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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: October 5, 1890 - Page 23

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 5, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                'if' THE BOSTON SUTOAT GLOBE-SUNI)AT,OCTOBBR^^ � E't'stlhg iu t.ho, minds of our many friends wton T7e ndvlsod tliom of tlio'Beomiug inlrossiMe pro-daotlon, onr Silk-Pinieli Balbriggau vest' for 50c,, also dru-wera, tlie ijrent quantity of poopio wio pnioUaood the goods last wqok, has certainly dispoUod the sumo, if any auoli existed, judging ty tlio various expressions of doligliti as ono novelty after another was dioplayed in fine �wool, silk and wool, pure silk, intbelovoliesttints imaginaWo, also Union Suits in all tho doairnble fabrics, Silk Vests for 69c., 75c., SI.OO, $1.25. Merino Vests, 50c., GZc, 75c; and $I.OO. All-Weol Vests, 75o., S I .OO, S (.25, SI.50. Rent's tTudorwoar in a, large variety, If yon �want a medium-weight, warm, perfeot-fitting Suit of Underwear, in Oamol's Hair, wo have it for Si.25 onoh. Eadiea' Ultra Flooood-Llnod Hoso, worth 50o. for asc. .Ohildrou's Heavy-Eibhed Hose, Fast Black, for 25c. Men's Heavy Cotton and Merino Half Hoso, 25c. liadios Silk Hosiery in new shades, 75c., $1,00, $(.25. Ladles' Nioe Fast Black Cotton Hose, Extra long. Lisle Thread Hoels and Toes, for ono week, at 37 I-20. In supplying your wants for tho coming season do not nnder any-oonsidoratlon nogleot paying our Hosiery Department a visit, Other dealers will quote lower prioes. For first-olasa goods at low prioeo we stand in this city alone. Sale at both stores. Without a doubt all fine grades of leather G-lovos will cost more on account of tho recent tariff measure. Just passed, to come into'offcct at once. Many dealers who have .a largo stock will mark up priooa, Wo propose^not only to keep all goods at old prices, but still better, to rednco all surplus lots of gloves to less than half the original price, as the oaprioions Dame Fashion is very exacting in regard to gloving the hands. Xou can hardly understand why wo must at all times, owing to tho slightest change in color or stylo, have many' lots of fine flloves to soli .you at a gTOat sacrifice. .   . 2-Button Gents' Stroot Gloves for SI.OO. ladies' Beauty Glovos, new shades, for $i.OO Nice Kid and Suede Gloves, rodnoed to 50c., 75c., and $1,00. ladies' very fine Oashmero Gloves for 25c. Mousq. Suodo Gloves, 8-button length, perfect fitting Gloves, Tans, Grays, Browns, Modes and Black, for SI. OO per pair. � A largo shipment of our 4-hutton Ladies' Dogskin Gloves, just arrived, the most stylish, eoonom' ical Gloves sold, 75c., $I.OOand $l.50. Never despair of matchingyour various oostumea to. Glovos. Visit SIMPSON'S and see (20,000) twenty thousand different shades. Orders byinail attended with oore. 48 and 50 Temple Place, Branch, 118 Tremont Street. TOfNSim LETTS fi. Evening at the Manhattan Club. Glimpses of .Gonld, Brieo, the Mors and Other KotaWcs. 48 and 60 Temple Place, Branch 118 Tremont Street. TENDER PARENTS, XNDBEDl An Ohio Couple's TouohlnE Idea of a Praotiool Joke. Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Reiser of 101 MIthoff Bt., Columbus, O.,. vront to church Inst even ing, ss,ys the Dispatch, leaving in the charge of their son, a lad about 16 years of ago, a 3-year-old baby. Like most boys he eventually got tirod of hia task and put baby to Bleep in the cradle while he �went up tho street. The parents returned home, and finding that tlieir son had deserted his charge, determined to give him a scare. With this end in viovr they tore up pieces of red cloth and placed them around the baby's neck and on its hands, and thoii upset the chairs and otherwise disarranged the house, and hid themselves. Tho Intent Tvas to cause tho boy to thinlc that the ch Id's tliroat had been cut and the house burglarized. In this they were enal- &ently successful, for upon the son's return e was nearly distraotod at the horrible sight that met his gaze. He rushed out ol the house, and alarmlnft his next-door neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Traoht, they all armed themselves, and returned to capture the robbers and inurderers. The parents by this time conoluded that the , joke had gone far enough, and came forth from their hiding place. The bojr received ashoolj; to his nerves that will take him some tinie to recover from. HIG-H ART OB WHAT? Sibyl Johnstone In Her Startling Display of Figure. OTABLE  was   the . financial success' of TlelotedSaMBoneSnrieon! I Miss Sibyl Johnstone's nude exhibition in "The Clemon-coau Case" at the Standard Theatre, New York, says an exchange, yet It would be incompatible ' with any other theory of precedents were it not for the violence of criticism with which she was treated by the daily press. The no-tioe she got would fill any theatre; Miss Sibyl Johnstone is. a younger and comeller woman than Miss Eytingo, who, by the way, was once a member of tho Wal-lack company in its best days. Miss Johnstone had to make an exhibition of herself that even Miss Eytingo refused. The unaccountable part of the whole thing is that in any exhibition of acrobatic skill on tho stage there are bel-ter-formed women, and with no more clothes on than Miss Johnstone weais in "The Clemenceau Case." '  '     � Female trapezists have heen seen witliin the classic precincts of the academy literally more nijde than Iza, But they were in oorapany of others equally imclothed, and It was the regular costume of that branch of the prof ession. It was tho seeing an almo.st nude woman among people properly clothed in evening dress that made the effect in "The Clemenceau Case." The very rapidity of the apparition and the haste to throw a mantle over her it was that furnished the suggest-Iveness. Put half a dozen women just as nude as Miss Johnstone on the stage of tho Standard Theatre in a burlesiue, which is avowedly a nude show, and they will not draw one^uartor tho money that Miss Johnstone has been drawing the' past two w6oks,' though the chances ore that the burlesquors would be much the better formed. In fact, Miss Johnstone is not well made. Fortunately, she is not seen long enou.gh by the audience for ontioal study. Has Harrison Emerged from the Shade of Unpopularity? Nnw York, Oct. d.-Being hero infrequently, Mr. Cannon, the president 6t tlie Chase National Bank ,said tome as I entered tlio city: "Comn ui> to the Manhattan Club toniKht^nd dine with me. You ought to see the StOAvart mansion since it has boon tumod into a clubliouso. "I know it very well," said I, "A. T, Stewart asked me to dine there Olio Sumliiy in 1870. But I thouglit you were a Ropubli' cm, Mr. Cannon?" "Oh, yes; but I liave a particular reason for going to tlio Manhattan Club toniglit. You may have soon that tlio mayor nominated mo today for aqueduct commissioner. If I go to tho Union League, where I am most often at homo, I shall get a dreadful amount of "guying." Club lines are not very olosoly drawn anywhere. I have belonged to the Manhattan for years, as well as to tho Union LoHguo; I am also a member of the Centm-y Club, and of the Players' Club, which Mr. Booth foimdod." As wo camo in sigiit of the Stewart House I saw overy window lighted up.and tliought what a oliange there was between life and deiith.whero but recently one of three jealous police watched that liouse every moment of 'the day and night, as if tho spirit within it might take tho form of a rat or a dove and fly away. The poor woman within tliere had inherited wealth, and this wealth had a great ogre to guard it, and no end of spirits arid fairies were at the uttermost parts of tho earth seeking to got tliis property under the guise of carrying tlie name of Stewart. Everybody named Stewart considered Judge Ililton to bo standing in tho way of his or her rights. It was like the lapsed earldom of Stirling for which everybody named Alexander around tho world, including pur old Lord Sturling so called of the revolution made application. What a farce after all is too much wealth As we climbed tlio majostio stops of this house, I said, looking up over the many stories and the wide facade of the side of the building, "tliis surely must have been in the mind of providence, if providence there be, as a club house ultimately, and it is a noble ono. Wo turned aroimd and Xiookocl Across tlie Stroot Pall Ojieninp; of Hr. Sweet's Snnltarl-uiu, 16 l/iilon Parle Stroot, Hoston. Foui-tU I'ear In Boston. Elegant Gjrmnnsltim Attached. Ponuanontly eStabUsKod for .tho rational treatment of tho most Obntlnate Forms of X^amoness! � rrom whatever oauBe; alBO Dimcult Chronic Bls-easo 6� any name and nature eucooBStiUly and . radically cured by the famous ".Sweot Method." A Corps of Alilo ABsiotants! Prof. Charcot'a Methods of Paris, for Nervous J3ifl-enacs;  Ileop Sea Water Douches; Electricity: '   Jlognetlsm; Massage. Obesity removed �without deprcBBion. The most tttoroitgh and mccesi^ful methods extant. Tlie "S-\ve�t Motliod" in Mlaeasos Of the head, throat lungs, heart, liver, kidneys and nervous system, and all dlsonscs of the blood, bones, Joints and slcln, a accorded pro-cralnenoc .� by.tlM press .and jieop e whornver Imown. Ea. iieelally successful In all forms of paralysis, onl-leiiay, dropay, diabetes and cajioor humors of Uie stomach and womb. SuroassIuK all in the cure of R^IBOIVE ASfn jrOENT BISKASM8 "us attested bv pubUoophilon in Now England for tho past 200 years. Terms -within the reach of the poorest. Vtovx clasaos, special, private, general and free. Invo. lids from abroad provided with rooms and board at reasonable prices. Dr. Sweet's Great Herbal SpociUcs compounded and dlBponaod at the laboratory connected with the Institution. Our next advertisement wUl ajvo ii list of tliem. Watcliforlt. pillce hours: From 0 a. in. to 7.S0 p. in. Sunday from 1 to 0 p. m. Horse cars from all tho depots pass every tew minutes. _ , (ig?~Send for Examination Blanlts and Medical Iviagazlno FKEE. If yoii want a RUG or a singleTASTEFUL PIECE of FURNITURE to brighten up" a room already furnished, you can find JUST THE THING in our warerooms. IiADtES W.tLL LIKE THEM. The OTevf Postal Cards Will Charm the Eye of Purchasers. "We may decide on a pale-blue shade," said Postmaster-General Wanamalcor, in talking of the now postal cards the other day, "or a pale-gray shade, or it may bo that a pearl or a yellow shade would bo b&st. Tho color and size are still subject to change. The pale-gray was tho color we .favored, but, as I say, we may later decide on some pale shade of blue, or perhaps on pearl or yellow." These new postal cards will be the handsomest things of tho sort ever offered to buyers. There v>-ill bo two now varieties, a large card, perhaps a third larger tlian tlie present ordinary card, of a oorhploxiou suggestive of torpid liver, and another size, just the least bit smaller than the present card. "Those cards," went on Postmaster-General Wanamaker, "will bo almost penny postage. Thoir s; dite a quite .zo w: epi 11 enable ono to in-uiTO .vii,.i.L.D i.:.MO"v -v'sHe pn them, all for one cent." But it is the pale-gray or poarl-coloredoai-d that will be the CToatost bargain. It ^^^ll not hold so much, but it is to be an uncommonly attractive affair. ' Tlie despatch from Oonneoticut spealcs of those dainty postal novelties for tlio fall season as '^postal cards for ladies," Mr. Wanamaker says this is nonsense. Tho cards will be sold to gentlemen or children at the uniform rate of one cent each, and 12 cents per dozen, and any ono who chooses will be allowed to usetliom. Tlie rumor that the cards were to be soonted is unfounded.       ,        ^ .v. Mr. Wanamaker does not expect that the cards will bo in the market much earlier than six months lionoe. OKOSS ON   HIS PALM. 6,^,10,12,14terim St. 117,118,121,123,125 Frifinii St. "B^AiHccc RESTORED. SANATIVO," tho Wonderful Spaniel! liiiniedy, i� KuUl with a Written Guar-nutco to ciiio all jSi^rvoua Disoa-Bcs, Hitch as Weak Memory, Lose ol Drain Pov.-cr, llcadacile.Wul.e- Befoi'e&. After use, I'hoioKruph.ed li-om iJle. fnUrefression to which he ^ave utterance, and burned at tho stake, the then ancestor of the present Earl of Cadogan having been )>nrticuUirly active in the iirrcst and persecution. As tlio flcimos frinn tlio fagots shot up around him, tho, monk raised a crucifix in his right lianil, and extending ittowerds CadogiUi. oxolaimed, "Be this your uur.so." It is snid in tradition that the tirst child horn lo Cndog.'tn .iftcr tho excciilioii of the '.niliajniy nio ik bore tho :nark of a cross on the palni of ii.'< risrht hiiml. The fhild < ;cd nix monliis after its birth. .Since thnt time seviji-al children Inive lieon horn to the scvei'al frraicr.Tiions of the house of Ciulogan, bearing tins mark, ;:nd nil liavo died in early infanc.v, while others iritliout tlic mark have usually .survived. Eugenie's Valor in Cholera Times. Bays tho ChicriBO News; The cholera sciire that has afiiicted Eiuopo to a degree lins reralkvl an incident of tlio time wiien Napoleon 111. was at tlu; liciglit of his power. The cholera prevailed to a friglitful extent at Aniinns, yet never a day ii.'usscd that the cuipri'ss ilifi not visit tlin hnMi!tii'..'i to suiit-r-iiiteini, t'o l;u-as i-lie rould, tlio iiohli: ivork oi iilh'.yiiiir tlu- sulTiiriiiv:.'; of tlic rtrickeii, One irmniiiig a cnrn ruslied into the w.ird where the oiiipni.ss was coii.-.oliiig a dying man. "(.lli, your luajesly," cried the ciirc, "two hfiur.s :,j;o nty vioar u*as hrcakfusting Willi nie, and r.iiw he is dead '." Ell[J^'!^i oochos are made, it is not the bridegroom, but tho bride's father, who returns thanks when her health is drank, this usage being owing to the fact that a father stdl retains authority over liis child after she is married. He may summon her lionie to tend liim when he is sick. If lie ]n:n) his wife ho may claim his married daughter's services during the first thrco montli;, of his widow-lio'od, and he vcit often docs so. If the daughter's husband dies her father may coniiml lior to return to his roof and ho bocoines tho guardian ol licrchtldren. None of these privileges aroreltuned by a nnarriod woman's mother. On the wedding day in Borneo tho bride and bridogromn are brought from opposite ends of the village to tho spot where tho wedding is to bo perfornied. Thoy are made to sit on two bars of iron th.at blessings as lasting and licalth as vigorous may attend the pidr. A c^ig.ar and a lietBl leaf, prep.ared with the areoaiiut. are next put into tho hands ot the bride and lu'idegroom. One ot tho priests then waves two fowls ov'jr tho heads of tho couple, and in ii long address to the .Supreme litanp, calls down blessings upon the pair i\nd iniplores that peaco and h.aiipiue.ss may attend the union. Alter the heads of tlicafliaiioed have licen knocked together two or three times, tho bridegroom "puts tho prepared slrih-loat and cigar into the mouth of the bride, and slio does the same to him, whom she thus acknowledges as her husband. LADIES' BLACK OnKTIOT REEFERS, rolling collars, bound AVlth briild, at Regular price $10.00. LADIES' nOUBLE-BREASTEl) CHEVIOT REKFKRS, high neck, at LAi)IES' MOTHER HUBBARl) NIGHT GOWNS, good quality cotton, full size tucked yoke, V shaped neck, sleeves and neck trimmed with liamburg, for this sale 69c. Always sold for $1.00. LADIES' CHEMISES, excellent duality cotton, yoke trimmed AVlth 3 rows of hamburg Insertion, i clusters^ of tucks, Jiamburg edging around neck, for this sale 39c. Usual price $1*2.00. CHILDREN'S     BEAVER    REEFERS, trimmed with gilt braid, at $2a50. Si'ACS 4 to 14. Also a large assortment of Misses' and Children's Garments at tho LOWEST PRJOES. GOOD (lUALITT WOOL SEAL CAPES at   .   ... . . . $J2.00 GOOD     QUALITY    ASTRACHAN CAPES at .... .,' $!2.D0 GRKT KREOIMER CAFES at ^iJfSlSO ALASKA SEAL CAPES at $30.00 and $40.00 LADIES' DRAWERS, good duality cotton, trimmed with liamburg ruffle, 5 tucks above, for this sale LADIES' CORSET COVERS, TRIMMED WITH HAMBURG EDGING, FELLED SEAMS, PEARL BUTTONS, for this sale Gloaing Out Sail SHAWLS -it- �       � . r ��� Less'than 50c.ontlie'Dollarj As wo reanire the room to better accommodate the largely Increased business In onr Cloak Department. LADIES' LIGHT WEIGHT   COIOBKD WOOL SHOUIBBR SHAWLS at 50c. Marked doim froM $1.25. lADIES'iCOLORBD AND BLAOKCHUBM SHAVTLS,    EXCELLENT   QUAMTTf LARGE SIZE, at $1.45. Marked down from .$2.T5. LADIES' BLACK CASHMERE SHAWLS M 89c.. � Marked Amm from $1.50. LADIES' BLACK CASHMEEE mmm SJUWLSj.FINE QUALITY, at ' '$2i69.' Marked down from $4.00. I-HOOK FOSTER LACING KID SUEDE GLOVES at and LADIES' BLACK PURE SILK MITTENS, with Fancy Back, at 98c. a Pair. Regular price .'SI.'!!). Only 2 pairs to ciich customer. �T mo yards BLACK SILK and MOHiffi f| GIMPS, dlffortint patterns, at -       ' 25c. a Yard.    , SILK and TINSEL COLOBEDi[PASRE-MENTERIE, a-inch wide, at 25c. a Yard. BLACK MARABOUT TRIMMING FOB WRAPS, 4 Inches wide, at    ., 50c. a Yard. 44 and 46 Winter St. "AS   m A   DEEAM   SIGIMUD IT.' Ho^w tiho Empress ITorced Napoleon m. Into War. Concerning Napoleon III. and the Franoo-Prussian war, a writer in FiKai^o says: "Tho emperor did not wish war. And wlien at tho council of ministers, tho crisis having rcacheil its ticutost staite, there was pubmittetl to him the decreerelatirif^ to hostilities, to follow on tho cxpect,ed vote of the Ch.ambcrH.hurelused to put his name to .the terrible paii.:'r. "Upon beiiiff pi'essod ho became ancTy- he,'tiio obstinately mild,'as he was called by his own motluT-becamo violent, sei7.(>d llie copy of the, decree, tore it in pieces, and Bci'ltercd it about ilio room. "Then, ill and -worn out by the insi.stenco ivith whicli he had Ijeen pursued as much as by tho iihysiciil suiTorinw W'lih which he had ionij been ufllicted, lie withdicw and retired lo bed. . "Tho f'niiirecs. on le.'ij'iihiff of the scene that had just t,ik  of llio einperor, who, porliiips, us iu a dream, siKiiod It." By H. B. K. "Come out on the piazzti just a mornont, do.ar Kny," whispered Lanronoo ' Darroll to the girl who rested so lightly in his arms in the midst ot a waltz. She hesitated a moment, then looked at him full in the face, a direct yet sad glance, and sighed a little, "It will be no use, Larry, You know all about It now." Ho only drew hor a littlo nearer to him, iind guided her to tho open door. "Como dear, take, my arm," he hurriedly murmered as tho lastnoto of tho waltz died away. "Quick Eay, hois not in hero now," and they went out the door;'passed a. few coiviiles promenading on tho broad piaz5;a,to the shaded walk beyond. It was a soft night in late August, just bo-fore the fall days come, tliat a pnrtv had iis-Homblod at the Higlilands in honor of the young girl who was to sail for Europe tho next month. Tho moon was shining through tho light drifting olouiis, and tho trees cast largo shadows. I'Tliis -n'ay," whispered Larry, "beyond tho lights to the arbor, It is so tar no one will be there, it is yet early in tho evening. Silently they mado their way down tho long avenue, through the'trees and gardens of flowers, by tho fountain and the stiimner house, to tho arbor at the end of the lawn. No one wn,s there, "Kayl Bayl" cried Larry, an ho caught hor to his breast, "this parting will kill me, in spite of ail-" "Don't Larry; 1 ought not to be hero-my father"-but her words wore stopped by kisses. "Tell mo that you will lovo mo always I That the absence, and all that influence brought to bear against mo, will not mako you indifferonti ileaveii, if I thought you would eoaso to lovo me I would-" This timo it wns he who was unablo to speak-a soft hand was pressed against his lips. "I can never love anyone but you," she said sadly i "but so long as my father lives -you know that prejudice-dearest-it will break my heart-yet I will never inaiTy Mr. Button," she cried fiercely; "never 1 never 1" Laurence uttered wild words of passion D.nd despair, and bewailed the cruel fato that was to part him from his beloved. "Wo must say our goodby now," said Ray -thero wore tears In hor voice. "You know that my guests will miss mo-and I shall have no other timo to soo you alone." She clasped hor arms around his neck, and through the darkness hor tender" ^yos shone upon him, their love light only dimmed by tears. Larry hold her close to his breast, and kissed the beautiful face upturned to his.   ' "Goodby Larry^my Larry-goodby. You must not forget mo, my boy. As it I oould over love any one but you! AVe are vowed to ottoh other, oven if fate never ,'lets tis meet hero; but some time,Larry duiiirl . . , They ivalked slowly back to the houBo and hooded not nor hoard not the light step behind tliom. .    ' Tho old mansion was ablaze with lights and in through tho open windows moved a brilliant company. Maguiiicently-dressod young women and ilower-liko girls wero passing back and forth. They heard the soft notes of tho orchestra and smollcd the heavy perfume of the flowers. llay slipped from Laurence's arras and ran swiftly in tho side entranco-tlien ho aa^sv her moving calmly among the guests. , She was .so beautiful in her white, clinging India silk; it fell .m such soft folds around her supple figure; now tho soft brown oyi's that liad loolcetl upon him only a moment before, so tenderly, wore calm and cruel-but they wero resting upon sonio ono �who �fl'as eagerly making his way tow-ai'd her. The childlike curves of her mouth grew haughty, and she drew horsolf up to hor full height and coldly greeted tho man who bent over her with an adoring glance. Laurence could only guess 'ivhat he, was saying-and lie titruod qiuckly and went away. "It isagrcat happlnos.'; to soo you," ho was murmuring. "You wore never more beau-ful than toniirbtr-" "Mr. Dutton, I do not care to listen to compliments," she interrupted with fine irony. "It seems to me that you do not care to listen to anything from mol" he exclaimed, trying to conceal his anger. "I do not,"sho answered, and attempted to move away. "You shall.listen," he retorted, his dark eyes gleaming, and the color burning in his face, "if not no'sv, you-ivill bo glad to some day." "This is more than ldio,"8ho e.xnlnlmod. "I hate you, and you know it. I v.ish 1 wore never to soo you, and, if you follow us abroad, I will never speak to you, no matter what my father comniimds." After the iiarty was over and the lights wero out, Ray stole out from h^ room to tho upper veranda, and lay hor head on the railing and wept bitterly. She had said goS L ing before him in the church. The sorvibai| liaa proceeded as far as tho question: "Wilt thou take this woman to betbyS wedded wife?" No response being made, the question i ropoatod a little more emphatically: 'Wilt thou take this woman to ba thrf wedded wife?" "Eli~ah-beg pardon. Were ytra speakteg^ to me, sir?" Ho was assured ot the fact; and havln�H rcff-ilned conscaousuess, tho twain weMfl qiuckly made ono. I Is the purest soap known for laundry and general use; de^ lightful for toilet, bath and nursery; pure wtiite, and has all the healing qualities of the finest Castile soap. Cleanses laces, gloves, .silk underwear,, &c., quickly, easily and safely,.,' II Is the best soap made for ex� elusive laundry use, being made from carefully selertj oils of our own i�6ning,^i^'^ia* cally compounded-. 30 that it-cannot injure the most deli-cate hands or the finest lacesil, Grocers Sell These Soaps*:. JOHN REARDON A SONsS 69 South Market St., Bostem. iN>w�
                            

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