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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, October 5, 1890 - Page 19

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 5, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                mm 1  1?P THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBE-SITNBAT, OCTOBER 5,  1S90-TWENTY-FOUR PAGES. 10 ITiogan lifo on ono of tlio liie raihvays of tho StatoB 0!i a, "cleimi-v" in iui on.'cino nliod. I had been oiiijiloyoil at thn shod in Louisville for 15 or 10 nuMitlis when I wont on wy first trip na liramaii. It -was Tory near bciiiiff my Jfist. I firmly liolicvo all tho voiira of flyitie nbout in an oxiiross ainco I was made an cnglnoer have not taltcii ns much out of mo as that sinKlo turn of an hour anil a Iialf. It occurred in this -way: One evening tlio superintendont at Louisville received 11 wire from Woaton-a stiitton about 70 rniloR down tho liiiu-to .send an engine to replace ouii whiuh had broken down. Ho i'amn to tlio shod nrid selected the General Gj'iint, 0110 ot the flnest loeomo-tl-ves on tlio road, Tlien ho sent ward to the onffineer and fireiium l:o coino ou duty, and start on tiieir iouriioy at 7 o'cloclc. Tho driver, Ben Norris, w�S\thore in goo'd tlmo,nnd Ira.siod him.self �with his oil-can. But Jim AVest, tiie fircm:ui, did not turn up punctually. At last, when it ^vas near tho hour for Btartinir, ho came int'i tlic slied. One glnnoc at hif. bloodshot eyes and un-Btoady ivBlk .shoiveil muhe was tho worse fordrinlv. Poor fellow! There wan only one thing for it-another flremrm must bo found immediately. If tho matter was rcferrou to the suporintendeut It would bo all up with my friend Jim. Prom that moment 1 made up my mind to take his place my nel f. leave him in charge of ono of my niatoa, �who promised to talce him home quietly. I �.had to oxjilain matters to tho enKiiieer, but no made no objections to my plan. It struck Jme at the time tliat ho took tho matter vorj-coolly! in fact, ho aoemod perfectly indifferent as to who went with hini. Time wiis up; I took my place in tho cab. Norrls sot to work at bnco, and wo moved slowly out of tho shod. Wo were off! While in the ptation I took caro to keep Bending: doT\Ti, as if oxamingf the flro, so that I should not bo recoeuized. But oneo clear of tho town I stood uprigrht, and looked aroimd. Itwaa a glorious summer evening. We Bklmmed rapidly nast meadows and corn fle ds and then dashed alone tlie bridge over the river. I began to tliiiiJi I would enjoy the run immensoly. I next turned my attention to tlio engine. As I ran my eye over tho shining machinery I felt gratified to think that its neat order was chiefly owing to my caro. I was proud of tho Grant and wondoroil it tho time Would over come when I should have chargo oil it myself. . I was so elated that I thought my companion ought to bo more lively. Ben seemed CO think of nothing but his v/ork. Ho stood Witli his hand on t-he throttle, and his eyes Utoadily fixed upon tho track ahead. I made ono or two rf inarlcs but he scarcely an-Bwerod mo. While I was wondering at his ailenoe he siiddenly appeared to roiue hini-B6lf. Ho Bhmcod at tho stenm-gaugo, muttered something which I did not nnder-Btond, then bent down and oxamiaod the fire-box. "More coal!" ho cried in a voice which almost startled ine. I complied without a word. Instead of . throwing in the coal recklessly, which I know would only deaden the fire, I piled it \ip carefully around tho sides. Very soon the sji'eod of the eiigiiio increased. AVo were ratthng along at a grand rata. I examined tho gunge and saw that tho liaiid pointed to 106. I could not see tho necessity for this rapid travelling. My companion's attention was again fixed �upon tho road before him. Presently ho turned toward mo .andexclaimodexcitedly: "Wlio.suy.s t/iat the Grant is not the fast-eat engine on tho roadV" "Moxly declared that tho President was lastor," I replied. "Then belied!" cried Norrls. "ThePresi-cent faster-wo shall see. wo shall seel" I thought bis manner very strange, to say ' the least of it. Bat I know his ways and said nothing. He was always cons dered rather ocoentrio. Besides, he was oas ly excited, and could not bear to be coutrac icted, Still there was not a driver on tlie line better acquainted witli liis business. We wore now couiing olo.se upon Wntor-ford station, and had already done about five-and-twanty miles of the journey. Ben's eves were still upon tho track. It was all clear alicad, yet 1 expected to see liiin close  the throttle and sloiv down whilo ;ja.ssiiig through the station. But I was mi.stiilcon. AA'iUi a roar and a rush wo dashed right tlirough. and the noxt nunuto' wo ware tearing along a level Btrotch on the other .side. "Moro coal! " J'ot only tho words thera-BBlvos, but tho manner in which tliey were uttered caused mo serious alarm. I began to guspeot that .something wa.s wrong. .Still, if I hesitated it miglit only aggravate h in, so . I flung in only a small quantity. "Go on-go on!" What was I to do? I didn't dare to refuse. The wild look in Norris'eyes frightened me, and I wont on shovelling in the fiiol. X '���slanoed at tho gauge. Great heavens! it marked 330! This pressure of steam, where �o cars were attached to tho engine, meant a fearful rate of speed. Tho engineer's manner was strangely altered. Instead of being silent and morose he was now excited .and talkative. "Tliat'sit!''hflci'iod,and I could b.arely catch tho words above llio roaring of tiio engine. "Now we're travelling! Ha! hal The President faster than the Grant? Not ^keljjll'll catoh up to her yet, see if I Shall I over forget those teri-iblo words! � They actually seemo.-i to paralyze me. As J stood there, clinging for .�.ujipi.rt to the side of the cab, tho av.'fnl truth tliisliod through my mind. Tiie tngiueor was mad! And, worsj still, be -was under tho delusion that faint. I ohuig on without dnrlng to look on either hand; if I had done so I think I could not have withstood the temptation to fling myself from the ongino. It was getting dusk. I was dimly conscious of hedges, telegraph poles and bridges skimming psi.it mo like so many flnshe.^. f ho hoarse shouts of the madman made niy blood run cold. He seemed to be working hi msol f into a regular frenzy. Rod Fork one mile ahead! .One minute more would dooiolotho aues-tnm of lifo or death. I drew my breath hard; I trembled liko a clnhl. Wo bad reaelicd the iiiidino. The engine wont at it witVi a dash. I glanoed out to see if any friendly llgiucs wore on tho track. IS'ota.ioul was in sight! I groaned and almost foil on the floor of tho cab. Tho sur, roundinu'objects seemed to fade from iny view, and in their plana rose up a picture of tho old homo away in England. I saw tho little cottage; I looked into my mother's face- "Oh.Hiaiik God I" Never before nor sinne did such a or}- of joy oncapo me, for at that moment I felt tho wheels of the engijic slip. Gr.adually the fiirions speed declined. NoiTis dashed.about the call storming and swearing. Vory'Sooii wo were almost at a standstill. Tho next sicond I had .imnpod to tho ground. Oidy just in time. Tho madman had turned savagely upon ' ine, I suppose nus-pooting tliat I had soniotliing to do with tho stoppage. I saw bis piirpo:3<) and du,;ked my head as a bullet from his revolver whin/.ed over it. Then I ran for dear lifo down tho track. Wlienlwasout of range I sat upon tho bank, completely overcome. Tho reaction wa.s too much for mc, and I belicvo for a niiniito or two I was aiiito uncomioioiis. But before I becamo insensible I heiird another report from tho pistol. I knew wliat bad biipponod. �    ^        , ^    , I uns aroused byaconfused iiumof voices, Upon opening my eyes I saw four men standing around lue. I got up at once, aaid we fANTED, POKER COERESS This Country ^Needs New Laws for Its Great Game. hurried back to tho engine, "hero stood.the Grant u fulTspeotV up.' tho wheels revolving witli frightful rapidity, but without pontile track witli 'olving with ........_______ _       ______ mailing tlie least headway. One of my companions spranir on board and shut off steam. Then ho canio to the side, looked down and exclaimed:     ,  ., "I say, boys, Norrls has put a bullet through bis brain!" I know it.-CChattor,       / GHOSTS IN COAL MINES. Phantoms Whioh Haunt Sisnitsd 'Woric inss and QiTe Warnings to the Uinsrs of Impending CataLBtrophes; [I'hUndfhftla Tlmcs.l Working alone in tho depths of the earth, minors arc oftentimes oxtreinoly suporsti titius, and tho recurrence of anything whioh thoy have learned to regard as an omen is suliiciont to cause them to quit work. Strange sights and sounds are claimed to bo hoard and seen by tlieso toilers. A few years siiioB an old trustworthy minor camo from his working in one of tho prinoli)al colliorios nt noon and aimouncod liis intention of quitting work for tho day. When pressed for a reason ho demurred at giving one, but finally stated that when hard at work in a now room, far distant from any other chamber, lie had lioard the measured tolling of a cliutch bell. Ho was laughod at, but persisted in going home, and subsequent events proved his good fortune in so doing, for before night the entire gallery in whicli lie had bopn working caved in, and it was only by ohimce that a large number of miners were not buried �under the dirt and clay. urions Ontcoinc of a (Jniet little Party in a Gentleman's Library. Many Dafeotive Rulas-More Definite and Better Lawfe Should bo Made. the Presi Insane id dent was  iext InoniCnt be held a revolver toward me, S'liilo his blaziiii.;- eyi.'s threatened instant eathif Idid not dc.�.i.'it. After that I ^;a^o riiyholf up for lost. Unless Providence interposed ou my behalf a horrible end awaitud mc. Up to rliis I had felt the heat op]n-C'Ssive, but now I shivered, jBIy hands i\ere cold and clammy, A baud of iron seemed to oncircle my li vayiiig fearfully. Every moment I expected to bo blo'.vn to Btoms by tho bui';-iiiig of tho boiler. Norris . levor ccaspd to rave about tho raoo with tho i'rosidoiit. And yet, tlimiijh ho iva.s so �b-orbed in his wor!c, he kept his eyu on mo ho wliolo time. Then it ^^os tliat an idc.a.flashed across po. A faint bopo spri.ng up 111 iny mind. 1 bust overcome niiu hycumiiiig; it v,'a.5 the pnly chance. ladvanoed to examine tho indicator; a,nd, though ray heart iiaiik wlien I saw tlic hand liulverin?; at liriu, I m.ade it appear as if i were dohglited, "Good," 1 cried; "we'll boat her yet! But we want mow. cual," I made tir.vard the teiuior, placed my left land upon .a lump of coal and .strnci; it across the back -with the sharp odgo of tho ehovel. Tbo Idow loft a gash from which Jho blood floAved freely. 1 gave a cry, and ;d Other mines have the reputation of being haunted, and tiiere are disused workings into which the men could not be tomptcd to enter. Soinotimes the phantom takes the place of an uncouth betist, of which large fiery eyes gleaming through tho darkness form tho chief component part; in others tlio spirit ot some comrade miner, whose life has been crushed Out in one of the frequeftt ca.sualties, stalks through tho pnllerios pick m hand and lamp burning in his cap. Not a sound does le make, butslowly traversing the miiin ga lory, ho goes to the point at whioh his bo( y, was found and disappears. Ibo news spreads through tbo mino that old Jemmy has boeu soon, and with ono accord tho miners throw down thoir tools and flook homeward to escape the diaastor the spectacle is said to betoken. Sometimes these tales aasumo a darker hue. It is related tliat in an old mino which had been worked for many years and which was a network of tunnels, a certain miner mot his death under a heavy fall of earth, while his companion laborer was unhurt, At the time there was considerable talk of the altair, and some bintod darkly that perhaps poor Tim's death was dot accidental after all. Nothing was done, however, and tho subject lost interest and died out, Tim's fellow-miner, Jack, toiled as of yore, but it was noticed ho never approaohed the spot whore lie bad so narrowly escaped death, nor would ho tr,avcrso the gallorios alono. One day when lio and a number of others were worliing together in a new drift as yet not opened far from the branch gallery connecting with tho main tunnel tlieir one hirge torch went (Uit and they were loft in darlcnesB, One of tho oldest and most oxpo-rloncod miners volunteered to go to the niMirest working and relight tho lamp, and tho other.'s ceased toil and took tho opportunity for a few niimites' rest. For a few seconds after tho footsteps of their comrade died away none spoke. Then a voice which all reoognizod as Jack's broke tho silence. "There, boys, thero goes some one with a lamp. I'll catch hini and get a light," All eyes wore turned toward the gallery, bur. nothing met their gnxe. "You had b(!ttcr comeback, Jack," one of the men slioutod after him, butthinlcing that possibly he bad seen a miner pass tho mouth of tbo room, no further attention was given the matter. iforris nstantiy turned round. I held up my right luiiid that ho might see the blood dripping from it. Then I stood with my back toward him, and pretended to bind up the wound. But 1 only wra.pped p handkerchief rmuul it, and. quick as lightuing, drew out my pockotbook. I tore oway tho leaves wliich wore written on, and, placing the l.ionl; on my kneo, scrawled these words aero;;;; rliu ilr.f t page: Driver win:, ;rrfri.S(; nuls. Then, holding it in my injured hand, I thrust it undtn'niy jacket, and returned to the engiiiccr'.s .Si�ie. AVe v.ci'c now rapidly apiiroachintj' AA'cf-tou, but Ikiiew thai Xorns did not inct'iid to stop. And I war; ri!-'hr. Ho blow along whistle, o.s if to .'^t'lrllo ilie officials, and tho engine shot Ibrough tho station like a roclcet. But I had managed to drop my jiockot-�faook at tlie siilc of tlio track. I did not dare to I colt back or make tho gbghtest siiru to tho AVcstern ollicials. If I lad done so I certainly would liave got a bullet through jiKi. ,':itill I lancicd I bad caught a gliiiip'-:') c[ a uian hurrying lor-ward to where the book had fallen. The suspcusMWas terrible. Kvou if they noticed the prHdvr?i-bi;ok, they niijrlit nut, I'c able to nndfTPtaud what was writicii in.^ide; ioritnjaybi- iiiKuviiu'ii tliat uinlcr the cir-cumstanc'.'.i liie licrawi m-.is ban.ly Ififiblo. Ibad :u:i'iij up my mini! v,-b:i". to ex;iect. Tlie next .^.taijiiu wii;; lied I'Vu-k, but 15 miles fartli'or on, 1 was .-.nro thO tra^'lc would be clear lav as Ibis place, luit oncii past it wc ii;i;;iit (�iic..iuiitcr an up train at on>'inoifKii!. If the Wf.-i Mil pccijle discovcreil my im-s-eage they -would v.-irc at once to Ri'.ii Port:, and there woi'.l.l be lime vnomili lor ili<: oliicials at tjiat .^ta'iou to groaiie a iicirtioii of tho rails b-f.ire v.c csnu: on the .�;ccnc. Bhould thi.i b.-i!ci7i','rai any .wrcnf aninfline iheM'lu'cls '.^'t-iilii "'lii* on I'li; tra'''k and tiio engine scfun f-uni' to a sLiii'lstil!. II was Willi n thriU ni juy 1 1 f i.'UioinbiTC 1 i'lat Iliere r'.)a!l just out.'iidii Uvd nt otiv:rw;:<'/, I'ud we !iiii:il h'Av.;: .sfippcd. I �ijii.' :n grr.piil ns v'.ilb hat luii.T^it, 1 wiiuld was such a pi Fork station, But if It turn passed the jilat-c resolved t'.i losi' the_ eii:-;iir..cr, (' - - Bpring i!p':",u liiui and try to y.ri-iirii the volver fruiu his liaiid. Tac tw^i: wouiil l!i;'ii be dcspcrat'.'; ami it was as i,-i-li lo d'.a in a fight for lifo as tu wait jiatiiuitly and be mangled in a collis'ou, AVhen I aiT.iuged all this in iny mind I endeavored to rehigu mvsolf to hiU:. I <'ould do no more at present. But tho agonies f suffered during that short run from AVesKin to Bed Fork I cau n'-.vor describe. The terrible Btrain of euepcus'.'. Hi-.' wild ni.'-.b, the sway-Isxs irom side to .'ii'ie, i-.-.a-'la     tci^l .'^i^k aud A few seconds passed aiid suddenly a hoarse yelj of terror burst upon the ears of tho waiting men. Tim! oh, God, Tim!" then silance, then another yell of hon'or and a sound as of a heavy body falling into deep water. "Heavens, boys. Jack's tumbled into tho test hole," ejaculated ono of the men. AA'cU knowing the usolessiiess ot starting in quest of tho poor victim in the darJino.ss anu. Indeed, quaking with inward terror, tho nitiiers awaited thocomlngof aliglit, which, after what ni^cmed to them an age, finally appeared. Tho party hastened to tho test hoio, apit sunk years ago in a ohambor long disused, and there, floating ou the surface of tho ivater, 20 feet below, was the liody ot Jack. AVhcii brought to the light ot day a sharp, deep wound on the mim?r'.s forehead .showed death had been in.stautaiieous. Orders were at onco'given to wall up tho ciitranco to tlio fatal chamber, and now its very existenco ifi unknown to the miners �working in ilie colliery. [KowYorkWorW,] A lawyer with a n.aino known to all the nation, two millionnalro merchants, a Supreme Court judge, a politician and tbo writer snt about a little round table covered with soft green billiard eloth last Friday night. It was in the oak-fiiiished library of tbo lawyer's house. Tho table was 11 card t.ablo, and tho game to which tho six men wore bending thoir energies was the American game of poker. Several intoreating questions camo up during the progress of the game, and as no names are mentionod hero tho writer fools that lie is violatiiig.no coiifidonco in telling in a general way about tho game and tho discussion it evoked. In fact, tho gentlemen are aj^reod that it would be well to give some of tiio questions brought up a certain publicity, sons to bring about inuoli-noedod reforms in the rules of tho game. No other game of oiirds is so widely or so universally played ns this ono game of poker, yet there is no game whoso rulos arc in such chaotic condition. It is called the groat national game of America, and at some tiino in his lifo every American who touches cards at all trios poker. At tho very outset last Friday night tlio writer, who liad never played with the distinguished company bo-fore, asked: "You play straights, of course?" "Of course," replied tlio lawyer, and then added: "It is ovidont you have boon travelling in tho AVest raoontly, or you would hardly ask the question. That shows tho laxity of rules iir this greatest of all games. It Is outrageous that one section of tho country-tho East-should invariably play straights while some parts of tlio AVest have not adopted, this sequence baud yet. "AVhat this country needs is a poker congress, to meet just as whist and chess congresses moot, and in convention draw up new and definite rules and settle mooted points. Tho giinie will never bo placed up-oil tho soicntinc footing whore it belongs until this is done. Straights, of coiuso, nru a valuable addition to the game if (mly on account of tbo possibilitlos of a straight flush. Tho fact that an opponent may have a straight flush ouablos one to bet on four aces. Otherwise, as no gentleman can bet on a certainty, ono could do no more than call on tbo best hand in the dock. "AVhy," he went on, "I can romorabcr whe 1 it used to bp a matter of discussion as to w lether a straight beat threes. Yet, accord ng to Dr. Pole, a pat straight should come to theiplayer once in 2nri hands, while he may expect threes pat once in 4(i deals. But all these things should be settled by the authotity of a poker congress." Tho game was a simple .?y limit, and nobody won or lost anything to sneak of at it. ihe men wore all well past middle age and were great stickers for playing exactly according to rule, not on ancount of tbo trifling sum of luonoy involved, but they wore all suocessfiil in life.and strict business principles y.-ero part of thoir very nature. Besides, th'Oy held, and rightly, that in any game wliero money is rislted there should be no opporttuiity for error-tlie rules should bo as delinlto as alegal ordinance. Shortly after tho game began, ono of tho players opened a jack pot by inistako-that IS, he believed ho had a straight when really Iiis hand was worthless. Kveiybody came in, and there was quite a big jiot on tho table before be discoverod liis mistake. Discards had boon mado and cards had been drawn. There was n. prompt discussion over what was tho proper thing to do under tho cir-cunistances, and the lawyer read out both Hoylo's and Bob Sehonok's rules. Qne of tho players had a pair of aces, and it was manifestly unjust to call tho deal off, for ho was at least entitled to open tho pot. Au-othor man had filled a flush on the draw, and as it.WA&the bpst'haud ho foltthatas JO had risked his nionby tho pot ought to go to him. The rulos were indefinite, but to tho olloct tliat the money must bo restored to oaoh player, the deal called off and the person making the mistake should put itetj\'o vUcy  cuuts.to have .that trunk carried up, oven if I cau find a man to do it." "Cert','' "And I don't know whore I caji find a man," "It'll take two, mam!" "(.Ml, ray 1 AA'ell, I'll give you a quarter to carry It up for me," No aiiHwer, but a shuniing nolso away down below, "Will you take a quarter?" No answer, but dull thuds on tho second floor, "1 say, will y-o-o-u- that a qua--" Stump, Kluni!), stump, crash 1 right at the speaker's lieols! "(�iracious! Have you brought it up four pairs ot stairs already? I didn't known, you hud started. Here's your quarter. By tho way, armi't you afraid your horses will run away wliiJo you ure violating tho rulos cf the company?" No answer. Tiio pirate lias-gone to proy on thousands of other weak-wiUod victims. Prisoned by a Ooral Eoof and Fed On Ohopped Meat. CritHbiirR rinimtch,] On a small island in tbo middle of tho South Paeilio lives a planter, the only white man on the ishiiid, which is full of brown-skinned folk, who cut and dry flio moat ot cocoanut, wbicb ho soils to trading vo.'isols, AVlion any stranger stops at his islantl bo will give him of tho best that tbo island affords; lio will get up gi-eat concerts and dances of the i,sbindors; above all, ho will take him out lo see Ids pet, which is, perhaps, tho Largest and oddest .animal that was over pottod by any man, "Come along with me," bo said, on the morning after my arrival at the islaiid, "cnmo out and see my pot." I was not much surprised when be led tbo way to tho boat, for in tbo tropics every one goes by soa rathor thiin walk a mile. Tho brown-sklnncd natives wore seated on tbo thwarts waiting for us anrl in tho bow was a barrel full of moat chopped fino. "AA'hat is that meat for?" I asked. "To food my pot," ho said, laughing. Tho crew rowed away from sboro over tho quiet waters botweoii tbo roofs. Tho Islaiiil was surrounded by coral, and from each comer of its northern siilc, which was about two milos long, a wall ot ooral stretched away northward to moot at a sharp angle live or six milos away. Tho groat sea waves broke into foam uiioii those walls, but within their protection was a triangle of water (is smooth as any lake. Out over this tlio boat rode easily nntil we had reacheil a point about midway botwoen tho middlo point of tho roofs and the Khoro. Hero tbo boy,s stopiied row-ing .and two ot them b(?g,a,u drumming with clubs upon tho bottom of the boat. "Shut your eyes," said tho planter, "if you wish to enjoy a surpriao," I closed my oyos and thn boys noon coasod thoir drumming .and some ono blow long blasts upon a born. Then that, too, coasod, and the boat lay motionlo.ss and nothintr ilisturbod tho .stillness. .\11 atoncol heanl a huge sigh, and felt a hot and slcklsh broatli. Thoro was no need tor tho planter to bid mo ojion my eyes, for surprise or no surprise tho lids would not stay shut. Not A Iiove Story. CKInotte 31. Lowater, in AmorlctuI "0 nhe Is lovely Ijeyond eoinpnre, Sweetest of nil tilings sweet," thought hoj "Proud and peneroiis, nrm and trtio, He is n initn of men," miisnrt she. "T would tliat she were mine," he thought: And slie, "ff only this man loved mo!" Tlien tliey smiled, and Iiowed, and etieh pn8S�d cd. Aiid that wti6 the end of It all, you ecol more than six lout away i saw a bugo inon .stor floating on the surface and looking at us with tho most expressionless eyo that I over saw in a living boast.   - "That's my pot," criod tho plaiitor. raised bim almost from tbo tlmo ho was a baby ot lit) feet long, and now he mcasnrca (!7 foot over all iind lots more growth to come yet." The pet Was a liporm whale. Ho seemed enormous whon coniparod wlch us men. Bo-ilnd tho great lieail tlicro atrotcliod out a ong body covered in groat pa.toluis with bariiaclos as largo ns a toacuii, and tho slock flukos ot tho tall, lying flat upon the water, seemed over so far away, yet ovtu' so much too near, when I rocallod whalers' iicconiits ot tho bohavior of this animal when enraged. The great head rose from the soa high above tiio water that it becalmed the bout Thooyo was about tho sii'.o ot an ox eyo ,0 deep violet shade Istiiut from tho eyo. Itin; the color ot the Tho Most Ooiiiraon Misquotation. [Wtlen Observer.]  "AVliat is tho most common misquotation In the I'liiglish laiiguago?" asked the inquisitive meinbor of tlie Cogburn Club thismorn-Inir a.s the purist entered. The answer camo promptly: "WJicn Groek moots Grcok, then comes tbo tug of war." "AVeil, what is the matter with that?" asked the iiiquisitno member. "That Is tho most common mi.sqttotat'on in tlio Englisii laiiguago," rc,spoiidi;d tho purist. "1 heard tbo late RoscotiCoiik.llns say once that he woji a. basket ot wine from CIcnitiiitL. V'allaudigbaiii on that quotti-tion. He wagered tliat IVIr. Vallandlghain could not tell M'liat tho correct words were, nor who wrote them, nor when thoy were written. And he iron oii ovtyj' iioint. Now liut yourselves in illr. A'aiiniidiivham's place. AVliat woiikl you have doiio?" "I should have declined to make the bet," said l;he imiuisitive nioinber. ,  . . � "And I," and I," camo from all parts of tho room. . ' "But I should not," iiaid'.^ tlio purist. " 'AVluui Grcekii joined, (ircek.s, then was the tug of war' is t!io correct iiiiotatioii. It was writiicji hy Natliamcl l.,o it. One day, some years ago, I was sailiiiif ii|i tlio lagoon, witli a barrel full of chopped meat, to bait a poo! in tlie reef beyond. All atoncol fell tho boat lifted up and ovcr-tiirnod, .and, when 1 bad riglited her and clambered aboard, there was tbo whale focdiiiii on the meat wlilcli bad hcoii scattered all about. Ho was only 20 feet, then, but that was quite long enough to give mo a good scare, in addition to my ducking. .Somnbow or other he never scorned able to i 11(1 the pa.ss back into tlio sea, and now ho is .so iiig thai bo could not get out even if ho wlsliod to. From licitig afraid of him, I i;'i'ow roconcilcd to bis prcueiico iu tho lagoon, and at last I began to feed lilm. 'From that time ho tittacbod himself to me and I found that lie rclisliod being petted. Once v,-licii I was ill I loft him uii-atlendod for sovci'iil m'ooks. Ho camo down lie htgonn much fiirllicr tliau usniil, and at ust r.in bimsoif aground just boloiv my .loiisoiiiid had lo waitsoycral hours for tlio title to float liiiii oil". 'J.'liat shows tliat ho missed llio, Ilnro is anotlicr saniplo of bis inlelllgoiico:' Wbcii the boys drum upon the bottom of tbo boat ho hears the sound a long ilistanco under llio v/alcr and at once comes to tlio surface, Tlioii it I blow bo horn he knows that I have come out to oed him iiinl comes quickly up to tbo lioul, bit if I do not blow tho born he never (Kunos clo.se, but frolics around us at long range. It is not easy to say bowiiuichsciuio a. wbalo has, but this ought to convince aiiv lino that iny big pet is possessed of cousid-erahlo iiitolligciicc." accidental I allowed an 'elevator. Perhaps tho Boy Was Gettias Lazy. rTe.vii.i Silllaiil.) Corner OJroccryii'.an-~lfi your littlo boy, Johnny, feeling well? Mrs. Smith-Yes, I tliiiik ,so. AVhy do you ask? 0, nothing, only bo pas.sod bore throe times this lunrniug and diilii't snatch a lumdtul of beans or Itick over a box, so I thought be must 1)0 aiiiug, Ho AVas Thoro. [WriRlillialon .SUir.] .Judge (to prosecuting wilnen,s)~AA'cro you present wlien the assault Wius comiiiiftod. (Ui your friend? AVitness (proudly)-AV.as Oi, yer honor? AA'ill yez piazo to luck at the mug av bim waust, that stbands over hoi the dtire? A Warrpw Escape. [j;id-i:onlinent,j JIlss Fannie-If you don't quit hugging me I'll call out. Billy Sinipkins-Don't do that; your father might lionryou. Miss Fannie-Oreat heavens! HoAV stupid ot mo! 1 forgot ail about bim I Tho Last of tho Season at Bar Harbor. [,Ind;:e.] Baggagemnstcr-Sony, lady, but you'll liai'o to pay excess tiaggiigo rate on tliis valise,  It's'JO ])riiind.s overwclglit. Ml.'-s Cliamberlaiii-1 low provoking! Ma-tliildo. I tbouglit I told yon to distribtito those engagement rings among the trunks. AWUiakers on the.Minister. [(.'liienxo .\dviiliee.] I don'tlik'i to see the face cnvoi'C.d v:\ih whiskers, especially when it is tlio face ot a minister. Much of the power of a public speaker do ponds upon tiie expression of ids face. Ot courRO ono may arguu that the boiird lias hyidciiio valiio, but tho beard has no lo.sihotic or elocutionary value. Tho Ninnotb face, too, repivsents a permaiuMicc of per-KOiial appcnranco winch the beard doiis iioc. Many people lilto to change their beards, and a cliani;e of beard cbanircs tliciii. To a minister who changes lii.-i Inward I tool s"uie-wliat as did a do;; whose master inlil b'lii to guard Ills cle^tlies U'liilo ho i\c]tl in siviiii-iniiig; ivhen the uia.ster came nut of the wali'r and wanted li'S elotln..-i i.!i;j iloij lii 1 not recognize bis master and v,oiildnut let liiiu have liis dotlics. To tbo deal the board has a .'.pceial oli-joction, Ni't a few in c^�lU'y eoii;rregation hear with their eyes, 1 sliall be clad of the dawn of llie day wlicii every luiiii.stcr has a tinontb face. GeoErophicttl. [.\iiierli'uii (.irocer.] Teacher-Thomas, you may point out to the. el.aiiS a spot uiion your map as yet unexplored and unexidainod and of which the world at b"-ge asyct ii^ in utter ignorance, i'upil-Yes, ^ir This hero ink spot. A Duck of a Doggie. [I'lieu.] Miss Canvn.sback-How do you glv3 your littie doij^gie e-xereise? Miss llidhi'ad-I speak kindly to him aud he wags his tail. AViUing to Leam. CiMlelt.J George (to debutiinto sistcrl-I'm almost sorry to see ymi go into society, Kdith: you are iiki! a ri..-i liud->o pure. :io iiiuoiM-nt - Kd'lh-vw mi;iil, y.-oi'i;e, 1 van le;ini, In tho Cloistors. [Anon.] It mny he slio will never Itnow 'I'iint J Inive niwnya loved lier soj AVltliln these elolsters cold niidaray 1 lliinii of liir hy nl(:ht, hy diiy, tfenrlly pacilng to lunl fro. If Bile Init. l\iiew!  Wlien liRlitsaro low, Amid tiie ehnntlng iuialied mid slow, 1 kneel jind lliiiii; of iier hart say lier inline for prn,vers; I ean not pray- God tinowB, but will she ever itnow'/ The Social Hypocrite. [Chjengii I'ost,] In piihUo wo Jlay often see Men who extremely gt.llnnt nro. A dumael neat Jlny cl.-ilm their seat Dcfore she's ac.are.ely in the car. Thoy seem to live Tli^ut they in.ay give To woman fail siireeiise from cares, 'file wlillo their wives A t liome-|>oor lives-      'j'' tug conl np tlireo long lllghts of stairs, The Keaaon "Why. [Jtary E. llriulley In October .St. Klcholn�,J "AVhon I w.as nt the party," Said lielty (nitert jii.st four), "A little girl foil off her chnlr, Kl.'jlil. down iiiwn the llouf; And all the ol.iier lltMe ftiris Iiei;nn to hiiljtii. bat mo- /dirt n'lhiiigh a single bit," Said lielty, 8eL-(oiiaIy. "Why not'.'" her motlicr naked hor, Kuil of deilKht to tlnrt That Hetty-li'.rsfl lier littlo heart!- Had been so -sweetly icind. "Why didn't j/ou laugh, darUng? Or don't you like f o tell?" "I did n't laugh," said Holt:.-, "'Canae it was me that feUl" ' Tho Eose of Dawn. fT.onl8R Chandler Monlton in Oetoher Century.l How mockingly the morniii:: dawns for nie, Slneo thou art gone, where no pursuing s[ieech, IKo pr.ayer, no f.Trthest-EOundlng cry ciln reaclil I enli, nnd wait tlin answer to iny iiiea- Hat only hear the stern, dividing soa ('iliat panscH not, however I beseech) ilrealiing, and breaking on the dist.int beach Of tliat far land wlioreto tliy soul did flee. Do liappy suns slilno oil flice wlioro tlioii art'/ And kind at.ars light with Jrlendiy ray thy night? And strange birds wake with iniisle strange thy morn? Thin bepgared world, where tliou no more hast part, JlisappreiuMula tlio morning's young deiiglif, And tlio old grief makes the new day forlorn. Jle Saw Ifliillions in It. [Anierii-an Croeer.] A ivcak, sickly-hicikiug individual witli a sliatvl and a pairofge.itcrsciilercilarailroad rcsluurant oiio day lui-it wook aud said to ibo waiter: "Waiter, brinifnic a sirloin steak, an omo-let and sonic baked polaloes." "Yi'.H, .sir, tiiat-" "And some baked bam, and-and a small mutton chop, waiter," "Vcs, sir, lea-" "A couple (it boltlcs of beer and half a dozen Ungli.sli iiiuibns." Tiie waiter put down Ins trav with a know iiig .smile, (iliineinj:: over at i he eouliK-r to .'ice-if Ihc pvoju'ictor was looking, he icaiied over and wlnapered: ".'iay. mister, you don't want a manager, do you.'"________ Mrn. Boyd Shot a Doer. [I'liUiuMiiliia iiiipiiier.j ?>Trs. tTohti Y. Bui'ii, irlui has buen snpnd iiig til'.'suiiur.er witli bar husbnnd and son atl'aiil Smith's fatiuui.sre.sorl in the,\ i'.. Woman's AVay. [Cloak, Suit nnil Lndlcs' IVeor Itovtcw,! They snt togeliier, side by side, AliHorbed in caipld's mission; "near ilohn, idoaiio tell," she softly orlel^ "What WHS my pa's dcolsion?" "AI.ih!" said he, "I greatly fear" (His voiee began to quaver) "3iy suit iii not re.o.iirded, dear," (I le heaved a sighl "w�h favor." . "Your pa sayu he can't see at liu" (lie sadly amoollied her tresses) 'How I, Willi aneii nn ineonie small, Clin even liny your ilreasea." "1 lliinU," sho answered (ami hercyft ' To his In (rn.st was curried), "1 niigiit lay In ii. good supply lleforo" (she iiliislicd) "we're nnirrlfld." A Summer Song. [I'"raiieeu Wynne.] In Slareii tiiii worlil was bnre heiieittli the eiiangefnl sky; It lies adorned nnd iair, Wrapt soft ill fiiinny i.ir, Willi llowers uvery where, -Now In .Inly. Hat la lileak March, lineliiiled, 'i'iie tiiriuslies w.-irideil iilgii, And ail iiie woodti were illiod Wi;li �,insii tlie hi leklilrds trilled- 'J'iii! sweet lilrd-iiotes are attlied .Now ill .filly. In yiarcii tiie cold nln fell, lint littlo iieedoJ I, for I ivns loved .so leell. Ijuve, iniflt thou lost llie spell? Is no Hiieh tiile til tell ^'o\v 111 .Inly? An Anaoreontie. [Edgnr Yutea in Portland Transcript.] Love one diiy naleep I fonml, ' AV'illi my own ills hands I lioiind; "Now, thon pretty rtTeteli,t!i(m'ltauy Wlio it la my tlite aiiali sway." "Is that iiUV" tbo elf replies. "Tiien iier iiluek, deHant eyeo, llaitglity lips and ipieenly air,- liaintlHk rosea In her ilair,- .Sii:iil in yon liio tokens lie Of tlie pasaioti-tnted slie." Jnat llien iloria pnssed that way, Sweeter tiuin a siiiiiiiier's day, - blindest iiltlo In-own-eyi.'d maid. Halt eonnding, Imlf afraid. Oai'.ed I nt Ihe vision coy. Ail forgelliil ot Ihe boy. Tin be pie.reod me to tlie lictrt With hi.i swift, iwlt-ranlillng liiirt. "Ail," I iieiirthu youiigLUor cry, "liOvo's no liaiid at iiropiiocy." � i, A Cluenticn. CU'lllliini II. IJii.'ii.nell In New York Meroarj-.l Ah .VnliU- wok enrryli:;,:; liie liiihy ifhi; ilay, To:iiiln;^ iiUul lii:- linnp ol' huinity, 1 lenr to Us I'lilleM' ami mohler no li'ivil't, 'i'o tiie rest of tin.' world a iiinre imiip of iiiimnnlts .Sinn e.iiiir; iiloni:. and wii.s lliiiikin;:;. iieiy lie, i'nll r.s iniu!li ot Annie us slio id ihe batiy. ",iti.st look at. liie iKiiiy,"  r som, P'nired out (,i; iidiliiit sound-s, I.IV;e liMpI.-.i ,n It s '1 WanKCLi llglitly Tile aieiul-i-r. UMiui :Um tireum ;ial sei'iii 01 -.vei-iiii 'flatl dio! ,Viid A ini-bHly iH^.lItli.' I.on,,:, la/ '.llie f! Wlieii -.vo -Viu'. n Ami i wiliow aeirn by r liamla ds Mile gleandng saiidji , imaui nia :y lilt.'rth.oi .111 tlu> l.ivi )u>lliii;d liol niUk- .1 ��v,= ;iiler a!l,..i\, are jitirredl, .vara. alb -� li lliiongii all tlie eiiornsliig I liear tei leuvei, ol apt big Ttie drip and pattering Of Ainil sklis. Wall eelniea f:dm aud ttvroet .^d 'latiy iingvl teet Dll^hi nialv., ai'>ug a dttilqt Of I'lUaateC. idUSltiiii   

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