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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: August 6, 1886 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - August 6, 1886, Boston, Massachusetts                                SWIU -wi'lto tho ttocoimt o�'Samuel J. Tliaen'i I tanoral to be publlslied In THE BiiUDAY GLOBE. mmwSi Samuel J. Tilden's Funeral will be doierlbod by Goorpte Alfred Townaemi in THE S8JNDAY GLOBE. VOL. XXX.-NO. 37, BOSTOIS, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 6, 1886-EIGHT PAGES. PRICE TWO CENTS. let Lazy Scenes on President   Cleveland Signs the Bills. mis aiii EliMsrpr In-iM t SeHaieaLii Hecesses tlie Fe th(> White Fawn and J. H. Nickorson. It will be represented that they came into port for other purposes than those spcciliod in the treaty of 1818, and a plea will also bo incorporated tor infraction of the customs laws. Lansdownn Coos to London. Halifax, N. S, August 5.-John J. Mc-Geo, clerk ot tho Queen's privy council for Canada, arrived in the city this evening for tho purpose of swearing in Lord Alexander Russol, commander of her Majesty's military forces in British America, as adniini.^jirator o� the Dominion governmeut during the alLsenco oti^ord LanKdowno, who sailstoraorrowforLondon. Laiisdowne's visit to England is said to bo to confer with the imperial government with reference to the fishery troubles. Bravo Officer Floyd. A dog supposed to bo suffering from hydrophobia ran amuck in a crowd of people oii Hanover street last night, biting several persons slightly. There was great consternation and a lively scattering of the crowd. The commotion brought Oinoer l''loyd of the first division to the scene. The enraged animal dashed at tho olticer, \7lio by an adroit movement escatied tho brute's teeth, and seized him by the nape of the nock. Five minutes later the dog lay dead on the cellar floor ol Station 1. A thirty-eight-calibre bullet from OlHcor Floyd's revolver did the work. Patrolman Dearborn Retired, Patrolman Samuel ,S. Dearborn, forrnerly assigned to Divifcion 13, has been found physically incapacitated for duty, and tho Board of Police has placed him on tho retired list, with pay at tho rate of 1 per day.___ Kansas Damocratic Nominations, Lkavenwoeth. August 5.-The Democratic convention adjourned today after nominating this ticket: For associate justice, A. M, Whilelavr of Kinsman; for lieu- THOMAS BUDGE DROWNED. 'the Sail End oj u  ruelitms Cruiie in the Ilarlior. The cat-rigged yacht Fearless sailed from South Boston yesterday, on a short pleasure trip. Capl,Elix Itidd hold the tiller .and navigated tho little craft whicii ho owned. With him wero Harry S. Wilbor, Mrs. Saraii Stewart and TTiomas Budge. Down tho harbor, pa.st the familiar landm.arks, they sailed, until tho approach o� evening warned them they must return. Captain Kidd put his helm about, and back up tho harbor the little yacht flew bo-tore the breeze. At about 7 oiclock, wlien about half way between Long Island and Moonbeiid, a sudden flaw strucic tho Fearless amidships, causing her to careen badly to one side. Every one on board instinctively jumped toM'ihdward, hoping to right tho boat, but all in vain, for in nnothor luomcnt tho little yacht's leeward rail was under water. Another flow completed tho work, and the boat slowly settled and sank, leaving tour people struggling doiiper.atoly for life. Captain Kidd and Wilbor wero oxcollout BWimmers. and though thoroughly benumbed with tho cold and encumbered with their elothing, they managed 10 keep Mrs. Sttiwart's head above water. Thomas Budge was unablo to help himself, an al.ronizod more than common for quiet tetc-a-tetcs. Noticoablo among tho throng were: Oo(iri;o ll."iVni-ro!i, Mi-s. .M. lliibhison, 0. O. .Sponccr, MlsK ^Va^ron. Oiiiiniodom I.fiu-y. U. .S. N., MrB. J.eiir.v, O- V. (iniliiun, Mlnu Crlsivolll, F. M.Joliclcfi. Mrs..!. Vrcd IMer-soa, .Mr. iiml .^h��. OsKOotI, V.'llltun Oiitliiiiik. ,Ir., JIi. hikI Mm. DiinlBl .Swan, E. C. l'o.st. L. 1'. Hcisslter. Mr. iii.il Wi-s. Whltm-v Van-uii. E. I.. Whitlu-oi), .h-., Fcijihall iveuiii!, ,Mr. imil Mrs. VziiiiKn- Wll-lliim Po-st. li. H. Jli^'nirim, 0. Do.vlnr, Mra. .lllllil HkhlilKo. S. Ilira(!li. Mr, anil Mr.i. 3Uii)l:i)tiiv(M', W. Uullicinord. IMIss (it'ikiii, Ch!ii-I(ss ll;ilc-!.-. .lire. (1. M. Minor..I, A, (;i-iBWciUI, Miss iMllll-r. .1. Ktlui!-ilcv. .Miss (illmi.io, Mr. lUUl Jh-s. I-riinlc W. AiJtli-ows. lliifth 'J'. l)id:oy, .Ir.. Mr.t, C. 0. I'onicray, Miss rumcroy, OuluiK!! (:.!or;!0 II. Foavhig. Mi: ami Mrs. .'4, .S, .Simrtn, c. lliivo-innver, Mi-6. ln\rriln;ii[, TIiuuihh llll<;heoi-.l[, ,1. Arvluir Lciirv, Miss lliury. MIS!) I'o.il. C:i)ilola anrtMi-B. (i(.-iM-|,'(i II. I'erliliis, .S, Cllfl. Ml-i.t i'lil't, MI.SS Hci-rv, Mrs. Tlitinius im(-lic.i<;lc, Ml,^ (liiln-ihol. Kcilm'll Anclruv.s. Mrs, ^illd Mt-i-i lliu-r(il,l-;,M. SbIU, Miss Mill, Mr. imil Mrs. II- V. Ni^wcoinl), .MlBii Ncwcoriib, Mr. and Mrs. Tlionias l-', Oiisli-inc, Mr.-i. ^'c^vlltlkl, W, II, 'I litjra, Jr., Mr. luiil .Mr.s, II. fUoli, Henry liL-i;loiv- Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock entertained a party of ladies and gentlemen at dinner at the Casino tnis afjernoon, and among her guests wero \V. IJ. .Fearing, Miss Brady. Carter Uiir-licoek, Jlii-s Po.-;t and T. PI. .Howard. Mrs. H. Victor Nowcombo also gave a dinner today at her cottago. Boat Clubs H;;ceand Dine. As a result of a challenge issued some time ago, tho West End Mutuals and tho Canibridgenort Four rowed over a mile and a half Gtrnight-aw-ay course on tho Charles river last evening, starting from tho Crescent bo:it house. Tho race was won by a few lengths by the former crow, but no tiiue was ka;)t. 'fho contutit v,-;is for a supijer at tho Crawlord Mouse, which was eaten later in the evening. K. M. Cox, stroke for tho -Mutuals, presided._________ Wo Fish and no Cood Outlook. PnoviNCK-rowN-, August C. -Schooners Longwood and Slowell Sherman have arrived from eastern mackerel cruises, landing twelve barrels each oi medium mackerel. Tho Longwood lias been cruising ten weeks- Both vessel.-; report no fish and no iirospocts of any. The entire catch landed bv tho Provincotown tieet to date will not e.vceed 100 barrel.s. The Stowell Sherman trailed today for North bay, aud tho Luug wood goes to Block Island. Killed t-'V an Emery Bslt. TAtrNTOK. August G.-,Tohn Wager was killed at Evans' nickel plate worus this evening by an emery belt striking his head. Abbreviated Desoatchas. Tho funer.'.l ot Samuel U. Coli'ath will take pfaco from bi^ late residence, 112 Ma^.sarhnsutls avenue. Washington, at 4 o'clock thi.s alteriio'jii. John P- Evans, r.;i the Cinointiati police force at the last October election, was yesterday convicted lif deelroying 100 ballots in Precinct F of the ninth ward. A rumor that Hubert ThouiiLSoii committed suicide has been in circ-.ilatiou in Now 'Vork th� past week. Hi.s physician is posi-live that ho oied Irom apoplexy. Rattan cliairs aud rockers cheap. Cash, weekly or monthly p'-iymeuts. Boston Furniture Co., 790 WashiUBtou street. is Poical Career ai His Fairorites. BisliiiEiMeS Cilixeiis SelecteS as Pall-Beargii A Grave in the Quiet Cemetery at LebaiOH. FresMeMt ClevelaitJl Will Mtmil tli& Fuiierat. New Yoinc, August 5,-A strongly divided public opinion follows Jlr. Tildon to tho grave. Ho was an old Now Yorker, having had to do with this city from boyhood, and his rather amateurs appearance in politics when ho was not a candidate for any oltice, but kept charge of the State committee, brought him into contact with all sorts of people, many of whom grew hostile to him, and I recollect saying to Mr. Williams of the old shipping firm ot Williams & Guion about 1874 that 1 thought Tildon could hold his head un very well with tiie fames of Seward, Silas Wright, Marcy and Van Huron. Mr. Williams looked mo with astonishment almost like dislike. "How can you make such a statement as that?" said he. Yet Tildon did become as groat a figure hi his way as Seward or 'Van Buron, both of whom wore also rather kickers against tUoir own party and its bosses, Tlldeik an a tawyor. In Tilden's career as a lawyer he ran against the interests and sometimes against tho ideas ot honesty and candor of a good many prosperous men. He hAd a way of burrowing, as it wero, to get a piece of evidence, somewhat in tho nature ot a detective's point. This would leave tho imprcBsion on some reputable old merchant or railroad trustee or hank president that Tildon had not the upright stature that ho mixed with tho Kentish puritan Bomothing of tho Spanish Jesuit. In short, Tilden's Intellectual rise was in spite ot a great deal of unpleasant personality, [i'ho devious tliinss ho did, whether from natural temperament or a kind, moral stratismus, wero ot no help to him whatever, except, perhaps, to make his private fortune; but hla reading, his research, his careful editing ot a public case, BO as to turn it into a strongly ,adniliii3trative case, and probably above all his literary inclinations, made him a candidate for president, and toward tho last a sort of Nestor of his party, lie dies enjoying tho rare distinction ot being tho only presidential, candidate who was not allowed to tako his seat. This will single him out beyond any emincnco ho could have achieved in his othco. As it has been said of Abraham Lincoln that it was well ho died at tho climax ol iho war, so Mr. Tlldeu taking the presidential ofiico,. according to my porcoplion, would havu dimmed rather than brightened his fame. A Kind ot Pai'iilU'I ri-Mildcnt. He has been able from a position of privacy to bo a kind of tiarallol president running down several terms. Issuing his proclamations about tho fortilicatiouh-, etc, and as icgularly praised and applauded at the national conventions as was tho name of Thomos Jefferson after ho had retired, but continued to put tho strings on his successors. Cleveland supplied a riglit arm tin-that enfeebled arm of Tildtrn's. -which ho could hardly raise ic shake one's hand with. The incentive of Clovoland's admin-islratloncontinui^dtoboTUden, the younger man being a pupil of the older one, but the strong hand ol Glcvoland has been as distinctively his own,as after creating ono person the arm ot another ono had been mortised into that will so us to do clenched work, 'i'he Fiiip�t Contrautc. Thus tlio lives of all these men prosont a continual series of tlio finest coiurasts. While l.'ildoii was hokimg tho attention o� the whole country there was no such man as Cleveland. When Tildon relaxed into the situation of a martyr tho unknown man walked forward and carried off the honors, and halt resented tho idea that Tildon still lU'ctended to have some claim on tlio government. That.hilni Jiclly and Tildon should have died so near oacli other is a subjci-.t of almost suiiorstition nbont '.I'amniany Hall. Tho very day that Tildon dies tho Mayor ot Now York city is calling before him Mr. Siiuiro of Boston, upon charges which have thrown the town into nearly as much con-Blornation as when tho vouchers were published against Tweed i: Gomranv. Hence, wlicra we think there is progreas M'o see nothing but the rcnroces.'jion ot events;. The great reformer dies and the great pur-loiner is at the bar. Mr. Tilden us a literary man was the superior of iiio.st of.the presidonts. and this gave him an inlluenco over the politicians of the next generation, who had not his art in subtle -words. 'i'lio iMttlloctiial Orcatoi' of Bfi-n. Ifo was the intellectual creator ot Govei--iior Hill, of President Cleveland, ot Secretary Manning, and to some extent of iMaynr Graco. These four men now constitute the unorganized regency ot Now York State, as Van Buron made u similar regency in tho days ot Tilden's youth. Tilden met Hill iu the State Legislaiuro aud got his o.ir and talked management info 11, Mr. Manning, without the wiioopinc-up which Tilden lent him, would have been like John F. Hiiivthe or Draper, one of tho bosses of the city ot Albany. Tildon got Ids ear, loo, and .showed hini that it was nosiubla to make a new Democracy, leaving out tho (irrors of the iiast and bottomed upon assistance to the :;i-eat body of the taxpayers. Spinning wassbiwly won over and lie becamo st-croiiu-y of the treasury, an oiiice Tilden would have rejoiced in for iiiuiself Cleveland came along from Bullalo to be govemor and he had, whilo mayor of that town (jr one of its politicians, been bomewhot taken with Tilden's rise and niontality, particularly where he bat-tored away iigaini.t tho ea.ial ring; so after hesitating Cliiveiaiid concluded to join the Manning-Tildeu, l''aircbihl-Apgar side. The result is Cleveland getting all the inside ol the reform pudding. Fuvoi-itL-t, at Xlldeii. Grace is the curious inheritor of all the work Tilden and his associates, O'Conor, Andrew Green. Mayor Huvemeycr and others did in 1872. Alter that there w-as a line of mayors, and tho fitot of thenn. Wick- ham, was especially tho favorite ot Tildon. Xbo next was Elv. who had only an Intellectual rosocot for Tilden. Then .cnmo Oonpor, who. thongli elected by tho Republicans, was nearer roal regard tor Tihlen than any ot those mayors. Grace followed, but ho has some rosomblanco lo Tildon, too much, perhaps, to bo his follower. Grace is a strong-mmded, astuto Irishman, and merchant, familiar witli tho down-town bauk.s, resolved to bo financially indepou-dont, and looking to political promotion with .as dotoruiiuod a spirit as Tildon ever had, 'Thoruforo tho city of Now York, before Mr. Tilden's death, had passed into tho hands ot ono of his own party who did not bow tho knee to him just as tho prcaidou-tial otlico had pa.s.sed to a young Democrat who paid to Tildon merely the respect ot a strong, hard head to an old and softening one. Tho chief figment ot official rcvoronco tor 'Tilden Was atlorded at Albany by tlio young governor whom Tildon had coached. Ho, probably playing a little game of cross purposes, wont annually to decorate Iho bustatGroystono so that mankind should bo sure to see tho fact. 'The lesson of ambition iu iuiob a case is severe enough to have lived just long enough to have tho applause of the crowd and to bo in tho way of tho real leaders of tho generation. The young element which has come forward moroly pays to 'Tilden tho attention that tho statue o� some saint receives; they bowed when they passed him, and ho slipped right out of their minds. With truth Mr. Beck remarked that in this ago 110 death of a man makes no more impros-i on than tho pulling ot one's linger outot a buckotfitl of water, tho hole whereof closes up so quickly you never perceive it, UlnMriey IVilltirjil O.-ii-eir. Mr. Tildon lived but a brief political career, which coniiuoncod -with his protiocu-tloii ot Tweed, and ended with tho spring of i877, in time hardly fintr years long. Before that period the highest olllco ho over reached was a member ot tho .r..esis-hittiro, where ho cut no llguro and was not popular. Since his curious hesitation about securing tho priisidcntial oiiice he has merely been tho cheated and rcflrod porflon, reoeivius' consideratilo partisan sympathy of the bolligeront sort, but only brought forward occasionally by some controversialist in order to diminish tho claims ot those who had taken his honors. IVnnanent InvnlldUni. Tho Now York Run looked all over tho field within two orthrco monthsof Tilden's death, to lind somebody to pit against tho President, and could find nobody there but Tildon, whoso dealh is a curious commentary upon that choice. Ho was already some 7a years old, and has not boon in good condition since he passed a year in the governorshii). The labor his ambition brought upon him, of exposing lirst the city ring, then impeaching tlio State ring, next making tho presidential campaign, and finally having the whole responsibility put on him ot .settling it, brought Mr. Tildon to a condition of pormaiiont invalidism; but ho probably had a keen enjoyment ot his mysterious and excciitional reputallon to bo like Jell'oi-son, another sage ot Mon-tcUo, tp speak to national conventions by letter like Charles V., after ho had iibdi-cated Jroin tho depth of bis Groystono convent to consider himself as he walked about his grounds and'amongat his books. These wore compensations enough lor a man who once told mo that ho never had any youth, having set at work lo bo groat from the time ho was a child. "1 never hud any childhood," ho said in a long talk 1 had with hull in the cottago of the United States Hotel at Saraloga. Upon this, gentlemen, opinicms will ho us various as tho standpoints ot individuals. Of course , only a low relatively could over have known him at all. Some others havo hud things told them which ha 0 given tbeni a bias ono w,-iy or tho other- .Mr. Tilden could at times inako a most agi-oeable impression upon a caller whoii ho was fooling sociable and.was without any suspicions. 1 happened to see him at ono of those times. It was in thof ntorvul botoi-o he was presldontinl candidate,taking his first summer at the ;-prings. Probably i� 1 had seen him just after his nomination I would have found a very dilleront person, for almost invariably alter a man has secured a nomination his own timidity or his fi-iouds .shut his mouth fast. 'The time to Bee the oandidato at his best is while ho is Booking-tlie nomination, and refuses no opportunity to bo assisted towards It, At the suggeston that I wanted to soo him and talk to him especially about mat^ tora �t thopasli ho aiipoitited a time, and thoro I conversed with him alono two or throe hours, and he aiikod mo what I meant to do ivftor dinner and told mo to como back again. -Ho 1 returned and had an hour or twomoro ot this conversation, which is very powerfully stamticd on my mind because of tho suhsoquont inlluenco Tildon had on affairs and tho stormy chapters through Which ho wont. A. fiirUuun Iteuiuerat. In the first place he was a partisan Domo-orat, not much capable of apin-ociating a Whig or Ropublloau statesman who had been the opponent of his friend,Van Buren. Ho (lualified this partnershin somo time after tho war, when he saw that the majority vole mu.st partially como out of the Republican ranks. The reputation ho had gained as Tweed's prosecutor from tho Ko-iiublican press and loadors materially modified his mind and made him see that it was possible to beat tho old favorites ot his party by straddling the nisuos. His iirsc movement ot it public nature iit Albany, which preceded the occasion of the visit I nni describing, was to invito William Ciil-Icn .Bryant lo a inibllc recepfirni. Bryant liad (iominenced life a Federalist, drifted along to become a regular partl.san .Iclfer-soniau editor, supported Franklin Piorco as late as ISG'J, and after that supported the Hopublican then ayainst Tilden lilmsolf. Mr. Bryant, witli obdurate caution, wcnild not allow mis siicclal honor which Tilden dill him to divert tho columns of his paper to Tilden's support when ho ran for president. . It was rather str.aiigo study to soo these two literary men playing for each other in i:ho oxecntivc mansion at Albany. Tilden desired to capture that morcanlile nowunaper, which had so much Inllunnce with the moneyed class dov.-n town. Jh-yaut had tiot the itch for money, and did not mean to havo his paper ombarra.s.sfjd. Bryant had said near the commencement of his life, when ho wrote tho embargo, that ho would never imt himself on roiord again concerning an individual,lor he had to tako itall back and haveitstuck at hhn by other editors tor years. Uaiu Airits of Now Vork State. About .Neward.r. Tildcu ;-:aid 1111-ceremoniously iliat bo had always iilnyod ,-Tlieio was a frost at Ka.Bt Haverhill and that neighborhood this morning. AS ML roll PH I-: W. L. BOUGLAS lietit liU^U'riiil. I'S-*'''! 11^-a;� or tii\ i-Uoi!. t:v.-rv jiiiir ivuinmanl. T;ikc lumo unlein aUiiniitil -NV. L, Uuii-):u"t;i!.00 SluK'.AVarniiiCoil." Conr.iesn. lUitloii liiiii I.ice.   XSoyii a�k �ortU� SUov.    r^iutiy blyli's as iliu t(o.Ot) Shoe.  If you v i^.-"' c:iunot KCt ilutja   khoi*--^ : SLMnl ;nliirc-ss or '-^  - � fillil to \\ 5-    I) i. u    1 j iirocl-.tim, Mils VvMit M.; I'll K.:.m1.ii.,i .L; l!�!i;t \V;.ahlu;t-t(ui   >t.:   loS   nuiiovfr.  i-ur.   lihicKbUMio   ."i.; Tit'iiu'iit >r.; 'j^ KUoti:.; I'J !ii'Vini.iitirtjSt.; 'JrL-ii.i:iUt;.; iii J:.s60X st.; '-107 \Yinllliii;tuii tt.; -iif l.o\fifit it,; .'10 t:itial-.ritlKt* it.; 3 Uarv^rtl TOW. CiimV>ri'U".e; N\. hruailnuy aud t;ii:t Tiiuivdwiiv, boutu i:o:,:ou; :;7; Mii\u St. aud 1.'�S Mulii Rt.. li. li. r.iHtriPt:   ^* Ilvoieit sr., 237 J,47 MeridiiOi fit,, -Utot lioi.tuu. D20?   

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