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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: November 2, 1890 - Page 18

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                TED CLAY. eorge D. of Ghioopee the Star Of   the  Republican Noon Hour. to Save. lodge Improves on Fox's Foeti'y. Dingley Seeks Light from the Late Arfemus Ward. A good-sized.ludiencogathered ntFrmouil Hall yesterday noon to greotHon. George D. Robinson, Hon. John D. Lous:. Hon. Honry Cabot Lodge, Hon. Frederick W. Grecn-halge. Senator Hoar and Congressman William Cogswell, who were to address them ou the issues of the campaign. Shortly after 12 o'clock Chairman Burdett of the Republican Stato committee ascended the platform, followed by Congressman Lodge, ex-Gov. Robinson, Col. E. A. Bufflng-ton and others. Ex-G6v. Robinson was received with an ovation. He launched forth at Sherman Hoar, to the delight of the audience. His reference to the inability of the Democrats of the sixth district to get a candidate to stand who resided in their district was received with derisive laughter. 6ov. Robinson's Spoocli was replete 'with, amusing allusions and sarcasm. Henry Cabot Lodge started right out at George Fred Williams and Sherman Hoar and Hon. W. E. Russell, and was encored again and again. After charging the Democrats with being un-American, ho drifted off to his pet schemo, the force bill, and asked the people of Massachusetts to send 11 congressmen to the next ConETess, that Reed's tactics might bo perpetuated. Mr. Lodge was given three cheers at the close of his speech. Congressman Nelson Dingley was the next speaker, but he did not seem to warm up the audience. Senator Hoar, Congressman Greonhalgo and Congressman Cogswell, who were announced to speak did not materialize. At l.l C the meeting was over. Governor Robinson said: Ladies and Gentlemen, Fkibnds and Fellow Citizens-You remember Henry Cloy said he would rathei be right than to be president. I have been elected president and it seems unanimously. And now I am going to find out whether I am right or not. (Laughter.) I haven't any doubt of it myself, for I believo you and I pretty well agree, and next Tuesday we shall see that the majority of the people of Massachusetts are in accord with us, too. (Applause.) It is the privilege of the presiding officor to refrain from making a spoooh and to stand as little as possible in the front, so that those that you have come to hoar shall be hoard with as little delay as possible. (Cries. "Goon!"} Much obliged to you; I only said that for effect, that's all. (Applause.) There aro tricks in all the trades except the lawyers', and, of course, I would want to fall in with the majority. Next Tuesday, as American citizens, we propose to exercise the rights of suffrage. Now what does the American citizen want? In his vote and in his judgment he is to express something, and every man who hns that right of voting, and has the privilege of citizenship values it as his very dearest and most precious right as a citizen. What does he want with it? He wants a good government. What does the government stand for to him? . It stands on this free republic or ours to give him security for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Given those things and the- American citizen can cope with the world. His life, his liberty and the pursuit of happiness-God never gave man greater things on earth than aro embraced in those words, whether he is a white man or a black man. (Applause.) Whether he were born on our soil or has come here to America because she is the best country in the world-color or no color, birth or no birth, as American citizens he has a right to it all. (Loud applause.) If we were to consider what the inspiration is of this grand old cradle of liberty, if wo were to call back that bore the bravo boys encamped temporarily, when they were on the march to the battlefield: if we were to know what lips have uttered here in nnd for liberty and equal rights; if we como to recognize what comes flooding back to us brighter than heaven's sunlight as the outspoken utterance of FaneuilHall in favor of the entire freedom and equality of all men, black as well as white, in this country, we should come to our task like inon, and know what our right is worth. I am not to stop at this stage of the discussion to talk about little things or great things that you may criticlso as exceptions. I grant there are such m every political party. But I take the grand sweeping movement of tho Republican party for the last 30 years, and I tell you it crowns and culminates the history of this country in a way that none other has and none other promises to do. (Applause.) Life and liberty-yes, not alone in tho old Bay State, where we think they are entirely secure, but. too, in tho Southern States, where we know they are not. (Applause.) Now, I have seen a great deal in the . newspapers about the force bill and the bayonet bill, and all other descriptions given to a certain measure that is proposed in Congress-for what? Not to make the country Republican, not to keep the Democrats away from the ballot boxes, but only to have a fair result, to let the votes be put in as the voters want to put them in. and to see to it that they are counted as they put them m. Now, isn't thaf right? (Several voices, "Yes." Applause.) Now. I hope you aro Democrats, for Hike to talk to the enemy. (Laughter.) I hope there are some of you here, and don't you go out till we all get through, and you will be saturated by the time you leave here. (Laughter.) You will be glad yon came up here. Now, you Democrats want that, don't you'.' You ought to. (Laughter.) I am alraid the follows that said yes are Republicans. (Laughter.) I will give way for tho Democrats any time if they want to say yes to that. Speak our now. Well, nov,', all that that bill proposes to do, boil it right down, is not to have any force about it nor any bayonets about it. Now, I am in favor of any measure, well conceived as that was. that shall secure these results-put ting in en appointed by tho courts, careful men, who shall see that tilings are properly done and a proper registration jnatic-of that vote.Then we know that affairs are ;ust as honest in one State as in another, and we know thai what we have exercised as our right is noi neutralized by the fraud of someone else. Put it all in a nutshell, gentle-men. that is all there ip to this clamor about the force bill and the- bayonet bill. How quick Alassacliusettb would clamor, how quick she would shout from one end to the other, "come in and take care of the rights of our people," if any tuch invasion and fraud were attempted to be practiced here.   (Applause.) Now. I am in favor of protecting the man not only when ho goes to deposit hi* vote, but I aui in favor of givinpr him all needful protection in ids labor and industry. (Ap. phm.se.; It does not mailer whether he lives in Boston or Lowell or Chieopee. n.aughier.) It does aot matter whether he i- en u ft trill or is a preacher in the pulpit. We all have interests in 'ouiuiou, and no 'ias.s and no section and no occupation of our citizens can suffer less and distress that the fibers are not smtly affected by it. We Hand together, gentlemen, just as you stand here now before me. shoulder to i�h..nld'.T, stronger liecause the next man is lo.-.-; bv you, braver an'J stouter because tl.ete Is another with you. Why, ili. -soldier buv, f,j;ht better when there is u'.othei *.iic alongside than when they are alone, ik'n't'.hey,' 1 always like to go out iii tin- evening with somebody with me, and �t >:,.-i;,, a vuuMn't be a man. (Lausliter.) 3 fi-.-l neit.-r then, shoulder to shoulder. (i.T.-t  s-f.uLt-r and njipUiuiii-J   We like LJl.     -r.j �. '�'i;'-.to!!, i call upw: you j'ust Desirable articles for this season at special prices. Bone Plates, Real China, handsomely decorated. 12 i-2c. Rcgnlar price, 19c. Celery Glass 8 5c. Regular price, 25c. Vinegar Cruet,  crystal glass, en-graved and plain, S 2 i -2c. Regular price, 10c. Wine Decanter, crystal glass, elaborately engraved, 49c. Regular price, 19c. Our line oi Glassware for table and sideboard is complete, and we are offering the entire assortment at prices that defy competition. RBBBON DEPT. 1250 pieces No. 10 �It08 flllAIN, satlu etIgo: 25c. Worth 50c. MACK VELVETEENS, 37 I-2c. Per Yard. Worth fiOc. Also a complete line of BLACK and COLORED VELVETEEN, SOc. 18-Iu. I'LUSnES, all staple colors, 65c. PerYaiird. A complete line of all (bo staple shades of SILK VELVETS, including blacks, IS.In. JAVANESE SILK If ANDKEttOIIIEFS, 29c. Worth 50c. Our BENTS' CNLAPNDEBED SHIRTS at 35c. and 50c. Arc tho best bargains offored in this city. 90 to 98 TREMONT ST, jSjpeolenl Sargaixts In INFANTS' PLUSH AND SURAH CAPS, 5cc, to 90 to 98 TREMONT ST. A small lot of 20 and 28-Inch All-Sllk Umbrellas, slightly shopworn, reduced to EACH. Less than half price. Complete assortment of all the popular makes. Prices guaranteed lowest in Boston. Thomson's Glove-Fitting B. & G. Ferris Waists, P. D., I. 0., 0. P. Standard Waists, and a full line of German Wove Corsets. 90 to 98 TREMONT ST. 1 case Men's Camels' Hair Shirts and Drawers, EACH. Worth 50c. A small balance left of those Men's Genuine Scotch (Imported) All-Wool Full Regular Shirts and Drawers, EACH. Never sold less than $1.50. Ladies' Merino Tests and Pants, vests long and short sleeves, with French neck, silk trimmed pockets, pearl buttons and ribbed bottoms, pants with extra long cuff, EACH. to 98 TREMONT ST. as well-merchants of Boston, Vhatevo your employment-gentlemen who are in the law, in modicine, In divinity-I ask you if you have any different interests from the man that takes his tvork on his hands every day and toils for the pittance that his labor will bring him" I say no. Froo trade will not do for you any bettor than for him. And although you may by birth or opportunity or advan-taee have got your brain a little more cultivated so that you can go on tho platform and make subtle speeches AfHiizast tho Doctrine of I*rotection, I tell you you aro talking against the interests of the men that cannot meet you in debate but meet you in tho necessities of the situation. (Enthusiastic cheering.) Now, it is not for me at this moment to talk to you about tho details and the structure of the law that has been passed. It has taken effect now a month ago, and you know well onongh that such a law, which covers 4000 or more articles, which is so extensive and abundant that it touches every man, woman and child throughout this great country of nearly 63,000,000 millions of people-you know that such a law as that cannot be framed by anybody without regard to his party connections so that it shall he perfect. Now, let tts.be reasonable about it. You may tako a tin pail and rattle away on It for half an hour if you want to (laughter) and say that that little pail will cost a few cents more under the new law than it did under the old. Now, I dispute that for the time being, because I say that when we begin to manufacture in this country you will have tin pails so cheap that every dog will have one on his neck. (Great laughter.) Why, we started on stoel rails, if you recollect, and they cost so much that you couldn't have one in the house if you wanted one. (Laughter.) But now wo have pot them so oheap that they tire moro playthings for the childron. (Roars of laughter!) Tako tho things that you are willing to make, that thousands and millions of people are anxious to make, and all over the world they aro waiting to see if they can help us. They are coming. Just as soon as this policy is established you will seethe gates opening and more people will come with brawny hands and Btout hearts to settle Amerioa. Why? Becauso they got a living chance here, don't they" Now, gentlemen, you may talk about the various things that thev harp upon. You may get in the insido of a watch, as a certain gentloman did. (Laughter.) He got in all over. (Long applause. A voice, "Ho hasn't got out yot." Laughter.) Why, you won't see him till a woek after election. (Renewed Laughter.) Tho watch that he has got into is one that shuts up on both sides-mine only shuts up on one sido. He is right inside both cases. (Laugh-tor.) It is a hunter case, hut he will be hunting a good while before he will get out. (Tremendous laughter.) Usury Cabot. i,o.d;fe Said : Mb. President and Fellow-Citizens- The knowledge of tho wisest-man is limited. Tho information of the best-informed man has its boundaries. In a given time tho wisest-man can tell you all he knows, and the best-informed man can give you all his information on any given Bubjoct. But there are no such petty limitations about the man who is telling you what ho does not know. (Laughter.) A man who is plentifully stored with misinformation is liko tho possessor of Alladin's lamp. He has but to rub it and innumerable shapes and groatpalaces of untruth ariso at his bidding for the .benefit of those who come to listen. That thought has been suggested to me as I have observed the campaign during tho last- three weeks. The shining hand who are going to allow the Democratic party to vote for them on Tuesday (laughter) have been inculcating thoir misinformation on this Commonwealth in a way that does them credit. And the admirer of tho Polish diet in the ninth district and his leador on the tiokot have come up tho political valley of Massachusetts to feel of Gov. Brackett on the lobby. (Loud laughter.) They havo felt of him and ho feels bad, and they are retiring down the valley in pieces. (Laughter and applause.) Not dismayed in that, my Polish friend, of whom 1 wish to speak with great respoct, is now disturbod about things that roach far beyond the littlo interest we are absorbed In, He is afraid we. shall have reciprocal trade with the Argentine Republic, and if we do, we shall get into difficulties, because tho Argentine Republic is not financially sound, and he is ufrald that Austria is to make a tariff war on us. Ho is terribly alarmed about these tilings, but he is moro alarmed about tho condition of tho ninth district than anything else. (Applause) Then thcro is my very brilliant young friend over in the fifth district. He is scattering the watches of Walthaiii right and loft, and with undiminished courage is charging down on the cucumber frames of Belmont. (Laughter.) You remember in Gulliver's Travels, where he visited the island of Lil-liimt, where among the fantastic schemers gathered there he found one person engaged m the project of extracting sunbeams from cucumbers. But my friend from the fifth district is doing belter than he. He is extracting an increased duty on lumber and glass where they do not exist out of the cucumber frames. (Laughter.) And yet with all their sources of misinformation and the unlimited variety which that affords the well-intentioned persons they are not original in their methods. They have hoard that at one time in England when they were discussing the repeal of the corn laws they hud what were called object lessons and so they have been giving the people of Massachusetts object lessons. They were alraid they would net understand what a duty was when they say there is a duty on trousers. So they take a pair of trousers from a valise and show them to the voters of Massachusetts. (Great laughter.) And so they go about the State of Massachusetts with cutlery and spoons and trousers in tltcir valises, giving Object Lessons to tlie  Voterg. And th'-y have gone to work and got up a big poster which begins with tho taxes on the woikinguian's clothing, his limine! shirt, his trousers, his boots, and after following him all through the day, at the end of the day they kill him and put a duty on tho marble overt his grave. (Laughter.) Now that idea is a* trot'd one. It ib not new. It was got up 70 years ago ijy a very brilliant Englishman, Mr. Sidney Smith. He got up that idea about every body being taxed. He was aiming at the direi-t taxes, the English probate duties, ap'jtii'jraries' licenses and uli that, ana they ujoh;;1u it was an excellent tiling to reproduce here, and, a* an instance of the sources to which they go, let me remind you ol the i-b.-ay f.'oin which that little.schemo of ttizanon is borrowed, at this j>oint. It is tin    nun-}- Auicnea:    jt    is    an   hs.J produeed no g.-inn--. w>... hut! ;.�..'.'.-n IVh'aiaii, Hat,Klin to t lo- wui Id'.' A 11 V I i-at 1,;,.! sle e.i II no , lii-io-wn. a';.,..:, ha I  i,vu i-.l l.v ! V, ^ititiKt-!.     ihi. a:h }1 :tJ>     of j ivvwiutioii.    UwIaUHv    A   i-t oya.   who had shown no horoism, who within eight years of the date of that essay had brought the English flag to the decks of many American ships. (Applause.) And thoso are the sources to which these gentlemen go to get inspiration to fight a campaign in Massachusetts in 1890. (Applause.) Let them be froo traders if they will. Let them be anything they please, but let them at least bo Americans and fight their campaign on American prinoiples and in American ways. Thero is a a serious sido to all this talk they have been making, a much moro serious side than any 1 have touched on. If wo are going to have froo traders in Congress, let us at least have men thero who are not conspicuous, as these fentlemen have shown themselves to be, or their complox ignorance of the industries of Massachusetts. (Applause.) Lot us have men who, whatever their views on economic policies, at least know something of tho industries of the State which they'Want to govern. (Applause.) They say it is an educational campaign. I hope it has been to them. They need it. (Laughter.) Nelson Kinsley's Speech. Mr. Dingley said: Mr. President and Fellow-Republicans-It seems to mo that you have taken mo somewhat at a disadvantage today. I know you feel a deep interest in the Republican party in common with myself, but after all it seems to me that your patriotism today, as illustrated in calling upon me, simply passing through tho State to the city from a speaking tour in Rhode Island on my way to New Hampshire, that you have imitated Artemas Ward's patriotism. You know Artemas Ward loved Ids country so deeply that he was willing to shed every drop of blood that ran in the veins of his wife's relations. (Laughter.) Now, I think, Mr. Chairman, that Maine set an example in her elootion without bringing me to tho platform. You have kindly alluded to Maine as the daughter of Massachusetts. I feel proud of the relationship, and wo have sot an example for the mother Commonwealth that we expect her to follow next Tuesday. (Applause.) Why, my friends, I was thinking as I sat hero that it there was any placo in tho world whero a man could make a Republican speech, it ought to" bo hero iu this cradle of liberty. Last night I thought I had very favorable surroundings for making a Republican speech at Woonsocket, R, I., for I stood upon tho same platform on which Abraham Lincoln stood 30 years ago, six months before he was elected president, and proclaimed the great Republican doctrines of the equality of men beforo tho law and protection to American industries. (Applause.) And I thought to myself as tho venerable goutleman who introduced Abraham Lincoln 30 yoors before, described to nie something of the character of his spoooh that if that great man could stand hero today ho would echo baok the sentiments which have beon so well expressed by your distinguished president and your distinguished representative of Congress. (Ap-nlauso.) For in that speech in Rhode Island 30 years ago last March Abraham Lincoln said that ho stood as the defender of equality of men before tho law and protection to American industry and labor. (Applause,) Tho same principles for which tho Republican party then stood are now those which the Republican party of the nation proclaims. Now. my friends, I did not. come here today to rnake a speech. I did not expect to say a single word. I wanted to listen to others, to gather something of the inspiration of the place and the surroundings. But since I nave beon in Now Lngland during the last two weeks making some speeohes on tho tariff cmostion, I have been astonished almost at the extent of what my friend Congressman Lodge calls the misinformation of gentlemen who ore undertaking, upon the stump here as Democratic candidates, to do what thoy call enlightening the people. Enlightening the peoplo? What are the lines of the Mc-Kinley taaiff which they pretend to set forth with such abundanco of misinformation? Thero are, my frionds, two lines running through that tariff measure. First, that everything that wo cannot produce in this countiy or manufacture shall oo plaoed upon tho free list. Secondly, everything; that we oan or ought to produce or make in this country shall vary duty sufficient to compensate for the difference of cost of production in this country and abroad growing out mainly of the fact that we pay highor wages to labor in this country. (Applause.) Gentlemen tell us that a measure that is framed on such lines as those orushos the American laborer. How? Why? This whole tariff question is puroly a labor' question, nothing more, nothing less. (Applause.) If my friend, the working man of New England and of the United States, received no higher wages for a given amount of labor here than is paid in Great Britain, or iu tho countries of Europe, then wo could have a fi'6o trade or a tariff for revenue only, but so long as the working men in this country receive higher wages for a given amount of labor than do the laborers of Groat Britain and other countries-God grant that it may always bo -so long as thoso articles we. can and ought to produce here, the Republican party hold that thore should be a duty imposed upon the competing foreign product to protect our own industries and our own laborers. That is nil. (Applause.) Therefore, I say, that tho question is purely a labor question-Now, my friends, I do not propose at this time to enter upon a tariff argument. I desire simply to say to you today that I am rejoiced to be able to stand hero and to gaze upon this great throng of the Republicans of the city of Boston. (Applause.) Wlieu   ntleiucn, l.ii-tcre we give them a I eliaio'i I have a right to r.-k y.m now to | Mi-::); for its.   Give ;is youruo.-. e best cheers i lor tin- ticl'.et, national and State, and lor t tJ-'- . :.o^' Wiiiih v-e ;vj>n.-en:. '   XI.� t-Uuew v-'eiv kcartiiy aivcu. THE IYfflC ORDERS. Some Interesting Notes for Odd Fellows, Doings of Knights of Honor, Pytlrians and Red Men. Old and Hew Sooieties-Entertainments -Sentinel Echoes, The grand master, I. O. O. F., with the board of grand officers will institute East Lynn Lodge, No. 207, on Monday at 3 o'clock. The Grand Encampment of Connecticut now has 3079 members. A lodge in Philadelphia recently presented 17 of its members with veteran jewels, for continuous membership of over 2C years. The directors of the Odd Fellows' Orphan Home Association of tho jurisdiction of Illinois have located the homo at Lincoln, that State. That city gives the association 40 acres in land and 10,000 in cash. The first degree staff of Maiden Lodge, 201, has received an invitation to work the degree in tho AVinter Hill Lodge, Nov. il. Integrity Lodge of Lowell at the last mooting initiated four new members. Seven applications were received and referred to the committee. Lecturo Master,. John McPhall conferred degrees upon eight' members. Maiden Lodge has a very handsome new paraphernalia and its degree work is receiving high enoomiums from visitors. Winnisimmet Lodge, 24, Chelsea, ooln-bratodits 47th anniversary by an exemplification of the third degree, followed by a banquet on Tuesday evening, Oct. 28. During the evening remarks woro made by P. A. Guelpa, N. G.; Joel C. Bolau, D. D. G. M., and others. Tho lodge initiates on Tuesday, Nov. 4. Middlesex Lodgo, 17, will work the initiatory degree. Wednesday, Nov. 5. A mooting of Robokah degree members, who aro favorablo to the formation of a lodge, will bo held at 100 Pleasant St., Maiden, next Thursday, evening, Nov. G.atS. A lodge will be instituted at West Acton oil Monday. Putnam Lodge, 81, worked tho initiatory degree at tho last meeting. Neponoet Lodge, 84, will work the second and third degrees Monday night. On Monday evening, Oct. 27. Ancient Landmark Lodge, 32, niitiatod three new membors. Paul Rovoro encampment will work the patriarchal degree on two candinates Nov. 4. The golden rule was worked on five candidates at the last meeting, and throe propositions for membership were entertainod. R. A. as may be brought to his attention Grand Secretary Wonsel will institute a new council in New Bedford on Monday evening, and also reports two more councils well underway in other sections of the State. Knights of Pythias. Manatiqttot Lodge was instituted in Brain-tree Wednesday evening with a charter membership of 40. The first rank was worked by the grand officers, and the second and third ranks by Delphi of Weymouth. The following officers wore elected: P. C, E. W. Holbrook; 0. C, 0. D. Ball: V. C, GeorgeH.Holbrook: P., L. 0, Crocker; K. R. S., John L. Delano; M, of F., E. A, Hollis: M. of E, Dean Southworth; M. of A., F. I. Hale; T., AV. E. Morrison; I. G., W. C. Edson; 0. G., B. D. Litchfield. De Soto of Boston at its laBt meeting worked the ranks of page and esquire on one candidate. It works the rank of page Tuesday evening. Visitors were present from Rising Sun of Rochester, N. H., and Commercial of Boston. The council of administration of the Supreme Lodge, of whioh Supreme Representative AV. B. Gale is chairman, reoently held its regular quarterly meeting for the consideration of several Grand Lodge constitutions, and various other matters which were submitted by Supreme Chancellor Shaw, who is to be congratulated upon securing so able a prime minister" as Brother Gale. Lowell Lodge at its last meeting worked the rank of page, and adopted resolutions of regret for the death of P. S. 0. John Van Valkenburg, who, in 1886, while supreme chancellor of the order, visited Lowell and had a publio reception (it the rink, where he made a speech which is well remembered. Remarks were made by P. C. C. Charles Cowley, D, D 5; Oct. SO, AY yman J. Huso of Charlestown, admitted March 24, 1870. aged 32, died Oct. 17. of consumption, paid 275; James A. Charlton, reporter of Belle-vue Lotlge, Roslindale, admitted March 20, 1878, aged 30, died Oct. 0, of typhoid fever, paid 252. _ Royal Arcanum. The regular monthly meeting of the Royal Arcanum Club, which was held last AVednesday evening, proved to be the most interesting one over held. Owing to the stormy evening, only 27 of the members were present, but they were amply repaid for coining. At tho election of officers Past Grand Regent Goodwin was elected president ; L. L. Biitterficld, secretary, and W. Herbert Boynton, treasurer. Four applications for membership were presented and accepted. About one-third of the D. 1). G, Rs. have completed their first visits ol inspection to the several councils in their respective districts, and forward very satisfactory reports concerning their condition. The new constitutions, also the new investigating committee tenons,are in the hands of the grand secretary ready for distribution. All councils not. already supplied should immediately semi in th.'ir orders for the above, as it is necessary that all should be supplied at the earliest possible, moment. The ooard of grand olikvr.s will hold their regular monthly meeting early in S'oveni-her, at which time plans will he perfi-eted for a convention of councils in the vicinity of Worcester. Members of ihe o.-dcr in looking over this column and not finding any mention of or notice concernine their own council should bear in mind that the lattlt lays with the officers ot then; council who do not consider it of sufficient moiortan "e to semi in items of inteii st, ami as they do not do so let each member eot:stiiuti- hinr-eU a committee oi t�ne and forward to the j.'Taiid seei-etarv not lat.-r than I" m. on Tiu\i-.-:-U:y oi - arii v.tek such matters oi interest to memoei's of the Order of the Red Cross. A largo number of members have lately jomed us from Maine, and also from Ash-field, where a lodgo will probably be organized soon. Puritan Lodgo of Milton initiated five at its last mooting; Enterprise of Providence, four, and Morrimac of North Andover also four at its last meeting. The supremo president, Dr. A, AV, Turner, visited Mayflower of Eastondale last- Titos-clay ovening, and succeotlod in getting a number of now members. Tho sick claims paid by the order this month amount to over $000. Two claims havo been paid in Eureka of Natick, amounting to S80; two in Lawrence of Lawrence, for 880, and throe in Launcelot of Boston, tor .�120, besides a number of lesser claims in other lodgos. Since Oot. 1 tho medical examination has not beon roquircrt, but sick bonoflts are drawn just tho same. Tho initiation fee is now $c.no instead of $6.60. The second certificates aro now ready for thoso havingr been in tlie order six months, and many have taken them. Home Circle. J. Howard Payne Council celobratad its seventh anniversary with a concert, reception and banquet. Thoy have several applications on hand. AVashington Council of Union sq, Somor-ville, will hold their sewing circle in Pythian Hall, Nov. 13. Loyal Council has arranged a series of entertainments for the winter. They will have a spelling match, Nov. 0. The membership is steadily increasing. Longfellow Council initiated one candidate at the last moeting, and more are to follow. A committee of Somerville and Cambridge councils mot on tho 31st, and perfected plans for a series of union entertainments, Columbia Council will have several candidates for the last meeting in November. Advance Council is perfecting plans to largely increasing tho membership. Tho meetings are more interesting than ever, and fully attended. The grand loador has returned from his vacation in Maine, and will bo at the grand secretary's office between 3 and 4 on Tuesdays. _ American Legion of Honor. The order has met with a groat loss in the death of Companion Tisdale of Taunton, who was a charter member of this grand council, a merchant of high standing, and a valued friend by all that know him. Orient initiated four at last meeting and received four applications. Dudley added two last meeting. Deputy AVillis will visit Fairmount Council Nov. 3. Northampton is at- work in response to the grand commander's request. AVmdsor will introduce anew feature at its next meeting.  All welcome. New Bedford has fallen into line and is receiving new members each meeting, Cambridge will give a curd party Nov. 7; members and friends invited. Hoiyoke Council is sticking to its good resolutions.        _ Improved Order of Red Men. AVtibau Tribe, No. 101, was instituted in Newton on last AVednesday's sleep, by the great chiefs. AValibe. of Boston exemplified the adoption drgreo to the entire satisfaction of the 47 paleface petitioners. One of the most pleasing features of the occasion was the presentation of a beautiful tloral offering by the brothers present from No-rumbegu Tribe to the brothers of AY'aban. At the close the brothers were treated to a rich feast of corn and venison. The great-chiefs present were F. O. Downos, great prophet; J. P. Gardner, G. C. of K.; J. K. Odell, D. G. S.; G. S. Penney of Powwow and G. S. Russell of Norumbcga. Yoncuito of Boston will work tho adoption ceremony Nov. 0. Ncriskuleta of Danvers is doing degree work at every council. Great iv. ol' AV. Dobie will visit Mohawk H Heal Astracuan....,........... .$12.50 Wool Seal................$14.75 African Monkey..................$17.68 We nre offering tho most desirable styles of French Fur Felts.    , All Colors at Worth $1.8T. TRIMMED ILlMflY DEPT. (Second Floor.) We pay special attention lo all orders for Misses' Trimmed Hats, and always have a line stock to select from. During the week wc will show sovornl new designs in Hats and Ilonnets for Isnlles and Misses. � 50 gross BLACK WINGS, 7c.*eaeh. Worth 12o. 25 gross BLACK WINGS, [Jc. each. Worth 25c. 200 doz. Colored Natural Birds, 44c. Each.-Former price 75c. 15 doz. Bliick Birds, 25c. Each. Worth 50c. 100 doz. Black Tips, 25c. Bunch. Worth 50ci 00 doz. Long Black Flumes, $8.25 Each. Worth $2.00. 90 to-98 TREMONT ST. This week we shall sell our In 3 Colors, and the Finest Line of That ever was shown at A&E ALL CHENILLE. Furniture upholstered and repaired. Pillows made over. Estimates f urnislied free. of Haverhill, Nov. 6, and Agawam of Tan-leyvllle, Nov. 13. AV. T. Litchman.greatrepresentative, will visit Attitasli Of Amesbury, Nov. 3. -, , J. P, Gardner, G. C. of R., visited Mo-donkawando of Brookline, Friday evening:. Massachusetts of Cambridgeport at its last council fire advanced seven brothors to the hunter's dearee and raised eight to the warrior's. Special Deputy G. S. James K. Odell was present. The adoption degree will be worked on several palefaces at its next council fire, , Nahaton of Norwood worked the adoption degree forMadoekawando of Brooklme on last Friday's sleep. Ancient Order of United Workimen. Guns were fired in Boston on Monday, Oct. 27, the 22(1 anniversary of the order. Sixty-six applications were reoeived at the Grand Lodge office during the past week. Sixty-six lodges reported the reception at the second meeting niRht in October of 214 applications. Four more lodges have sent in their pledges, amounting to 27 members. > Monday evening the wand master visited Inman of Cambridgeport with other Grand Lodge officers and there had the pleasure ot listening to the reading of 16 applications. AVinsted recognized the 22d anniversary of the order by inviting in its friends ana neighbors after tho close of the regular meeting. Grand Overseer Farron and P. G. M. AV. Landers were present. They had 11 applications that night. On Tuesday night thore was a convocation of the neighboring; lodges' at the hall of Garfield Lodge in Melrose. Two candidates were initiated, one of whom was .the Hon. William E. Barrett, speaker of the House of Representatives, and editor of the Evening Record. Arrangements for the grand master workman's trip into' Maino are now about com- Slated. He will leave Boston on Monday, qv. 10, accompanied by P G. M. AV. liigalls and the grand recorder, and will attend a public meeting at AVoodfords, near Portland, under the auspices of Deering Lodge. On Tuesday evening he will be with. Highland Lodge at Augusta; on AVednesday, joinod by Judge Andrews, supervisor of. Maine, ho will cross over the country to Roadfield, where a now hall will be dedicated on that evening; nnd on Thursday lie will attend a public mooting at Bangor, whore the City Hall has been engaged. Metropolitan of Boston will give a musical and literary entertainment to its membors and friends Tuesday evening in Union Hall, 18 Boylston St., at 8 o'clock. The following talent has been secured: Commonwealth glee club; Prof. Fryo, humorist; Hill-man Lenfest concert company and Mrs, Ella F. Davis, reader. Boston Lodge Kivos an entertainment to its members on the first meeting night in this month. A collation will be served. New England Order of Protection. The grand officers make the following official visitations this week: Tomorrow evening to Riverdalo of Auburn dale; AA'ed-nesday evening to Columbia of Dorchester; Thursday evening to Hercules of Boston and Friday evoning to AVatatio of Fitcli- ^wi'nthrop of East Boston received a visit from the grand warden and suite and D. D. G. AV. Sarah A. Mitchell Monday evening. Two candidates were initiated and one application was received,.after which a collation was served and remarks made by visiting members. Visitors were present from Ocean of Beachmont, America of Charles-town, Alpha of Chelsea and Good AVill of Everett. Granite of Goffstown, N. H,, will hold a public meetingon the 14th. The supremo warden and supreme secretary will bo present and deliver addressess.       " Deputy Joy visited Webster of Rockland, Tuesday evening. Grand Warden Peck of Connecticut paid an official visit to Elm Tre-o of Now Haven, at its last meeting. Twolvo applications were received. Tho first grand social of Warren Lodge of Somerville, whioh was held Thursday evening, was a grand success financially as well as socially. There wore over 200 oople prosent, including Grand Vioe-"arden  George E. Lovett, D. D. G; W Mrs. Velzora Marsh, Grand Secretary Eben S. Hinckley and a largo delegation of mombers of Ciunbridge Lodgo. Sobago Lako Lodge initiated 10 candidates Monday evening, and will hold its next meeting Nov. 10. Mountain View of Hiram has amunber of candidates to initiato Thursday nifilit. The organist of the lodge is organizing; a double quartet choir, which will mchulo one of the best sopranos in tho Stato of Maine. Treasurer Bryant and Secretary Gilbort of Presumpscot visited Riverdalo on the 20th and a special exemplification was given for thoir benefit. They were much gratified with tho work as well as their cordial reception and are desirous to have tho Suprome Lodge sond the staff down to Saccarappa and exoinplify for tho benefit of all the neighboring lodges. United Friends. Revere of Somerville is contemplating consolidation with Bunker Hill Council. Harmony of AVoroester is active this fall and is making new members at nearly every meeting. Tho council has ordered a new set of emblems. After Dec, 1 next the grand executive committee of Massachusetts will bo composed of the grand councillor, grand vice-councillor, grand recorder, grand Measurer, chairman of board of trustees and two junior past grand councillors. The per capita tax has been replaced at SI iu all jurisdictions, and it is nov,' a constitutional requireiuont that the per capita tax shall be fixed at a sum "not loss than 81." Athenian of Boston has soveral candidates to initiate Tuesday evening. Grand Recorder Johnson has returned home after attending the session of the Imperial Council at Buffalo, and reports many changes in the laws which will be of decided advantage to the order. Among others ho regards the extension of tho jurisdiction into some of the Northwestern States as of great importance. A fund will immediately bo created to be used exclusively in the newly aquired territory. Fraternal Circle. Over S30.000 has been paid in sick benefits up to date. The month of October will show an increase of nearly 1000 new members. A new lodge will oe instituted at Canton next Wednesday evening. Amesbury Lodge will have tt public meeting next A\ ednesday evening. Bcnelit. of Stoughton anticipates initiating if, candidates at its next meeting. Hull of Boston will electa new president at its next meeting. Industrial Benefit Order. Charles River Lodge was instituted ar AA'atortown, Oct. 28, by .Supreme President Dr. Home and the following officer.-', were elected: AVorthy president, AVilliam New-comb; vice-president, George F. Faxon; secretary, James R. Harrison; treasurer, J. R. Harrison: marshal, Henry AV. Howard; sentinel, Fred Baron; medical examiners, Drs. E. True Aldiich and M. J. Kelly. This lodge starts with 90 charter members. Powderhorn of Chelsea will hold next regular meeting on AVednesday, Nov. C. It added 13 new members since Oct. .1, and several will bo added at the next meeting. Fanettil of Brighton added 20 in October. Massachusetts of Boston added 101 during the month. Over 400 was paid for sickness and accidents in October. Assessment No.-9 to the relief fund will be called Nov. 1, payable on or before Deo. 1. A. O. F. of A. The next meeting of Court \Tolunteer of the Hub will take place Nov. 4 at Alpha Hall, 18 Essex st. Tho meeting will bo called at G.80 p. m. and close at 7.30 p. m., to enable the members to attend the ball of conclave 8, K. S. F. Conclave 8, K. S. F., will hold its 12th annual, ball at Turn Hall, Tuesday, Nov. 4 over 400 tickets having ..been disposed of. Among the invited guests are members of conclaves fifi aad 77, who will attend in a body, as well as the chief officers of the various courtsinBoston and the delegates to the Foresters' Association. The Foresters' Association lias voted to hold its meetingS'On the first Saturday of every month. Prizes for the sports at the picnic were awarded and a committee appointed to arrange for a ball. At the last regular moeting of Court Evening Star there woro three members initiated and throe propositions. A circle of "Companions of the Forest" is to be instituted at tin early day. The 7th annual ball will be held in Monument Hall, Friday, Dec. 19. Order of Scottish. Clans. . Royal Secretary Kerr has reoently issued his report for the quarter ending Sept. 80, which shows that the order has a membership of almost 3000, with 72 clans in aotive operation. The order has paid $11,655.39 in beg,ueath-ment claims during the quarter. Clan Matheson, 73, was instituted at West Duluth, Minn,, Oct. 8. Clan Cameron, 74, was instituted by Royal Deputy T. G. Fleming at Rockvllle, Conn., Oct, 10. Clan Macdonald, 75, was instituted by Grand Chief Allen and staff at Brockton Oct. 16. The committee who had charge of the clan pianic on Labor day have just presented their report, showing that the sum of S5G0 had been realized, clear of, expenses. This nets tho treasury of tho eight olans who participated the sum of $70. Order of the Helping Hand. Progressive initiated seven at the last meeting.   . Clayton initiated five at the last meeting, and is now tho largest tent west of the Mississippi river. Deputy Starbird is on a trip through the Western States. Deputy AVebber instituted Montcalm at Great Falls, N. H., Friday evening. Dr. De Langle instituted a tent at Hartford, Conn., Wednesday evening, with a very largo charter list. There were four priests who joinod. Honesty, at Fitchburg, held a public meeting and entertainment Thursday evening. G. C. Ii. Robinson and E, S. Blaine were present and addressed the meeting. Pontucket of Haverhill will hold an entertainment and public meeting AVednesday ovening. The full board of grand central officers will be present. Knights and Ladies of Honor. The August revised statement gives the number of initiations 1055, suspensions and deaths 502, net increase 4S5, new certificates C20, new lodgos S, membership Sept. 1, 65,8-18; insurance written .'8757,600. Grand Seoretary Hathaway visited a neighboring town on tho 31st, and oxplainod the merits of tho ordor. As a result' a new lodge will-be instituted oarly in December. At the memorial service to Past Supreme Protector Gage, held on the 20th, addresses were made by � P. G. P. Mrs. A. M. Allen, Supreme Guido S. B. Brood, Grand Protector J. A. Williams, Supreme Representative C. A. Foster and others. Tho Temple quartet rendored sovoral selections during tho exercises, and an original poem written by J. II. Crnff was read. The committee on special dispensations will meet with Linden Lodgo Nov. 1'.). International Fraternal Alliauae. Norfolk of Cambridge hold a well attended mooting in St. Paul's Lyceum Hall, last Friday night, and initiated five candidates, Highland of Eoxbury held an enthusiastic mooting on Monday night and initiated three members. J. P. Brawley was elected delegate to tho State convention and P. H. Costcllowas elected aitermito. Harvard of Cnmbridgoport held a large and enthusiastic meeting m Raymond Hall, Tuesday night, and initiated three candidates and received several applications. The committee on entertnininont and dance, to be held in Odd Follows' Hall, Nov. C, disposed of nearly 400 tickets. Tho cabinet secretary and Brothers Butler of Highland of Roxbury and Osterland of Norfolk made remarks. Attorney-Gen. Houghtaling is organizing an assembly in Northampton. Industrial Order of America. Supremo Organizer Sterry and Deputy Cole instituted Douglass Council in Commercial Hall, 604 AVashington st., AVednesday night, with a large charter list. Progress held an entertainment and dance in Commercial Hall Thursday night, which was a grand success. The general consul, general secretary ami general medical examiner were present, and delivered short addresses. Alter the entertainment dancing' was in order. The Order of the World. Fifteen joined Boston lodge last week. Charlestown sends in three applications. Tho new lodge in Roxbury will be instituted iu November. Dr. Fred AV. 1 Uigalls of Kingston is among the new appointments for medical examiners. Foster Lodge, of Nashua, N. H., is making arrangements for a public entertainment, to be held at an early date. P. F. Y. B. O. Turners Falls Commander}' will observe its anniversary Dec. 5. Grand Union of Boston will hold a series of entertainments on the third Monday of each month during the winter. Plans have been made for two dances, one banquet and three musical and literary entertainments. The Benevolent Union. Riverside Lodge of Cambridge gave a public entertainment on the evening of Thursday, the L'ltd. The programme was of varied excellence, making altogether the most interesting occasion in the history of the lotlge. Arrangements were made for another entertainment, to take place Nov. lit, at which time the exercises will be peculiarly attractive. Bristol Lodge of Now Bedford is growing Kttttdily. At the last meeting, Oct. 1G, Brother Nelson G. Pollock was elected president, vice Brother Henry Todd resigned. The supreme secretary was present, and gave the members much valuable informa. tion and advice. The next meeting of Franklin Lodge, Somerville, will be held, Nov. 15, in the now G. A. R. Hall, corner of Bedford and Pearl sts. All members are specially invited to be present, as business of importance is to be transacted. Eight new applicants for membership are on the roll in Lynn, and in a short time a lodge will be instituted. A new lodge is being formod in Dorohes. ter. Dr. A. W. Blair on Norfolk st. is the) medical examiner. Pilgrim Fathers. Austerefield Colony, No, 183, Campello| was instituted Friday evening, Oct. 23, This colony starts with 35 charter member^ and 40 applications. The officers are: Ex� governor, Asa AVhitnian; governor* Ira A, each; lieutenant-governor, N. C. Clayton I secretary, R. H. Gilbert; collector, E. J, Dunbar; treasurer, Edward Baker; chap* laint N. J. Cox; sergeant-at-arms, C. A. Ed� wards; deputy sergeant-at-arms, J. R, O'Brien; S. I. G, Henry M. Bates; S, O. G-T.J. Alden, Jr. ^      " Anriawam Colony of Attleboro had oveu 100 Pilgrims at their meeting Monday evening, Oot, 20. One candidate was initiated by thoir degree staff. The work was dona in an excollont manner. Supreme Gov, Brown made some remarks, after which a husking party and several very interesting games were played. Supreme Gov. Brown officially visited. John Endicott Colony Tuesday evening, Oct. 21. At their next meeting there will be a musical entertainment. John Aldon Colony of East Boston will have a social entertainment and dance afl G. A. R. Hall Monday evening, Nov. 3. United Endowment Iioaene. Perseverance of Eucoter added five at Its) last meeting and voted to ask fora dispensa* tion to extend its charter 30 days. Whaling City of Now Bedford met laslj week and good results will surely follow* The officers of this lodge have been judiciously solected.and no other lodgo conboasd of having more competent or enthusiastic officers. Dorchester Lodge of Dorohester Is keep, ing along, adding .a member occasionally, and the .members are much interested. A mook trial and the initiation of one gandi, date made tho meeting a very profitable one. Rialto of Fitchburg has voted to hold its, meetings on tho first and third Monday evenings of eacli month. At its next meet" Ing tt numbor will be initiated. On account of tho lateness of tlieAlmu ham Lincoln entortainmont no notice will be given of it till Monday. Iron Hall. At the meeting of Branch 34, Cambridge, port, last week, two candidates wore initi< ated and five applications roceived. Claims: to tho amount of 8575 were approved. Re, marks under tho good of the order by soveral of tho members made tho meeting very interesting. A few days ago the supremo justice left $21,000 ot tho Iron Hall paper with tlia Manchester members. During the month of September the ordeir made creditable strides. Eenewed interest in tho order' has been aroused in different � parts of the country, and there bids fair to be a large addition to the ranks in the neat future. �_ United Fellowahip. Past Directors E. 0. Jameson of Ivy Coun. oil, 1, and O. E. Cousins of Eagle, 3, head the petition for the grand council of Massachusetts. The law requires the signatures of 10 past directors. The grand council of Massachusetts will bo instituted Jan. 15 in United. Fellowship Hall. Reliance of West Somerville will give a pound party in Studio building, Nov. 3j^nd Eagle of Boston will givo one, Noy, Ksi m Unitod Fellowship Hall. United American Mechanics. "Tho American Mechanics March," a new march adapted to council work, has just been published by tho Oliver Ditson Company. It was writton and dedicated to the O. U. A. M. by Brother Manning of Sandy Bay Council, Rockport. A meeting for permanent organization of the deputy State councillors' olub will bo held -Nov. 17. ' Sentinel Echoes. Tito regular monthly conclave ot Hugh . do PayeiiB Commantlery, Knigbjto Templars, of Melrose,will take place on Wednesday evening, Nov. 12, and a special meeting will bo hold on.Thursday ovening, Nov. 20. Afsiting fritters from the different coni-luanderies of this jurisdiction will be present with officers of the Grand Commandery, and the work on these evenings will be especially interesting. Unity Lodge of Odd Ladios will hold a sociable, AVednesday, Nov. 12, in Ebevle Hall. Gondii's orchestra will furnish the music. Acadia Commandery, United Ordei Goldon Cross, will givo a musical entertainment, Nov. 10, Among tho artists who hav  tho great rush to see this wonderful Doctor iu October over Three Hundred Patients were turned away, and, by their earnest solieit:tU�
                            

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