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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, November 2, 1890 - Page 17

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - November 2, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                1 THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER FROM STAGE TO CASTLE. Duchess of Derby Was Waif and Actress. ft�Y FIRST P.REWJIUWI' IS A QUEEN OF WASHING POWDERS. 17iave used SATMNA for some time, ami consider it the "Queen of Washing Powders." It not only rend rstlie  c..sli. .Send b, reL'Wered Jelter. or e.\:;reM. to -- --   '   -'- yiivihc, I-hl., , Jackiu Ml orders iiiuBl i1. o. monev order 1.1V. ELLlS, 103l:uut Bay St. 1 n! b'.^(foi-'resr.oiiuence EOllcltedJYom all_ wishing o or more bones. '� TThi iilSl* VltaE Exhaustion I Sexual Disability! Cured Ity Katlouul SSf:Lits. Av�'M <)n�ck 0K"� Mt'tlU'iiieif. Jl." Hh and ilnidiiKulfnilv restored. Valn:ibl..-l�.(,lt pie,HE llistruetlous and perwn.il �!�-I'leuint'iu t'rte, serureiv K-.-aleil. on ive-rii o: iK.&iu^e umee S lllie.  Aiik lur Ihein. .>:. Y.,>lTts. iSuiy t�U vaughan, who introduced SKIKT hawing. "as amu.ront that -she was deeply moved, fin- vVrv l.isr words that Ludv leiule inters hi.].i"-n io in- re'tutrkiilily auuheable, viz.: ! ..-t iiSw mutest. Lady hneerwell, th-it-Von will make my respects to the sean-.lalou.-i college of which yon are a niciiiber, ami ii.K.rm them that Lady lea/ie, licen-tiu�� beas Irtive to return the diploma they u-r.-mted her, as she leaves off practice, and kills rhi.rai'lvr.'i no hnis'.'r.' Hardly wit-- the words out of her mouth How Ho Looks, His Peculiar Voice and His Inquisitive Conversation. Take a man the size and build of Adjt.-Geu. Daltou, give him curlv. n,ut-brown hair, a short, thick, grayish mustache witli a long pray Napoleon III. "imperial" hanrr-ing under it, dress him in a big, flat-topped brown bat of English make, a No. 18 turndown collar with dark tie;put on a black diagonal, three-button cutaway coat, a blue and white spotted "white vost," a pair of dark heliotrope trousers with wide skirts1 to them, and a fine pair of broad-toed, neatly polished button boots and that man is I Ward McAllister, us ho niig'ht be seen any fair day in Newport last season. Thero is nothing of tho "show-off" or the swell about him. Ho is, perhaps, 00 years old-perhaps more-but it so, well preserved. A drop-a-nickel-in-thc-slot weiprhinfr m:t-ohine will place the finger up to 1h0 pounds when he gets on; still ho is rather short anil not at all "pussy," but very wide and square'and solid. In looks he is a cosmopolitan. That large neck and head say he is Irish; his short lens toll of old kuickerbocker Dutch descent, and his bio; hairy hands and wide, duek-like feet mako lain out to bo either Yankee or Scotch. No one would look at him twico in a crowd. But listen to that voice of his; Boston sports ko wild over the tones of "Calliope" Miller, tho sweet-noted base ball captain. Hut McAllister's out-calliopes "Calliope." It. can coo like a dove and roar like a lion, and is musical at both. In youth lie was called a trood singer and had many tempting oilers, but he preferred to lead tho 400 to being soloist in a church choir. So society lias won what the church was sad to lose. Every morning about 10 o'clock, when Mr. McAllister is in Newport, n low open one-horse phaeton, drawn by a"pluggish" looking nag, rolls out from his place on Bellevuo av., and takes the Ocean drive at market-wagon gait. McAllister, with rubber-rimmed "nose pineher" glasses, fills three-fourths of tho seat. The rest of the cushion is occupied by a little weazened, shrivelled .Scotchman, who looks as if he could transform himself into a ghost without changing his clothes. They ride along together, chatting like brothers, and looking at the sky. the sea, and the green fields as if they enjoyed life. On gala days, like big yacht races and visits of squadrons, Mr, McAllister goes clear down on the point in front of Mr. Davis' cottage, and there he keeps up a fiow of melody, like a big church organ. This is a fad of his,, never to know anything. All lie does is simply to ask questions, and if Queen Victoria, were present and wanted information ui him he would be likely to turn to the nearest bvstander and repeat her uuestiun. This is not,done because ho does not know; he simply wants to show his cautious way of getting at the "lower ten"-and to display that wonderful voice. The man or woman who can keep him on the witness stand for two minutes in succession may be considered to have wen a great triumph. LudyPatiiicefote, the accomplished Mile of tin- liriiisli minister, tried it a score o� times one afternoon, and after asking 'mo or two questions yielded to his sway j nd devoted the rest nf her time to making i ej>iies. It is believed by the best ol" New Yuri; society that the cross-examining angel will have trouble with McAllister when he reaches the lH-n-uttrr. As his talk is largely in the form of a catechism, there is little chamo for humor or nathos. ll is doubtful if he has much of either. Sympathy and a desire to becuuiu a member of one's own family, as it were, are the ruling trails of his mind. Of brief, not ovor-nointed anecdoleM he is full. "s the man who dnps in for an after- bridge rivals, and" the way in which Harvard lias run up tho figures against the smaller teams has made more men than Rhodes very thoughtful whon tho Springfield game is mentioned. The Yale team has been unable to match the Harvard figures in contests with tho same toams, ana while this is by no moans a roliablo criterion of tho relativo strength of the two teams, thore is still too great a discrepancy to allow much buoyancy among the Yale sympathizers. The Amherst games With Harvard and with Yalo shed the bluest light upon the Yalo view of tho situation, for Harvard bettered Yulo's score by about 00 points. Unquestionably Amherst playod a better giuno iigainst Yalo, but how much better no ono can measure Yalo played but 15 minutes of the second half in that game also. Tho Wosleyan game was also considered more or less of a test, and Harvard again had the best of tho comparison. Yale men are looking for the Orange Athletic Club match, on Tuesday for still further comparison, but tho chances are that it will only servo' to emphasizo these others. The Yalo team may bo individually described at tho point they have now reached, but there will bo much patching up of woak points, and smoothing out of style beforo tho 2Sid. Before Capt. El lodes took a sprain in his knee, he was playing a far better game than that of last season, Helms always been a thoroughly reliable tackle, seldom missing his man and prompt of thought and action in emergencies, but this yoar, In tho early, days of practice, he addod to those points a self-restraint and steadiness which mado his game even more effective. Now, however, just as tho friends of Yalo were congratulating themsolvos upon the fact that Itliodes Was llettov Tluin I^ast Year, ho goes lame, and, worso than that, the lamonoss that promised to be so slight sticks to him so tenaciously as to have kept him off the field already two weeks. | Mills has moantimo been playing right tackle with more or less varying success. At times ho is strong and brilliant, but quito likely to lapse into weakness most unexpectedly. Hois moderately fast, a trilling tender in tackling, very willing and apt to bo too anxious. Adams can also play this position, although ho has boon filling Hof-1'elfinger's place at guard more frequently. He is a little heavior than Mills and more aggressive. Ho has only been on a short time, as he was laid up with a serious cold upon his return to college this fall, and is only now recovering from it. His tackling, which was anything but strong last year, lias markedly improved, and if his health admits ho should train into very good form in three weeks, so that ho could well fill the place of either guard or taeklo upon occasion arising. Holcomb, tbo present centre, is a product of unwearying persevorancc. For two years ho has been tho snap-back for the scrub sido, and it goes without saying, that his lot has been an unenviable one. But bo has kept doggedly at it uutil ho is today unquestionably the best centre rush in the university. In the first game of tho season ho mado a poor showing, but followed it by putting up against tho Crescents an exceptionally strong gamo, so much so that tho old Yalo mon on tho Brooklyn team unhesitatingly pronounced him tho host oen tre sinco Corbiii. Holcomb is rather deceptive in appearance, us he looks heavy in tho body and rather light in tho legs. In'spite of this appearance ho Seems to keep up to good uniform work throughout tho gamo. His improvement has, howevor,como to a halt, and whether ho has reached his limit is an interesting question for Capt. Rhodes to solve, for Holcomb might have been a most promising man in October and still not up to par in November if ho morely holds his own. His blocking is only fair, but ho gets the ball back well. His tackling is not as good as the average of the lino, although when both Morison and Heffelfinger aro at work one does not notice this defect very much. Heffelfinger, like Rhodes, Is still on tho shelf. His injury, which just missed being a dislocated shoulder, would probably have been fully well by this time had he been kept off the field, but he tried to play In the Orange gamo, and when he did quit it was with a very bad shoulder, which has refused to como into shape. Before ho was hurt ho was certainly an ideal guard. Thoroughly experienced in his position, never having playod out of it, and with a physique that any one might envy him, itis no great wonder that Yule Men Were Uatisllert wltli Him. Weighing over 190 pounds, ho is nevertheless very fast, running in races down tho first three or fotir of tho toani. How serious this shoulder trouble really is, is a puzzle. The mon is one to whom enforced "loafing" is extremely irksome, and he is not the least bit of a baby about pain, so that every day adds more and more to tho anxiety of those who know him. Should ho fail to start in next week, Rhodes might well feel nervous about him. His play of last year is fairly well known, but in tho early days of this season ho exhibited an added dash and determination, which made Yale men count largely upon him. Ho gets through a line sharply and has plenty of bottom. S. Morrison, who plays left guard, is not unlike Hell'elfingor in build, but lie has neither the experience nor the concentration of his comrade guard. His blocking is not secure, and his breaking through apt to be sporadic rather than continuous. He also lias "off days" when his play is decidedly inferior, and no amount of coaching can then bring him up to tho scratch. Ho is a1 powerful lino breaker when called upon, and with his speed on and arm out is a difficult customer to handle. It was this quality, combined with an ability to hunt, that kept him in tho half-back crowd last year. Wallace, at left tackle, is a powerful chap, but green at the gume, and lienco not able to make the most of his strength. He is thickest and heavy in tho legs, though fairly fast for all that. In some of the smaller matches he has appeared to great advantage, and he is sure to make a first-class player before ho graduates. At present his judgment is often at fault, and for that reason he is obliged to work harder than he would if he had a bit more of that intuition regarding the probable destination of the ball, which is so valuable to a man in the tackle's position. His running is strong, but his blocking weak and sometimes almost careless. Hartwell has been brought over to the left, and to give more experience to that end of the line. He, too, has been laid ell' with a slight lameness, and is thereby missing practice. The game ho is putting up is one of promise, because lie HJaidersitalulii Wllat is Wanted rather than because his execution is as yet good. Except in a game his tackling is not us clean as the position requires, but in the games he seems to bring himself up to the proper pitch. He is strong, although he looks slight, and one is always surprised at the way he tips the scales. Ho still shows want ui practice, both in interference and in handling interference. The candidates for tbo position of right end seem to be legion. Crosby, Ridgway, IJolk, Preston and .lames have all had a try lit it, and although the two at the head of this list have done the most work there, they neither of them show any rapid improvement, Kidgway occasionally does some good tackling, but Crosby has had more experience, i'olk and 1'reston have both been laid off by slight injuries, so that it is impossible to pass much of a judgment upon tlii'iii. .lames plays a very clevergame for the fivshman team, but has had no chance as yet to try  . In oonneotion with thin sale WE GTJAEAN-TEJ3 to givo tho GBEATEST BAEGAESTS Hf GLOVES evor offorod in this oity. A regnlar 7Bo, Kid Glove, all shadosi 59c. por pair, A regular $1,00 Biarritz Glove, 78c. por pair. A regular $1.00 7-Hook Poster Laoe Glove, 79c. por pair, A regular $1,00 8-Button Longth Monaquetaire Suede Glove, 79c. per pair, A regnlar 38o. Cashmere Glove, 8-httfcton length, 25c. por pair, A regnlar 76o, All Silk Mitten, 55c. per pair, "We guarantee and fit all gloves from $1.00 upward. SHAWL COLLAR "and front faood with ASTKA0HAN, Muff to nmtoh $2.00 extra, fcTTheviot Reefers, $3,90. Coat Collar, and bound with braid, our rogular prioo $4,90. Wo shall olose out tho remaining lot of ZOUAVE JACKETS, advertised last wook at $6.00, $6,00, $7.00, aotually worth $10, $12 and $16, for $2.50 Each. , We shall limit ono to a customer. Colored Sontaohe Braid, in all shades, 19c. per piooo, 2 doz. yards in a picoe. Kegtdar prioo 42o. 1 ' GREAT SACRIFICE MISSES' GAPE ULSTERS, and Upwards. JERSEY HOUSE WAISTS, AT EXACTLY HALF PRICE, 35 and 37 Winter St. ^Sl.    C3r"(-'s.oM-�..ix'tcc. Wo givo a written guarantee with every Oape, and rofnnd nionoy if not porfeotly satisfactory. Fine quality Astraohan Capos.......SI2.50 Fine quality Monkey Oapes.........20.00 Fine quality Wool Soal Oapes.......   12.50 Fino quality OhnpolloCapos.........   12.OO Fine quality Sealskin Oapos......... 37.50 BOO Soal Olives, 10c. a pleoo, regular prioo 17o. 100 Soalloops, 2lc.perloop,regnlarprioe38o. 100 gross Buttons, in all sizes and stylos, 1c. per doz., rogular prioo 16o, and 2Bo, BOO Dress Clasps, Ic. apiooe, regular prioo 26o, BOO gross Bono Buttons, 6c. a box, regular prioe lOo, _ 35 and 37 Winter St. Holcomb good service. His judgment of plays and tneir probable result is far above average and his individual work in and boliind tho line, while not showy, is worth much to tho team. Bayne is ihe substitute quarter, and ablo to play end on a pinch. He is very shrewd in his insight into the opponent's play, hut not so steady in his passing nor so quick in handling as Barbour. Half-backs seem to lie plentiful at all the colleges, this year, ami Yale is no exception. McCiung, Williams, L. Bliss, Morrison, all are m good condition, and the older Bliss and Van Ingen are only temporary spectators. McCormick, tho captain of tho freshman toani, can also play a good gamo behind tho line. SleCliiuR is �lio Old Hand of tho party and is playing a better game this year than ho did last. Ho has always been a brilliant runner in tho way of seeing openings and taking instant ndvantago of them, and of lato lias improved upon his speed. His drop-kicking, while it looks a bit awkward, is still fairly acourato, and he catches well. Williams has tho most speed of tho lot, and when onco in stride gallops down a field very fast. He can punt a long distance, but is neither sure nor accurate. His tackling is a point upon which ho needs constant coaching, but ho is making a better bid for the team this year than ever boforo. Ho' is a good lino breaker and koops his hoadway remarkably well in close quarters. L. Bliss is making it pleasant for tho other candidates by tho way ho insists upon gaining Itts ]() or lfi yards whenever the Dull Is ontrusted to him. Ho changes his speed clovorly on an end run, and, although he is light, it is hard to stop him when ho is sent through tho lino. In addition to this, ho is a fair kicker and tackles well. His sophomore brother looks on with jealous oye, and is evidently longing to bo in it again before tho freshman member of tho family gets the start of him. B. Morrison is doing bettor in many respects than ho did last Benson. Ho has more weight than any of the others, and for bucking the line is better built. His running at the end lacks dash, but whon ho happens to got on his snood at tho right time no runs strong and hard. His ambition seems to bo tho most difficult to arouse. Harvey at full-back is rapidly learning the requirements of his position, although it was hard at first to keop him back. His experience had been that oE a running,halfback, and on twit account he had much to learn. Tho practice of the smaller games has not given ono'inueh of a ohanco to estimate the qualities of a full-back, but what little ho has had to do has been well performed. His kicking is stronger and much quicker than it was a month ago, and his catching lias kept paco with that improvement. 1 "Walter. Camp. NEW BRILL REGULATIONS. Col, T. F. Edmands  Continues His Criticism. In Time of War tlio Volunteer Will Be the Country's Reliance. The Work Considered in the a Disappointment. Main IN FIGHTING TRIM. The Gymnastic Girl. THE REASON" EOB IT. How Cortam Firms and Men Havo Mado Large Fortunes. Several tilings have occurred lately whioh should direct the attention of thinking business men toward the success of firms who havo been known as bold advertisers, says Art in .Advertising A short time ago the manufacturers of "Ivory Soup," Messrs. Proctor & Gamble, sold out to a stock company, and their proved statement showed that the net profits on the business for the past three years had averaged more than ijnoo.tJOu per year. No wonder "Ivory Soap" floats, When the Royal Baking Powder Company was called upon to mako a statement m court of their profits they proved up a net profit of 8720,000 for the year, and this has no doubt increased during the past two years. Take the firm who make Allcock's porous plasters; it. is said that this one item nets a profit of $200,000 n year. Suppose you are a jobbing drug firm, and you want to buy Allcock's porous plastei-you have got to have them or your trade will leave you; no drummer ever calls upon you to sell these plasters, so you havo got to go and buy them yourself from the manufacturers. "When you go to their oflice and apply at a small window, like a telegraph boy a broker's olliee, a conversation something like the following occurs: Customer-1 would like to buy a large quantity of your plasters, aud want the. best prices. P. P. man-All right; 5 per cent, off on a carload, cash in advance. Customer-But a carload is too many. P. P. man-Then you don't get the 5 per cent. Customer-"Well, send mo a carload with a bill. P. P.man-Wo don't deliver goods; send your check and we will dump a carload on the sidewalk; you can cart them away yourself.  Good-day. Yon go away will, a sublime respect for the power of advertising. Supimse yuu are a grocer and want (or rather are forced) to buy pcarliuc, out of whioh old Mr. dames Pyle anil his sous Mrs -\stoi\-," hot t consult when they it. tia isp:.i. i.u."'* base i�lV^. �'lu wwk the pure. �ebe rlv clever in kcci'iii;-' 'his lord in thiit way he dova draw some JflOO.OOU proiit a y will lind that Messrs. You will lind that Messrs. J'yle don't care a rap whether you m'11 pei.riinc or not, an' don't givo you eiioueh iH'utit to k.-ep yuiir best girl in soda water. Thoy ha\oadv tised pearline until it is independent of the J-'rocery trade; they have made people waut it, and you must supply pearline or go out ol the busitie.is. The Potter 1>rug and Chemical Company of Boston (of whom, by lilt- way, Mr. W bite is now ihe head, though he entered the eoiiiuany's service as i;ii eni'iel U.yi, jevuds ^-'tio.e'ii^i a year in ;,d''en;.Mii;:r. makes an uuuual proUtof. syiuvUuuu iikoi-ioo.ouu. Tho weekly instalments of tho proposed now infantry drill regulations,published in tho Army and Navy Register from tho 27th of Soptomber to tbo 18th of October, contain a mixture of a littlo of everything, so thrown in as to emphasize tho ill management of the book. Corfimonies predominate, Wit, as thoy aro of no particular consequence, thoy may bo dismissed with a few words. Thoy are detailed with groat niin-utenoss in part, and are in part so described that somo unlucky ollicial will bo sure to have his bauds full to answer tho conundrums thoy will excito. Thero is an innovation concerning the adjutant at dross parado which gives the impression that tlio board wants to sit on adjutants generally. In the review there is a half stop in tho right diroction whereby tho second salute in lino is omitted. A whole stop would havo omitted also tho second saluto and the tedious walk around of tho rovlowing ollicer, loaving tho ceremony to consist simply of a formation in lino and a march past. The issuo of tho Army and Navy "Reporter for Oct. 2f>, contains the smallest "10 cents' worth" that has yot been put on n confiding public. It relates only to a squaro formation for street lighting-it is exactly five inches in length, and it, contains no word of advice or counsel concerning tho handling of mobs or cities throatcnod with them. Perhaps this most important subject may bo among future instalments, and thore nay he other equally important things to come; but, if an item in a roeeut number of tho Army and Navy Journal which says that 'ihe tactical board is to reconvene Nov. 1 at .i'ort Leavenworth is true, if, behooves thoso who have any criticisms or suggestions to hurry tho sanio off. whether oomploto or not. Wo can, therefore, up to date, deal only with instalments thus far published. In so doing, omissions may bo noticed, which tho board proposes to supply, or which may, lerlinps, be now lying in wait to bo pub-.ished for an iiidohnilo period in very small doses, liko their last ono, of Oct. 2E. Thero aro important omissions enough to keep tho publication going at tho present rate for six months longer at least. Still, tho serial form of publication is unfortunate, because it wastes time in all directions-both tho time of tho board and tho equally valuable time of militia soldiers, who are, as a rule, a busy class, snatching from more or loss urgent affairs the moments to bo devoted to military matters. To save time, one would prefer soeing tho book all at onco; but as wo aro Denied that privilege, wo can only go on with tho instalment plan. No part of tho grand manual appears, whereas, so fur as it applies to infantry, It should have been printed entire, the drill book being the proper place and tho only placo for it, wliero every soldier may study it as an essential to his drill. The same remark applies to Ilmioi's io bo I*aid by Troop*, to which a mere roforenco only is made in directing attention to tlio chaptor of army regulations containing thorn, Thoy should all ho printod in tho drill hook. Outpost, camp and bivouac and marches are well treated, but it is remarkable that no allusion appears to such important matters as transportation by rail, destruction of railroads, the destruction and rude construction of bridges, tho preparation of in-trenchments or the general conduct, of troops in cities threatened by mobs, every one of which subjects is of equal importance to anything the hoard has printed. There should also bo a short "Kmergency lecture," to show how the life of a, wounded mail may he saved by artificial compression, how he may be temporarily bandaged, how he may he tenderly handled until a surgeon can bo reached, and how the apparently drowned may be restored ; and there should also be a compact sanitary chaptor containing the simple rules which no soldier m campaign can bo allowed to neglect. All theso tilings should boas well known to every soldier as anything he is taught, aud should therefore be in his drill book, where ho will bo sure to see them and lie compelled hv his officers to observe thorn as a matter of uniform practice, uniformity in such being of the first importance. Looking now on what has been seen of tho hook, after noting these omissions, it stands in the main [us a disappointment. It is like an ill made pair of boots, one of which fits ami the other does not. Outside of the ceremonies, which are of little consequence, the last part; of the book, barring limits in urranc.ouieiit, is good; its first pari, is bad-so bad that it ought to go iuto the waste-basket. The first part should be reconsidered and all present traces of it removed from the second part. Then it should bo concisely rewritten and adapted to the second part. As tho two parts stand now. they do not belong to eacli other. Tho division of the parts falls between the close order aud extended order. 'They are so unsuited to each other-so incongruous, that it seems hardly credible that the same board can have produced them lioth, or rather that n board capable of producing the one, should have been unable to cut loose from the conservatism which permitted the collation of the other. The four articles, of which this is one, containing the Criticism*, imtl Sug-iresticms of tho writer, have treated of tho various matters, in or out of the book, m detail. From the nature of the publication, his comment, dealing with instalments, has been perhaps too diffuse, and could undoubtedly have been concentrated to advantage had he been able to have seen the book as a whole from the first; but aside from a condensation which he could have desired for the comfort of the board (if it dues him tile honor to read what lie has written), tint writer sees nothing now in his comment that he desires to ulier. For the convenience of the board the folhiwing recapitulation of principal points is respectfully submitted: j. Setting-up drill too Imig. 2. -Manuul ol arms not suluc'.ently oimpii-fied. ;:. Loadings and iiiiugs need careful re-vistou. -1. Bayonet exercise sunertliums. f>. Cpton system ot louts iiernieious. u. "Siiuu.t" inn' its Mgnitieancu should be subst;iu:e.l i'ur"n urs" throughout the book. 7. Hatdee's *y�wiu oi lionk uiaceUiiig should bo substituted for tho Upton system of fours, unloss tho board is willing to introduce tiio squad system into the close-order drill, which would be, perhaps, an improvement on Hardee. 8. The six-inch interval is worse than useless. 0. The entire oloso-ortlor drill from tho school of tho squad to tho battalion Bhould | be rewritten, vastly condensed and sitnpli- j hod, and adapted to what follows. 10, Tha language concerning the color guard should bo clear. 1.1. No cadenoodstop should bopreaorlbod anywhere in the ox tended ordor. 1 2. Positions of oilioors and non-commissioned officers aro to rigidly laid down in t' � oxtondod ordor, and should bo mado more elastic and discretionary. i;t. In revising its work tho board should remomber that tor ono rogular army man there will be 10 militia men to be instractod in it, and that if war-comes the reliance of the country will bo in the proportion of 10 militia men or volunteers to ono army man. I'l. Hence, as tho tendoncy of militia is to practice tho manual of arms and closo order movements to the exclusion of tho less attractive and more arilrtous battle tactics, tho board should soo that tho militia is not toniptod with too much minor matter to play with and waste time upon, attboox-pouso of good solid work. 15. Above all, the board should endeavor to formulate imneral provisions, wliero, by reasonable uniformity according to cirouni-stances, may be securod, to the exclusion of dangerous rigidity-that, is to say, general provisions which will mako it impossible for thoso who must use tho drill to quibble ovor trivialities and require thoso "Decisions upon Points of Tactics" that havo been tho bane of military instruction in tactics during tho lastllvo and twenty years. 1(1. The following matters should bo inserted in the book: The guard manual. Honors to he paid by troops. Transportation by rail. Destruction of railroads. Destruction of bridges. Construction of bridges, lutronehments, Aid to civil power (In cities threatened by mobs). Emergency lecture. Sanitary rules. By throwing out say two-thirds of tho elaboriito and useless close ordor matter, these necessary additions can bo made without materially increasing tho bulk of the book. Tho board has dono wisoly in asking openly for criticism and suggestion upon its work, and such a liberal-minded course do-sot've.s a recognition full of praise. The comment has been, and will be, from all sides, copious; some of it will be sharp; but it is Imped that in its unenviable task of sifting all that it will receivo, tho board will realize tlio great interest felt by soldiers �all over the States in the preparation of a oomploto and safe manual, and that the majority of thoso who may writo are actuated not by a carping spirit, but by an honest desire to prevent mistakes, which, in tho hour of need, might cost the country dear. Tub has IT. FIdmandm. Lowest Prices in the World. Genuine Eogers Saltspoona . . 5c. Genuine Eogers Mustard Spoons, 10c. Genuine Sogers Sugar Shells . 25c. Genuine Eogers Butter Knives . 15c. Genuine Eogers Gravy Ladles . 25c. Genuine Eogers Teaspoons . 75c set' Genuine Borers Dessert Spoons,        ! $1.25 seV Genuine Eogertt Tablespoons, '. $1.37 set), Genuine Eogera Dessert Ports, ' $1.25 seftj Genuine Eogers Medium Forks, $8.37 set; Genuine Eogers Oyster Ladles, $1.00 Genuine Eogers Pie Knives . $i.OO Genuine Eogers Berry Spoons . 50c. Genuine Eogers Berry Spoons,-oxidized handle . ,.....' .  $I.OO, Piokle Jars, triple plate, regular price i $1.50, for this sale .... 98c. \ Butter Dishes, triple plate, regular prioe -$1,50, for this sale ....  98c.' Bon-Bon Dishes, triple plate, gold lined, regular price $1.50,for this sale,76c. Oasters, 5-bottle, triple plate, regular Diioe $2.50, for this sale  .  $1.75 Triple Plate Sugar, dream and Spoon Holders, regular price $2.50 each, for this sale .......  $1.50 600 doz. Warranted Silver Plated Teaspoons ..... i .  25c. Ret 260 doz. Warranted Silver PlatedTable and Dessert Spoons . . 50c. set 260 doz, Warranted  Silver Plated Medium Forks ....  50c. set Silver Plated Hut Pick Sets, 6 pioks and 1 orack, Eegular price $1.50, for this sale ...... 98c. 250 doz, Silver Plated Table and Dessert Knives  ..... 75c. set 60 doz. Silver Plated Napkin Eings, 5c. eaoh 60 doz. Oarving Knives and Forks, 25c. set 25 doz, White Bone Oarving Knife, Fork and Steel ,  .  , .  50c. set 76 doz. Fine Imported Stag Handle 1 Oarving Knife, Fork and Steel, $t.50 SOD : Prioe in dry goods stores $2.50. 25 doz. White Handle Steel Medium and Dessert Knives, regular prioe $3.50 per dozen .....   31-25 set 150 doz. Genuine  Eogers   Oxidized Handle, Triple Plated Medium and Dessert Knives  .  .  .  $1.50 Bet Eetrular prioo $5.00 doz. 500 doz. Genuine Eogers Triple Plated Medium and Dessert Knives, � $9.25 set Lowest price ever known. Eemember wo are the agancyand'head-quarters for the Genuine Eogers Goods, and guarantee our prioes lower than any dry goods store, or money refunded. ABE  DTD  NOT LAUGH When Galled a Ono-Horso Lawyer-Palmer's Tale of Lincoln. I was onco oallod to Washington to seo Mr, Lincoln on a matter of business, writes Senator Palmer in the Chicago Herald. 'It was in 1805. I was shown into an anteroom, and waitod for somo timo. I saw sonators and othors going in, and finally I was called. Mr. Lincoln was being shaved. He said 1 was homo folks, and ho could shave before mo. 1 said to him: "Mr. Lincoln, If I had supposed at tho Chicago convention that nominated you that wo would have this terriblo war, I would novor havo thoughtof going down to aone-horso town,and getting a one-horse lawyer lor president." I did not know how ho would tako it, but rather expected an answer that I could laugh at. But ho brushed tho harbor to one side, and with a solemn faco turned to mo and said: "Neither would I, Palmor. I don't believe any grout man with a policy could havo saved the country. If I have contributed to the saving of tho country it was because I attended to the duties of oach day with tho hope that when tomorrow camo I would bo ottuitl to the duties of that duy," aud ho turned to the harbor. A large and complete stocfc of the finest Shoes manufactured, suitable for all occasions. Shoe: Fine Oalf Hand-Sewed Shoes, laoe, oon^ gross and button  . Patent Leather Dre3s and perfect fittine;  . . . Fine French Oalf Shoes, lace, and   button,   Pioadilly Blucher cut   ..... Our Oork Sole Shoes make a perfect Winter Shoe, warm and waterproof, all styles and sizes, $5.00, $7.00 and $9.00 $5.00 s, stylish $6.00 congress last and $7.00 45 Winter St. JOS. SCHIITZ'S CELEBRATED A mold's OgclenaburK Alo, nlao Imported Kaiaor, rtlnoiier and Ciilmbach Bcors, wholesale, and retail, in wood and bott.loa, for tho trade una family use. Dopetuud oulce.l�5 Pm'oluise St., Boston. Telephone No. 804. SuTTliStf 012 Tho Turkish Hair Tonlo restores hair on bald heads, stops Its rail, ing, cores dandrafffiJid headftcho. Certitlciitcs and testimonials la Boston. We have never had one complaint. Ask to see it and take nothing else. Goodwin, Carter, Weeks A. Potter, aU druggists, and llr.lt. K. Fletcher, 20 AUen St., No. Ciutlhrldge, WasB.   SSuT ill ARE YOU CONTEMPLATING___________ It so. Blind Immediately to tlio OIVIALE ACKNOT lorthjirlllUKt.uiodbookontholMiiBiiJcf and � cul'-!�.� ot Men, concise, pithy and full ot sterlins mudicnl t'liuts. and pood advice.  Olves sj-niptonis and ___ Imporil- nie.ilB to Matrrlacs.   Filf'Soiird of;, CoMnltliif trmit.uent of all diseases of thin nature and i'l.ynlcl.m�. CoiuulUcIou tVec(by in*II or luofflrf SjulodXrouUuoEi-oo.  tllbslri Ae"o�J. ��* tutton M., H. �. SuJlWFlCOt  020 s Positively and jiurmimiMitly restored iu 2 to 10 days; ,!l'j<- ,'o naiiai'iUlint drugs, iiiliicr.ils, pUls or Poisons, but the delicious MUX.t'CAJV COarPUClTlOW, uomposcd of fruits, herbs and plants. Hie most POWKKFU1, touic known. Itestores the vigor, snap and health of youth. Sealed book free, glvinu full particulars. Address tfau Mateo Med. Co., f'. O. box 481, KL Louis, -Mo.       Silly  myll IVBak men, with bnitn, nerves and sexual organs imoolred, ciut llud on absolute euro in NERVE BEANS. Thoy mako old men young, give lire and vigorto es-haustol youth, double Ufa's joy.>lj>orbox. postpaid, rimtililet f i�e.    NERVE BEAN CO..BnFJfALO,M.Y. Sold by Cl.oate Drug and C. CO., Church & Co. DYE TO Id order to lcn.ru how maoj people rccul advor-tl^ttmeuU, 1 u ill J-cuil tree ut' uti cuirge by mail, tu f acti ttiiQ vrttu uUtea iu which jjaper tula otitir htui buuu rtad: 10 uent box Dye Ct>Iur, ouo liuoK on Cngu Birtla, oue Uaoli uu Duga, uce Bout ____cm lIurBaa, Cowu, ivDd I'oultry, uud one tlo� of Arnica Court PUuur, or ft 10 cunt box ut Corn Plan* ter. Dr. PBONKFIELD, 400 V. 3d et, Philadelphia, Pean. lavcutor or the boat Uarne, Caiilo, ami Poultry Powder 14 the world.  Liu-go papers 25 ceuts by iiitiil, or i Uosea FItEil. We Warrant our Shoes, and guarantee entire satisfaction to purchasers. 238 WASHINGTON STREET, Clobe Building, Boston. SOMEtHINC  mew, REGISTERING SAVING BANK. l'a.twtu;d June lli, ItSSo, ^Tlus ImtiK imUonit-i tit all times cxivct amtmtit oon-tfttiioii. 'I'ln- Ursi coin Uu'-ks duor, ivliieti tiumot be lurLi-tl iu miv nibt'i' iiutiuitir, ;u*u uauuuC bti oturuad untt! tull uuK'ttai bit* bv
                            

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