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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: May 28, 1888 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - May 28, 1888, Boston, Massachusetts                                a   J.     -- VACATION Is coming', and good qnlet places for families can bo found by reading tlio small '^�nt ads" in Tlio Globo. I SUMMER BOARD Can always be obtained by putting a "want ad" In Tlie Globe, tlio best advertising mcdinm m Kew England. PI Si 11 \ VOL.. XXXia-NO. 1,49.. �vBOSTON,  MONDAY  MORNING, MAY 28, 1888--BIGHT PAGES. PRICE TWO CENTS. ODiMoiis |i a Peialieilofl Spare 'Tlie CMeS'Courts a Full IJiscreet Silence off the Other, SMe. deny the oliavges. Two I onto/but little about, but that concornihc my lioiiot suaU be proved or thn oviBuatoraiiall sutler for it. 1 want-a full aud complete examina-tiou, Xot every one who ciiveH to lieiir it coine. Seorosy is not what I dosire.but it is my wish tliat the world as well as the gentlemen of the police commission shallimow Wherein I am guilty." , Henry O. Teickey. The story 01 Chief Inspector Hansoom's official shorteominRS, as alleged in the charges preferred, against him by Superintendent Small, the details of which wore, published in The Globb yesterday, has aroused deep interest throashout the city. � The hiteh- character of 'the gentleman accused, his unquestioned ability as an otilcer and his hitherto untarnished record as a man, made the oharees diflioult to believe. On the other hand, they'wore brought by ail official higher in rank, whose ofCorts for many years have been to maintain the police department in a condition worthy the city of Boston, which it was to protect.  .  Superintendent Small's iong experience in police matters, his iinancial success in life antt the high ostoem with whioh he is held by those who know him best, made it eaually impossible for the community'to believe that ho would bring charges against any one unless there was occasion for it. �When interviewed, however, ho declined to make any statement lor publication; and, therefore, all that can be learned of the case are the specifications made in the complaint against Mr. Hanscom, which lie will meet at the examination to be held before the board of police'commissioners on Thursday. 0 A gentleman of the legal profession who has had occasion to do business through the machine in Pemberton syuaro,' said yesterday afternoon, in speaking of Chief Haiis-coiu: "I consider him one of the cleanest oliiceis in power in Boston today. YoucaiS-not lind a crook who says he ever did business with him; you cannot find an oflioer who ever found him in error while executing his work; you never saw him under the influence of liquor; and.' what is more to tlio point, you u'ovor saw him.when he wos not a Kcntleman in the full sense of tlie word. It has been .'aid, even in I'emborton square, that a man cannot hold the oliioe of cljiofiuspectpi^aJid ignore the.'ffiidaiomau,'^ llu.t go-between in soeiety, who pulls down the.power of tlie law aud by bribery . (Vhile the criminal plieS''his infamous work undisturbed. JMr. Hansccm maintained, however, that such a course was unn'eces-Eary. He had no friends among crooks. He Dousidered them all alike as long as they cemnined in tlie business, aud if they liad Iriends of intlnenoe it availed little if he OLtained the evidence to send theni to pvisou. Hf) was relentless in his work, and meant to show the criminal that ho had no chance of aalety ur.lfcs.s it was in upright livihg. As loilg as ho was liable lefore the law so sure was he to bo prosecuted. 'This ivastlie policy pursued from the he-ginning, and wliat has been the resulti' Boa-ion has been  eiuocrata in Oanoua Ilte>toro Buty on mUots of Stoel, Olaas, Xito. Washington. May 37,-The tiemocrats of the House assembled in caucus last evening to consider the proposed amondmjsnts to the Mills bill. Mr. Kanflall was not present, being out of town.. The Democratic members of the ways and means cdlnmitteo reported back quite a nuuiber of tho amendments which had been s'ubmittod since the last caucus with favorable recommendations, and the caucus immediately proceeded to consider tlie report. The following articles have been taken from the free list and restored to exist ng rates of duty; U ue, gelatine and all similar preparations, lis i glue or Lsmglass, liquorice .mice, nitrite ot aoda, bolie black, ivory dronlilaok and boile oliar. hatter's furs not on the skill, plaster ot paris when ground or calcined. Plate glass of sizes larger than 24x(!0 inches was restored to the presnt i�te ot;  nt � more than any other, .ind if I were ho I �would make the originator of the charge prove his case or abide llio consequences of a prosecution in court. "It is not ilie work of the reformer-a charge like that, and tho conditions sur-rouniting its pulilirution show tlio spirit that promi'teil it. Who has brought it? 'I'liat is a quisiioii to be ttiisw.iod. Supenutend-eiit Small I don't believe had aiiytuing to do with the charge. lie knows Mr. Hanscom too well. Ir'.F St on his family and iias spoken with his wife. .F.ven if tliere were trmh in the rliaito. I don't believe he woul,-i ersonally give it piomiiu nee. There )s Bi'ffetiiing biicr.- of it .-�11. and when the truih is. Jtnowii 'I belie\ e Uie u onl ccnspir-Bcy will sljdw in pint the sgiiific.ince aud lelial ility of the chir.-e." Late ill ihe evening a c.ill was made at ilie resideu e of Heorgo Chapman, the well-known ex-iletei.tive, who.so snccesslul m-Vcstijalion of crime hii.s ainassi/l him a fortune. Jlr. t^liapman. wlio is a warm per-toiial friemi of .Supeiin'.ciidcnt Small, "^'as not to be seen: hut a liiend who is familiar With the relations of both .said, when called Upon: "I doubt ii; Mr. Charnum would express auopinian in iliis ca.se. It is entirrly Inside the depurlineiit. and if he knows aiivtliing about tlie i.ncts he would naturally cousidtii'itcuuhdentiai. He h^'s Iroquently Eaid to me. however, that he did not think Kapeuintendeut Small would do anything unless lie had at heart the best Interoits of the community." Death of Rev. Dr. Ciesv. Waskinqton, May 27,-Kev. Samuel H. Giesy, D. D., rector of the Church of tho Epiphany, died this afternoon of pneumonia. Dr. Giesy was born in Lancaster, O., oh Aiig. 2A, 1820, and was graduated from Franklin and Marshal College, Mereers-boi'g, Penn., in 1840. He was a minister in tho Dutch Reformed Ohuroli until 187.'3, when he was ordained in the Episcopnl church. His lirst charge was ns assistant to Dr. Leeds in Grace Church, Balt'moro. In 187-tho took charge of Chiist Church at Norwich. Conn., whoro ho remained until 1885, when ho was made rector of the Church of tho Epiphany In Washington. the Tho Emporar May  'X'ot Escape Clrlm Dostroyor.  Bbblin, May 27.-The Emperor appeared at tli,e window several times this evening. He. complains of a feeling of lassitude, which the phy,8iclan3 attribute to the warm weather. The empress has postponed her yisit to the scene of tho Vis-tulo Hoods until � after tho arrival of the imperial party at Potsdam. Dr. Siuiion, who nrosiaed at a meeting of the Goethe Society of Weimar, in proposing a toast to the iiealth ot the Emperor, said it is idle to believe in tha infallibility of doctors. German or-, English. Many heroes have been ureal iu action; otiiors have been great m endurance. The Emperor is equally great in li'oth. We hope and desire that years euual to the number of drops In our slasst'S may l:o added to his life. Prince Bismarck has returned to this city.__. Why Mr. Cable Caused Mr. Chapin's Arrest-Interesting Statements ty Accuser and AoouBBd. Hyde Pawc, May 27.-The news of the arrest of Charles M. Gliapin, the woU-knbwn insurance agent and an old and prominent resident of this town, last night, for alleged embezzlement fell like a thunderbolt from a clear sky upon tlie. Sunday quiet of our town and created a widespread feeling of pity, both for him and his family, who are among the best people in town. When the late train on the Erovidenoo division of the Old Colony railroad rolled into the dopbt from Boston Otlicer O'Cou-nell arrested him as ho stepped on the platform and took him to police headquarters, after wliion the ollicor acoompaniod him to his home, on Gordon avenue, whore they passed the night. Early this morning he was taken to Boston, and was delivered to Inspeotor Hanscom, who had'a warrant for his. arrest, on oomnlalut of Hobart M. Cable, one of our BOloctiften, for emlio;!y,leiuont of 34000, Mr. Cliapiii immediately iurnished bail, and rotu'rnea to his residence later in the day. Mr. Cable said: "In the latter-part of last February while Mr. Oliapiii was in.Chlcago my brother, Herman D. Cable, who is presi-aent of tha Cottage Organ Company ot Chicago, sent to me by "Mr, Chapiii stock in tho above concern to the valuo of, $7600. This sto.ok Mr. Chanin brought on to Boston and deposited in a Boston bank as collateral, on which ho borrowed $5000, "For months I have been trying to oollect this amount, and Mr. Chap n has put me ott'from tihio to time, .saying le would pay tho .money to me which he la led to do, and writing me a lotlor saying he had sent the money to my brother in Chicago, which a telegram refuted. I have done everything in my power, going rope ' sa way    _______ .. ---------------._________________ upon liini, and, although he has repeatedly promi.sed, ho never has made any explanation either to me or to my brother. "Ho paid mo 8710. which . I sent to my brotlior in Chicago. 1 trusteed hifi banlt account I'or'Saco. '''Ho paid mo thatSlOOO and gave mo a uoto for $1000, and owes me for the balance, .*8000 and the note lor $1000. Mr. Chanin went west to Topekq, and Denver the 14th of this month, and wrote mo fiom there, so that I got traclii of him. I saw no hope for asettlMment. ana had reason to thinlv ho intended to leave the State, and for this reason entered crlm inal proooedings." This evening Tjie Globe reporter oal ed uprin Mr. Cliajiiii at his homo in Sunpys de and told him that it was Thi! Gr-onit's w sh to hoar his side of tho story, and prljsont his case imiartially boloro tlio public as the details of tho allair wore them.    Wh lo Mr. Cbaiilu _________, _..... publicity of tho aU'air ho, in justjeo to himself, made the following statomont: "Previous to ray gong lo Chicago I had a talk with Mr. Oaolo and told him 1 know a party who had SKOOO to invest. Mr. Cable wanted 2C cr 28 shares and I told him if his brother would let him have six certificates of in shares each I would negotiate a loan for him and I was to liavb S4000 for a certain length of time to bo paid for in in.italmeflts. He was not to pay for his stock until the fifth and sixth instalment tlio first, sixth and last six months in tho third year, and whcil 1 went to Chicago to get the stock his brother wanted him to take more. When he was herein Novombur Herman said ho could laUo SO shares, and- he wanted to arrange it by making tho collateral large onough so that Cable could have ."iO aliaios. I said, 'I tluiik so.' and he also toleplionod mo that ho wanted to see me on othor business of cnother nature. "Uorman wimtiid me. to negotiate for lilm and the treasurer a joint note of .'SIO.OOO. and he was going 11 send me 250 shares of tho stock. When 1 found that Hobart was going to have more than he lir.st intended. It took longer time to negotiate, and 1 wont to tho bank and asked' tor S6000 on 75 shares of stock that I �brought bach:, and I was making other arrangements toward negotiating tho balance. VVhen tho tran.'^act'on w.is lialf completed Mr. CiiBlo stepped lii and demanded the rotui'ii of the note he had Indorsed and the return of the stock. Consequently I was unable to cany out tho arrangement, and ho pitched into mo. I paid �1000 and kept the .?*ooo to return to him aocording to agreement, which agreement was verbal between Cable and myself." Mr. Chapin says he told Cable ho would pay tho money as agrei d. He feels his position keenly, and tlunks Gable's action in causing his arrest lor emhezzlenieut was unjustitiablo. Ho reiterated to the reporter that he Inid done no wrong and wasopiiii-dout that he would come out of it all right Pliysiclaiis Coiicede TW Eiia Is Near. lie No Longer Relieved the Drugs Used. Phil's Victory Cedar Creeh. nt abandoned, and it is not behoved that General Shorldan can last another 24 hours. General Sheridan fully recognizes that his end may come at any time, and, it is said, has made all arrangements he desires to have iierfooted prior to his demise. Ono of tho physicians in attondaiioe said this oveniiig: "Qonoriil Sheridan has great vitality, but I do not think ho will bo alive i!0 huui's from now, and certainly not in two days, unless Ihoro is a great chango. He has no pain, and I think lie will sink away easily. A rocurronco' o� tho hnart trouble may come-the heart wilt cease to beat, and all will bo at an end." Thoro hiis been il steady stream of callers at tho general's residence today, and mony telegrams were received asking for information as to his condition, 'The Prosidciitseut a basket of flowers a id a note of symoathy to Mrs, Sheridan In t lO morning. Ho asked to bo informed of tho general's qoudltiou aud exprossod a sincere hope that his life would bo spared. 'lo an Inquiry made at 11.30 p. m. as to the general's condition, the answer returned was; "Ho is hoveting between life and death." At 1 p. m. no cliaiige is reported In Sheridan's condition, Ue is holduig his ow'n, and is conscious and rational at all times, except immediately after inhaling oxygen, when he bocoiiios. somewhat fllgnty. Tho doctors say it is improbable that any change will occur forsevoral hours. At 1.45 a. m. General Shorldan is sleoplug quietly, and uoinimodiato danger is apprehended. Tho only persons in his room are a physician aud a nurso. The otiior doctors are lying down, and Mrs. Shorldan has also been persuaded to take a short rest. Tho general has had ono or two slight attacks of coughing. QAi.i,A3iiT rjotir,. Albert Everett's Found. Body Sea at North Scituate. IB a member of the celebrated class of 18ft7. to whioh Senator Evarts and tho late Chiel Justice Waite belonged, and which celebrated its semi-centennial last commencement at Yale. There is every reason to believe that the contracts for the iieiT. building are not yet given out and that they will not bo until tha "fence" exoitomontia somewhat allayed. , crowds AWAITED HER. Dearaiice ohineese: dens raided. XoHUg   (ilrls and   Iloyo CaptnroiC- 0|>luin Smoking In Proitrciia. New YoiiK, May 27.-The police raided two Chlnose brothels in Mott and Poll streets.toiiiglit. In one 12 Chln.imen, two boys and seven young girls, and in the other three Chinamen and two girls were captured. Some of tlio girls were in short dresses. They begged piteouslv to be releiisid. Opium sim king was, in progress at both places. Ono oi the girls was Mary Farrell. who was married three months ago t'l Prince Mock Ling of the Chinese six companies by Justice Pitsche. THE WEATHER, Washington, May 27. - Indications for 24 hours comnucucing 7 a. m. Monday. May \ 28: For New England and eastern New 'York, slight changes in temperature, local rains, fresh to brisk southerly winds, Xhs Police I>Uuerso a jureotlnii After the FU'luK of Several Shots. Paiiis, Jfay 27.-M. Do la Farge, presiding at tho centenary of tho Assembly of 1780. made a vigorous speech against Bou-langerist Ciesurlsm. ThoAsseiiibly adopted a resolution demanding that tlie coiLstitu-tioii be revised so as to provide tor the abolition of the (Sonale and the jiresidency. The speeches ot tho Conimmil.sts in tho cemetery of Pere la Chaise loday provoked a fight with Bouluiigerists. Several revolver shots were fired and two Anarchists were wounded. The police wore comoellod to disperse the meeting, SANOTIONKIK  BY TOtSTOI. LEACUERS AROUSED. Vigorous ' 'VVorda   hy I^aKaii   and  a ISishop Ovor tho XCo�crii>t. Lincoln, Neb., May 27.-A,meeting of tho executive officers of the Irish National League ot various States has been called by President Fitzgerald, to bo held in Clove-land, Juno 12. Tho papal rescript the indirect cause of the meeting, it having stirred up much bad feeling among the members of tho league. Many of them, prominent oniong wlioin was Patrick Eagan, regarded Komos iiitor-feronco as entirely uncalled for and un- 'WASHiNaTON, May 27.-General Sheridan's life still hangs by a thread,'and tho thread is so'flne that the siightest jar may cause it to snap in twain. Tho first bulletin issued today repdrted a slight itnprovomoiit iu the patient's condi-tlon.but those official utterances are necessarily dolusivo. It, after a very nerious attack, an attack so serious that tho general liangjt over tho very brink of the grave, he recovers over so slightly, the'bulletin announces that he Is a little better. Of course lie is a little bettor compared with tho time when, tho last bulletin had been issued and an acute crisis was at hand, but no comparison is made with tjio time before the Inception of tho crisis. So tho bulletins do not show whether the general is losing groufld or gaining strength, but simply toll that for tlie time Doing liis physicians have boon able to keep tho disease m check. Last night's lata buUotln showed that tho attack of heart failure had. not yet yielded to treatment from 5 o'clock until 10, aim it was not until 4 o'clock this morning that tho doctors felt that they were masters of tho situation, At that time General Slieri-dan sank into slumber and slopf lor about an liouri whioh seemed to do him more good than any rest he has had since ho was taken 111. AVlion he woke up ho,asked for some-think substantial to oat, aud robelled at tho peptonized milk that was offered him by the physicians, and on whioh ho has mainly lived during tho last few days. Ho wanted some ohi'ckcn broth, and after a good deal of hesitation he was given a tcacupluf, which ho drank with rolish. Ono of the greatest dangers tlio doctors have to fear is an attack of Indigestion; it would bo almost certain to cause ddath. During tho day tho general. dozod at intervals in the big chair that he uses in proference to a bod, clnoo ha was sick. Ho is never loft alone Joranilnuto. Two of the doctors are constantly on duty. Sisters of Charily relieve each other at staled Intervals, and Mrs. Sheridan is assiduous in her attentions at her husband's bedside; in fact it has been with tho greatest diflicuUy that tho medical attendants have been able to induce her to talce much needed repose. The distinguished patient suffers little if any pain. Now aud then he rallies and seems  ontroyoil~Two   'Womon Ituriod In tho Kuius. AuiLiiNK, Kan., May 27.-There was a heavy hall storm yesterday throughout Dickenson and Ottawa counties. At Manchester, this oounty, a bank building in course ot erection was demolished bv the whid. At Vino creek, Ottawa county, a cyclone struck the residence of W. A. Tudor, completely destroying it and burying Mrs. Tudor and her daughter in tho ruhis, They wore badly injurt d.bii t not fatally. At Detroit, this county, and Milton Vale, Cloud county, tho hail was 'accoiu-�jjanied,by vast clouds of dust, tuiniiigday into night. Barns and residences were more or less injured, hut no one was hurt. Crop* 'were badly damaged. Nov/ Engiland Briefs. . .Hanson is excited over the Snding of a neglected feina:e infant. ..High tides caused considerable damage atCiiluis, Me., Saturday night. .. Burglars visited West Barnstable Saturday uigiit, but secured no booty. . .Robhison Brothers' savv-mill in Nebraska, Vt.. was burned yesterday. Loss, 81000; insured. .. Kev. John S. Hlncks has resigned as pastor of the Bethany First Congregational Church m Montpelier, Vt. ..General Butler will be unable to deliver the Memorial day address at Lowell, Rev. Mr. Blackburn will bo the orator. .. Mary Armstrong of Lowell was knocked down with an iron poker iu the hands of a neighbor on Saturday and severely injured. ..FredBates, a New Bedford boy, stole 835 from his oiiiployer on Saturday, hut was anestfd yesterday wiiile hunting. Ho had 823 left. ..Rev. Charles Wadsworth, Jr., pastor of Plymouth Church, Worcester, resigned yesterday, having accepted a cull to San Francisco. ..William H. Osborne of East Bridge-water has been auixihited a member of tlio board of examiners of applicants for admission to the Flyinoutli county bar, to succeed Hon, Jonathan White, tesignod. that(jenoial Shorldan has fatly dogonora-tlon of the boiirt; that.is, there is aii abiior-jual devolopment of fat constituting tho walls of the heart, instead of healthy luu.s-cuhir tissue. Undoubtedly tho valves of tho vlliil i.'igau lire ailectod and do not close perfectly. Thus, M'hen tho blood is pumped out, it runs back or logurgitatos, and cannot properly nourish tho body. "You win notice tliiiv the bulletins make special men lion of the (edema (or swpll ng) of the lower limbs. That is the med oal term for diopsy, and is caused by the presence uf water in tho blood coming to tho surface. Tnis condition may bo due to throe things, failure of the heart's acthm, a diseaBOd liver or a disarrangement of tho kidneys may be tho inimodiato cause. In the present case 1 should say that it was owing to tho woaluiosscf the heart, po.s�lbly complicated by some urinary ttonble.aiid that it will be found thot. General Shoiidan has Bright's disease as well as a weak heart. "The general's pulso is abnormally high. We aro told that uornially It is iou, which is surprising, ns the pulso of tho average healthy man is 72. Now, however, his pulso is beating away at the rate of iiu cr 118 .'itroUes a ittinute, v/hllo ^lis breath comes in quick, snort gasps, 'that shows tho tremendous eil'orts Ills heart is making to perforin its accust"med fuiiuiions. 'A medical man hates to .'�ay iu advance whether a nationt is likely to die, but I should fay tliiit General Sheridan will never leave his rcoiiiain e. Ho may rally and live lor some little'timo yet, but 1 doubt it, as it IcoUu to nie as if there was a general breaking 111) ot the By.>tBm. Death will bo caused either by a clot in the heart or else Irom suffocation,.as the blood will bo poisoned and will be powerlo.ss to sustain life. 'Ihe slightest accident may cause death. Should iho general eat anything requiring the least effort to digest it, the extra labor thrown on tho heart would be fatal, and for that reason the doctors have to be zealously oarelul 0^ what he eats." Between 4 aud G o'clock this afternoon GcuomI Shorldan had another attack, which yielded to tioitment more stubbornly than any ot tho others. The doctors have hi;d to rely on digitalis to lestorothe heart's uetion, but the drug has been given f.o I'roi ly during tho last week that it lias lost its potency, and now, unless very large dosos are given, the effects are inappreciable. Between 6 and 8 o'clock tho general w.is nearer death than he has been at any t-ino since last Monday, and the doctois have now given ujj hope and concede tiiat it iu only a question of a few lionrs wlien all will he over. The following bulletin, issued at 8.;io. shows how tlio doctors feel: "Bulletin-General Sheridan iu not so strong nor as well this evening as ho was earlier in tho day. AlielTorlsof tho plivsi-cians to rally him Iroui the attack of yesterday evening nave proved unavailing. The doctors are even less hopeful th.in before." TiiB last stage but one in tho case has been reached. The lungs are refusing to perform their duties as filters, and the bio: d 1 emaiuB stagnant in the voms because of the excess of carbonio acid. This can lofct but a little longer, then the blood will be so poisoned that it will not be able to support lile. ,  Bulletin, 10.80 p. m.-AU hope has becQ How Mo Xurnotl I>efaat Into 'Vlotoicy at. Cetlnr Oraok. Washington, May 27,-Major MoKinley of Ohio was talking tonight about General Sheridan, and recalled the time when ho led tho groat charge after the disastrous defeat at Cedar Creek, "I was on General Crook's staff," ho said, "and was po.sting some artillery under orders I had received from Uim, wliou General Sheridan aud his staff ottine along the pike,' General Sheridan had just come back from Washington, where he had roooivcd his oommissioii as a major-general, and knew nothing of the disaster thiit had overtaken us. Ho asked mo where General Crook was, aud I conducted him to headquarters. "Tho two generals retired some little distance and engaged in close conversation., Slioridaii decided that an imuiodiato advance should be made, and tho camps from wlilcli wo had been driven bo recaptured. It was suggested that General Shorldan should, first ride down the linesoihat his presence might encourage, tho troops and thoy might know that the general was once nioro among thoiii. He had on a brandnow overcoat, such as we all wore, and this he took off and handed to an orderly. 'Then a pair of major-general's epaulettes were fastened on his sliouldora, and in the full uniform df his rank, at tho head ot his stall, ho rodo down the lino, "What a scene that wasi I never expect to witness .such another, Tho liu'/,;;as and shouts wore deafening, and his prosenco was as gocd as a couple ot army corps, Shorldan naid but liltlo attention, except to tell us that before night we should again be .ill our camps, and, as you know, his words canio true.- Ho looked tho ideal soldier, and ho had that pocullur power of bn-ing able to in.spire everyone with his^wii ooiilidenco and to havo the love and aliec-tiou of his men,"__ Sherman Prays for tho Dying General. ' Nbw YoliK, May 27.-Rev. Dr. Talmage's church in Brooklyn was crowded to tho doors tonight when the sorvicos in memory ot tho dead soldiers of the war wore hold. General W, T. Sherman sat on the loft of the eloquent preacher and tho Grand Army posts occupied the centre ot the auditorium. General Sborman waa received with ciieers, which were roooiitod ovory tlnio he made a remark. After a tow remarks he said: "jU tliis moment thoro lies at death's donr hi Wa.shlngl on, ono ot tho groati'st commanders of the war. I ask your prayers tor him bore tonight. He is 11 years younger than 1," continued General Sherman, "while thoro is lile there is hope, and 1 oariiosllv pray to God that in tho so-queiice of thiugs I shall precede liiin to tho grave."___________ LUMBER GAMP BROTHELS. Innocent Girls Enticed to Their Buin- Heads Shaved and Hunted by Dogs tip Prevent 'Ihoir Escape. . Gold Wa.teh, Mich., May 20,-Among tho prominent women who have boon in at-tendaiico at the meeting of tho Michigan State Woman's Christian Tomporanco Union is Sirs. Obousauer, well known throughout the State as a fearless worker in tho cause ot tomperiinco and social purity, Mrs. Obensimer has just returned Irom a missionary toiir In the upper noiuiisula. � "Senoy, Schoolcraft county," said Mrs, Obensauor, "Is a place of 2G buildings, of which 15 are. saloons. A quarter of a mile from the hotel I could boo the roof of ono of the dens, around it a high Blockade. The dooris lil'^li in tho palisade, and tho whole aspect ot tho place is that of afortrosH, What eoos on inside that stockade is a lear-t'ttl blot ou our clvlllKation, Much of my knowledge of the horrors ot the lumber camp dens 1 got from Presiding Elder Bart-lett of Marquette, who paid a man to go through some ot tho worst of these places. His ttiiidavits are nnvi' In coiu'so of preparation, and will soon bo ready for use. "When I was up there a man from Rood City stopped up to mo and said: 'Mrs. Obensaeuer, I want to tell you about tho case of two girls who stai tod 011 the train from St. Agnace to go to Marquette for work. Thoy wore rosnoetahle girls. As thoy were talking over their plans a -vvoll-driissed man oanie up to them and offered thorn big wages logo to a lumber camp to cook. They finally consented, and ho took tlicmtoaii abandoned" camp, whoro they were kept for several weoUs to suit tho pii r-oosesof a crowd ot men who eanio night alter night. The girls wore locked in tho house during tho day, and were finally re-leitsed by a party of luiuters, 1 myae f raised nionoy to iiay for the caro ot tho girls atn ho.siiital al Marquette.' "So you see," continued Mrs. Obensauor, "that the saying, 'Ohl IIju girls wore bad, anyway,'has no application in some oases, indeed, Iho only way iu whlcli those men ciiii get girls al- al I is lo make false proinlses; lor evou the most abandoned womun irom the city would not go freely to a place from which she knov.' that a horrible death alouo would bring her rolca.so. "Tho worst dens aro now in Judge Steer's district, ill Schoolcraft, While Temporai�ily Insane He Wandei*�i Away. sir*. Cleveland At.touds Ohnrch Tlirea ; Times on Sunday. PHiLADELPHiiV, May 27.-With todeiy'B blue skies and bright sun camo the first ploasont weather that Mrs, Cleveland hM ' had since she has been the guest of Rev; Charles Wood in Qermantown. She attended worship in the morning at tho First \. Presbyterian Church, of whioh Kev. Mf.' Wood is pastor, and when, the carriage droYO up CheltOT avenue was black-witll pooplcaud the sidewalk wasso crowded that . it required tho efforts of two stalwart 1 policemen to keep a passageway open. Mrs. Cleveland occupied tho pastor's pew near the front of tho church with Mrs. Wood and y Miss Bessio Wood, and all through the ser- : vice heads were turned and necks craned to  get a glance at her pretty face.   As tho ; organ struck up a lively tuno after thebene- ; diction, she stepped quickly down the aislo tiohind her two friends,  tripped lightly across the sidewalk and entering the oar- ; riago, was away before half of those who had only coino to church to see her knew that sha 1' had gone, Mrs. Cleveland looked pale and ; tired and kept her eyes down as if she were annoyed or onibarrassod. She wore steel; gray velvet trimmed with silver braid and a walking hat to match, with whito flowers. She spent the rest ot the' day quietly at tho Wood mansion and attended tho Sunday school celebration in the afternoon and tlio .services in tho evening. 'Mrs. Oleve- ^ laud will go coacliing today on a tally-ho � and will bo feted in the afternoon by i George W. Childs. . The Suicide Tlieory Proved False. PARDON OF THE ANARCHISTS. conntios," Luce and Alger "Were not detectives sent up thoro?" "'Von, and llicy were boiiglit oil'. 'Iho only way in wliicli wo eiiii got evidence is throUKlKKimoonowho is brave enough to go through the di ns and then te.stify.or else to get the testimony ot the lunibornien who turnStat�'s avidcYice. 'i'lio miin whom Elder Barllett has ill charge saw women, without anything �i(. turned into a crowd of men. "The girls have their heads shaved so that if thoy oscaiio and wander off in the woods tho lumbermen will returntliem. 'This pro-caution is in addition to tho iiuiiting by dogs, wliicii is regularly done when the girls escape, "TheStateoillcers don't realize the depths of depravity there. I have written to Governor Luce, but he says that he cannot bo expected to reform humanity, and that tho womon are cf the abanduni'd class. You 1100 ho has not aoquainted himselt with the real facts. ''There is another diBiculty, Dan Dunn, 'Roscoinb Dunn,' they call him, wlio boasts ot his fumo in that county, where the.so dciisaie, is tlio political inanaijer. He Is now under bonds as a result ol the Green law, but he is praoticijliy able to dely the la^v. lie has made a fortune out ot his saloons and biothel.-'. :iud he controls tho voters fur ml.es. In fact, he is the bo.ss ot Schoolcraft county. Now that tho vote is so close in tho uniior iiciiinsuia. It ia iiuiio importiint to have Duiinaiid his votes. Both parties, I believe, figure with hiui." "Where do you place tho blame for this stall! of things iu tho upper peiunsula.-"' "With the Oumpanios that own tiio camps. These men hire labor where it is choaiiest; that is all right. With the camjifi come tlie KiilooiiB. ill miuiy camps tho com nanitd own the saloon buildings; in some llicy own the liquors. 'Iho liiotliels ovist as a cou.'^eijuenco ot the camiis. 1 think these companies have some duties in the way of carimr for ihe moral coiiditicin of the ignorant who work for them, yet few of those como.^iiies will give money for missionary work. It is a sickening picture." HiNOHAur, May 27.-Tho body ot a man, which was found floating in tho water off the Centennial House, North Scituate beach, last li'rlday, was today identified as that of Albert Everett of Norwood, who disappeared so mysteriously tho 20tli of last MuKoh. 'The body was taken ashore about 0 o'clock Friday aftoriioon, but owlua to some mlsuudorstandincf ot tho parties wlio found it. Medical Exapiiner J. Winthron Bpoonor was not notified until Saturday afternoon, w,hen Undertaker William J. Newcomb took the body In ohargo and placed It in tho receiving tomb at North Scituate. , Ideutilication was something of a diffioul't matter, as it could only bo by the clothing or some small trinket about the person. 'The body had evidently furnisliod food for tlio deep sea fish, as the head, both hands and part of tho arms wore entirely eaten awav; The part ot the skeleton which rcnialnod was dressed,,in a dark colored vest, a fancy white iiosouiea shirt, brown undershirt, white standing collar, black four-iii-liand necktie, tho lower end of whioh wos pinned to tho pleat of the shirt; dark striped pants ond heavy lace shoes. In the pockctn were found an old fashioned gold watch and chain, to whioh was fastened an odd looking seal, which served for the purpose of identlticiition. A leather bill hook containing a liusliioss card of the Miinatuok Silk Colnoany, a ticket on the Now 'VTork & Now England railroad from Boston to Norwood, a dinner ticket of the Gate Waquoit, and $2 worth ot two cent postage stamps. As tho body lay high and dry upon the beach, a large aud curious crowd flOllo3tod, and had innumerable theorioB to offer. Many tliought it the body of some man washed from tho dock of one of tiio fishing schooners in tho fisherman's race hist Fast day; others thouglit it might he some one of the Jargo nuuiber wlio are annually drowned in this vicinity. 'The family of Albert Everett were loth to beliove that he had met any such sad death. Although hU mysterious disappearance could not bo ok-plained, it was believed, and almost expected that ho would some time turn up and Datlsfaolorily explain for his ahsenoo. The reason for tills belief was that Everett could have had no reason tor taking his own lite, and it was not known that ho had an enemy. His future was unusually promising and ho was consldored especially fortunate. About throo years ago ho marrieil an estimable young woman and settled down in a comfortable homo in Norwood. Throo months ago ho bcught out tt stationery store on Columbus avouuo, wlilcii he run for a few .weeks and tliort suddenly disappeared. Others who claim to know Everett, but who could not positively identify the body, said that Everett had boon noting very mysteriously tt short .tlmo before his disappear nnce, and frequently had the "bliiois.'' The reason for this was given that the store was bought through un agont, >vho was to havo all ho got over a certain price, and as a result pocketed about 8400. This is said to have preyed upon 'Everett's mind, producing temporary Insanity, and in one of these spells ho took his own lite, But owing to the almost un'recog-nl/ablo condition ol the body tho cause ot Everett's death mimt remain a matter of conjecture. From tho accounts published in the newspapers, tho family gave up all hopes that Everett would return, and sent Frank N. West, who has a'phice of business at 405 Washington street, to see It he could identity tho body. Mr. West has for several years past been an Intimate friend of Everett, aud today visited the tombs ut North Scituate. Fi'iiin tho watch and clothing he quickly Idontiliod the body as that ol his l^ornior bosom friend Everett. Ho was at an utter loss to give any reason for tho sad death, outdid not for u moment consider it a case ot foul pluy. "Everett," ho said, "wuB my iiurticular friend, and a very blight and agreeable young follow. Ho had nothing to trouble lilni; on tho contrary, ovorythljpg to bo happy over. He was not in any niianciiif dilhculty. and was very happy iu his domestic affairs. A few days before his disaiipoaraiice he comphilned of a bad feeling in the head, and wo thought ho was threatened with brain disease. It was evidently liis intention to visit his relatives in Norwood, but by mistake took the train to Scituate. Here he must have become a victim to the disease that threatened him, and, in his aimless wandering.s. must have fallen into the water and drowned." The body will bo taken to Norwood uo-tt Tuesday for interment. THEY UPSET THE LAMP. Itnllani Havo a lEow, 'Which Xiud* In a XVolooaiigt. WiLKBSBAiinE, Penn., May 27,-A terrible holocaust occurred at WestPittston early Sunday morning. On Saturday night a largo number ot Italians gathered at a hoarding-houso kept by Chris Saragorl. Tlioy all got drunk, and a flght followed. 'The lamp was upset, and tho place set on tiro, Saragorl's Xonr-year-old daughter was burned to death, and three of the drunken Italians wore seriously buinod, two of them it is believed fatally. COSVEPARE PRBCES Anrtyou wlU (Iml Hint Blmllar (iKaUtles of gooan to oiu-u euiinot lio proounta wltlila luto 20 por cent, us low. Coiiiiinro tliu stylo niul workmnnslilp of our now AsU itudrooiu Suits, lO S>looea, at iliSU.IvO; uur clogiint Oalc,  iiiiluar-I�ooni Furnl* turo. iiiitlquu .iiul uLliiir stylea; SXuudKome SdldolfoaiiU ttjf. 91118 niiil upwnrd. Coiiiinvro our juiaorCinoiit of.JPux'lor JB'uiriii* tQi>>o, tliu iiQWeyt denlyns, lii ricliust tupestrles, pluaii, otc. wxi OAr.1, AT'rmNxioJs to orii SPHCIAI, AlCKAiVOIiSUSJVXS POK '1>HE FUltSTISSlINO OJ.^ COCK. I'llTf KKSIMKNOKS. MIJ'ritOFUI,. ITAW I'AItDlBIt VANS FO.Ta 8AFH J>1B1,IVI!UT, ItAIW OK SniMK. I.OWEBT I'KIOES. OABM OlE STAILMJENTS. 1075 fB 1079 Washington St. lyons won  his  BET. Bib Fire at South Pittsburg, Tenn. Chattanooga, Tenn., May 27.-The Perry Stove Works and Payne & Co.'s large dry goods house, at South Pittsburg, wwre burned last night. Loss. S200,ouo. Twelve thousand stoves iu'stoclc wore ruined. Tho insurance was about fllL'.uou. A SArE, sure and speedy cure for coughs and colds-Adamooir's Botanic Balsam. KiNKit the waste piijc.s and disinfect every suspicious pines With riau'a CiUorides. Tho Prlxo 'YVBfl a Xiarrel at Boer, and tli� OIHcers �Id STot Oct II. The attention of a coiiplo of ollicers of station 31 was attracted yesterday afternoon by a number of men hurrying towards the Codman farm, which is situated at tiio corner of Washington and Codman streets, Doiehostor. I'roceeding to tho large barn which is located on tho estate lliey found a large party of highly-excited individualson-gaged in a heated discussion over some suli-jeot wlilch, despite tho best offorti of the blue-coated guardians of the peace, was kept a profound secret. Whether a cock fight, dog fight or man fight hail been in firog'CSS could not be louiueU, and the uu-io� retired, discomfited and disappointed. The C'luse of tho excitement was a wager. Vvliicli the occupant of the farm had made last weoic, that he could run from his homo to thr- Dorcliester cemetery and return in 15 minutes, and a half-barrel of the best brewing was tho pri/e to be Avon or lust. Numerous friends cf both contiactiug parties assembled to witness tho heat, and had tho pleasure  o an Issue In tlia   tl Illinois Cnmpaisn. OnrcAao, May 27,-Dr. Ernst Schmidt,  ' chairman of the Anarchist defence commit-tee, said In an interview today: f : ^ "Tlio. pordon of Neebe, Fieldon and Schwab will enter into the present Illinois political campaign. If a promise to grant executive clemency wore made by either : candidate it would result in his defeat. I  am not in favor of pushing the movement, for a pardon at present antTbelieve that any attempt to secure one would compromise the chances of the mon." : The Anarchist defence oommitte will apply to tho Circuit Court this fall for a writ . of habeas corpus in tho case of Oscar Neebe. It is claimed that errors havo been discovered in the Siipreme Court reoorcl, Geneial Butler is quoted as saying that "Noeba has a fair chance ot being released." I'ov the iio.xt ivoclc wo will glvo to each purchasop of iPCO worUi ami upwurds ftiircsont of a i^oort lue Cliosti or, Ifiiu I'jo client la not n-nntea, �ny otlior artliilu or llko valuo iniiy bo BuliBtttiUwl. .t,OOIi: AT OLTA .lt>llCICK8i AsU ClIiHiitbet* ISotii,  ......  fltlA Alut CloneC ltEiiBt.o�.  ...... Ouriictn, aOc. por I'd. OTpward. AlflO, all klnils of llouso FuniUlitug ut lowest price* lor CANII. or on INSTALIWIENTS. I. P. LORD  &  CO., �18 UIVION ST., liOSXON. Chamber Sets.................$iO to $200 Parlor Suits...................S30 to S250 Carpets.......................20c. to $2.00 Oil Cloths....................19c. to 50o, Straw Matting.................13c. to 60c. Single Oven Ranges.............59 to $40 Double Oven Ranges...........$14 to $60 Curtains and Draperies.......25c. to $50 Baby Carriages..................$5 to $40 Mattrosoes....................$1.85 to $30 Bed Springs.....................85c. to $10 Cabinet and Mantol Beds.....SI0to$50 Refrigerators................$2.50 to $40 Toilet Sets.....................$1.85 to $10 CASH or INSTALMENTS. FEEE DELIVEET. HOME FUBNITORE GO. EKTHAXCi: TO WAHKKOOSIS. 263 Washuig;tou St,| opp. Water Stk-   

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