicum;, and contains an account ot a epeeeh or yours ticbusiuir me of uolrini; the nomination of Mr. A. II. Wentworth, my opponent in th"* county convention. Yon fire careful to disclaim responsibility for the state-ent and also to conceal the name of th*1 person in whom you have the "utmost confidence," and on whose uuthoilty you make the r.Uitimieni. You close your attack hy "hoping thai the charge Is without foundation," and movmn* that the secretary of the town committee he iiiKtruetcd to inform me oi the charge and require some reply from me thiit no injustice may he done ire. According to the report resolutions were then adoptrd. An account of the. proceedings war. then irh'i'n to the press, and in such a manner that it may appear iu the paper*: before any notice of yeur action can get to me. After the publication of the neeniiut of the pro-ccedlm;�, 1 revived a leiicr from George 1>. Soule informing me of tho vote in jvgvrd tu myst If, but continuing no mention i*t \vur re t.o hit ions or Uw-'oaiit; of the meeting, 1 Iran, that copies, of your resolution* wero vol d to be acitl iu every town, com-xniUfre in tula district. 1 uui t'blijxed lo you lor your- extreme caie. that no injustice fcb-ouUl b* a�u* infcj ai.d cojagnUulAte you TO BEOEIVE THB BETUKNS. Gnslimci'o Hats as above  . 39c. Silk Bonnets,  25o., 39o, 50o. and up Plush Bonnets, . 39oM 50o., 75o. and up Infants' anil Gitiren's Wear. Infants' Knit Bootees -  - 7c. Infants' Knit Shirts .... I9c. Infants'Knit Sacks .... 28c. Infants' Long Slips - - - - 9c. Infants! Eml). Flannel Shawls 44c. Infants' Long Cashmere Cloaks, eml). cape and skirt, silk girdle, SJ.G7 Children's Plush Coats $2.38��  Children's Elder Down Coats, $2.50 and�� Children's Cashmere Coats, SB.25 a�d �I> Children's Woollen Mittens � 7c. Infants'Worsted Mittens - - I2*c. Children's Corset Waists   - - 89c. An Importer's entire slock of Capes nt 33 B-3c. on the Dollar. Lot 1. Former price, $1.75 Lot 2. Former price, 2.50 Lot 8. Former price, ,$3.98 95c. $5.39 SI .98 All latest styles, reduced to S4.2S, c5.00, S6.95 and up. Russian Hare Muffs ....  19c. Ladies' Cardigan Jackets . . 39c. Fine Silk Scarfs, worth 87c. . 4rc. Corset Covers, reg:price 12|c. 7c. Corset Covers, reg. price 50c. 17c. Drawers, Hamburg flounce . 19c. Chemise, Lace Edge .... 85c. Night Robes, Mother Hubbard tucked yoke, reg.prlcc 63c. 39c. Children's Drawers .... 9c. Children's Skirts . . , . . 9c. Children's Night Robes . . 29c. Ladles' Knit Underskirts 49c. andnp Children's Knit Underskirts 50c. 63c. 75c. and up SPECIAL BARGAINS. Ladies'Hose 1 On Q Pair Children's Hose[ I L I "L\tx d Hill. Men's Hose .  .) Worth inc. 4 25c. a Pair. Children's Hose Supporters .) Ra Misses'nose Supporters . > �Jv� Ladies' Hose Supporters . .) a rair. (Worth 10c, Vic. and 20c.) Handkerchiefs, 1o,, 2o., 5o. and 81-3o. (Worth from 8 to 5 tlmns the prici>.) Cents' Gray Undershirts ) fig* _ Ladies' Jersey Vests . . > /HIP Children's Wool Underwear) �.tlUB (Worth doable.} Sewing Machine Oil , . . "t ft _ English Needles .... V 

00. 1 hat was tho condition of tilings, and whether Boston bought ono or 100, the price would bo tho same. Then what folly to send eight men to Now York to see a scow that the owners would have sent up here and given us a practical tost of at tho minimum sum of $15 a day. "Angels and ministers of grace defend us," cry tho reformers._ Sheeted ghosts have, left thoir pent-up prison houses at Mt. Hope and, to paraphrase a Shakespearian lino, "now gibe and gibber in the corridors at City Hall." The city of Boston that now owns Mt. Hope and tho corporation of lot owners who want to own it aro at loggerheads over tho future destiny of that silent city. Under these condition of things can we quito reconcile ourselves to tho assertion of tho poet who says: No ond cini cull tlial JllllCll hlg own Savo Unit binall plot where lio Bhail crumble.bone by bone. The city charter expressly states that no member of the city government shall vote on a matter in which ho is personally interested. This being tho fact, it will bo interesting to note how the owners who aro members of the city government will act when tho matter comes up Nov. 1-1. Since Boston becamo a city she has spent �530,000,000 for widening and relocating streets. Is not this a reason that streets in tho suburbs should bo laid out now by the city before the district is built up? Surely it is. if the events of the past in old Boston is any criterion by which to judge of tho ovtints to como in what must somo day bo tho centre of the city, viz., Koxbury aud Dorchester. _ Scene: School st. (opposite City Hall) Rural visitor (from Varuiouut)-I say, be that thar' tho gas house? Real native (with mock gravity)-Yes- for the whole city. ____ Junius. Bernhardt's Greatest Triumph. The* eccentric Bernhardt accomplished unexpected results with hor personation of the Maia of Orleans. So great is tho revival in interest concerning this half-forgotten heroine that, the minister of public instruction has published a decree to the effect that Joan of Arc. or Jeauuo D'Arc, as tho French say. is to bo celebrated iu the future, by an annual public holiday throughout the schools of France. Globe Athletic Club Anniversary. Iu celebratlou of its third anniversary tho Boston Cltibo Athletic Club will give an ou-tm-taiumflit and dance in Berkeley Hull, Odd Follows' building, Thursday evening, Nov. U. The following talent has been engaged: Peter Richardson, barytone soloist; F. Yyrnen-Walker, reader: Liiliouu Burk-bolm, banjo solyist; Luccillo Perry, reader; Le Roy, premier illusionist; tho .Bosloniau nutle quartet, consisting of George E. French, first tenor: Frank H. Clock, i-eeoud tuner: 1C IVWitt Tiuglt>y, baryioim; Frank K. Alien, bassov with Daniel Y. Cook, ac-compauist. and Nutwr'a orvhosira. At Ut* oouelusios of tho wucvteiiiauiut, which opons at 8 and closes at 10, there will be dancing until 1 o'clock. A WHITE FEATHER US' SIGHT. MoAlpin, Talcott and Day Make up a "Razzlo Dazzle" Combination. New York, Nov. 1.-We are somewhat at soa hero on the base ball situation so far as knowing exactly how things stand, but there is a well-defined suspicion aa to the state of affairs. It is generally believed that the two local clubs have been consolidated and that thero will be but one club here noxt season, no matter how the baso ball cat may jump. Positive information Is wanting, but indications aro not lacking that tho consolidation has taken place, aha that it, is a part of tlie scheme for a general amalgamation and tho formation of two leagues out of the three presont major le�guos vory much on tho lino laid out by the late conference committee. Of course this is vory distasteful to the ?entlemen who managed to cause the con-eronco to como to an end. Instead of ending negotiations by tho move, they have only mado them easier. The original committees have met as individuais, and have, so it is said, como to a dofiriite understanding as to tho outlines of the scheme, and they are now trying to perfect the details. There havo been three or four meetings of tho capitalists, and somo men who were supposod to bo actively opposed to consolidation havo been talked into line. Ono of the features of this campaign has boon tho disposition of men who are in-formod to talk to reporters when they are given absolute assurance that then- names will not bo used, and this tendency has given some reporters a chance to attribute all sorts of statements to alleged unknown "gentlemen on tho insido." Tho following statement was made to me by a gentleman who is about as near to tho Players' League people as anyone in this country, and, although I canuot give his name, I will vouch for his words. "I am disgusted with this whole thing," said ho. "The players' league had the best of tho fight and when they bought the Cincinnati club thoy wero on top by a large majority. Since then thoy have weakly let all tho advantage slip away from them, and today they stand before tho public in abad light. The indications aro that tho players' loague olubs in New York and Brooklyn mean to consolidate with the league clubs in tho same cities. Boston and Philadelphia may balk tho deal now in progress, as both would got the worst of it. I hope that tho doal can be prevented, but there must be somo lively work, and lots of it. The chances aro against success. On the whole, tho outlook is gloomy, Base Ball Notes. Sanders, the pitcher of the Philadelphia P. L. club, says he will not play ball next season. Carponters have boon at work during tho wook boarding in tho front of the grand stand down at tho Congress st. grounds. Manager McGuniuglo of the Brooklyn (N. L.) team will bo tendered a compliment-tary banquet at Hotel Bulmont, Brockton, on his return home next week. Jimmy Manning was tho leading bat,sman of the Western league this season. Pitcher John Boaly was given a great welcome this fall on his return homo to Cairo. 111. A brass band and singing society mot him at the dopot; it was a fitting climax to his trip around tho world, including Kansas City and Toledo. Pitcher Ed Smith claims that the Clove-land league club failed to settle up with him in full this fall. Tom Burns has not yet signed with Chi. cago, but; it's dollars to pennies that he will at most any salary offered him. Billy Nash will start for California to spend tho winter in a few days. . lorry Sweeney, tho old Kansas City cap-ta;n and a member of tho famous "Out-Boys" club of Boston some yoars ago, is now dying from consumption at his homo in the North End, this city. His friends are to got up a benefit for him soon. Ed Williamson is already located at the Hot Springs, and says that he will be in fine shape for good work next season. Capt. Kelly is enjoying a quiet rest down at his Hingham home, and mailing life miserable for tho chipmunks aud other game that wander around his estate. Cleveland leaguo club would like to got Billy Higgins for socoud baseman. John Doylo, Al Johnson's new catcher, is a Holyoke boy, and played with Lynn two yoars ago. i. M. YALE, America's Only Complexion Specialist, to Lecture at Tremont Temple, Monday^ Nov. 17, at 2.30 p.m. Subject: Natural Beauty; or� How to Cultivate tlie Complexion. TICKETS FREE. 31 me. M. Yalo, (.he uotod complexion spociailafi of Sew York oity und uuthoress ot thut famous book, "How to Cultivate the Complexion," will favor Bon ton ladies with ono of liv.r celuUrated lco-turea ou Monday, Nov. 17; subject, "Natural Beauty, or How to Cultivate tho Complexion." Tickets fre� can be had at Mine. Yale's otilco or Tremont Tempi** an7 tiino after Monday. Secure your seats early, as overy lady is anxious to hear America's only complexion specialist. My mission lu life, says Mme. Yale, is to imituralize that beauty in my sex that God intended they should possess. A clear, lovely skin is tiiublematio of woman's purity, und no woman can lay any claims to good looks who does not possess it. Wmii. Yale is an eloquent speaker and immediately ilnda her way iuto the hearts of her audience. Her lectures axv a lucid description of tho skin's formation, preservation �uid proper treatment. To Mme. Hale's individual work rapid strides have heen made towards cultivation, ot natural beauty, us will bo fuliy established in her lectures. Mine. M. Yale's Boston office is now permanently located ut ITS Tremont sr., mom Sit. wherw her uiar-.�ellons ExceL-dor Complexion Bleach aud other complexion remedies eim be had. Mmc. Yale wishes to inform public that 1i19 Excelsior Complexion Ukavh is dbtine: from any other sa-eaJLh>d bleach, therefore have no tears in using it, aa it clears Uiu ikhi tu every instance of freokltJ, i/Unplea, blick-heads, .molU patches, sallow�e:w, etc., leaving u10 sklu pure aud clear, the same as tins body. Jsuud for catalogue, ur call uu 178 TREfVIO^T ST., BOSTON, WiA&S,

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