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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 5, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                OTfi ::bos*on,: .sxjnbay. globe-bijni)ay,. October 5, is^o-toenty-four . pages. m THE EXT 30 DAYS, TWENTY-FOUR PACtES. SUNDAY, .OCTOBER" 5,4890. UNDER THE ROSE. One of the most intorostiiiff charaqtora at the tlinnor of the Civil Service Roforni Lengxie at Parker's last week was Charles Jerome Bonaparte, groat-i?randson of King Jerome and Betsy Patterson; Bonaparte, ereat-grand-nophew of the "Man .of Destiny," and by blood and justice having a prior claim to that of Prince Napoleon upon the imperial heritage.' 90 to 98 TremonlSt. Our entire Lamp Stock reduced for this week only. Wo arc prepared fo offer our entire line of PARLOR TABLE LAMPS M 20 Per Cent Mweiion For tills wcoU only. Oarlsbftd Chamber Sets from $13.00 to $200.00. Parlor Suits from $35.00 to $200.00. Manges, com,plete, * from $12.00 to $100.00. Carpets from 23c, yard to $2M0. JParlor Stoves from $3.00 to $30.00. EVERYTHING TO FURNISH A HOJVIE FROM TOP TO BOTTOIV!. We cannot waste printers' ink going into further details. Wlien Mr. Bonaparte was announced as a speaker there was a decided stir, and every one was immediately on the qui vivo to see and hear the man of the famous name. His speech was exceedingly happy in its way, his graceful Frencliy gestures and peculiar Southern accent, flavored occasionally witli suggestion of the darky dialect, delighting his hearers immensely. Ho has a peculiar inflection in his voice at certain pelnts in his sonteneos, which is in fact a touoli of the Stuart Kobson squeak. It is a ratlier remarkable fact that wlien In certain moods tho great Napoleon had the same odd expression. He is rather under tho medium heiglit, and inclines a little to be "top heavy." He resembles Jerome, his great grandfather, in tho face, but a back view, or partially so, of hislioad, Bhowsaromarlciblo resemblance to Napoleon, Tho head and forehead are tho same, tlie hair growing in the same peculiar shape about tho temples and over the forehead, while tho back of his neclc and the heavy protruding jaws, as seen from tho rear, are exceeding ojiaraoeristio. His hair and a rather olosely-oroppod moustache are black, anct liis dark eyes, which are nearly always laughing, are of that brightness as if focussing in thon),86lves all the rays of light, like a sun glass, Tho round chin bears tho famous dimple in most pronoimcod form, and the ears aro as perfect a copy of tliose of Napoleon, as if modelled by a sculptor from Paul Dola-rocho's familiar painting. Come in and see the Bargains even if you don't lt)uy. 126 and 138 Hanover St., BOSTON, OPEN ETENINGS, Hear msUngtoa St, J. J. QUIWlir, Manager. Goods dolivered froo to any part of New England, 1 CarlSbBfl Clitna Teapot Xllc, hand decorated, Reduced from 25c. This Bonaparte is a jovial yotmg man, and indulges in a sonorous infectious laugh on the slightest provocation, winking merrily at tliose about him whenever anything strikes him as amxising. He is of a nervous temperament, and has a habit of constantly stretching his arms Up over his head and grasping his hair, 6^'^-dontly from a desire to do something. He is thorouglily democratic, but appears to enjoy the attention which his name inspires, and speaks of "a certain relative of mine" with a naivete which is quite startling. There is nothing more distinctive about the Boston newspapers than their attention to the happenings andintorosts of their own immediate community. When a Boston orator like '^Yendell Phillips or a Boston poet like John Boyl O'Reilly dies, tho news and sentiment of the occurrence aro spread over the entire first pages of tho local press, and so it is with a notable speeoli dolivered in Boston, such OS that of Henry W. Grady's last win. ter, and that of Henry WattersOn's, Friday evening. In Now York tho papers subordinate things like these to European despatches and horse car strikes. The speech that Grady made in New York, which gave him his national fame, was coolly neglected.by tho papers of that city, one of them, as I remember, waking up to its startling Interest and excellence tho following week with a verbatim report otit. Chlii'n Fruit I'lntos. Imnd dfico. rated, colored borders. � Always sold for laVac, Onr Fall Importations arc abont all In and opened now, and wo assure ouri pat-rons that thoy are marked at the lowest mar.slu posslfile. As wc have never before Kept this lino of raercIiRndlso, vo make n bid foronrslinro of tlic trade by offering the following prices, whloU are unprecedented for tlioiiiialitlcs wo are offering. CENTS' SH8ff?TS. Cnlonndorcil, Inserted linen Bosom, Felled Scams, 50c., 62c. and 75c. Laundered, 75c., 88c. and $1.00. 26 Stylos Oonts' Collars, In both standing ana turn down, ISic.'and 18c. Our tSc. Collar nsually sold for 250. Also a (all lino of Onfl^. Infants'Plnsb and Surnh, a comploto lino of colors and slzcs,'rrom 50c. to S2.88. On Monday we will open another lot of PATTEHN BONNETS In our Irlmmcd Millinery Booms (second floor). TJio McKINLEY BILL ADVANCES the DUTIES on all Lace Curtains to 60 por cent., commencing Oct. Gtli. FORE SEEING this, we PREPARED for it and LANDED $800,000 wortli of BRUSSELS, SWISS, IRISH POINT, FRENCH GUIPURE and NOTTINGHAM CURTAINS, wliich aro all in plain view of every one entering our Upholstery Department. We shall inangurato f or ONE Week, commencing Monday, Oct, 6, tlie most MAGNIFICENT and MAMMOTH sale of Lace Curtains that Boston ever witnessed. Tho range of styles and (lualities are so enormons that wo cannot mention prices. Wo simply say thoy aro the lowest ever quoted. "Our Popular Grade" of Felts In the newest and most dcslrable-styles. All colors at only 62 cts. each. At 98 ctSa Wc arc offering a FEB FEW HAT In walking and turban shapes that Is worth S1.50, Wo aro retailing Capes at less than tho manufacturers' present prices. An early Inspection will bo to your advantage, as tho prices are rising on account of scarcity of skins. S.Bntton length Suede Mousquctalre, Mt fall shades, only Great Value. >. All gloves costing $1.26 and npwora'tttWa "V40oX".'Eureka French Etching SHU,, for art design in outline, allcolors.lftc. pcrdoz.. 90 to 98 Treitiont St. The regular price of this auallty is sc. per BMlNSilfllMS T-Ilook Suedes, In black and Colors, only ni2.nntton length SaMeJ Monsquctalrc, Jr light shades, for evening wear, worth 81.50. 90 to 98 Tremont St. ETEETOKEHASSEfflTIEI Blue-Coated Police of Corner Sqiiad, the Who Rflcp Crossings Clear and Answer (Jnestions All Day. (Jallant Maynes, Little, Carey, Glass, Brennan, Matter, Walkins. In Hats, Bonnets and Toq^uea, Ostrioli Plumes, Tips, Birds, Winga, Aigrettes and Fanqy Feathers, including the latest Parisian Novelties in 6-old and Silver, Braids, Ornaments, Silk and Velvet Eibbons, ON nUGNDAY ANP TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6 and 7. It Tvaa in rievr of this markotl toiidonoy that I looked over the report's lu tho Now Yorlc papers of the imveiling; of Hovaoo Greeley's statue in front of the Tribune bnildinff and Chaunoy M. Depaw's accom-panylne oration. Tho Tribune naturally gave the intorestins prooeodings in full and they more than filled apage, but tho Sun, the Herald and the Joui'-nal each disposed of it all in less thant-wo columns, while the World went a fourth of a column beyond them, and the Times contented itself-with throe or four stioks on the subject. _ Wallio Eddingor, who personates the waif in "The Soudan," is, perhaps, tho most talented olilld actor on the stage. Ho is a sensitive little fellow, too, and was more than mortified ono morning last week ^hen ho was called Willis in ono newspaper and Nellie in another. Ho consoled himself, however, hy propouiiding tho conundrum, "When docs a hen lay tho longest?" His soh^ion was, "When she ain't called right." Waluo says, "I ain't a hon." O SLOW there 1 Kvcrybodyhas soon him. He is a burly, hlue-coatod fig,uro ^vith a heavy gray helmet. WTiere the crowd is thickest at tho busiest street crossing, whore impatient drivers gnimblo oatiis "not lond but deep," and the timid pedestrian halts imdeoided, there he stands', as the enthusiastic aide-de-oamp said of Qen, Jaolc-sou, like a stonewall, his weather-beaten features betraying no emotion save that of calm quietude, his brawny bluo-sleeved chevroned right arm uplifted 'in mild protest to tho pushing throng and tho swearing driver, and his mild voice mging patience and no jostUngi It is the police officer at the street crossing, the member of the little-lcnown but all-important-corner sduad. Tho corner squad is not so important an institution, however, in Boston as it is in a city like New York, for Instance. But it works harder and renders equally valuable services. There are about half a dozen street cross ings in this city whore specially detailed polioeoffloers'do duty from 8 o'clock in the moniiti'g imtil 0 in the evening. These ofD.-cers are selected for qualities that are nocos-sarr to success in handling excited, impatient and ignorant crowds. They aro all big, cool and good-naturod men, and tholr experience tends to make them even cooler and better natiu:ed. Tho crossings that require police officers in constant attondanoe arO at Summer and Wash ington sts., Temple pi., Ti-omont and School sts., Scollay sq., Court and Washington sts, and Devonshire and State sts. There is hardly any moro important post than the crossing at Tomplo pi. Tho ofdcor who looks out for things hero Is James R. Glass of station 4. He is of short and stiu-dy figure, and has a handsome brown and gi'ay beard, blue eyes and flashing white teeth. phildjs bioyolo while sho stopped into ono of tho big di'y goods houses in,tho vicinity. Down on Tremont and School sts,, Charley" Maynos looks out for the, crossing. Ho has shoulders aa big as those of tlio mamvith the shaggy torso who holds tip tho world In tho ahnanocs. He belongs to station 3, and has been at his present post about fom' years. Just iiow ho is talcing a woll-oarned vacation. Ho has a black mustache, swarthy oomnlexion and prominent features. It isn'tso hard to handle the crowds there a.s it is at sonlo other crossings. But Officer Maynos has acquired a reputation for stopping rnnnwaya. Beacon Hill from tho head of School st. is pretty stoop, and sometimes tho horsos come down pretty fast, and onn'tor won't stop just as the drivers want thorn to. Or tlio horses coming up or going down Tremont st, booomo tangled up and get mad and start ofO m a lutrry. So "Charley's" atTongarnus required to sot matters right, i-lo has boon ooniplimentod several times i�jJ�ayMy,in stopping runaways. As a special indncement to make onr Millinery department a grand suooess, we shall offer 50 dozen French Felt Hats, in tho latest designs and shapes, -at 49c. each. Eememher this price is only for Monday and Tuesday, the opening days. Yoli's Dirteil 2341 and 2345 Washington St. This is tho 6608011 or tlie year in which uniirinolrletl ch.irlatnnBpronx "I'rof." to their iiiuftcs nndhlow tliclr horns loudly through tho iiri'ss, with their matchless uiifrmmnatlcnl ".irts," hi fond nnliclpa-tioti of dunliiB lui unBuspecflng puhlu-. Such niouu-tahanliS e,an ha found In nil tho iRrco cltlca, while the country towns fairly sTOrin with ItlncrantB who bo,ve iio standing, either in ooniinuultlcs or the diuioing professlmi, and who posaeBS neither urtlstle ability or good elmraoter. ^,       ,   . To guard agalnal iiuposlMon on the part, of these "Gentry," get a cony of "Tlio �aIo|)," 20 pages, montlily (tho only rellnMc Journal iiiiMishcd in the Interest of danclnc in the world), or call upon the editor, who wiU cheerfully glvo you correct informa-tlon, or advice, upon any points jiertalnlnB to dancing or its teachers, having a full list of all re-tlable te,nohors in Uio United States. Office 3.031 WnBhfnctAn st,, Boston, Mass. E. WOODWOKTIl 1IA8TEES, Editor. It* Big CJ is UQknowledffed , tho lending rciaofly for ''Cnrcs ln^"^C'0��oirrlKieji�S:�leet, r'l TO i DAY-S. \a""'.^        remedy f Uunranteidnollo'gtor   I.,eU('X>I'I'k(�a  Or eiMO SlrUtare.     Whites. - I prescribo it :-.:id feel HfaonWbr Bate in r.commcnd- .TheEvMIsOheMIC/IICo. ing it to .-.u sulTDrers. '   C1IICIIIK�TI, CEiagSBA. J. BTONEB, M.D., u. a. .\. jjt^ DjiCi.Tun, III. tM^^-mSj^H^a^Tt^      ITlcc, 81.00. dSuoodly b23 With 8t,eam heat and power, 2 floors in factory, 178 Commerclnl st,, Dorchester; Blzo of floor, iiSilOOi llirht on all sides and elevator. Aniily to euBincor at laotorv or to 1'. F. C^ASEY, 1280 Wasliiugton st,_ Bnflcrlu!; from tho cttocts of yonthfal errora, early ^cay. waitintt weatness. iwst manhood, etc., I T;-ill �esu o Talnabie treoiiso (aealod i oontalnluB toll portieuiAts for home care, FEIEE of charge. A IpleBdld medical worlt: should be read by every mac yrho is uerrnuR and debilitated. Addreafl, Prof. I''.C.li'OWJL,ES�,M��o% Kum and ali dlstlUud liquors ar(7 iibw lately j)oiaoD,exei3pt tht^p luv\-o been purlUovU Tfaqs. \ iliu ilr^taiid oid^ {kraot^ cjd rinHhod ever opacftCMl jtopurUy lliiuora by<*3rt� dUlns tlio f u�cl oU and suro JAXkA buy il(jtuur�.    CUSIU^'Oi ? 823839   

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