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Boston Daily Globe: Sunday, January 27, 1889 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - January 27, 1889, Boston, Massachusetts                                HOW TO COOK. I,iitile�,iios�reanamdthoropOTta of th� leotuMs at tie Boalpn Cooking Soliool, evwy Vrcek In Tbnndaj'j BOSTON GLOBE. NEVER SAY FAIL TVhon y�jB oan socoMderery Um� 1�f liuKiMlttg* "wunt ad." m THE BOSTON OtOBE. letiOftlW peopit Knoir wbKt yau ttrant, and you wQL'jtet ik VOL. XXXV.-NO. 27. BOSTON, SUNDAY  MORNING, JANUARY 27, 1889-TWENTY PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. House Furnishers, DELIVER FREE Furniturej Carpets ing, Ranges, inss ete BougM of thorn, to any city oi town in Now Eng-Bsdi where there ia a railroad freight etation/ We also sell for either Gash or on Instalments, yon I7ill find onr terms the eailest to he procured In this oity. YOU WILL FIND fliT Mi k li Oir PricBS tie L Oir Terns llie Oor I TO BB FOOTD HJ THIS OOUHTEY, IT IS A WELL-KNOWN FACT That Tim? Is Money, and if yon will call on ns for whaterer yon want in onr line, yon will save time and money both. If yon oan't call, Write for Catalogue and l�rlces, Aad^.yon will receive a prompt and nnderstand-Ing reply.   ^ WE HAVE Very little room for prioes, bnt we will quote a few Just to givo yon an Idea of what we are able to offer yon in ^he way of bargains. ka extra nice Hair Oloth Parlor Suit, solid walnnt frame,weU made and a beauty, for only................................$33.00 An Embossed Plnsh Parlor Suit, solid walnnt frame, combination of oolors, prlos only.. $40.00 A Omshed Plnsh Parlor Suit, oombination colors, built to wear, and only......$50.00 ' Also Parlor Suits, covered 'n Eaw and Spun Bill:, all styles of Plushes, Satins, Sam-asks, &0i, &c., &o., at prices ranging from.........................$3S to $500 Kemember, the above sets are only our leadersi  enter'H interview, with LI Hung Chang: how China's groat viceroy lives, acta and talks. Page ID.-rAre our pjibllo schools doing ;holr duty? Shirley Dare points out some moral and physical shortoomlngs-Mrs. Shonvood's otlquetto hints-New lllor.iturc-"Jeraemy York, a Story of Strange Advonture," by W. Clark Euasell (concluded). Page 20-A day with old-tlma merchants: the march of trade from the water front to the city's centre. iUusiratcd-News sparks for firemen-Hand shad-owSi some tricks which will pleasebotholdand yonng, illustrated-Effect of overwork upon Cardinal Gibbons. f HITII f RITES Bayard Asked as to National Policy. LEFT HER BABY  IN THE SNOW Woman Arrested at Eagt Pepperoll for Attempted Ohl'd Mnrder. North CHELtoSFORD, Jan. 28.-Georee Morse of Groton was returniD(cto his home aboat 6 o'clock Wednesday afternoon Whilo pasBlng: throueh a. seoladed soot near Leach's pond his attention waa attracted by the ol'ies of a oliild. Leaving hia team and followinir the cries Into the adjoininBT woods, he discovered a female child ttliout -i weeks old.lying in the bashes abont 60 feet from the hiehway. The child was well clothed and carefully covered with a wrap, but nothing could be found on it to ass.st in any way in establishing its identity. The child was taken to theNorth Ohelms-:ord almshoube. It had suffered severely Jrom e.vposure. Its face and eyes were badly swollen, and its recovery ia considered doubtful. State Officer Burt visited Kast Fepperoll today, and. in company with Otiii er E. GoRKlD of that place, arrested Lizzie Smith, 27 years of ase, employed as a domestic and living with a shoemaker named I'enK. dergast. It seems that the Smith woman is mother of four chil dren, the present one being borii at East Penperell, ,Tan. 13. Ten days later the mother took the child, ostensibly to place in the keeping of her mother at Lowell. Arriving in that city, slie walked to Liaoh'spond. Here the Inhuman mother left her oifsprlng alone to perish in the snow, where, by the merest ooOident, it was discovered five hours later, Mrs. t-mith was seen on the oars bv _ Globe representative, while in the custody of Officer Burt, but seemed wholly unconcerned about the affnir, allhoutfh ai'kunw' edging the facts os above given. She wi.. be arraigned at Lowell tot attempted child murder. ACAIN8T   THE   DOUGLAS   HEIRS I.B1T Decision at OUIoano In Favor of the trnton Mutnal JLire. Portland, Me., Jan. 2C,-Th6 Union Mutual Life Insurance Company was toaay notified that the Supremo Court of Ullno had renjlered a decision in the company favor, m an outcome of the litigation be tween the Uuiun Mutual Company and the university ot the oity o( Chicago for title to certain land on which a large amount of money bad been loaned. The doc sion is also adverse to the lieirs of Stephen A.Doug, las. These heirs olaiined that the property, having been alienated from the uses for which it was first intended, reverted to them and not to the insurance company. The decision sets aside such claims and establishes absolute title in the company to this valuable piece of property, valued by many at over $400,000. CARRIED FLORAL TRIBUTES. Friends   6t    MUs   Parker    Attend Funeral Services at Bookport. Ego-pnrTr Mass,, Jan. 28.-The funeral of Miss Jeannette Parker, the victim of the elevator accident in the Young Women's Christian Association build'Ug, JBo.ston occurred today from the Methodist church. The serviops wer� conducted tij the pastor, Bev. J. H. MausHeld, as'laied hy the tnrinet pastor. Rev. A. W. Terrlll of Westboro. A larg� delegation of oluasmat-es and students were present 'rnm Boston University, who brought beautiful and fitting floral tributes. The ,Sund.iy school attended in n body, and were represented in ihe beautiful floral display by a magniiicBnt harp. THE WEATHER. Washington, Jan. 26-8 p. m,,-Indications for 24 hours: For Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont, fair, followed by light snow or ram slightly colder, variar ble winds. For Mas?achnsett�, Rhode Island Conuec-tientand eastern New York.threatening weather with raiu.sliffhtly colder, variable winds, becoming generally easterly. _ Blue Hill Predictions. Indications for Sunday; Warmer, rain with high westerly winds on the coast followed on Sunday night or l^Ionday by cold wave. _ The TenriDeraturs Veaterdav, as indicated by the thermometer at Thompson's tjoa^ ;i a, m., 3a jea. ro., 83 i) .     - - jp. m., 40 ; 6 p. m . 41) ; B p. m., 40-; 12 mid., 37. The average m. SB 12 m., 42": 4,1 ; I. u. m., 40-; 121 temperature, 38%�. WO Letters on Samoan Trouble. property in danper. Consnl reports Apncr-Irun In boat tlying American Hag seized in Apia harbor iiy nrmed German boat, but released after investigation, German captain says no Hag was sh wn. State affairs so stTions re nest additional loroo, Bei;naln lit Auckland three weeks." In' uiiy at the Navy Department this aftcinoon dovel ped thu fact that Secretary Baya d has iiiBdo nod rect response to Secretary Whitney's letter iiKiulrinir as to the policy of this government. I is understood, however that the President's action in re erring the matter to Conirioss was .based to a ci nsiderable degree upon-the points made in Secretary Whitney's letter. In onswer to an mnury on the subject Becietary Whitney this afternoon said: "Th re is no antagonism between the Stoto Department and the Navy Department In this matter. l''or the protection of th"" naval officers tvho aro at Samoa, or wh. may bo sent there, 1 ns ed for a d finite statement of polioy 'or thoir guidance, and on the 15th inst., (hoP esidont referred ihe whole matter to Congress, and there it rests." Assistant Secretary Rives said this afternoon that the despatches received today from Samoa will bo transmitted to Oon-gresa early next week. AN AX.AK.M1NO SITVATIONT, Javal Deprlmeflt Has No &� slmctloiis. Klein Calls dermaii Consul a Tyrant, And Blames Him for Slaughter of ths Natives. Washtnoton, Jan. 28.-Tho following letter from Secretary Whitney to Congressman Herbert was made public this afternoon; Kavt Department, I Wabhinoton, Jan. 2B, 1889. I Sir-I have the honor toaokuowiedgo the receipt of your letter of Jan. 'J4, In which you request that there may be transajjtted to the naval committee ot the House, any recent reports from the officers of the vessels stationed at the Samoan Islands, showing the condition ot things and the lequest of the department for the anpounoement of a definite polioy referred to by me in my letter of the 23d Inst., if part of the records of the department. There are no later reports than those, conies of which wore transm tted to Con gress in a message of the President of Jan. G. 1889, printed in excout ve document No. 08 of the Senate. The communication of the department to the secretary of state. reference to the aniiouncomont of a definite iioUoy is contaiued m a letter, a copy of which is enclosed. Your letter also contains the following request: "1 should be glad to know if any further enlargem nt ot the appropriations of your department should bo made in view of existing conditions." This inquiry upon its face seems to nut upon this department ihe responsibility of estimating for possible expenditures arising out of conditions which it cannot anticipate. Until a decision is reached as to the polioy of this government regarding the independence of the Samoan group of islands no judgment can be formed upon the subject of possible expenditures. Up to the present time thedepartment is not aware that we have had any national policy upon tho subject. Neither the Monroe doctrine, nor any other expression of national policy is understbod to apply to the islands of the Pacific One by. one they have been taken witliout interference from us. If there is to be no new departure affecting this group of islands I conoeivo that the department is i uite able now to perform every duty arising out of existing conditions. Unle.-^s tliere is a contilot between the polioy of this government and that of some other power, di erencos will i.oubt-less be hiirmoni ed, and no extraordinary exjienditure will be called for. Having brought to the attention ot the appropriate department the circumstances specially witliin the observation of this department seeming to call for definite instructions to its officers, and the whole matter having subsequently 1 een laid, before Congress oy the President, it would be preferable that this department should not anticipate conditions beyond its authority or control. Very resneotluUy, W. C. Whitney, Secretary ot the Navy. SAMOANS IN THE SOUP. The following is the Inclosure above referred to: Navy Dbpartment, 1 WytsHiNQToN, Jan. fi, 1889.1 Sir-Enclosed* herewith 1 send you c py ot despatch just received, by way of New isealand, from the captain of the Ntpolo, now at Samoa. The department is able to send immediately two additional vessels to Samoa, in response to this reques . and lias given direi'tioiis that they be made ready to receive sa ling orders and would be pleased to Btiengtheii the force at the Samoan Islands by these and other vessels of the Paoitio squadron it any useful purpose is to be served thereby. If, .however, the purpose of the German government, now made entirely clear, imposes no duty upon the officers of the squadron to strengthen the naiai force at these iaiiinds, t would only place the offi ers underirritatiug conditions with no duty to perform, and would in all probability give rise lo trouble. The Nipslo is entirely ade luati lor the protection of our consulate and as an asylum lornon-oambaanta entitled to the protection of our government. In view of the critical situntion at the Samoan islands, itseems to tho department that tho officers of tho squadron, if luither vessels are to despatched, s)u uld receive Instructions of a definite character as lo their duty iu tlie premises. From the correspondence heretofore hold between the Dopurtn ent of State and the German government, and from the reports received from our naval odicers and the consular agency at the island, it appo.-irs ' '   as is Klein   Itnvietri   the    Conflict   and ninines tho Clarmnn Gnninl. Nb)w York, Jan, 20.-The World tomorrow will print the following from John S. Klein, who participated iii the battle, Deo. .17, at Apia: Apia, Jan. 16.-Never in the history o� Samoa has the situation been so alarming ai< it is at the pret^cnt time; not alone for the natives themselves but the Ainurioan and English residents also. Since rhy last letter, as the result of tho continued tyrannical action of t 0 imperial German consul, Dv, Knappo, '2. sailors from the tliree German war ships now ih the linrbor have heon killed and sn wounded, many of whom will also die, while American and Engli.sh houses have been burued, together with tho hags of those nations; American citizens taken prisoners by armed German man-of-war boats, tho oooupants of wbiuh Jon ed thoni to submit at tho mU7.. lesof their rifles, and the oiiptaiu and first lieutenant ot an English man of-war nearly shot by a German from one of the wur vessels. All this has happened within four days, and the actual troub e has . ust commenced. Alter recounting the various causes which led to tho conflict iMr. Klein sa.is. While waiting there a i atlve name tunning from the Wailili plantation houses, saying that a number i,t German siilors who ha.i been landed there during the n'ght in one of the Eber's liuats. the ship reiualniBg at Saulafata, had formed a hollow s.iuare or "tcnce," as he termed it around some Tamasese men, and that the Mataafa men, who were anxious to fight them, weio airaid to shoot upon them, knowing that in i.oing so t would be impossible not to shoot some German sailow, which they desired to avoia. On the other hand it waa said the German sailors forming the square were firing qn the Mataafa men. The native referred to, and also the chief asked me for my opinion as to whether they would be justified in shooting the Gorman sailors, nt whether the Matiiata men were expected to remain passive and be shot down lika dogs. Wh lo 1 had a decided opinion of my own upon the subject. 1 de lined to take tlie responsibility of advising theni in any way upon the subject. The high chief previo sly referred to then aSKod me to return with him to Apia for the purpose of obtaining the opinion of United States Vice Consul Black-look upon tho subject. X was Well Convinced thot Mr. Blacklook would decide that he could not give tho natives any advice whatever in regard to the mattor, but agreed to aoonmpany tho chief to Apia, and see the vice consul. We had not gone far on our way when we hoard heavy volleys of nius ketry. interspersed with irregular shots, in the direction ot Wailili. A few minutes later a native soldier overtook us, and sa.d tbnt while the Mataufa men were waiting, undecided as to whether to iire upon the tjermana, tl.e atter had iired upon them, killing the son of a cliiel. The father ot the young man wa- standing by his side at the time and Imnieaiately threw up hia gun for the purpose of taking revenge upon tho slayer of his son. He was restrained by the other Mataafa men around him, however, wlio desired to avert a oonhict with tho sailors i/possi lie.  While the chief was being urged by his men not to shoot, another German sa lor drew a sight upon hiuj and iired, killing the chief instantly. A second time tho Mataafa men restrained themeelres from answering tlio shots of tlie German sailors, and a third time the Germans fired, killing still another lUataafa man. The German civilians, who were barricaded in one of the houses of the plantation, were not inactive during this time, one of them, it is said, killing two Mataafa men. and shooting a third man iu the moulh. This man was removed to the hospital at the British consu ate later in tho dav, where he is now lying m a dying condition. At tills point of the rtyht the native who brought us ilie news left the scene of the battle. The chief and myself came on to Apia as quickly as possible and called upon the, United States consul. As I had.antio oatod, Mr. Blucklook informed the chief t lat he could give htm no advice concerning the course which tlio natives ought to pursue in thoir fi hts with the Germans. Tnat was a matter whioli they would be obliged to settle entirely without ooun.'iel from him. About half an i-our later a number ot natives came ruuning into Apia with news about the fights. Some saiu that six Get-man sailors had been killed. Saugus'   Tax   Collector's Books All Right. Every Dollar Collected Receiptfi for by the Town Treasnror. Rumor of Defalcation -Founded Wholly on a Technical Error. WHO WILL LADLE THEM OUT? [Bismarck's heavy hand is on the fighting Samoans, and he is dropping them into the tureen. John Bull and Uncle Sam aro both' entitled, under existing treaties, to protect Samoa's independence.    Which of them will use his ladle first ? ] SCALPED m CARVED. Heinous Assault OU Nurse. a Hos- pital Bonnd Hand and Foot and Slashed by a Wonld-be "Rippen" A Eejeoted Lover Sus-peotad - Night �atohman Under Arrest,. intended by the German government in the interests of a conimero al � oinpauy, and ia being consu mated by overt nets, whioli Do NOT take any chances of being pois-joned or burned to death with liquid stove olsh, paints and enamels iu bottles.   The ' ^lising Bun Stove Polish" is safe, odorless, bril^ant; thechiefest and best stove polish 1 made, ood the v nsumer pays for iio oxpen dw. common Street, Boston. JfeM-lSj^"' � ore multiplying day bv day. There i no longer any pretext w on which i an be explained the interference of the German nien-oi-war in the contest in progress upon the island of Apia. 1 api rehend that the ofiBcers of the nav � will not underatand, without definite advices to that effect-what thoir duties n.ay be under Ihe oirouinstamea as t'ey are developing. Our antecedent relations to this group of Islan s aud to the tjaudwich Islands have been of an exceptional rharnc-ter and will be likely to give rise to d ulits in the minds of the oihcers as to their duty under'ex sting conditions. On these two groups pf islands, by treaty, harbors have been rei-erved lor ihe use ot the. navy of the United States and as to the Samoan group, the three goveriiments-Germany. Great Britain and the United Stat'-s-have, up to recent date, acted together, upon the theory of mutual co-operation in preventing the autonomy ot tho people of the Samoan islands. A harbor at Samoa will become of national oousegnence to us in tl e future as a naval power, but it the islands are to go under the domiuiim of Germany ' would cease to be of use. The department bus heretofore directed the oifioei'b ot the squadron to uot in accord-anoe with the instructions whioli the con Bular agent at Samoa sliall receive from the Deportment or State, but In view of the late servli es i nd this lequ st for an additional force, the department desires to be advised whether it is the purpo.se of the goviMumeiit to announce anv policy regarding the Samnan group, of which the officers should be advised:^ Very respectfully, W. t;. Whitnbt. ,   ,     ,, Secretary of the Navv. To Hon. Thomas K. b'ayaid, Beoietary Of State. Washington, D. 0. The despatch received by Secretary Whit-ney from the c.ominaniler of the Nlpslo referred to above iiears the date ot Auckland, Jan. 6, aud iu as follows: "Three Gorman war ships at Apia threaten to disarm Mataafa, and landed at Laiendo to prevent Mataafa's retreat. Engagement followed. Germans lost 20 tcllled, no wounded. Germans swear venireanoe; Bhelling nnd burning natlveB' Tillages, �eniral property Pot respected, Froiests disregarded Aueiieau And Tlielr HeaiU Taken. Another that not a German sailor had been left alive, while others again said thot a number had made their escape in the launch by .which they laadeu from the Eber on the previous night. Several hours afterward a trustworthy native soldier came in. tr.,m whom a connected account was obtained. The German sailors, he sai i, after runn ng away from the breastworks on the shore at Fangeli, went directly to ihe plantation houses at VaiUle. The natives who were unoble to overtake tbem then scattered through the bush and along the shore, and udvani eu upon the plantation houses at Vnilele from all s des, a number of Matauta men having run down from the bush abo\e \ allele and advancing from the direction of Latogo. The Germans maae a stand on the top ot the hill near the plantation house, formerly the square, When the Mataafa men began shooting trom all sides, the sailors beoauie paiiio-strickeu and broke their, formation. Some of them rau under tlie plantation house for safely, throwing away iheir guns in their llight. Others stood behind fences and fired w Idly in the direction of )ufts of smoice which they saw coming .rom the r.Hes of the natives, who were concealed in the bush or buhlnd cocoauut trees. While looking in one dtreotion for the enemy the sailors would be shot from be. hind. Their total lack of knowledge of t le way Sam ana fieht was so f-ovident by the manner m which they defended them-seives. Lieutenant Siqgeiv of the Ulga was reported by several natives to have fired his revolver aimlessly os rapidly as possible, and was iheu shot through the heart by a native who was some dUtaiico away. He sprang into ilie air. his sword fiymg from his hand, and fell on his back. His body was sei ed bv several sailors, who sought to take it to one of the house, liut who were in turn shot. Several wounded men vr&tjp kU ed, according to ti.e Samoan custom, no priscnors ever being taken ant no quarter expectca. Some of the wounded sailors when they saw the Mataafa men ao-p.oaching ihem threw awiiy their rilies, cartridgL'B, belts, canteens aud all other accoutrements, and with the piuposo of placating, if possible, the ire of their enemies, cried out: "Talafa Malletoa," which means love or success to Malletoa, the present king. Other sailors called out to the advancing natives that they were good Mataafa men. and would fight against Tamaseser, The natives, remembering the injuries without number which they had already suffered at the hands ot the Germans, refused to listen to the pleadings ot the sailors, and dtcapitated them, knowing that they would probal.ly rece re the same treatment wure the situation reversed. Several German sailors' bodies were decapitate I. dill'i lent statements bein^ made as 10 the actual nuiiibet', some saying that only one. while others asserted that six heads were taken. The German consul admits that three heads were cut off, and this is provably the correct number. The decapitation ot the German saiiorb Is not looked.ou as an act of barburlsm directed especially towards the Germau:j. .-Vs I have stated in preMous letters the Mataafa men take Tamese o heads when the 01 pnrtunlty offers, ami the latter reciprocate when they are given a chance. Tlia actoutrementa of many of the dead sailors were taken by the natives, including the sword oi Lieutenant Sieger and the swords of other oftioers who were wounded In the tight. During and at the conclusion of the battle the remainder of the wounded sailors who could not be taken into ilie Elautatiou houise were carried to the boats y their mates and their escape effected. Xne Matoaia men then withdrew, burnuitr O.^m^)e^, N. J,, Jan,38.-This quiet town has had chills running up and down its back all day, for last night it was visited by a very good imlftition of tlie world-lamed 'Jack the Ripper," Between midnight and 1 o'clock, at the Cooper Hospital here, a woman nurse was attacked by a man who had made his wav into thebuilding, aud she was oarved up iu a mo.tt shocking manner aud left for dead by the ruffian, Prompt attehtlou waa given to hor wound � when she was discovered, and the probabilities now ate that she will uot die, Kow. although she is able to give a clear account of the assault, she is unable to furnish the least cJow towards clearing up the mystery, and tho police here are utterly at sea. Annie Eisenhardt, the victim, is a profes-siouol nurse. She is about 35 years of age. Friday, about midnight, she gave a dose of medicine to a man convaicBoing from typhoid tever. and then went to get a bag of hot water lor a patient suffering with a chill, She ent  a black overcoat and a black hat. As she lay OU the floor, the man kneeling beside her, she could feel hia hot, whiskey-laden breath on her face. "X could not get a obanoa at you last night," ho said, with a vicious gleam iu bis eye, "but I'll finish you toni,iht. Tomorrow night I'll come and finish the watchman." VroTo his pocket he ioo_ktwo^ bottles, one committed the assault. No ono was allowed to see Miss litaoiihardt this moruing, and tlie liend pliyslu ao tells tho st >ry ot the i.urso^s mh.niglit en ounter. Shortly atter 12 o'clock she entered the bath room for tho purpoao ot pioimriiig a hot bath f. r a patient. As she ontere i the room she WBsaei ed by a man. who closed the door and demanded her money. "I have no money," the replied, terribly frightened, "but hero is my gold watch; take that," "I don't want your watch. I bavo como tonight to do away with you. Tomorrow night 1 will do t e watchman," fiercely exclaimed the os'-ollant. He then tied her hands and feet and attempted to assault her, when tho towel around her neck became loosened and the poor woman screamed, '1 lie man tightened the towel OKiiin and then made an eilurt to throw her out of thojv^ndfiw, bul lie tailed lo got her out, and tlirow hor Inroibly on to the lloor. l.hon ho iokod her In ttio abdomen and siilo and Blio lost coiisciouflneHs. When .she revived tho man had gono and tho window was opoii, indicating that ho hud gone tbnt way, Hho could uot ariao bo-cauno hor hands nnd feet wet'o still tied, bnt her groans attracted the attention" of a uiglit watchman who was ,iust making his round.?. lie and a ooiivale.soent patient oppned the hatliroom door and found iho nurao lying In a pool of blood on the door. She was taken tn another room, whore her wounils were drossnd by Dr. .larrctt, tho resldeut phy.sioinn. The doctor found three iii-cl.sions on the right forearm and one on tlio loft arm, two on the forehead and una on I tho right side of the faco, ono on the scalp, one i n the left leg and a loiig cut on tho ' calf of the right leg. This last was deeper than the others. There are liorribJo bruises on liei' side and abdomen, where the brute had kicked her. CRDCIIIED A SHOAT, Curious Antics Charged to a Norton Man. Adolphns Hunt's Children Apply for Oiiardian for the Old Man. Testimony as to His Eooentrioities &iven in the Tannton Oonrt, CHILDREN STARVING. Families Without Food or Suffloient Clothing-Pathetic Appeal for St^tferera in Seward County, Kansas. St, Lotus, Jan, 28.-A special from Kansas City to tho Post-Dispatch savs: Information has been received bore that many of Ihe people in Seward county, Kan., are on tho verge of starvation.   Appeals have been scut to various plooea, and I today a letter was received by the post-, �...   uuuo� ' master here from Mrs. James K. Richard- W "� petitions tlie court toappo;nt a guar- Taunton, .Tan, 26,-Tho Piobato Court room was full ot pooiilo ot both sexes tnday farmers, ma rous iniu maidens ol Norton nnd Manafiold being there in largo uumbora, The occasion grow out of a quarrel between sundry members ot the Hunt family, and moat ot those pre.sont were there to tell what they Knew of Adol nhus D. Hunt, an oged and respected citizen of Norton, now iu Ills eighty-first year, and oossosalng considerable menus. Tills last consideration haa bred discord between his children, and miido him a bono of contention, and dragging him into court to have all his inflfmitios paraded boforo tho World, Sinco the death of his wife the old man has lived with his son Frank, aud from what Is learned from today's hearing, made nwiii some time ago providing foradivi, Blon of Ilia property between Frank and his other child, Mi'S. Emily Skinner ot Mansfield. A few months ago, because ot alleged trouble with Mrs. Frank Hunt, tho old gentleman went to live with his daughter. Mrs, Skinner. Subsequently he mode a new will, wliich fact, coming to the ears ot Frank, b;itweon whom and his sister there is an estrangement, tho siispioion waa aroused in his mind that this last   will . boded   ill    for   him,   and OFF NOT A DEIADIiTER. SAuans,Jan. 2G.~A rumor want flyine through the town today tlifflt the pretaenti tax collector, Edward O. Copn, waa short in his accounts with the town, and the figores stated varied trom SOOU to SloO). This caused uinoh comment, as it is not�year  ago that ox-Collector Warren P. Coppwas found to bo a defaulter, ana got away .to Canada before his actions had become generally known. AGloiik reporter started out to Investi-gato this latter case this altomoon, and ttra* visited Selectman Atherton. That gentleman did not have much to say, only that ho knew such reports were out; but he did not liovo the tax collector had done onytbinK ^vrong. .1      � The Gr.onK mm then proceeded to Cllftondale and found Mr. Coop at bis home. After stating his errand Mr. Copn oxorosaod much pleasure at seeing his visitor, and al once escorted him to his ollico. who!b the town books were kept. Mr. Coppsaid thnc at the be4inntngof the year ilia books and Treasurer Whitehead's a..'rced. On the 18th dayot the present iiionih tho lollowing letter s^as sent to Mr. . Copp by Auditor Hughes: , OlTFlCB Ol' SeLBCTMBN. 1 Saugus, Jan. 18, 1880.) Edward 0. Copp: Di-:.\u Sm-Wohajp e>amincdTOurbooks of taxes receivedrfand paid, and find SI uo-Liiri taxes ollectod and not accoutitea tor; please explain to auditors at youi earliosi convomonce.  Eespeotfully, (Signed) J. K. HuoHES. After receiving this letter Mr. Coop took tho hoolcs. went through them and founn out to his satisfaction that the were all ri-rhtand tliat he should have the money on hand. He diil have the required suiii, but had not turned it over to the treasurer, n nco the mistake. It the treasurer had only told him that the boOka should have been footed tip and all tho money utniod over before the new year. Ill would have been done; but tho gentleman was new at the iislnesa, and desiring to make a good showing at his work, ho said had neglected to do this. Thus this money would ha\ e been charged to last �ear's accounts, and no mistake would hayc icon made on the last day of la88. CiiUoctor Coppoarrlod S1800 to Treasurer Whitehead's ouicc, tjut the latter was in Boston; ho did not go a-,'ain uhtil the evening of tho following day. when he found the treasurer and gitve. him the money. On Jan. .s IMr. Coop carried eauoo mora to the treasurer, making $3800 in ^I, and ot Ills recoint for that also. Thus far ho .las collected this year SI500, aud at prea-ont ho has in his possession 8451.90 of tho town's inonov. "And th.it is hardly enough to skip to Canada with," said he, Mr, Conp is a native of Saugus: li a man consl orod by everyliody to be honest and r liable; is highly roapocted hy all, and this report thai has been circulated ao freely baa cau.scd him aud li.a friends much pain. Bottle of Laudanum in His Pocket. Shortly after 10 o'clock, last evening, Patrolman Lombard of division 12 found a man lying on East Broadway, near Don cheater street. In a aomi-unconscious ooudl, tlon. The man was taken to the station, where he gave tho n:ime of Hugh Conway, In his pocket was found a bottle of laudo. num. Ho was taken to the Carney Hospital. wis'a flask or whiakeyof which he smelled aud put back Into his pocket. Iheotlior was a seven-oniico vial ot olilororprm, He aud put bac! was a seveii-u,.,.-�--------------------- cook it, aud holding her nose tried to force the liquid into her mouth. She clenched her teeth and pressed her lips toaethur. With an oath be replaced the bottle and drew a scalpel from his poi ket." "I'll take you as you o e," ho said, and, raiaing her head, began cutting tho back ol her bead as it to scalp her. Ho forced the weapon through the closely plalicd hair under the nurse's cap audmade Several Vlcionn Slashoa, cutting through heavy masses of hair and several times penetrating the 1 one. Tlion he flung her down again, and t: king another scalpel from his pocket began to make savage lunges at hor. Sho uttered taint olies, whereupon he turned to her, and holding his face to hers hiesed: "It you make a sound I'll smash your brains n," At this point the woman became partly unconsoi us, but felt each alaahof thesbaru surgeon's knife through her clothing and into the I esh. The sight ot flesh seemed to infuriate him, and he began slashing her again with the aoalnel. Two cuts reached across the forehead and two others dowu the arms. He made a sweeping cut across the woman's breast. %be map finally arose and gave several kl ks tothe prostrate woman. He stopped ai he boaril the sound of voices, and with an oath went to the window and seemed to apeak to some one outside. ,Ho took down a large roller-towel, drew out what seemed to the woman Ike a pair of shears and. nutting the towel into broad bands, tied the pieces togotlier. fastening one end ot the rope to the Iron heater in tiont of the Window, and threw the other olit. After one more io'ik at the noose and after shifting the woman's poc et-book and its content'^ from tho bathtub to the whidow-sill he stepped out aud seamed to use the towel-rope merely to ate dy himself as he dtopaed to the soft grou d, 10 feet below. This was the story told by the woman, wlien half nn hour later her groans brought the nigiit watchman to her side. The woman's history was looked up. It was learned that while she was at the Hebrew hospital a man proposed marrlago to her aud wO' rejected aud that shortly atter he made a threat that he wou d kill her. Inquiries at the Hebrew hospital showed that she had the best ot morals. Miss Isenha dt is restinx ea
                            

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