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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, October 5, 1890 - Page 17

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 5, 1890, Boston, Massachusetts                                TOE BOSTON EDITED  BY FRANCES  HODGSON BURNETT. THEra stehak ltjok. Boys Afisft efftory That ViTiU Interest Who Can Sail a Boat. AST off that lino and �been made tho 'broozo had freshened oonsid-orably and kept on iiicroasins. They vard able to make soTOral knots an hour, and hy iniddnytlio ontrnnoo of tho inlet could bo soon where tho sloop lay during the ijalo. Tlioy.roaclind it hy 2 o'cloek. It wn.s now hlowine a stronsrhreozo, hut fortunately the tide Avas with thein. It was a very anxious Hioinont for them all as they approached the land. Jack ordered all sail to bo taken in on tho sloop, and let it drop aslom, as tlie hrig had headway enough with that hrooxo. Tho question 'now was not n.s to the wind, but as to whether the brig drew too much, to got up to a safe berth. Hlio was of smnir burdpn, but was deep in tho water. As they drov,' near tho shallowest snot in tho eliannel a liigh swell lifted tho brig, and she passed over handsomely; tlien camo a turn in tho cliannol, loading up to a slio,l-toi'ud cove.- Jack ran aft, took the wheel himself, and cried to the boys to lot go tlio shoots of tho foresail and forotopmast-stay-sail, and then put tho holm hard to port. Tho vessel slowly answered to it, her head c!\uin up into tlio wind, and tho no.\t moment she grounded on a soft hank, where she lay as safe and easy as on a cushion of velvet. fh hoist tho iih!" This order was givou by Jack Wil-Jl.ims, a youth orl6, who was standing at tho helm of tho sloop Gazelle. Jack's companions wero Bill Thomson, Dan Simpson and Jerry McNeal; tho crow of tho Gnzelle, therefore, numbered four,- all told. The sloop belonged to Jack's father, and was a wholesome Jittlo craft. She could sleep four on tho trausoms in th� cuddy, and there was an oil stove in the fore peak. Tho summer vacation was about half over; H was getting, toward August, and tho boys thought they'd take alittle cruise down thocoast, putting into port at night. Thoy all know hoir to h.indle a sloop, but Jack, who had taken two or throo voyages, was tho only one who knew anything about sailing on blue vrater or numaging a square-rigged vessel. Tho Gazelle was lying at anchor just inside thohiir at tho ontraneo of a little b.ay. With the wind off tho land it was a good berth, but with a strong sea �v^'ind sho was sure to bo blown ashore. Wlion Jack looked out of tho cuddy that morning ho s.aid: "Boys, we've got to got out of here. Let's have a cup of coftoo right away, and then make sail, for there'll be a gale of wind by tonight, and we've got to fetch across the bay before tho tide changes this afternoon." Under single-roofed mainsail and jib they manngod to make fairly good weather of it, although tho big gray swells streaked ivith foam grew larger every minute. Toward noon, when the tide turned, tho wind increased to such a degree that Capt. Jock plainly saw it was not so much getting to tho port for which they .started as getting anywhere before night, with tho weight of tho gale, should swoop down and engulf them. On tho loo beam was tho mouth of a small river, two or tlireo islaiuls hearing on the right of th,o entrance. There was a channel marked by two or three spar buoys; but there was a bar at tho entrance, and only vessolB under 13 feet could get in, and then 'With a leading wind. Tliero was snug nuohorage behind the islands, and Jack decided to run in there. They got in .iust in time, for tho wind and sea soon rose so fast tliat an liom- or two later it might have been exceedingly dangerous to make the attempt. It blow two days, and rained a deluge. On the third day tlio wind shifted .to west-northwest, and blew very fresh for two or three hours. AVhen it moderated tlio boys made sail and started for homo, having what is called a leading wind. They liad got out about 10 miles from land when Jack, who h.id gone alol't to straighten out tho topsail halliard which was jammed, discovod what at first looked like a sail. But there was something curious about its appearance which lie could not make out at that distance. Ho called to one of the boys to attach the spj'glass to the end of a line, which being done he drew it up and took a Bfliuint at tho stranger. He then saw at oiico that it was a small hrigantino which had been partly dismantled and seemed to ho waterlogged. He immediately came down and told the boys, declaring that ho was a good mind to run out and take a look at her. Bill objected that it was a long way out, and if thoy should bo bocalmod or another Etormshould comoup thoy might get caught in a very unpleasant scrape. "What's tho good, anyway?" he continued, 'its nothing but an old wreck; who wants to look at a wreck?" What if it is a wreck," replied Jack; " wo the captahi lying in a bunk with an arm and leg brolcen and other injuries. He was unconscious, but infermig that tills might be in part because of hunger. Jack directed the; boys to brew a cup of tea right away in the cuddy of tho Gazelle. A Unv teaspoons of thi.s caused him to open his eyes, but ho w.as in a dazed condition, and did not .seem to have long to live. Tiio boys moved him carefully andmado him as comfortable as possible. They then turned their attention to the vessel, for there wn.s no time to ho lost. She was about ICO tons and had a full cargo. The decks had been swept by tho late storm, and as sho lay a little on one .side it was evident that sho had boon thrown on her beam ends and shifted tho cargo, but as the hatches wore still tight the cargo was probably not greatly if at all injured, and was therefore well worth saving. Tho mainmast had boon carried away near tho deck, but tho foremast and fore-topmast wero still standing; tho topgallant mast was gone .at the cap, and the jibboom, There thus roniainod available for inime- TOWING THE SHIP. "That's all right, boys," said Jack. "And now, Bill, I want you and Jerry to take the boat and cross over to that farmhoitso there, take a team and ride to the first telegraph station and send this messaso to my father. Thnn bring a doctor hero to see the cap-t.ain." Tho boys did as directed. That night Mr. Williams arrived by train. He found a crowd of oomitry folk and seafaring men around the brig, some of tliem sharpers trying to bully or ohaff tho l)oys out of tho fruits of their skill and courage. The arrival of Mr. Williams, who knew all about tho law of the matter, soon cleared the air, and ono by one tlio crowd departed. Tho captain cliod before morning, and was buried tho following day. In the meantime, Mr. Williams examined tho .ship's papers and telegraphed to the underwriters and cmisignees. It was found that there was little injury to the cargo, and tlio ship could ho easily got oft and repaired. Tho ship, and especially the cargo, wero of considerable value, being estimated at .925,000. A claim of $11,500 was made for salvage. It was settled for .SflOOO, and tho court took occasion to compliment Jack and his cora-pauioiis for their pluck. Of tho amount recovered Jack received one-third, the balance being divided between tho other boys. Ail seemed satisfied, as they bad reason to ho, with tho outcome of their little cniiso. S. G. W. Benjamin, person is provided wltli a pencil and a slip of papor, as in that very antl pi'ar to lie any one on l^oard except a dog. Wlicii he heard Jack ho leaped up from behind tlie niasl wiiere lie had been sleeping, and witli tlr.n, lioarie bark gave theiii a W(-.lcouie. lie looked gaunt, and had the appcarunff of a dog tiiatitad liariced until hunger anil ili-.siuiir had overcome and exhausted Itiiii, ^vllLll he. liad lain do\Mitil oontaiiii.'ig a half mile of wue.  He then engaged Dun, the farm-hand, to cut down poleii along the route he had selected away from tho timber. The poles -H'cro st<.iut young pines, which, hen trimmed, were about IS feet long. 10 ......"   '        ---Ifliuohe- Capt. Brophy'a Papor on Electric Wirea --Noxt Assessment of the ITlremen's Eehef Association-Now Engines, Appointments and .Appropriations. Tho paper by Capt. AVilliam Brophy of Boston, recently road before itlie Maasachu setts Stato firemen nt their convention at Lam'enoo, upon tho subject of oleotTrio wires and tho protection of liroinon against iijury from tho elootric currents, is worthy tho attention of all firemen. Capt. Brophy avoids tho error, into wliich eloctrioiana too often f.oll, in -ivriting for a mlscellnnoous audience of employing a mass of toolmioal phrases. Capt. Brophy's papor, as well as many others of intorost to firemen, will ho pubUfllipd lu the procoodings of thu 11th convention of the Massachusetts Stato FiremoA's Association and distributed among the firemen of the Stato and country. Dlstrint Chief Mullen of the sixth fire district and Driver James J. Hugos of cliomical 8 havo tlie sympathy of tlio department, tho former ou tho loss of his brother, tho latter if Ids wife. The next assessment that tho Firemen's ,ef Associatiou will ho required to pay ,.... bo ou tho death of Calvin W, Bates, formerly driver of eiiginu No. 14. jVsslstant Engincmnn 11. F. Forrcn, for nnny years attached to engine No. 2, lias been retired ou a pension of $iOO per annum. Tho noble fonn of Capt. McCarty of engine No. 12 can be .seen this week at tho fire department dr 11 school. The now engine houses on 'Congress St. ondin EastBostonas well as tho truck house on Harrison av. aro noarlug completion. Tlio now chemical engines whioh were contracted for have arrived from the works of the Fire lixtingtiisher Company of Chicago, and -will bo placed In service at an early date. Six young men havo been appolntod tho pa.st weoic to don tlio suit of blue, -ivliilo six more have boon promotod to bo f ull-llodged flronion. Tho joint standing committee on finance of the Providonoo, II. I., city goveninieiit has reeonimonded an appropriation of 100,000 for tlio malntonaiice of tliat fire department tor tho financial year ending Sept. 30, laoi. It will cost $17,000 to build tho now engine house at Waltham. Chief Parks will no'doubt bo proud of it. Tlie Pennsylvania Stato Firemen's Assn-oiation, liko thoir brothers of tho Bay State, held a vory'sucoo.ssful oonventioh at Chester, "SII-YLL I TELEOKAPH NED ZfOU ABSISTANOE?" �^l^___________^ inohes'indiameterattiiobase, and at the top. .      .      .   ,      . Dan out them down with a. few Btrokea of liis groat axe and triuuned off the branones This work was done in the evenings, and Then ho borrowed his father's augiu- and bored two holes in each at tho points marked "B." Ned inspected the work and declared that they would do. He wrote to a firm in Denver to send him IfiO glass insulators, and tho bill amounted to .97. He also purchased at a hardware .storo 10 pmiirds of nails at 16 cents a pound, and sent them all out to tho farm in Dan's wagon. Then J.iek wont to-work with a hatchet and out off a patch of tho bark near tlio top of tlie polo and made it flat. On this he nailed elects to the polo about 18 inches from the top. Ho then screwed on the iu-sulators. This took him throo days, as ho did idl tho worif himself after school hours, and thou Jio was ready for the real hard work of his line. Jtr. Ford, who now saw the feasibility of tho boy's project and considered the money well spent in the useful lessons of oultiva-tion, economy, .forotliought and construct-ivo experience for tlio young engineer, offered to assist, but Jack jealously declined. It was to be lis line, he said, ana was to bo built inside t lo appropriation of $!tO. Tho digg-ing of the holes was the hardest part of the w^ork, but Mr. Ford sooretly arranged with Uaii that he was to bo paid extra for that labor. Jaclc also eonstrneted a hea-vT mallet to tamp tho earth around tho poles when thoy were up, in order to make them secure against high winds. But tlie mallet was too heavy for tho brave litl.lo follow, and DiiTi did that part of the ivork also. When his poles wero all sot; up the next problem for liis youthful ingenuity was liow to string tlie wire. He borrowed an old pliers from tho railroad lino repairer and learned Iiow to make a splice bofH'een two pieces of wire. When ho had mastered this accomplishment lie began to construct a reel on which to coil his wire. After having niadijarude reel ho set to work and coilod his wire, and put tho reel on ono of his father's wagons. A light stop ladder used in tho barn was talcen along, naid ho mo-outod tho first pole and attached his wire by means of a small piece of wire called a tie, around t.ho insulator, which secured his lino firmly. Ho then trotted along to tho next pole after tie -n-agon, and Dan lifted tliowiro, which was secured as before with a tie. Hero Dan's strength was useful to koop the wire strqtclied until it was secured to the glass insulator. Glass is a substance through which electricity will not pa.s.H. It is cal ed a non-cou-ductor, and when the current is running on tho Aviro none of it escapes by contact ^vith the glass. In tlirco days ho had strung all his wire, and then looked with pride at his -�'ork. So far ho had actexl as onghieor-in-cliicf and constructor. His man, Dan, and iiim-Bolf werequite competent to perform all tho work, ho said; but now a new difficulty stared him in tho face. Ho consulted his books, hut thoy gave him no comfort. Tho lino was all ready, but his fatlior saw that there was a Idtcli somewhere. He prudently said nothing, however, and tho hoy -was left to his own resources. There were several glass jars in tho collar which had held preserves, and Jack obtained permission from his mother to use them as he liked. Then he went to the village drug store and bought 10 pounds of suliihato of copper, which is commonly called Iiluo vitriol, at J 0 cents a pound. Jlr. Ford was going to Denver on biLsiness, and when he came liome he brought the boy six iiicces of zinc wlilch had claws,by which lliey w-ere liuiig on the side of the jai-s. All .lack now-ivauted for his buttery was coppers. He went t Genuine Eogers Butter Knives . I Sc. Genuine Eogers Gravy La,dles . 2�3c. Genuine Eogers Teaspoons  . . 87c. Genuine Eogers Bessei't-Spoons, ri.2Sset| Genuine-EogerS'Tablespoons, $2.50 set Genuine^Eogera Dessert Porks, $1.25^861; -Genuine-Eoger& Medium Forks, $l.50 set Genuine Eogers Oyster Ladles, SI .00 Genuine Eogers Pie Knives , SI .00 Genuine Eogers Berry Spoons . 60c. Genuine'Sogers Berry Spoons, oxidized handle........ $1.00 Genuine Eogers After Dinner Ooffoe Spoons...... .  75c. set Genuine Eogers After Dinner Ooffefl Spoons, oxidized handle, SB.25 sol Pickle Jars, triple plate, regular prio! $1.60, for this sale . . . . � 75c, Butter Dishes, triple plate,.regular pries $1.60, for this sale ....  75c. Mugs, gold lined and engraved, regulai prioo $1.50, for this sale . .  75c. Bon Bon Dishes, triple plate, gold lined, regular price $1.60,f or this sale,75c. Triple Plate Sugar, Oream and Spoon Holders, regular price $2.60 each, foi this sale  ..... Si.50each Castors, 6-bottle, triple plate, regular , price $2.50, for this sale  .  SI .50 Oake Baskets, triple plate, regular prioe $3.00, for this sale ...  $1.98 Ice Water Tilters, regular price $12.00, for this sale . , . ,  . $8.50 500 doz. Warranted Silver Plated Teaspoons .......  25c. set 250 doz. Warranted Silver Plated Table and Dessert Spoons . . 50c. set 250 doz. Woi'ranted   Silver Plated Medium Porks .... 50c. set 250 doz. Silver Plated Pruit Knives, 50c. set Silver Plated Nut ,Piok Sots, 6 picks and 1 crack. Eegular price $1.50, for this sale 33c. 250 doz. Silver Plated Table Knives, 62c. set 60 doz. Silver Plated Sapkin Eings, 5c. each 50 doz. Carving Knives and Porks, 2Sc. set 26 doz. White''BoneJtOarving Knife, Pork and Steel .... 50c. set 150 doz. Genuine  Eogers   Oxidized Handle, Triple Plated Medium and Dessert Knives . , , SS.SOset Eogular price $5.00 doz. 75 doz. Wliito Ivoride Triple Plated Medium and Dessert Knives, $2.50 set Eegular'prioe $8.00 doz. 500 doz, [Genuine Eogers Triple Plated Medium and Dessert Knives, S8.25 3et Lowest prioe ever known. If you are in want of any. of these goods do not he,iitate to buy them now, as prices will bo advanced 10 to 26 per cent, when this lot is gone. The manufacturers havo already advanced prices 10 por cent, on aooount of the rise in silver, with prospect of another advance shortly. EXCLUSIVE CLOAK HOUSE, 500 Washington Street, Comer Beilforil. Headparters forFa?lii?!n?.fe!s Cloaks 1 lot Eolled Plate Gold bead Heoklaoes, regular prioe $2.00, for this sale 98c. 1 lot Solid Gold Moonstone, Euby and Emerald Eings, regular prioe $2.00, for this sale......98c. 1 lot Solid Gold Friendship Eings, regular prioo 75c., for this sale . 4Sc. 1 lot Enamelled Tie Pins, regular prioe 10c. each, for this sale  .  5c. each 1 lot Eollod Plate Gold Ladies' Pob Ohains, regular price $1.50, for this sale.........  9Sc. 1 lot Garnet Snake Bangles, 10c. each Formerly 50c. 1 lot Moonstone Bangles . I5c. each Formerly 60c. We warrant our prices-on Jewelry lower than any dry goods store or money refunded. No mail orders filled under $1.00. _ MATHEY-CAYLyS, A tent of ao YliAllS I1.1h proved the gr�at merit of LlilB pupiilnr n^uiedybytjioi-ttttiaiucreiiiie In favor with J.-!a(U!lg prij-btctiiriB ovorywhere. Ic Is Bupoxlor u. iiU ...tjicra tor Uic Bttfe. inompt and qiilcl; oure otkmg atamUnu: or recent caseB. Xot only Is it tha best, liul thu cheapest. ALL DttrTUGISTS iieU it for 160. per hirlUu of (ii capsiUus. ULIN &, CO.,rAIUS. Siay  Jelti Why Pay lOo, for Oigars when At 5c. will suit you as well. L. BRAYTON & CO. . .  BOSTON CA5MART BIRDS S"X!"S riuiu iHm^.* Ci)r9, feiiil l)tiil vii-Kier-s. Maiieil to any f.O. lu the U.?S. Of Canatl*, /or 1& irtul.s, bj thf IlIKLt KUOU CO., iOC S. W nt,, rUllc ilt,-l[)bla, I'uua   pli-il H'Jiili; Irtc. %Vuu-k lui-n, vitli Uruin, mu'vos ajxd wexuil argaua impaiix'fl, eftii tiud oii ubaolute cure iu l-JoiVK ISRaH-^, Tlu'V uiaKO I'ld nii'jj ViuiUR, Kirc Urtt audi vii^rlo ex- isc\d hy C1i'>rtte I'^nig uml C, CO., Chttrdu ,V Co. 15   

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