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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: October 5, 1890 - Page 18

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 5, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                10 Winter St., Boston. Briutch, 3S arnrlcdt St., X.ynn. FALL. OPENING Our prico for iilioiop f lus will lip found so much 7*oli>w Uic naim] oiips fhnr si�(i]p rtoiUtt imy nrlnpfls to rlioqiifiUtics (ifUn-od. Tlicreforo, all gooils will bo fcolil Willi     lollowinR � �v^'o wnrrnnt. nil our fui-s (unless Bpeclally ftdvor-tlsod :i8 sonoud grndi?)� to I'o jirlnic qunltlr. Money will be. rcfinidcd on poods unsntlstnctory for ftuy cause, tf tfottu-ncd within two weeks of Btilo. All our n.ipes tire ni:ule with rolling collnra, pointed fronts and lined in the best manner. Kent Seal (etraorrlinnry value)............ I'lench Se:il (cxlr;i eholeo)............... 10, rriMieh Seal, AsM-,Teltiin eoUdrs.. .. ;....... HI While 'Jhlliel Liinl>'s Wool........,...... l.'t, Woid Si-Ml (extra)......'................ Jl', lllae.k Astriiehnn....................... 1:;, lllaek Astrarhaii (eeoond eholoo)., 4^7.50 .Tnd !J. I'niilucked l''roneh Seal (extra eliolee)...... 1- Afileitn Monkey (shnwl collars)........... iJi; ^nturfll'lleaver (extra). ... ;.....'........ So Penl J'lnsh (double eollnr)....;........... (1 DlncU Coney____...................... 3, IS THE ONLY STORE IN BOSTON Selling Exclusively Cloves. The Cuillaume Clove Store Is the only store soiling absolutely nothing but WARRANTED Cloves. The "culllaume" sells a warranted 7-Hook Foster Lacing Clove for ----- SI.00 The "culllaume" sells a warranted 7-Hook Lacing Dogskin Clove for    -    -    - SI.25 The "cuHtaume" sells a beautiful Imported Biarritz Clove for    -    -   -   -    -    - S1.00 the "Culllaumo" sells the best quality gloves made at lowest prices. The "Culllaume'' sells a Misses' Lacing Clove for   -    -    - i?5c. The "cuillaume" sells ftflfen's C)oves f rom 75o. to S2.00 a pair 4 WINTER ST., BOSTON. MAKE YODR OWN BOfflETS Every Woman May Become a Milliner. Pretty Headgear tliat Cian bo Prodiiccd at Small Expeiiso. Several Stylish Models and Just How to Duplicate Tliem, Produces a Beautiful Complexion. Wlutens a Sallijw Skin.' Eemoves Moth and Liver Spots. Prevents Sunburn alid Tan. , To Travellers It is IniiispensaWe.' Keeps the Skin Perfect in any Climate. TLAXTA BEATlilCE, I'lCll.IAR..........81.28 FLESH   WORM!    PASTE. SlUn Itertiicr a�inl rimple Komovor. Win reflno a 0.OAII.SE, liOUQH, POROUS SKIN, a iiosltlvo oili-o for rlJll'LES, eruptions nnd entirely removes th.at [lls.>igreeaWo KISDNESS Al-lth ivlilch BO many are nflllotetl. Per jar, gl.BO. Our complete line of toilet requisites nuil inanlcuro goods are absolutely rX'UIi and IIARMLKSS, nnd cnu be obtained at the foUo^-ing reprosenliitlvo Boston druggtcta: �loBoph T. Brown i Co,, fiOl Washington nud Hod-fordetreeta; Theodore'McleJilf .t Co., 30 Trcmont Blreel, also at Copley Squnre Store; Chnrles C.npl-l.ilne (t Co,', Coliunbus avenue, cor. Dnrtniouth Btreel; r. Keniilson, 10 Temple plivee, Kdwnvi Cnr-rol, Jainiucii Plain, RosHndalo, nnd all liiit-class denlers. liVliolcsnlo Agents for New ISiielniid Status, � WEEKS & POTTER, .Hao WaslLin^tou SU'coi, 'lilo&tdii, Muss. LondcsT ToiSet Ba^arCo., Wliolesiilts olHcc, Ko. 20 Knat 17tli st. I'renUBH on the complt\\-ion nt nhnvn iifUlitiSs frf?n,, or 6f nt to aiij* nddrosa on i-ecclpt of 4 ota.    Snlf 821 ART AND ARTISTS. �$5.00 BOOK FOR O^aVSlOO How to Build A Hoiise. Jtc Your Oio7i A I'chUect. This book v.'\\\ fi.n ve you hun-di'i'da of doUiU'fi If yoM arc. ihlnU-Injj iil)out build- __.  iilK � hOU6C. vuii ;ir<-iiit^iiiii;^ I'l iiKUiiiii}:; :i litiuRR you ouftlit to i'm Mic Hf'W hill)!;, r;i]HH''r'o Amcvlc;in AhiIiIUm;-trri', .jr iiIar fwr jr.stied on Itnilrling. Nt'tirly Innr hmi-dn-d lf.s. Schnol-li-inseR. Town Hall, Cluirches Liid oilier ]ndilii: linildlntis, toi;i.'tln;r �wiih hpciMllna-liuns. form ".t tMntnu-r aiid a lar^ie aninniit of infoi--niailtin on tliu on-ntion ol' Indlflinj^fi, sdc-H'Mi fd' site, eniplnvnuMd. o.f ARdiit^^rls. It Is wtMi So-00 to any tint', li'ui. J will send It in paiier cover liy midi pnet-pald on n-ooipl -iri^l.OO; liound in clolh, r?'J.O0. Ad-drr.ss all firdcrfi tn ,1. S. OCilMMK, I'L-ni.i.-MEn, 57 Ituau 8l.. >"l'W York, Sndt f;2B Sirri'JCREllS FROM KcrvoiiH Ocbillty. Youiliful iFidlflcrellons, LoNt Manhood. BeYoKr Own PiiysiGlan! i Mfiny nion, Irom the tffTt'ctfl of yoiithfnl Itnprudoniio, Imvo bi-ouRht nbout a vUiU- oC wfakness thut has rothK^td tlit pcncnil �jw tc;n 6o rnuoJi as to fiidiico nlmosi, o.vory other di.seimi.', and tlio rotd causo of tlio trouble �c�in:l-ly nvor lioincr aUHptctt'd, thoy ore docloi-.iii for cvt-rythiuK hut the rlirht one. Ii'ot^ciihhtaiulhik' tin* mn.ny vrhiablo rum^dii't; thiit niRdlt-iLl stdenct-' Iirk produced for ttierL-iinf of thli; i'lni^m of pfitt'Mits, nona of tiie ordlniir.v ir.odv.s oT tit;atint:nt ciTiicta tnu'y. IMirlntt our (ixLcnt^Jve (Mdicj^c ami hon-pltiil prni^tlpi; wo hr.vf: HXpcfinuMiU d vllh ond diwcovL'ieil novmid cojJL'l*nlinl"d rPMio-dWh. The Rccnnjpanylnijr preiicrtption li: of. i'ei-fd as ii fcrtain luid wpcrdy ciir*^, lui hundrf-'ds of ciiiw;; in our piiiuliic have bi'en I'osttnvd to porf'.-ct henph by ill use nftnr fill i>tljt>rmm'(iic(iffiilt'U. rcrfci'tly pnn>(n-rifdlt-nthiimntdjc utitdlntUt-'prfcpaiialuuoX tiiiu pr�;.'ii;rlrjLli.iii. tfc-Erytin'oxvlori cocr, 1-2 diacbia� Jiriruhcbln. 1-2 drairhni. I'clonlrni ]>ioic.'v. 1-2 drachm. Gf'!:-i-rtiln, JI pi'nlii:;. Kxt. '.'MXhVtxti .i;niir.T(ivlcolioUc),2prr�iiiB 3->;l. h-pt'^iitlrii, 2iicruploi Givccrinn, q. r., 3lpJ:er,:ji'i:ij:. TakM Mir, pill at "p, Tn., nnd nn* otlitT (Ml Kolnjr to ijcri. In i'or.'.o cii-scs It v>\\\ ' i.c-iuoes.'.jLry for the jiutlcnt T.o laku two plUs r.l lK-dLliiH-,inaii.tiik' Lhu mimbL-r ihn o iidhy. Tins rcnirdy isail.'iptt.ri tocv(.-iy cou'iltion of ncrvo;!-; dPi'JHtvand �\veul:t;rs.'i In iM!hyr�rx, n-nd uipc-flttUy In ll]o;-c c.r.^v.s ri'sultin^' from iiriprmJ'jnn-. TJio n?cuiK'riiti^t,! poA-f.rp at this ici^iojativeurotruly u.'^toiii.'-hiiir.tiotl ltd \l^f co:nlrn.i'-'d fr.r n t,lHii-t ttmt? c!ir .'.iiwhownuM prt'I'crldolitilnUof UK l:y rtjinlttlm; $l ai'ci'uroly ucaJod pack-u;,''' ciiMtinniac: CO jillif, rait'l'uUy com-poun^iod.-.v,:i ho RfjiT. liy rrnmt mail from jitir prlvat* Pih.irriory. or w-j will jurniih C p,-w:l:r.irc!(, wliloh will uurt moat cttsos, l'or$i Addrei.s orcrdl on KciW ringlaiid Msdical Institute, 21 Trt-riiont Uo*.t, liotitoii, .Mum, Coiiyrii.dit,       uy V. 13. UnxUL NEHV.EANDBB.AiNTREATiy!ENT Mfi:;:ic I'll- Jly�,;,Tl!i, Id;:/,'. noHS, I Hh, N(-uralBlu, Wai. :ihi  i'll i d'^aill, I'MniMi uri'Old ,\ U'-", J'iaiTcniU'!.n, J,ii.-.I V ;:i 'i'ii' : 1 ui'nluiilai y Lnh!.'f, and SjHTiii^i;''! rl)'.  r:,r,--'M Lvn-t-r-*?* rn.m of ihcVridn, t.''^r ��vi'i-i'.iiul.;':;)'-'.. i;a.!i l.t,,\- r 'i'.ajiiti tr.i- uioMh',- ir'Mllii'''-il. Sr'l ri l>nx, nr i^l.v Jnr j-J,, jii^al  i'r.'p.i;rl, i-;.. h  ordfr ImJ tlx li-,-.-'^.'w;il     'k1 piHTi!.-.K( i  ^�uiwiinTi't'        u-iund ui'-ii'-vll ih' :rt-:it:M!':;l ladhln .'nr.-.     :.r.-S;:fe, I'roinijB, llf f i'Cl u;l1 , lii' (.;,.::'i'iJ :m;u "tiIv ^-'juuln-' \Viini.Hi(.*� NaU'it- tiici. /-.i all '.iM:::i,i.->:.^. M ^. :]1 'iU-'":', h'-'MUf Jroin (�l.i-Jt-cMiil ni p;-:-;-, fl. (.w-i. <;<�<' -\:."   , A somewhat similur error led to am'u.sing coniplicitions at Cai'l.sb.-ul List June. James 1. Iving of Buffalo visited the.Bfihciriiaiispa lor a cunrsu of ircntuicut, and the local press and the cnro-list (by a natural thongli none the less serious hUmdcr) announced liini as .linui s 1., king of Btiffalo, in America. This bliuider seemed humorous enough at first, but prcst-ntly serious symptoms v.-erc exhibited. Tho ijarvemis, tho sycophants, tho tuft-hiintciK, tlio snobs, the iJarasitcs and' tho heggars swooped do-mi on poor Wng; the hotel people fleeced him, and there seemed t,n be a general conspiracy to mulct him. Ill vain lie sought to convince his pcrsor c-.iitors that it was all a hideous mistak-)- that he w-as no royal persoiiace. Heaetually had to flee tho town, nnd I sullSl't)Uontly hl'ard that hi> was in hiding in Mnricnbad under the alias of Thomas Thomp.sou. vr!i, ^;^:!(Tn;i. '�"!:H'r-.ip;l'Jii ____.  .   - ;Hi dl�.�;;^��^, i . h.,-nrl A LFE A Poor Widow and Eis^ht Chiiaren left to the Mercies of the World. "He could havo been Bavort If ho ^*ctnlil only Imvc come to Ur. 'Wiui-cn." So litn poor widow ihndts, nllcr fifctnj; tliu prciit nnmbcr of r;vs(T> of tin- tmiuti KlTid �whirl! are turned nway cured every day nllt-r one or two inapnetlc ireiUnientfl. Owinp tn ihR ^reut rush to 6Rr; this vonderfnl Ijoctoi-in Stptt'mbyr over Three lUmdrc-d Piwicnt* wero Lurnod away, and, by IhMr carni-ft (i'.diclia-tlon to be cured Dr. Warron lias i;*'nvnt*d lor u few dayfi niorfi Ui pivt* couBuUnilonB, ireat-nHJiit and niedlc-lno froo to prove i.i ihe jmldla thai he IS tbu Orcatcbt 2..ivinp,- >9i({;'iicttu I'liyhiciJi" of tho ayii, and that be i:an l�y the kltii|ilo layiutr ou uf liaitds cure chronic cahfft -ivhiidi have been pruiiuunt:ea Incuraldc by fcnine of the hcBi dcictore in tJie Wiirld. I'ndcrhi.s Muffiustic ttiuch tb"? hiinenre madr- lo walk, the bUnd iM h<;t,-and thp vleaf to her;r. in fuot he can in a few iMli.ut--a r<"hevf. "(ill uf tlio illK which (leih Is ]ir-!r to." lf#' ivill curt; Drspeptola and nil Stoinaidi .-\jlii(i-:i[F., Inilaniinailon, Jlardcidn^ and all dlrtcahps of iht- Llvci, fi.iarrh, J(rnnl�tatl^, Aalhnia. and all dl.iea(^r:.i the J.iun.-h, .'^frtdula, AliKo<'Ah"s, TninorB, Ji...lanj^ and Hui nij.t; Jiiinmi-b, f:au'^erons Atllku.onB, all Cljpmi''. .Si.ln Ji|t.(-itH ' Aillutiunti ii(-cullar in wnif?!. Dr.  Warren will (jiv i to *'v*i*5* parfy tnlji-T tt)iiMiitntle>ii, o;ie tiX'iitmvjit iiiK': jnc'tUiiue fr�-�', in jirnvt- that he can and C'-'-i- ciij-i- thi- ul^i'v^- i-hronii; di>' a.s i'.'-na-n'.b'. 1, tlr.b clier la t'ljly i;^.!ld fur tbe month OiUtf Sto-arh: l>.;;o  . (Uu the fold mi the bias as wide again as it is to bi' Avhi'ii ill plare. l'\ild the cilacs in once towaril the middle and Jiiaki' a ibit .seam, tr.king a sliiirt .slitch iirf^l on cm! .si'Jo and ihen on the other. Tho raw i-dgus uiu.st meet on the imderfide of liic fold. Lay the fi-ild thus made, aro^iud the edge ot the brim or whi.rovrr on the brim it is di'sir.'d to jilare ii.piaitiu jdrtce, merely Eticking the piu.s through tho velvet SO'not to. mar it, and bllnd-.stitch down thu edge noarost tlio bi'Jm, stretching tho velvet gently, Tho other edge is not sowed, koopingin place -without it and fitting more smoothly. For tho "milliner's fold," Used still on many bonnets for the bridle strings, a piece of velvet rather more titan throo times os' �\vide a.s' tho fold is to bo when made, will be required. Fold tho loft edge in toward the middle, turning down ono-thivd the entire width. Fold' tho right 'edge in once for half'that distance, which will bring tho twoi-aw edges together; now fold righii side over once more, wliich will bring tho fold in tho middle of tho string, and blindatltoh tho odgo down. The stitches may bo taken through upon the under side for greater security, since they will not show. Tho soft pufflng u.sod so much on the brims of hats and bonnets is put oninone-of two w.ays, either as a binding or as a facing, dopendiiig upon whetlier tho edge is to be covered or not.' ' In ono cano the volvbt'is gathered and sewed along one edge upon' the right side ot the brim; in tho other it is sewed upon the under side between tho wire and tho odgo. In both cases,' the velvet, or whatever tlio material, i.s th'on' turned down and caught in soft plaits iiiround the -inner edge ot the crown. Thcptifflng must bo cut on tho bias and put dii 'rtliko' on both sides of the middle; tlid fulhcssi'iiV poke .shapes is massed above tho face,' growing less over tho oars. Some puffed facings are in puffs above tho face, and laid in lengthwise folds along the Sides, the lower odgo being forced under upon tho wrong side, leaving tw'o oi^ three tuok-liko plaits along tho oiitoif btiin. Plainly covered frames, such as ai'O made in velvet, also in silkfor mourning wear, are, treated as are plainly c'oy.o'red brims de-Bcribod above. Tito top and sides of tho crown are covered wdth matorial-out by a paper pattern' tha.t is cut to flt.tho shape. Stretch the top of'tho crown in place carefully aud'basto jui3t below tho'-angto made by top of crown and .sides. Then baste side piooo arourld in place with long even stitches upon wrong side'and turn down ovor crown without pulling velvet far enough down to show the seam. Some milliners turn down tho upper raw edge of this crown piedu and do not sow it at all. Have Beam (diagijiial) 'com6 uiider trimrriinsf. Tho fashionable draped toques, round; liats and bonnets of this soaso'n' liro not so ea.sy td-make as would appatir at first 'sight.' It is only a stop from artistic folds to merely a-\vrinklod mass, and the-good inilllnor is caroful not to ttUto that step. Do not miiBS your hat trimniingg by ex-poriinentinK, but take a piece of old cloth, silk or vol vot and do some trial draping on tho frame with that, and when you ha-i'o caught a successful arrangement of folds, nnd trying the hat ou find it becoming, it ia a simple matter to repeat the design in the - new fabric. And so with bows and twists. It is amazing that -women who can paint pretty well, embroider and so on, havo so little knack in raakuig bows. Notioesoveral pretty ones in tlio good milliner's window, and then practice with some old ribbon (pressed smooth) until you can duplicate the triumph, you are trying to copy. Tho littlo walking hat is of folt, tho brim and crown being braided .with parallel rows of emal,l silk cord, This is sowed on precisely as hat wire is put in, is rather slow tvork, but ofCect-ivo trimming, .Keep clean by.bru,shing with a very soft silk hat brush, or else by brushing it with a spongo wrung - dry from a littlo ammonia and water; do not use a whisk broom on silk cord ever, A soft �vrAucrNGHAT, twist ot velvet ia laid insiile the rolling brim and a cluster o�.tips oriiaments the side. . I'he brim of the rocoption hat above the faoini? is embroidered with fine silk cord, -wrought on tho folt. Being an imported model the strings are of number 12 velvet ribbon, but that Width has not proved vel-y popular on thiiJ side yet, and American milliners are still using'number seven or nino. Tho pretty Ghirrcd crowns appear again, this aea.'jon in cr.apo and silk for mourning, in silk and plush for children's wear and in velvet and softer stulTs on di-essy capotes Horo, again, a piece ot old silk or cloth can bo used for a trial crown to .save injuring tho real trimming, until one is tainiliar with methods. Millinery goods do not stand handling; they mustbe put together deftly! and abcu-rately at the start, and not -worked over and over. The "ropo" shirring is used for crowns, the rope being a large, soft cord. Tho simplest way ot making the semicircular shirrings is to cover the centre, of the crown with a piece ot the crape, say, gathered on fall; then shirr a long bias piece of the goods in parallel rows (marked oft previously with basting threads), ','not putting in cords or drawing threads up until 111 1 the 1;ncks are run ' in. Then form the halt circles by drawing each .succeeding row toward the centre more clcsply; when iiiplaoo over the g.athcr.ed centre piece that Vi'lll appear to ba part of tho shirred piece. A dainty little theatre bonnet is ot pinlc crepe do chine with sliirred crown, the close brim bord'.n'od with a narrow band of -wired jot n.bovo which pink crushed roses iiri! formed into a low coronet, Black velvet ribbon strings are added from the back where they are fastened in a. tight little bow. Jto.'it milliners will confess that they thkatuf. hoN7,'f.x. "hate to lino" bat-; and bonnets, not that it is so very hard to do, but it is a fussy job. Take a stniight piece ot Jlat lining long enough to go siuonllily around the inside ot the crown, and wide enough to reach from edge of crown nearly to centre of same when done, allowing tor turned in cdifcs. Hold hat or bonnet carcrnlly upside down to prevent mussing tlie trimming, and be.'jiu at the back. Ilohl the lining with the lower edge of the wrong .side just below the edge ot the crown, and t'llce short stiTcbes vertically through the lining and the edge of the hat crown at int^.-rvals of an inch or so qiiito around the hat. Run the ends neatly together ;;ud gather the top ot linim;-, turning it dov.-ii once and making a little hem, through top nurrov,'fastu is run, drawn up and tied in a little bow. 'Tliei-o are bonnets and bonnets and hats and hats, and trimuiijigs vary as do tho v.-inrls, but lliei-n;n-o al-.vays models galore lo be .studied (not .slavishly copied) which may bo adapteil by tho close ob.scrversoskil-fully as to nia'.ic her chapeaus seem e.spe-cially designed for her. Kii.ack-that evasive w-ord that stands for genius in niillincrj--is somewhat ii matter of innate lasto, but largely aninttcrof practice, ami not beyond the reach of any ob.-iervant and painstaking body. Avoid over-trinnning a hat as yna would the plague, and avoid fasteniiigon the trimming til look as if it were sut in plaster. Little l;-iiir.uiiig, that little i-rood, and put in place to look .".s if it drifted there-these are characteristirs of Parisian inillinery. IiIiBtakes cf Women. "Women make strange! inistakea in tho nrtistics "to coin a v.iirii-ol ih-(^s.s," says uu artist, "but one of the strangest is tho way i.u -vvhich tlicy iro^'.t their necks wh-jn -ivear-iiig a low cors;u;e. Nearly evci-y woman bulievcs lh:u .'i bl;ick velvet bji.ml licigijtcns till'beauty of her iK'ck. Especially if it bo 1(111,7 and .slender docs she insi.st upnu put- HEB BEST GOf S Will 1)8 M^de Probably of Bengaline, lovely. Combincations Possible in Fabrics ', of the Season. Produotions Eioh-witli Embroideries-Novelty in Sleaves. ' HE "bBstgo-wn" of a good many women this'season-vi'ill hoof tho lovely-bengalinos, which In toxtm-o and coloring are among the most beiiutiiful fabrics shown this fall.   . Tho dealers consider them in many respects superior to tlio ottoman silks which they resemble so closely in the heavy cord ot .thoir weaving; and certainly tho filling of pure wool seems !to add to. their richnoss without taking from tho lustrous softness of their silk surfaoos, Tho straight bengalinos are woven in the plain hotiyy corded dosigu, but there are. varieties wliicli show other woa-vings, iis the mitsoovite, which has a cluster, of three tiny cords alternating with a heavier flat, cord. The coloring of these new bengalinos is something marvellous in its riohneas, the peculiar texture ot the fabric seeming to give offocts not obtain.ablo iij other goods, , In a bea.utiful, lino of this inatorial soon recently, there '-(vere some most exquisite shades. Perse, judoo, anemone, vervain, chnrdon and dahlia were now varieties of that reddish purple which has been miS-oallod heliotrope so long, the tints ranging from the palo "perse,"-which is like the Persian lilac, to tho dnrkestshado called dahlia, the anemone, vervain and thistle (ohardou) being exact reproductions of the colors of those flo-n'ors. Maize and ripe corn- are sufficiently described by their names, as .are citi'on and straw colors, and there was, beside, a deep, rich orange, which under the gaslights, and soltenod by folds of soft white lace, was simply glorious. A puro blonde or a real bnmottoiu subh a gowm would be a picture I. Printemps (spring), acacia and fougore (fern) were throe very lovely shades of green, tho first quite light, the tender green of the' early spring foliage, and the last the deep, cool-looking, yet rich green of ferns in the shaddowy recesses of 1}he -wood. Neptune .and Dauphin are grayish greens; Undine ai-id Triton are, of course, shades of sea green ; tho Nile green is a well-known tint, very light; the emerald greon has all the vivid richness ot that- lovely stone, while tho Russian shade is much darker, and tlio myrtle green'iilmo.st black. Among pinks wore rose, azalia, tulip, gladiolus (glaieul), and peony (pivoino), two .shades of coral pink, a deup vivid cherry, and a fuchsia -which had a suggestion of purplo in it. Three lovely grays wore appropriately named argent (silver), nickel and platinum. Aniorig the blues were ciel (sky blue), !i?,uro, bouvracho (or borrago), a -v^ery bright vivid blue like tho flower of that name, bluet, etondard (standard or banner), and the dark marine or navy blue. Turquoiso and email (enimiel) are lighter and darker shades ot the same color named .after tho turquoise stono; the goal, or jay, reminds one ot tho feathers ot that saucy bird, and the tint c.allod libellnle gets its name from tho glo.?.sy blue ot the dragon fly. The rods are beaiitifu! this season, rich and glowing, from tho coqulicot, or poppy,-througli cardinal, pourpro .-md grcnat, or garnet, to tho caroubo, or ciirob. , Fuvet or ferret color in a very light brown, almostcafo-au-!,ait color; bison is a .shade darker, followed by taliac, mordore (a rod-dish brown) tn loutro, or utter, which Ktands for tilio vi^ry darkest tint seen in otter fur. Beige and castor are new varieties of our old friends, the mushroom color.-f, .and morocco (maroquin) and miu'ron, or chestnut brown.'i are also lovely r.h.ados. Fau-votto .and bouvrouil aro pinitish browns, tho names borrowed from the warblcv and 'bullfinch. The daltiia- (from tho date palm) is a beautiful shade otold gold. To con-ibinc with the bengalincs in these exquisite colors, are the most beautiful brocaded and figured stuils ot vavious sorts. Thus with a very rich shade otdark heliotrope was shown a pcau-de-soie of the same hue, wlni-li ^vas covered with a lovely raised design looking like a network of plush and silk coi-d.s, in the knotted meshes of which Ruial! oval Ic.af-Uko figures ot tho .sam(! v.'ori' cntniigled. A hand.-ome mcr-dora or reddish brov,-n, bi~,d for combination a peaii-cle-sciie, u-itli a large conventionalized liimrc in pliish and silk brocade. Another handsome juittcrn of peaii-dc-soio ting black velvet almul it, An.l tbiis hlie | had a quuintiv conventinmilized vine in mal-.i'S 11 look even longer and sii'mU-rcr.     I ciil(,prs ou a black gi-oimil, loolting old-fash- "Tlie clTcot fit black i-li'sc up to the neck and face ij alu ay.-i in make tbcm look thin. A v(:r>- .stout wom.'in.ivilh a neck toci iiliiniji, may employ thii lilni'!; b.and wiili advantage, lint the thin v.-oman slinubl v.car a �li!.-iit vii-ibon, oj- blue, or a string of pi-ari.s iir of gold brruis if she -wants to produce the pk-asiiul.'il effect." ionod i-iumgh to have been -\^'o^u by our g!-anilinotlic)-.s. Brocaded vclvet.s are al.sn used with these, a dark myrtle green gruund for exnmplc, having a quaint viiu-like j>at-tcrn in fuchsia piuk silk sunl: into it* SiU-fii(-e. 'Then there were bengalincs with pompa- dour effects, scattered all over,-with tiny, bright-colored flowers. Sometiiiies these, flowers wore combined with large satin, polka dots a-s big as a quarter. Thus a black bengaline had the large satin' spots also o� black, with aspray of tiny plrik, flowers with their green loaves dropped as it by apoidont over tho surface. Ponu-do-'' soio in various colorings is also shown with tho flower-besprinkled surface. Those who like stripes -will bo pleased with tlio bengalinos, -ivhioh ..iliow S.vo-iiioh stripes ot satin alternating'with tho same of bengaline. One of the lovely no-v^elties of 'the Season-is the- "ombre," or shaded Vel-vet. 'This comes only in a very rich and expensive quality, And the ofEoct of narroAV-ahadod Btripesls pi'odiicod by the manner in which the pile of tho fabric is wot-on in, being thick and olb.s'o in tho 'centre of each stripe, and thinner on either side.- Tho'thinnor places allow tho .silk back to Show through and so the shading is produced, the'pile being always of black. Dark blue, ycillbw, a'lid hunter's grecri are some of tho sliado's-shown,-and a gown-which has sleeves of this hiindsome stuff is a rich afl:Bir. -   .' Tho fashion of hatdng sleeves of another material from the body of the sarmieijtis one which is likely to Inet for some time.-Beautiful vel-vets in bigplalde are inajported' .for this special pm-pose, and a plain dross with .this addition needs no other tTimming.- Pattern aloovos are also sent over from' Paris, usually of velvet richly' embroidered-in jet, siilt: or cloth applique. A :cdllar is sent with . these, and tho whole makes a lovely, doooratidn for a plain gown.  ' The regular pattern gowns of the season are lovelier than ,e,vor. . They rang.e'in price from 334 .tp .iJS.BO, .and some of theta are as, handsome for:a "best go-\m'! as are,the ben-zalines. A lovely camel's hair foulo in dark-heliotro'pe Hvas, shoivu, -pHth appliquo,d .Stv-ures of velvet.'outliiied with silk embroidery, the pattern : giving a bordered front with slee-v'es, collar and bolt. Another had tho camel's hair oi.tt out in a floral design along tho lower edge, over velvet of the same shade ivhich showed beneath, ' I Though not the most expensive tbis was one of the ' handsomest  designs, shown, others had borders of astraehan -woven in, and among the prettiest was ohe -which had a wavy zig-zag band of velvet embroidered in silk along its edges, above -\yhioli.-were tiny flowers scattered over the front and sleeves of tho gpwn., ;.           ........ OiU' illiujtrations merely hint , at. � the beauty of these go-mis,'. as their coloring and really lovely designs cannot be shown in-acut.  : � �  (For information received thanks are duo Messrs. Shepard, Norwell & Oo;) ' ' Jean KiNCAiD. MARBta-GB m HIGH SOOEBTY. It is Too Much- Like Traffic. TMnis a London Paper. Can anything,' asks the writer ,of 'Truth's society letter, bo more heinous and revolt-� ing, when critically. scrutinized, than our present methods of marrying and giving in marriage? . '     ..   ' Up to tho ago of 17, or thereabouts, we carefully odticato our daughters to the observance of oxocssiyo and exaggerated' modesty and purity, and then, pro.stol instantaneously half unclothing them, niglit att'.n- nisht wo exhibit their suggestively displayed nnd decorated charms to the excitable gazi3 of possible purcl-.asers. Call it "going into society," it you will-still, practically, this is what it comes to. In youth wo impress upon our maidens tho beauty ot disinterested love, we feed them on fairy tales and polished poetry, and then, launching them into the world of tact, suddenly reversing all former precepts, we inculcate upon them the .absolute necessitj- of marrying for money. Their education is lU-tilicial and based on the unconscious desire ot Itonting a spurious article on the matrimonial market. In the seductive atmosphere ot music, perfume and luxury, the eligible man, dazzled and inebriated by the illusive surroundings, is ciitranpod bytho combined blandishments of the selling parent and the child on sale. Can this possibly bo a proper method ot contracting the inost serious and important compact of human life-a compact which. i( it is in tho least likely to prove even tolcra-bl Tr., P. G. Home of Ciim-bridfee and Alonzo Wheeler of Houghton & Mififin. Mrs; Payne ot Winthrop will be Pocahon-:taa and Mr. Barry of tlie Traveller, John Rolfe. Little Nana Gi'imko maJtos a ohorm-iiig Indian child. In tbe Russian wedding feast Miss Laura Lee, the portrait arti.st, who has ]ust returned from Paris, makes a picturesque bride, and Mrs. Foster of Hull a handsome mother. ClMrs. Merrick of East Boston is the Dutch bride and JEss Bosio Byrne leads t le dance.-EG. F. Farren is the Japanese bridegroom and Misses Annie Lee and Grace Farring- lon, tht) butterflies. Miss Mabel Howard, Messrs. Flockton, Collins and Butler form the Japanese band. The Gretn a Green drama is nnder tho care .of Mrs. F. C: Lord and iaraily of Roxbury. It will bo remembered tbat, these young 'People and their friends played charmingly in the "Prussian Honeymoon" last winter. Miss Edna Lougeo will be the dainty bride and Miss Emily Browne the mother. G. F. Darling of Boston will be tho Stanley and Miss Veasey Dorothy Tennant. This tableaux will be very impressive-with tho .seven clergymen in their robes and tho choir bbys standing on either hand, and will show'in an imposing way tho soleinn rite of marriage in a Christian country. Educational, and Industrial tTnlon. The Women's Educational and Industrial Union is constantly in need of more funds -with which to carry on the noble work it is ijioing for and among women, and to supply present needs its friends have,planned a mammoth Dickens bazaar and carnival to be hold.in Music Hall for the -week beginning Nov. 10.  � At a meeting of thaso interested in this work, lield in tho hall of the union recently, Mrs. Abby, Morton Diaz presiding, many plans were matured nnd outlined. It is proposed to give the first fonr days and evenings of tho week up to tho bazatir. Booths and tables of a "Dicicens" character iiave been planned, caoh to represent some book ot the great author, tho attendants to bo ilrossed in appropriate oostmuos, etc. Among these are tho following, with their manager.s: - Miss Kato C. Phelps will havo a candy table to be called the "Lollipop table." Mi'S. Kate MacMahon, 8X 'Westland av., will havo charge of "Jounio Wren's doll tiible." Mrs. E. B, Kellogg will have charge of "Botlin's Bower." "Silas Wcgg's stand" will be under the cat'c. of tho iniistrial department of the imiim; also "Lfttie Dorritt's table," with Jfrs. G. O. North chairman. "Mrs. JoUaby's table," for tho sale of .books, periodicals, etc., will be managed by Jlrs. ii. E. Harkins. ThcKenwigs will have a stand ior tho sale of fancy articles, the -whole family being represented in costume by yovmg ladies ot .Somervllle. Mrs. E. A. AVood, of 10 Durham St., will manage "Dr. Marigold's pro.scriptions," and everything wlileh this prince of "Cheap Johns" used to sell will be disposed of from the tall of a real cart. Mrs, H. B. (ioiiig, 70 Huntington av., will haA'B "Peggotty's boat." Miss Louise Crump has tJie Christmas Carol table. "Sairey Gamp" and "Betsey Prig," will h.ave an apron table under the charge ot a member of the union, assisted by Iili-s. L. P. Holdcn and Mr.=i. D. C. Drft^v. "Gad',-- Hill Garden" will bo a flower stand, ill chavgo of Mrs. J. H. Hecht. Mrs. C. E. (rlunn and Sirs. Harkins will have Caleb I'lunituer's toy slicip. Tho Old Curiosity Shop, the Jlicawber table, the pawn bioker's .shoji and host.sof others have been suggested, many ot wiiich will be organized. The restaurant v.-il! represent "The May-polo Inn," and M-ill lie made mo.st attrai-tive by the presence ot Miss Dolly Vardun and her frii'iuls. There will be :i Dickens baz.aar paper, edited by Mr.s. Abliy liloiton Diaz, wl-.o will bo assisted by atile tmd distinguished writers. On Friday evening ot the week of the carnival, tableau.\ troiu Ilii-kens will be given,and the v.-holewiU clo.s-:' v.-iih a grnud Iliolccn.s costuiue bull .Saturday iiiglit, wb!i.-|i will begin witli a Knmd n-iaicb ot cii!ir!!ctr.'r.s fro-.u Difkeus' books. The i'Xecutivo i'ouiiuitti'e mi ilic carniviil includes; ib-s. rn-njaiuin F. I'itini'u, cliair-man; Mrs. Boiiton Whindcn, sccrciiirv; A\illiani Browne' Kclicw, trea.surer; .'Irs. "lVilli,iniI!niu-iU! Kehciv, ii.ssi.ut.int (i- .j j.,jL�i> i-. Pr,actical Value of Ph-ilo_.^.. , _ Tulia Ward Howe: "Special Legislattoh oa Moral Energy," by Mrs. Kate ' Gannett Wells and "Study of American History," by Mrs. Kate Taiinatt Woods. A large party will leave Boston for the congress, Oct. 1.3. ' A conference of the offl. cers will be held Oct. 14, and the formal opening of the oongress will take place on the 15th. _ �   - .Ktorol Etiubatlon Araooiaidon. TheBrigiiton and Allston branch of-!tbe Moral Education Association was organized Oot. 16,1886, by Miss Kate C. Phelps of Boston. Miss Venah J. Wai'ren was chosen chairman and Mrs. Sarah E. Willis.secretary, which offices they held for three years. At the death of Miss W.arron Miss Annie M. Judson was elected president and Mrs. Joseph Bennett secretary. During the five years of its existenoe this branch has given to the public .30 lectures by tlie ablest women of Boston, Kato Gannett Wells, Julia Ward Howe, Mary F. Eastman, Dr. A. M, Boecher, Henrietta L. T. Woloott, Ab'ijy Morton Diaz, Dr. Salome Morritt, Babu Chatterjee Mohimt. and George Parsons Lathrop being amouB the number. The association has made an annual contribution to the Youiig 'Trav� ellers' Aid Society. The society is in a prosperous and growing condition and stands for all that is best in-the .social, intelleotual and'moral life of -ward 26. _, Olulj Meetings. The meeting of the comnoittee of ootmolt., and co-operation for the election of officers -will be held Monday, Oct. 6, at 10.30 n-, m., at the Woman's E. and I. Union rooms, 08 Boylstonst. Tho first meeting of the season of the We w England Wheaton Seminary Club will ba held at the Thorndike, Boston, Sat-urday, Oct. 11. Tlie afternoon will bo devoted to music, the topic being "Violins and Violinists." At the next literary meeting of the'- Woman's Press Association, to be hold - at tho. Pinker House Wednesday, Oct. IB, at p. m.. Miss Rene S. Parlts will read a paper on "Immorality in .louma-lism." High- tea will be served as usual after the disousslou., We iaTO jnst mftde one special depnitment h( our Btor'e for tlie sale ot Eomaanta and odd patt terns of Oarpetings only, and any one in soaroii o( bargains cannot fail to lie pleased witli the im' menee variety, and alao the very lowprioos, wUoi are marked plainly in red ink on tie tags, and f�( one-halt the repil.Ti cost. LoT7oll Extra Snpori 25c. to 65c. per yard, Roxbnry Tapestry, 45c,to 77 l-2c.poryari Xio-(vell i^rnEeels, 75c. to $I.OO per yard. Moquettes, Qf .00 to SI.SO per yard, VolvotE, 75c. tn Si.25 per yard. �Wiltons, $I.OOtoSI.75por yard. Straw Battings, lOC. to 40c. per yard, Oilcloth, 15c..to 30c. per yard. ThoEO contain from 1 to 40 yards oaoh. 25x3 y.-.rds........... 2x3 y.aTdB............ 3i4 yards............ ...........55.63 ...........Sf5.75 ...........S9.0O B IBiSEin, Bnyrnas..................75c, SGiolin. Bnvra.i5.................SI.50 SOTBOin, iJaiyrnas................S2.50 36x72 in, Bisyrraa................S3.50 Ton canijfuruisii your ho'.ir.e cnt-rn from otur Samnant D-ipai-tiiCit and t&i'i 50 jier cent. WHOLESALE ANO RETAIL, 597,598 ari!l601 WsshingtonSt Oiip. Globe Xlieatvc, Boiton.   

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