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Boston Daily Globe: Friday, July 12, 1889 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - July 12, 1889, Boston, Massachusetts                                . Skipper Brown Eyes. The oMdren will find ,out � all 'about him (01* her) in THE SUifDAY GLOBE. The Fair Young Widow. Yon will get 8om*;'n8W ideas" about this e&ohantiiig memher of sodetr in the next SUNDAY ftEOBE. VOL. XXXVL-NO. 12. BOSTON, FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 12, 1889-EIGHT PAGES. PRICE TWO CENTS. CONTENTS OF TODAY'S GLOBE � � w .    .    ____ ' ' � Pbbo 1-Slenal failure of tliri attempt to fill places of Carnefltio's striliors-Appointment oi Oapti ^ratik Oroutt as collector of Internal rerenueloi- Massachusetts-SulVivnn'a arrest-Hds release on ft writ of hatoas corpus- � Kilrain dodging the police. Pace 2-Seawanliaka yachts arriving at Marblohead-Colored men as - soldiers-Business interests ot the town ol Ipswich-Disorder in the French Chamber of Deputies and Boulanger the cause-/l'Longtfieadow octogeu> ariiin's strange marnage. Page 3-Some curiosities in the news about �weddings and divorces - Salem's elopement-Advanoincr prices dn the stock� mdrket-The Italian padrone in court-News o� the fruit and pro-ylsion trades, Pago 4 -Editovials -About the tramp's viidatlon, with a prediction that they will remain in Boston through the summer-Havoc played by rockets at the Back Bay-Cant. Orcutt, the new oollootor of internal revenue, with portrait-Sunday audiences on the Common - Lleiuor licenses in Rhode Island -Symposium on the subject of religion in the public schools. Page 6-Drizzling rain on the South End grounds-St. Paul cricketers meet the first defeat, ot their tour-About other sporting events. Pages G and 7-Continuation of the story, "Sergeant Von"-Real estate news- Remarkable history of an unmarked grave in Franklin-Want and amusement advertisements. Page 8-'rea6bers taught at the institute in � Bethlehem-The Fourth of Jiily Sailing regatta recalled by the question of protests-Through freight rates discussed by railroad' magnatds in New York-Cavoor ot Robert Smalls, the new colored collector in Stauth Carolina-History oE the schooner Polly, the oldest vessel flying thfe American flag. Iron- and s 0- 8 0- 1 Laaeue. Camos Yesterday. AT SKW TOmc. ^InnlnM.........,...1 2 3 4 6 6 7 8 jTowYorlt.............4, 0 0 4 0X00 CleVelmul.............0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 Bntlerles-Welch, Ewing and Brown; Biikoly, ZImiiicr nnd Siiydar. Uiun hlU-Noiv Yorlt. 10: Clovoliind, 6. Errors-Sew York, 7; Cleveland, 6. at rniLADJiriPHIA.  ' tnnlnpii,.............1 !! 3 4 5 fl T rliUailelphla..........0 5 2 0 0 2 0 0 0-9 Clilcngo...............0 010O0010-2 Batteries-Bumnton and, Clomonta: Dwyer and rnrroll. Unsa lilts-l-Mladolphla, 14; Chicago, 12. trrors-PuUidelplila; 2j Chlcigo, 6. at WA6KIXGT0X. 'Innings..............1 2 3 4 6 JnillanaiiDllB...........O 13 2 2 �V\'asliing[on...........0 0 0 1 0 Battenes-Qotzelii nnd naly: O'Day and Clark Bubo hits-Indianapolis. 8; TCnshlBstOD, B. lirroM-WdlanapoUa, 3; WuBlilnBton, 11. 0 7 o 2 0 0 8 0 - 8 2- 3 THE WEATHER. Washington, July 11-8 p. m.-Forecast VVvJS>M/)'.^a^     till 8 p. m, Friday: SJjJ^" Sv^Hlftv Maine,   New �^'''^ - - Hampshire and Mas sachusetts generally fa'r. clearing iu eastern portions; warmer, except nearly stationary tomperatuie in western Massachusetts, variable winds, becoming westerly, For Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island and eastern Kew York. fair, no decided change in temperature; variable �winds, heoomlng westerly. � 'Blue Hill Prediotions. :  I^^lp^tjbps for Friday: Light rain, followed by'fait weather, stationary temperature, _        Ox^tipm. The Globe's Forecast^ The weather of Boston and vicinitr for todaywill be generally olouoy, with chances of a fair evening,'conditions tavorable for showers, slight changes in temperature and light winds Irons south to west. For north em ' New England and the northern coast continued cool weather and light, variable .Winds. _ Forty Schooners in Motion. OHA.THAM, July 11.-Wind breezing from southwest at sunset, and the fleet of 40 schooners which has been -becalmed oyer the shoals is proceeding north. Highland Light, July 11.-Light westerly winds.' raining and rough sea from eastward.__ Te.meerature Yastardayi _,As' indicated , by the thermometer at Thompson's Spa; S a. m., B4''i s�, m.. 63" Sa.m., 67�; I2m., ao"; 8.30 p. m,, 67' . S p, m.. Q7''; a p. m., 68�; 12 mid., 66'^. Average temperature, 05%�.. PiTTSBuao, Peun,, July 11,-Today a train carrying non-union men to Carnegie, Phipps He Co.'a steel works at Homestead, this county, where a big strilse against a reduction of wages has just commenced, was attacked by the strikers. The new men, who started from Pittsburg under the protection of Alexander A, E. McCandless, sheriff of Allegheny county, were cut and bruised by llyins missiles and some, in their fright, jumped out through thewindov/s ot the cars. They were then driven out of town. When the 8,50 a. m. train arrived at Homestead, 400 or 600 mei\ . were there to meet it. There were :jl non-union men aboard, Italians; Hungarians and negroes. When the train stopped several strikers jumped aboard. The door was looked and they failed to got in. Some one shouted, "Get out of this car." Immediately there was a scramble, ond four or five men jumped through the windows. Sheriff MoCandless stood at one door. The train proceeded to Munhall station, where ^ another crowd of some 1500 were waiting. As soon as it came to a standstill the crowd blosed in about the smoking car. The siierilir stood oa tho steps, with tho new men- behind him. The strikers began to hoot, and several nonunion men jumped from tho oars, broke through the crowd and escaped to the iiills, followed by a shower of stones. Presently the ahoriit, with tlie order "Follow ine," jumped to the ground and started toward the mills, a distance of 300 feetaud through doiiso lines of the strikers. August C. Geizor. an employment agent and two nou-uuion men made a rush and pot inside the enclosure before they could be stopped. The remainder were chased down tho railroad tracks. One man succeeded in catching the rear oar as the train uullod out and bogged tlie conductor to land him in someplace where he could escape alive. Two of the refugees stayed in Homestead until the return train arrived at 11.20, and came to the city. At stations nearer the city live of the 81 got aboard and the balance are still in the woods. Tho sheriff will take a big force of deputies up to Homestead, and tomorrow another attempt to fill the places of the 2r>U0 strikers will be made. The Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers is preparing for a long sioge. and Secretary William Martm has removed his headquarters from Pittsburg to Homestead for the present. Secretary Martin will have charge of the strike. From him all orders will be issued, and he will dlrede every movement personally. His fivst move on taking charge was to telegraph all over the oiiuntry to members of tho order to stop all men from coming here. A committee was sent East this morning, one West and one North, The Eastern committee will take in Philadelpiiia, Havris-burg, Steelton, Panvllle, Phoenixville, Col-umbla and nil tlie smaller towns in the eastern district. Tbe western committee will visit Chicago, .Toilet. St. Louis. Louisville and other places of less importance. The northern committee will begin at Milwaukee and cover every town in which iron or steel is made. No committee was put South, for the reason that that district is thoroughly organized, and It is thought no one from tiiere will come up hero to work. Chairman W. L. Abbott of Carnegie, Phippg&Co. said today: "We advertised m 40 papers for men. and will bring them from all parts ot the Uaited States to operate our Homestead plant under our scale. What we want just now is laborers to cleat un, and then we shall put skilled mentdwotk. Wo shall ope'ratb' the Home-stpad plant under our scale, if it takes a CHARLESTON AGAIN SHAKEN. Blicbt Slarthcinake Slioak ot Three Booonils' Dnration. � CHARtnBTON, S. C, July 11.-A slight earthquake shock was felt here at p.47 tonight. Tbe duration of the shock was about three seconds, the movement north to south, and the motion vibratory, accom panied by a slight noise. Railroad Censured for Four Deaths. eud ' Bank. N. J.. July 11.-A ooroner'i jury in the case of four persons who wore killRd by a railroad train at Little Silver, W, J.. Sunday, today anuouniJed tnelr ver diet, Thev censured the railroad cimpany for not having a flagman or gates at the prossing. Nutritious, Healthful, . Appetizing, Easily Cooked Inexpensiva 12g. per Package; $1.40 peMloz. $2.75 .nercaseof 2 tloz. BF�OIAL-Add a little milk in cooking. COBB, BATES & TEMA, �     �^^^^:'^^hwot ivi2 POSITIVE m SALE -Olf- FURNiTURE,   CARPETS PAPER-HANGINGS AND WINDOW SHADES OFFERS .EXTIU.OKDIS'AKV baruains Ooodj valued at 1(35,000.00 will He sold at nliout BO per cont. leas than regulur preyoUliig prloMl Corns and see! Tlmii Is UiuHedl' Leass explresi Ilnlldlng must bo vaunted! ,     CoiuBtodiiylortwospiiolBlbargnlnsI 400 Antique Chamber Suits, $15.0� 125 Rolls Extra Super Carpets, 45 Cts. H. M. CREENOUCH, 1^3 to IS8 Tteinant Bt. and 37 BinUton, > t AlMCDlo Xuaple.     X   tt ifi HASSD INTO THE WOODS. Scabs'' Run from Homestead for Their Lives. iteinpt to Fill Places of Strikers a Signal Failure. Steel Workers Keep Away. Notified to They have engaged tho new factory built! by Wnrren Page, ahd .hope within lo days to be turning out about 15, cases of shoes a day and to employ iiOO hands.. In time they hope to hnng their entire business here, giving 500 hands employment. LET THE PASTOR RUN THINGS. Eev. Mr. Kinney's Advice to Christian Eudoavor TTnions-Questions in Order at the national Convention. PHiLAhELPHiA, Julv Jl.-The National Christian Endeavor convention today was largely attended. Eov. H. N, Kinney, president of the Connecticut Christian Endeavor Union, led the devotional meeting at n a, m. The order of answering questions was taken up, and Mr. Kinney answered tho first himself. It was: "What relation or control is the pastor to have over his church and the society?" He answered it by saying: "II I were pastor I would have tbe society to suit, or legislate it out. If you don't like a pastor's doctrine ask him to resign. Otherwise joii should lot him run things." ,_Rnv. Wiivlnnd Hoyt spoke upon "The ^ow Praver JVIeeting." He said that the new prayer mooting is the prayer meeting of tlie Christian Endeavor, and the rea.son why it is tbe best is because it Is a reversion to the,ola typical prayer meetinc:, A telegram was received from Washington, reading: "President Harrison sends greeting to the convention, PUbliv business prevents his attendance." Dr. Hoyt moved that the ' president and secretary of the convention be directed to Kfind a tolegfRm o� thanks to pre.sident Harrison, which Was passed by a rising vote. The secretary rend telegrams of greeting from societies in California. New York, Maryland; Nebraska and other places, and, while he was making announcemeuts. Postmaster-General Wanamaker entered tho hall, Tho convention arose to its feet as one maii,wliile cheer after oheor rolled upward, and no was given the Chautaauan salute- the waving of handkerchiefs. The postmaster general .spoke briefly. The closing session of the convention was held this evening. " COlLICTORIRANKOfiCnTT A Successor to Fitzgerald Appointed. Must Suffer the Disappointment. Tanner Sent for by NoUe-Job for Dr. Loring. WASHBURN A POOR MAN. Senator's Klelieg Have Talceh TPlngs -He wm Have to tlvo m His Salary. MiNKEAPOLia, July 11,-The simultaneous announcements thatSenator Washburn had sold his milling and lumber inter ests and departed for Europe set the gossips to discussing his financial condition. The following facts are printed here this after, noon; About a year ago Mr. Washburn founa that he was not making-taoney. He had largo interests in and out, of tho city. He was interested exten.sivoly in milling and banking, and he was president of the Soo railroad. He also had a senatorial fight ou his hands, whioli was talcing a large amount of his time, and was ox'oensive. Tho business IntorostB. as the story goes, were not thriving, ou the whole. It beijame evident that to recover from the imnoiuling disaster it would be necessary to attempt a systematic looping off of the various enterprises. This was attempted but the clouds Of financial ruin were stil. lowering, when some of the warm-hearted and stanch friends of Mr, Washburn took it Into ihoir heads to try and tide him ovoi;, \ syndicate wnslormod, of which Thorn a*' -..owory, C. A, Pillsburv and II. Is, Fletcher wore loading members, to furnish money to keen Mr. Washburn's interests above water, until he could dispose ot ovitsids interests. An examination of his affairs showed that in plat'6 of being worth several miiUoif dollars, his business interests were not worth oyer 5400,001), The plan of Senator Washburn's frionds was to secure him a competence, relievo him from lis burden of business cares, and so allow h m to devote his attention to politics. When he gets his affairs settled up, instead of being worth 94,000,000, his capital will amount to a few thousands,aud he will be obliged to live on his senatorial salary. With year andiiv half to getstar.^e5..-~-r-xr?--------i �Mr. Abbott ordered Employmeht Agent Geizer to quarterall the men who had been driven away from Homestead today at the Centennial Hotel in Pittsburg, and  armed deputies, has gone to protect about 75 miners who have agreed to return to work at the Godley mine of the Chicago. Wilmington & Vermillion Coal Company ot the price set by the operators-8G cents per ton. _ Double Sets of Miners. IsHPEJii.vo, Mich., July 11,-Double sots of miners were set at work at Cliff shafts and Uarnttip miDO today. Several of tbe mines liave of late inoreased-their working forces to meet tho requirements of the mnrkoc. _ Mors Work in Salem. Baiish, July 11,-MunroB & Co.. shoe manufacturers, havo decided to remove their |]usine&B to Balem from the country. MIXING BROOKLYN  BEER, VETERANS URGED TO STAY HOME Oraud Arinr Resents th� Kafuial ot Knilroads to Orant a One-Cent jento. Chicago, July 11.-The Gron'd Army cir cular against tho railroads, because of the latter's refusal to grant a low rate to the Milwaukee national encampment, was Issued today. It says: "There is general feeling that the men whose services and saoritioes alone made it possible for tlieso railroads to exist ant share in tlie prosperity which has attended the nation in recent years, nre fairly entitled to. at least the rate which has been asked, I roijuest of all comrades of this department, asamaiterof self-respect and self-defence ana out of love for our order, that they forego tho ,anticipotBd pleasure of meeting their comrades at tlio national en-oamumont, by remaining at liome, only those attending who are iluly elected dole-gates. Let us in a dignified but resolute manner re.ient thlii groat iii.lustico, 1 issue this request with much regret. The circular is signed C. A. Partridge, Asst. Adit.-Uou,; J, S, Martin, Commander, Single Fare the Lowest for C. A. Tt, NewYohK. July 11.-At the meeting of the trunk lines and Central Traffic Assonia-tion, in joint committee today, application for rates ot one cent per niilo for persons attending tlie encampment ot tho Grand Army of the Kepublic at Milwaukee during the last week in August, wtis declined, and the rate fixed at one lowest limited flrst-claas fare for the round trio. German Teachers m Convention. CHicAao.Julyll.-Tlie Gorman-American teachers in convention today listened to papers by Prof. Liebe ot Boston, president ot the National Norpial Music School, on "Tho Imoortauce of Music as an Educator; Prof. Herman Shuribht of IdlevlUe, Va. on "The Importance of German-Amorioaiv ism for the Improvement of tiie Ainarioau Nation," and Prof. H. H. Priok of Clilcago on the "Relative Usefulness of Male au' Female Teachers." Modelling Montana's Constitution. Hbt.bna, Mont,, July 11,-In the constitu. tional convention today a committee on Irrigation, to consist of ll members, was ordered appointed, A resolution was Intro duced, providing that there shall be no now counties established except under certain oirouinstanouB. Mr. Eaton introduced compulsory education bill, Kesolutions looking to irrigntldtl and , strong anrt.Ohino.iB immigration resolution were also orei-entou. The Old Guard, Sanford's Cmger Sanford's Oin^er U � Bwt or M knoirii QlBger*. with ileepleu Tlgll(vno� Sahfoiiu'b Ginoeb Eonrds tlie lionie agulnat a tlioussind dnncari tliat Uvo 111 lar, water, food �ud cUiuate. Korer lia> been found nantlng In any einorgenoy, and hence liaa become enahrlued in oountleu hoiuee at the realization ot all that li provenUve and ourative In medicine nudcondlinenti. Once Intioauced into the lioutehold It can never bedlepla�:d. It li lt> own best advertUcmuiLt. Tboueands aay dally; "Uae SAXfOKU'a OiHGEu; it la tbe beat of all glnsera.' Composed ot Imported ginger, choice atomatlcs and the beat ot taodlclnal Kreuoh brandy, SAsroBo's OiKQiiH U vastly luperlor to aU other glngun, and uare ahould be exercUed la purchasing leat aoine cheap, wottbleaa and often dangetoae glnfier be ubatltuted. Aaktor Sanford's Ginger IVUb Owl Ii'iids.llark an the Wrapyer. WAsniNQTOx, .luly 11.-The President today appointed Frank E, Orcutt of Melrose to be collector of internal revenue for the third district (the State ot Massachusetts) vice John E. Kitzgerald. With that peculiar love ot secrecy which characterizes all the acts of this administration the appointment was not made public until nearly C o'olook this aftornooa. or an hour after the Treasury Department had closed for the dayP The qlob.e correspondent had reason to believe that the appointment had been determined upon at yesterday's cabinet meeting, and early this morning made inquiry at the Treasury Department as to whether tho successor of Mr. Fltzeorald had been selected. Tho answer was that nothing was Known about hia successor, and the impression conveyed was that tho matter bad not been considered very recently. At the Whits House the same blisslul Slate ot Ignorance prevailed. At 3.30 Secretary Windom's private secretary was again asked respecting the appointment, and althongli at that time the new collector's commission had doubtless been made out and had been sent to the White House to receive the President's signature, still the Treasury Department was in O((loi�l lenoranco of the matter and could give no information to the members ot the press who were anxious to know if tho appointment had been made. The appointment of Mr. Orcutt settles w;hat up to the present time has developed the hottest fight for any ot tho federal otiices in Massachusetts, There are places in gift ot tho President in Massachusetts wiiich nay better than tho colleclorship of internal revenue, but none of them lias had as many cnntlidates in the Held as this. Oi course the Treasury Depart�ient peo- �le reluse to say whoso backing Mr. Orcutt as, but it is very well understood that tho names of both senators were on tho psper:!, and iu addition, Representatives Lodora and Cogswell had appended their sienaturos. If Mr. Orcutt had other congressional backing, it is not. Itnown, He was also indorsed by some of the prominent business men of Boston and the Grand Army, throughout the State rallied to his standard almost to a man. In fact, it is understood that hia Grand Army ot the Republic support was more notent in securing him tho appoint-uipnt than almost anything else, Mr. Orcutt secured the Grand Army in-dor.semonts by starting out early as a candidate, and thus obtaining ploiigos before tliey had boon mortgaged to other candidates. His papers, it is believed, wero tho iirst ot all the Massachusetts candidates to bo placed ou fllo, and they were sent to Waaliiugton very shortly after tne 4th ot March. Tlio appointment ot Mr. Orcutt must be a very IClfioii 3tlsnpDoliitmolit to Jeremiah J, McCarthy, as when ho was down here in tho spring and was taken by Gen. Banks to see the President and tho secretary of the treasury he believed that the appointment was coming to him without question.- A gentleman who is on friendly terms with tho White House and who watches public affairs closely, said tonight that the appointment confirms the rumor circulated soon after the murder ot Dr. Croniu and whenit was learned ot the connection of rick Egan with tho Cian-ua-Oael. that no more Bluine Irishmen need apply at tho :^i^i^t%S^aeiiM)^SS^f^^?'^^ time to ComWiB^fni'BRffllw^W'nairput uo tho bars as far as they We'riJobhoerned. MnCarthy said that he liad been indorsed hy Mr. iLoUge, but this Mr. Lodge, in au interview with The Globb correspondent, denied. The salary of the collector is 34e0O a year, and he has to give a bond ot 8200,000, as ho handles very large quantities of money and stamps which are negotiable, and are the same as cash. As soon as his bond has been approved by the treasury officials Mr, Oroiitt will enter upon the active discharge ot his duties. Oollector.s ot internal revenue have no fixed tenure of office, although it is dus-tomarv to give them the aarae term as other ofiioials-four years-and tills has been the policy of tbe administration so far, except where removals were made for cause. Mr. Fitzgerald was confirmed June 7.1886. months ns he has been since he has been in office the administration would be confronted with a deficiency ot siB.ooo.Ooo before the end of tho fiscal year, but il he carries out the tttll programme which ho has outlined, the deficiency Will bent least S40,ooo,ooo, antt how much more depends only on the freanenoy with which the law is evaded, and that is such an uncertain quantity that it cannot be figured on. Those figures caused the President to onen Ills eyes vcn-y wide. He sow it would never do to pile up such a treniondous defioienoy tho first year of his administration, and it was by his direction that Sooretary Noble, as the superior officer of tho commissioner of pensions, had the interview with him yostorday. It was not satisfactory, at least not to the secretary. Tanner believes that ho Is making hirasel t solid with tho Grand Army, nnd that is all ho cares lor. As a matter of fact, however, there are a goou many veterans who do not approve ot his couiso, and a man who has held a very nrominent position in the De partmontof the Potomac did not hositate tho other day to oxpro-sa his disapproval in the strongest terms of the lawless way i.ii which the commissioner is running his oflico. Secretary Noble gave his snbordinate to nndoi'staud that there must be no deficiency created, and Tanner would not consent to curb his ambition to geirid of tho surplus- That is the way tho matter stands at the present. Tanner is now on top, but unless he proves more tractable It is certain that either lie or Noble will have to go, ond it is not likely to bo Noble, � Secretary Noble refuses to talk about tho matter, and when told that his refusal either to deny or affirm that thero waS n serious difference ot opinion between him and tho commissioner would be construed na nil affirmation ot tho rumors, he still said that it was n subject which he could not discuas. �ion Fos j>n. I.ORIBIO. ot Chance to Bhoiv of What Kind Stuff He Is Made. Washinoton. July 11,-Dr, Loring, our now minister to Portugal, will ba able to show the kiud ot diplomatic stuff he is made ot before many days are over. The seizure by Portugal of the Delagoa Bay railroad, reported by cable from London a few doys ago, interests an American syndicate. The concession was originally granted to au American. Col. MoMurdo, who took it to London to gelslhe co-operation of English capital, CohMcMurdo gained very largo share in the concession, and ou the day when it was reported in London that Portugal. �had seized the road ho dropped dead from excitement, Portugal's arbitrary act meant his absolute ruin, while it tho road had not hetin interfered with it is believed it would have made every one interested in it very wealthy. Mrs. McMurdo has already filed a claim with the State Department, laying domages at j;7G0,0Q0, and Col, lugersoU has been retained as bor attorney. Sficretary Blaine is giving the matter his personal attention and has not yet issued any instructions on the subject to Minister X^orlng, but from what ho has said it is evident that he nelieves Portugal clearly violated not only its own laws but also all international laws.and that Minister Loring will bo directed to enforce a settlomeut. PjafiSIDKNT'S A.I>FOINT]UXiN'rS. Collootars of Onatonis and of Internal Kovouue. Washinoton, July 11. -The President this aftornoon mado the following appointments; Frtink 0, Crosby to bo pay director in tho navy, with the' relative rank ot captain; John W, Cobbs of Kentucky to bo surveyor ot ouatonis for the port ot Paducah, Ky,; Alexander McMaster of New York to be supervising inspector ot steam vessels for tho ninth district (Buffalo, N. Y),- To ba collectors ot customs-Henry II, Lyman of New York, for tho district of Of. wogo, U. Y,; Robert Hancock, ,)r.. of North Carolina, for the district of Pamlico, N, 0.; John F. Hon-of Florida, for the district of Key West, Fla. .To be collectors ot internal tovonuo- FrankE. Orcutt ot Massachusotta, for tho third district of Massachusetts; William H, Gabriel ot Ohio, for the 18tli district ot Ohio; John Sieokete of Michigan, for the 4th district of Michigan. Sullivan Again a Free No Shadow of Right to Hold Him. KilraiD CliaseJ lii hmi Gains au Hour on Sheriffs Posse. How the News was Recaived bjf Champion's Friends. FOU A NA'TiaNA.T. 17NIVEKSITT. Prosldont Harrison l.>laiteua to a Pica from IienriinR Oollogsii. Washington, July 11,-President Harrison is in receipt ot communioations from ofiicers and prorasaors of leading American colleges, and from students, urging that steps be taken, either by the commissioner of education or some other proper official, looking towards the founding of a national university to promote higher education iu America. The Jplau which finds most favor with teachers is tho union at Washington of the principal colleges of tho country upon a basis not prejudicial to the local continuance, growth or value of these umvoraities, ana yet promotive of a national university thoroughly organic and supremo above them all, while yet composed from them. It is proposed that Harvard, Yale. Colum-bia, Cornell. Mich'gan, Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins and Princeton detail certain professors for duty at tho National Uni voraity for a part of each year, and that certain of the students of tbosa colleges be permitted to avail themselves of the bonelita ot tho university. Graduates of those colleges would also be allowed tho privileges of the National Oniversity under certain conditions. Tho entire expenses ot the university are tobomutby the general govonimont, and It is proposed to place the university itself under the control of a sort ot congress, mado uo of delegates from tho various higher educational institutions of the coun- "^Fresident Harrison regards the plan ns ingenioua, and by no means impracticable. It will doubtless be further developed, and will probo bly excite considerable discus.iion. Seoretarr Noblo Has a X.lvety lUatluoe Wtth the Oommjialiiuer. Washington, July 11,-Yostorday there was a conference at the Interior Department between Secretary o� the Interior Noble, Assistant Secretary Bussey, tlie man who is helping Comtniasioner ot Pensions Tanner to squander the surpliu by writing favorablo pension decisions whenever he is given half a chance, and the redoubtable opmmisslonor hlrasolf. After it was all over the commis.;ioner was ' asked what it meant, but in his airy way he said that it wos merely to dt^cusH the affairs of the olUce and that he had asked for the oonferenco. It was stated last night that at yesterday's cabinet meeting Commissioner Tanner was discussed at considerable length, and the interview, which waa held after the aeore-tary of the inferior had left the White House, was directly due to the fact that the course ot ComiuisalonBr Tanner nad occupied so much timo of tho oablnot. Commissioner Tanner did not ask for the oonferouce. On tlie contrary. Secretary 'foble sent him word that he desired to see iim,and ho ordered him to report at the nterior Departmout, and tho matinee, while not particularly long, waa very lively. In the first ot tho mouth, when the appropriations for the present fistal year became available, Corp. Tanner miitle a requisition on the Treasury Dopartnieut for Siu.ooo,-OuO,an
                            

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Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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