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Boston Daily Globe Newspaper Archive: December 2, 1883 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - December 2, 1883, Boston, Massachusetts                                VOL. XXIV.-NO. 152. BOSTON, SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 2, 1883.-QUADRUPLE SHEET. PRICE FIVE CENTS. HITE & CO. CARLISLE THE HOMIHEE. DRESS GOODS DEPT. 5-CT. DRESS mi At 50 Gts. per Yard. At 50 Gts> per Yard. .00 DRESS GOODS At 50 Gts. per Yard. .25 DRESS &0 At 50 Gts. per Yard. He Shows Remarkable Strength in the Caucus. Messrs. Randall and Cox Close Together in the Background. Mr. Keif er's Popularity Outweighs That of Hr. Bobinson. s ALL ncles We wish to redaco our and to do this shall select from our stock certain lines of Dress Goods which have been sold all the way from 75 cts, to $1.35 per yard, and mark them ail at the nniform price of In this lot, which we shall place on a separate conuter on one of tlie centre aisles of our stoi'e, are some goods which are 54 INCHES ^Ide, and, taking the former average Retail price, these goods are LESS THAN 50 CTS. ON THE DOLLAR. The lot includes Blacks and Coljbrs. No Samples will be given. R. E WHITE k CO. 22-IICH Although we advertised that on Friday last we should place 10 additional salesmen to wait upon the enormous crowds that have been so eager to secure some of those THREE-D0|.,LAR PLUSHES attheUNUiSUAL BARGAIN of $1.50 Per Yard, still we found ourselves in the middle of the day.between 12 and 3 o'clock, utterly unable satisfactorily to cope with the demand. On Monday Morning, at 8,30 o'clock, we shall place the entire balance remaining of the 800 pieces of the original  purchase  on  our Retail counters,   including Blacks.   Wines.   Plums, Prunes,   Navies^    Imperial Blue, Myrtles, Dark Greens, Eironzes. Olives, Olive Browns, etc., etc., and we oannot too earnestly recommend that those who can should apply for these goods between 8.30. and H A.M., when there is a smaller crowd at the counter, and we can serve them to better advantage, both to themselves and to U8� ' B.H.WHrr�&GO., Washingtoo Street, ISpeolal Dtspatcb to The Sunclar Globo.l �Washington, Ueoeinber 1.-Thero was a lull In the storm of excitement over tlio spcnluirslilp contest toUay. Lnst nlglit the lines were closely drawn. It wns shown beyond pevadventure that Mr. Carlisle had a majorily ol the votes and would receive the uoniUiatlon unless a weak spot could bo found In his^ulumne, Tliotlandall men for tlio past tweuty-fonr holirs worked without ceasing to discover some position In the Ken-tucklan's forces that could be carried cither by stralesy   or   assault.   The South was found to    bo     almost     solid     lor     Carlisle. Mr.   Randall's   frleuds   from   that   section were   few,   and   the   prestige   of   apparent Victory that hung over the Carlisle camp had its InUueuco upon the straggling Kandall followers. The  enerulos   of   Mr.   Carlisle's   lieutenants were    expended   In    keeping   his   friends together   and   In   guarding    ngalnst   subtle attacks of the enemy.   His. friends protessod no loniter to dread IJatidall, but thov feared the possibility of a combination whioh might elect an outsider. Mr. Converse of Ohio, Who h.is been considered as an available "dark horse," was unusually active during the afternoon, and the operations of the Kandall forces could not bo detootcd. The corridors of tiia hotels, iho myatorlous precincts of private boarding houses and avenue sidewalks were thronged with scotits from the opposing camps, the llandall guards trying to win recruits, anil the Carlisle forces strlvliig to keep their friends In solid lines agamst llandall.    The    drift   which    goes   with   the cuirent was all in favor of Carlisle, and the flood carried vote after vote away from the Pcnnsylv.v nian. The energies of the Kandall men were mainly exncndea on the Democratic delegations from the Northwest and in trying to wheel the solid vote of Now York In place for New York's candidate. William H. Bal'nuin.of Connootiout. who has largo Interests   hi   the lumber ami copper regions of Michigan and Wisconsin, was hard at work for llftudall.   Alexander Mitchell, the niillhmnnireof Alllwaukee.bad his coatolf and was in the front of the light. Other Influenual men from the West were engaged in tho same occupation, and no ono scumcd able to tell what the result of tills last ditcli warfare would be. Samuel Sullivan Cox passed nearly the whole day In his neadiiuarters. Howas lu a stale of a'^^ltatiou caused partly by the spilt in his owa delegatluii anfl partly bv the natural strain of a prolonged iiolltlcal contest. Another nieotlng of a purtlim of the delegation was held this afternoon, at which It was shown that there were nine men who would vote for Mr. Carlisle. Mr. Cox was asked by a delegation of the Carlisle contingent to withdraw from the race. Ho flatly refused. Ho said he would go Into the fight to swim as long as ho could, and then sink If ho could not keep alioat. Tlie dlscouaolato freetraders from the metropolis retired and Issued nottces for another meeting of the delngatlon prior to the caucus In tlie room of the House committee on foreign alfairs. Although it .appeared Mr. Kandall had lost some of his strength in the delegation his friends were still In a ulajorlly,. and the delegation being pledged to vote as a unit for Mr. Cox against Mr. Carlisle whenever there should be a flat Issue between the two inen. tlie champions Of the iCeu-tucklan were very uhcaay. Kolfer Indonea. At 2 O'clock this .afternoon sixty Eopubiioan tticmbers met In caucus- in the hall of the House to nomitiale candidates for the House olDces. The slender, attendauoe wns due partly to the fact that many Hflpublieans are yet absent: tliat several of those present did not wish to take part in proceedings which were , almost ;carta|ni;i;tp.,itpWit,-..lH giving Keif er the ooiripUmaiUapy npirjlijiiitlQU fiiir.spoafteri ana that others had! KUleot'uo fbtcrest In the purely pevlniiotofy work of the odiicils; -Mr, Miller of Fennsylvanla called the caucus to order. Oflieers were elected, and Mr. Plielp/l of New Jersey moved that the caucus adjottru to roeetAIon-day at 10 o'clock. Ibis motion was rejected by a nearly unanimous vote. He then moved that the caucus siiould not honiiiiate any cundldutos. This motion, being contrary to the precedent and custom, was also defeated by a large majority. Tom Brown of Indiana then nominated Mr. Keifor as tlie Bepubllcan oahdidate for speaker in a speech which he evidently thought might cairn the troubled waters. He believed tlie noinlniitlon of Mr. Keifer would be a vlndlcv tlon, not alone of the ex-speaker, but of the ma-Jorltylnthe Forty-savenlh Congress, which had been most unJtiDtly criticised for Its acts. Abram X. Parker of Now York nqmi-nated Uepreseutatlye and Uovernor-eiect George D. Bobinson of Massachusetts as tlio Bepubllcan candidate In a short and eloquent speech. Mr. Thomas of, Illinois seconded Mr. Kelfer's 'norulnation, and Mr. skinner of New York seconded the nomination ol Mr. Bobinson. Several Hpeeohes were made after the candidates had been put In nomination. William Waiter Piielps tolU the caucus why ho oijposed Mr. Koifer's nomination, using substautially the same argument as is contained In his letter, published this morning. Mr. Calkins made a warm defence of Mr. iCeller, and a standing vote was taken, Kffteen votes only were cast. for Mr. Eobluson. Among those who upheld Ills banner were Messrs. HIscock, Skinner, Parker, Nutting, Johnston, Millard and Payne of New York,'Atkinson of Pennsylvania, Uorr of Michigan, McCOmas of Maryland, Phelps of: New Jersey, Walte of Connecticut and Poland ol Vermont-. , All the old utQcers of the Hoiiso were then renomliiated. OJt.BIiISxiJB~NOMiarA.TEI>. The    Kentucky    Oonnreuman  .Virtually Obo.en to.I>rn.lde.' l&peol.I Ueapatch to The Uunday Qlobe,] , Wabhinoton,- December l.--John Griffin Car Uslo of Kentucky Vvainbmlnnted tor speaker of the House of Benres^ntatlyoB. by the Demooratie caucus this evcuini: on'the' first ballot. He received 106 votes., Mr, Bandatl got 62 and Mr, Cox received 32 votes. The noiiilnatlon of Mr, Carlisle was afterwards made uhanlnious. The control of legislation thus passes for the first time since the war from the North and Kast to the South and west. The caucus wilsouUedtoi order at 7.46 o'clock by General Bosecrans,' cbairinaii of the Democratic caucus uotumlttee. in accordance with prearranged progfamine JudgdUeddes of Ohio was elected chairman and A^essra. Dibble of South Carolina' and Wlllih of JCentuoky were elected clerks. Messra.-StMkalager of Indiana and Caldwell of Tenuesseei were Chosen tellers. Mr. Dor shelmer of New York moved that the candidates forofflcei'sof the House should be nominated by a viva vdise vote, ,aiid Mr. Nichols of Georgia moved to  amend tlils mothm by substituting , a vote by ballot. JMr. Nichols' substitute was defeated ..by a vote of 75 to 113^ and (he viva voce plan was adopted. This vote made umnifest at once the strength of the Car-lisle men, aud tile supporters of Mr, Bundall tni-mediately conceded Ills 'defeat. Without any .....-' - lor nearly two hours. When he concluded Judge CofernsUedthe other Judges to adjourn fertile dav. When asked bv ono of the lawyers-whohad a case set for that dav-why ho ndjonrncd court afler Carlisle's speech..the old Judge answered erispiv: 'I hated lo hear a good thing spoiled, as wonlil bo the case If any other man had followed him.'" THE ORANCE TRAQEDY. Ro.ld.nco of tlie 1    Su.plolon - The Bo.ton Clnimoil a. tho Xtiuro A.i'rc.tod at Prlmuiior*. l^oollsti Lie. l.speclid Dosu.itcli to Tlio Sunday Globo.l New YniiK, December 1.-"Johu Boston," tho colored man arrested on suspicion of having been implicated In the Paulino murder at Pago Bock, near Orange, lias been transferred to tho New Jersey authorities and sent to Orange with - Olllcer German. Ho wont willingly and made nlmjielf inoro trouble by Ills contradictory stories than could have been made for him by tho deteellve. Ho said ills name was .folin Matthews ot Boston, and that ho came from Washington. But although lie claimed to have been living In that city f(U' a lung time he did not know where Teuallytown- was, aud that Is the negroes' name for the negro district In that city. He reiiacted Ills storv ot nose-bleed, and said that the bluiid on Ills shirt came from a cut on the wrist. Ho said he lived at -12, aud aiterward changed the iiuniljer to 30 Thomp.9on struct. Plnally ho admitted that he bad no, homo in New York; that he had bi^en at Waldemau's Theatre, Newark, on Sunday; tliat he knew tiie surroundlng.s of Orange lierl'eetlv, that he had been In the city only three days and had walked Iho streets all three nights. It Is doubtful It he Is the murderer, but his lies have iihiced him m a predlcaiiieiit, A Comolicnted Wo.nthor Proeramme. WAS1II^�C1X0^, December 2-1 a. m.-Indications for New England: Ligiit rains and snow; wanner, southerly wind, veering to brisk and hlgli northwesterly, falling, followed by rhiliiB barometer, aud colder clearing weather. have cause to regret your action this evening, aud that when the liiborsot the Forty-eighth Congress are closed you may liu able to cungratulato yourselves that no iiiatbi-ial interests of your party or your country have lietn InJudlelonsly alfectod by administration    '   " my you may speecli-iiiakinKi:Ueneral ________ presented Mr..Cox's nttfiia Jo the caucus, Mr. Klurriauii ut Illlauls nominated Aliv Carllslu, and Governor Curtlu of Pehusyivanlii uomiuated Mr. Baudail. The vote was Iiiiinedlately taken, and before the roli-oall was fliilslied Mr, Carlisle's friends had obtained tho majurlty and won the An hour before the time assigned for the meeting of the eiiu&tis, tlie ball ol the House was lighted and the niemb�rs and friends of the respective candidates pushed into the corridors ot the building. AdiiDssioii could only iie obtainetl through the east basement dour, and members of tlie captlol police were stationed there to keep oil persons ytrbo w�re not properly entitled to admission. Two or three hundred men, iieliolinieu ol the Ciuidldiites, and newspaper corresixindents were allowed to enter,  Xbe room of Uitt ways and iheana.oomralttee was made tlie headquarters of Mr. Handali. Mr. Carlisle uooupled the priuolba* room of tho appropriations oommlttee, aud Mr. Cox was kept from the ;,puoUo view lo a coin-inlttee room, of -tliB upper floor until after the restfjt^t the.tilHuinatlun was announced. .The corridors oU Wi^ eMt side of the House wing from the ways aiid miiails room around lo the east door of the^lobby in the rear of the chamber were packed with poUtftjiatis and newspapermen. The first vote showed 188 members In the caucus, a larger attend(u\ce ttian was,expected, and the exo tement was lnteiis(�. -Pree entrance to Mr. Kandall's roont Vv�8Kr8nt*d until tho crowd be. came so luteose %m a doorkeeber had to be called, and the doors; Were locked. T)i9re were nut oyer Sr�'it^';?l'Si^.",Si'? ^."i-^'^JSJ?" �/!�'" "utU after he received the uomlnatloii. Then Hiers.wus a rush to his guartep wd4t was almo�"topMsibte KalnaamlsstoflivMr. Carlisle saTVt     iiead of of the oflice for which have nomlnaled me. In fact, I may go a step further, and venture to hope that every snbalantlal Interest will be advanced and iiroimned by ilie united ell'orts (it tho presiding oniccir ami the majority on the lloor. Such, a result will ensure vietury In tho great coiitc-it yet to come, ami, I grant, a long Hue ot DemooraUe oxeontlvos, with an honest, economical and coustltutliiual aduilul.s-tration of our public 'Jlalrs. lJut, sirs, you have yet much labor 10 perform. And again "thanking you for what you liavo already done, 1 shall say uo more." Mr. Bandall then spoke brlcliy saying: "Ama-ority of the DeiiKicrallc Hipreseniatives ot the i'orly-elElith Congress has seen lit to select the distinguished geiitlemiin from Kentucky for tho exalted position of speaker. His admiulslrallou sliall have my llrm support. To my friends, tlio mhiority, who may be disaupointeU at this result, 1 tender my gratlliido for their sup-jHirt,which was actuated by a iioiile, lilslnlereateU frleudshln,based on tlie IiIkIicsi eoiisUleratlon ot dnty, as they believe, both to their mriy aud to their country. I bow to he decision of a majority oi my colleagues. Tlio duty Imposed upon ino by my eoustltneuts III be perfoi-iued with earnest zeal for their Interests, for the trluuiph of my jiarty and for tho real prosperity ot my country. It in the lutiiro tnere bo any .service I call render that will tiuid to those oiids It will be periornied with cheerfulness that no other elti-/.on can excel." Mr. Cox tlien gave ntieraiiee to ono of his char-.nctorl.stle speeolies, lilled with good humor, and losed by saying that he belonged to tho "Old Guard," and would eheerfldly aid tlic young Kcu-tucklan In his administration. Other fiToinitiatlons. James g; Winteramitli of Texas wa.s nominated for doorkeeper by a vote ot iiG against 08 for General i'leldS and 10 for iMr. Colt of Connecilcut. I.yeurgiis Dalturi of liullaiuipolis was nominated postmaster by aeelamatlon. . ailiJie'Kilrd ,h;ilior,Joliii iS. Clark,, Jr., of Ml.s-' sourl was nominated for clerk; receiving 05 votes; Atkins of Teuiiesaeo 92, and Manlu of Delaware 'CceiVBd 2. John freedom of Oliio was then nominated by acclamutidn for sergoaiit-at-arnis. . The Vote lii I>etall for Speakeri by States, is as follows: iltnte. CarllBle, .ubaina.....................   a Arkunsits....................   0 iV.lforala....................   2 Uoiuiei.'tlciit................... 8 Delaware....................   1 Florida,............... ......   1 .. GootKla......................   8 1 lUlnols.....................   7 .. 1 luUiuim......................   BIS :ovva.........................   3 .. 1 ivoutucky..................   8 LoulslaiiiL....................   4, 1 ,. Maryland...................... 4: Massac.luiaettB..............   1 .. 2 "'chlgau...................   6 ., ., .BBlsfllupi..................   5 ,. ....BSiiurl .................... 11 .. a Nevada......................   1 N�w Joraey..................... Now YorK. Something Entirely New. Kowntree's Imported Queen Chocolate, pow-dered. Is dclioately flavored with vanilla; sold oiilv in half-pound tins. Cobb, Bates Ss Yorxa. MM OF Tfll IK The lun^s �ro the modlnm that gives �� the powor ot action, 'tho iiowoi'I. In ttni air; thi� Iuiik.i taking it ri-oni tho'air auil couvcyliiK it througii tlio blocul to thM whole ByHtBin. Tho uctlim ol tho Iiidkh. the full aud coitiploto oiimnslon -ivhlcli wu ilosiro to luocinoo at each breath, niUiit'iiecoiBarlly dopitiul .oniewlint upon tho ooiidltlou ot tho tltrunt, wliidpiiio, tho liirger uml Emallor air iias.iaKOS of tho luugB, ulr cellB and Bubstaiico of tiiQ liiiit^s. In nourly all casos ttl throat (tlRoaso It will t)0 found that tho lungs are al.so niiicli attoctod. tnilaninuitlnn of iho wlndplpo and iiarts iibniit tho vouul orgttiis U usually attended -with tioai'senoa.i and ^voalcllOsa of tho voice.-vvUlch can at onco lii; rellevd by tho UJ-^ ot ADAMSON'.S KOTANIO COUUII BALSAM, as Ij Shown by the following wonderful cures: From WM. H. TAYLOR, 3 Beacon St., Boston, Mass.: laiu very uuxloii. to may it word In fnvor of    ADAlUfSOX'S    BOTANIC     COUOU BAI.SAM. I havo boon a great anfforcr from n cough for iionrir ouo year, trying a greai many Gout;li niocUcliit-.n, tiiid costing ino u largo amount (if innney. 1 fuuiul tliuin all usoloaa until 1 met a friend who hail tioiiii troiiiilod as I was, aud ho roeommendiMl ADAM,>ui;i:,v- .t, l-.jiUlw.;i, l.lhH tio^tiMi luoycUj (.'liiii,-,;-: Union PH. � hoytitni, \. \ s.ji!. ci'MuT .lov -ami Myrtlo St.. ju.'idliary, 11. t-'., 44:t    a.sMiictun st. Ilr .lion I;i;il ir.l Hull, 7,', i;oiirt st. Itroiik;!, K. K., 7'.*:' >^a:.-tdlil;um at. Hrtjvvii, li. A., .>huiiiu!:i I'lalii. hrou-(i, 'rii.jMi.iA. i:i*- r.roiidwav. South Itostoo.  Ilili;l r Llneoln and BoAOti. t'luuTv, .1. 11., t.',7 SliawUMlt av. Oiiorrv, .1. It.. 01 .^Iiawmut av. Clarkb, M. T.. f oriior tHivor and Sh&mnut BT. C.illmrn, .1. SN'.. :un 'rromont. Conrov, .lobrii Illy Shawniut av. l."o.ill(l�o, Win. G., l-tt Knoelauit st. Coy. Aloiiuo    IIio., Mlt Atlantlo ay. Crohihtoii llnuRP, 'I roimuit at. tJross. I>. .1., ;ilW-l)iii-oho�tL>r st. Ouinndiies, T. ,1., 37 tlunkor lllU, Ch�rle�town. Ccirtls. I,. II.. M .-slalB. Daly, .1. A., 4ti No. Market. Iiiiulols. I.). II.. MO Troinoiit, imiou, T. .1.. 414 Trimiont. Diiilne. 1-;. .S., 46a M.iiiuTOr. Dohei-tv, .1. I'\,3�li Tri-montst. I�olllvo'r, .1. \V., Cu.scoin House. Dowinir, 1'. i;.. 18 flty si)., (Jharlostown. Tiojie, 1'. .1., 10 Doylston. CambrldKB. Karaos, 0. it., liUO flauovor. l!'.ayrs. A. 11., .lanuilca Plain. Kmery.A, II., City Point. �Jivor, IC. 0'., Ifio Cainlu-ldKO. 'av, Poarce & Co., Devonshire anil Water. 'erBUSon, I)., ustat-j ot. 2 West Broadway. ''orKiisoii. J)., esriite ot, 2110 Uorchoster st. ' 'Isk, I). D., rt'J l!i-ilIoi-il St. Fisk, Mark, DVb Kllbv st. -'lnnoKHU .t lii'ona. b'.'O Treinonc. Fiynn,     If.. (101 liorchesior av. Kolsoin. ,1. T. ,v. t;o., eoo C'oiuniorclat, Kraser, t;. I,, it .sons, Vrast-r so., liast noston, Kroi-mau, .S. A., onn Main st., cliarlestown. Vrti%l ,t IJearbiii-ii. 8 alul Ifi Pif.irl Bt. Ciiilo, .itepliuii, I7r>.n Washington. (iartliier, A. 1... llilglittiii. Clilr.rt-as, tr. Irving. 701 lu-oaflw^y. Ulllllir;hiun, A. ,t Co., tirj Kliot st. Gordon it i-dnklcy, cor. Colnmbus av. and Borkoloy. Ornhain, .lohn Si fo., nil anil 133 Milk, (Iravoa, .1. W., 1351 Waslilocton. Oroen. Charles, 14l{ CainbrlrtK?. Orovfr. 1-.. II., 170 West tumitli. null'.i, CK.,0'i7 'rromont. (iulhl, V. O., 1H2 I'lOiiaant. Httdiiiic.k, 11. I.. ;noo WashliiKton. Iliill.M. ll..'J7t Main St., Charlostowo. Hand. O. t-'.,(IOt Wi.-.it I'ourlh. Ihu-vey, .1. I''., iiro;ulway aiid Kinerson,         lleani, T. H.. lO'J Ilarrl.ton iw. Iloath & Co.,(i;i.'i Wa^Iilnuton. lIoH-os. V. A.. 1-151'v Main St.. CharlOBtowu, Hooly, J..(., �J'Jli West Ui-Oailwai. rioMior A I'rootor, 120 Ks,tc.-c. Ilowai-e, William I'., 36-J. Hunovor. Carefully selectetl in tlie Continental niark�3ts for our best retail trade by our own representative. any monavod eonBlderaiion for tiio cood one IwttlB did mo. Mv itoiieral health Is bettor than It lia.-^ boon tor some years, and 1 urn not troubled any inoie \vliu my luufits. My <*ouKh Is entirely Kono. 1 hanks to ADAMSON'S HALSAM, 35 couta savml mo frpiu o'lu-suniptlon. Yours falthtuUv, JOHN E. AVJSflY. Augusta, Me., Nov. 2U. '83. "Wholesale Department. At the Lowest NEW YORK OR BOSTON QUOTATIONS. BOTASIG BALMl I. for nolo nt nil Flr.t-Clii.a Apotlji^ijury . .. .iitore. In TXbw 13n;. D., estato of, 01 Vliio �t., OhartettowB. lllstsou, V, S., 606 Tramont Koliblnsi H.-P..770 Waahlngton. Ifookwoll, D. B, SViCambrldgo. Kyaii .(r ClarUo, 383 Tromont Kyan A. Clarko, ShawmuC av. and CantOtt. Itydor, C. C., 009 ITemout Rhaltiick, 11. I'.. 01 Charles. .Shorinan House, Court su. Sleenmund, C. A., 1653 washlnRton, Smith, Tlieo, 301 West. Broadway. Siwar Bros., 4*0 Broadway, Cliolsaa, htacy, B. I''.. Thompson so., Ch.irl�Bt�wn. Stlcltuoy, Lyman    Co., 1114 Moln st. Cbarieitown. T.I.V. .1. N., lini Cnurtsr. Taylor, Oao, E.. 06 Kadoral. 'lhoni)iaiin, J. K., Bflu Main, Cambildgeuott. Tower, LHvi,,tr.. Hotel Bristol. Tower ifc Co., lOHl WaBhlugtoii. Towno, J. W., aSBMi Bnukor Hill st �i'utts, .1. W. A; Co., SO W'aahlnnton. Uiidorw.ioil, C. li.. Ma-irorlolc so.. East Boston. Vllcs. Clinton. 201 Hiinovorst Vnii nor Hoydi!, Otto. 137 Meridian at., �Mt Bostoo,  : Warrcu, C.eurBo. 2131 Washington. Wiirsh.uor, II.,03 Main st, Charlestovrn. Wntorliiiusu, .1. T., 374 Wost Broadway. Wobstor, s.   Co., 83 Warren av. WMur. A. T. ft Co., 470 West Broadway, Whito, A. T. & (jo., 17-1 Oorchostar st. White, C. E., V!T3 Hanovor. Wllhor, A. Ci..707 Wa.^hlliKton. Wlllov. iy. U. � Co., 2!m Bro�dwnT. Cambildgepor*. Woouhiiry, Bone* Hall, liHVa Illghst Woodriilt. (iaion, -404 I'roinoiu st. WrlRht, W. It. & .Sons. St Woat Cartar. youni;, James W., 16U Saratoga at., mtt Boston. AT.,KX/VN�T.:K BJtMM. ��; (^^f., Wliolt-silln ri'Ulta, so Oliitthuiu St. I   JiA'I'Jtlhl, 115. .1*.. 4!ium' �3��lthe<', <:filtl-iil 14 , �t t;0., Whdliaalo Oi'ittrcva, litO Ntnte Wl. OA I^ITTHB, 4:. tl. cl:  i-rn 'H'tiliaceo ittul ,% IJllluii Si. it-.^NAIiV, 1*11. t'.., .B^fblK'i- iM: lc�'n(o Orocrr, 14H Illiieliiitone SU ."HA V> I.r.,a.:, MOMKS Jc.  W, .1. E.. Oi'l'lx.-rX'iBum �nd TtihnefO,. AVftltl'i'�0, O. ICI, flubbuk' Ciuurn lin'd Tol>uceua, .97tt Xl^i&noycr Htt The " BEAGOM" isoomparstively anewbrand of CKJARS. but ia sold by most dealers throvafioiit New England. We would ask any dsaler who hu,s riiit tHo '* BEACdiW "'^JO ARB In stock to try a unmplo box.of them. Splendia Our skatlnir seasloni aro from 10 to 12. S.SO to S and 7.8'J to 10.30, but, for your ac-ooinmodatlon, the doors wUl DeopouBd at 0.315, a and 6.30, thus aftord-lug long and eoloyabla aKutluR Besdous. hardly any   _____   _.. lawyers, aud. oonslderiUK the case aud tho au cuce. It must have heen a moat tiyiiu; maldeu effort 1 oiin see Carlisle now an he stood up in the oourt-rooin with a oopy o� llie Revised Stat-litea In his hand. Hei had Hint same weary, stu-dlous look In his eyes. Hint same cold, uassloulesg expression ou his pale faee that he has today. Without the least degree ol iiervotisiiess, in a Plain, calm, quiet way, he bejiau his srieech, You could see that ho had niastered every detail, and the lawyers, as iliey crew more and wore IntereBted, mnvod their bodies forward and huiig on his words. I have no hosltalloii In saylog that U wa.s the best speech of the Rind ever made In the Covington Court House. Without telimf; an anecdote or oraoltlng u Joke, thero was soinetlihig so winning in big voice and In lila manners that tho tiiteiesc never Uacced. W'lien lie had Dnlslied the lawyers &11 crowded around him, me Judge sliouk htm warmly by tho hand, aud Tom Jones, who hap. pened to be in the court room, told him ho batl a great iHtiiro betoro hitii. ^Ffom that duy his (orwne was made. Frnctlce JOHN M. LITTLE, JOHN V. WOOD. S. J. UYRNE, , Auc tor OlbBoo'a Impoited Friat Tab)�t�s itU ,i(i�v�u;. SQi4v)ilyiuKi�ti8bu(U�>. DiOKKiau. A CARD FROM Dr. Lighthill. Uavlag returned from my Soutbera ylait, I wonld Infoiin my patients and tbe pulijlo Kenerally that I am ready to regeivo calli from 8 a. m. aotU IS m. dady. My piaoltee, as for the p��ta7 year,, U oou-floed to tbe onre of Catarrh, Daafoai, and dUeaiei ol tbe Tttniat and Luntts. Boapeotfally. A. P. U6HTfiILU M. D. lis Bnylaton BtrePt. It* Bridgwood & Son cela^ brated Opaque Porcelain, acknowledged by all as the best goods Imported. We are the only house in New England which imports these goods and offers them direct to the consumer. Deasort Plates, 5 in., 62c, per doz. Tea Plates, 6 in., 73d, per doz, -Breakfast Plates, 7 in,, 94c. perjdoz. Dinner Plates, 8 in., $1.04: per doz. Handled Tea Caps aud Saucers,^ three styles, 49c, per set. Platters, 4 in,, 7o, each. Platters, 5 in',, 8o. eaoh. /' Platters, 6 in., 9c. each. f Platters, 7 in., lOo, each. Platters, 8 in,, 13c. each. Platters, 10 in., 23c. each.       j Platters, 12 in., 34c. each.      j Platters, 14 in,, 59c. each, Scallop Dishes, 4 in., 9c, each. -Scallop Dishes, 6 in., 13a each. Bound Covered Dishes, 7 in,, 49o. each. r Bound Covered Dishes, 8 iu.y 54o. each. Bound Covered Dishes, 9 in,. 69a, each. i Bemember, these nro the jBnest godds imported, and we ar^ the only direct importers offering these goods at retail in New �ng-laud. We always have a ;complete line of these goods in stock. Houghton & Duttou, 21 & 25 Pembertou Sq.. Mr jw     4   & Beacon St., OO Tremont St, Asaovl.mont ot fc-iiitiiblo for HOOGHTON & DUTTON Will offer for sale on MONDAY, Dec. 3, the cheapest Binins: Set over offered for sale in this country. - BRIDGWOOD & SON OPAQUE PORCELAIN DINING SET of H2 pieces, BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES, the be*t aud cbcHi ond-Uaud TablM, " capeit. A  idva fui' tin- )TalUlny� la Coiiiurlidnff fe.^ Sots, nin-nor and Ki'aaUfaat Caalurs, lllll�h"a. I'icklu .Iar�, hatter l)l8lie�, Suup Tui-�uiia, crult, JuUy, alia Saiico l)Uhe8, Niic llowlii, Ico I'ltchera and 8ota, l^ulver*. O.diluta, Oupfi, Muntard I'ota, tiidlvlilual Nnlta and I'epBorii. I'rult Kulvm, I'l-arl. Ivory. t?t>lliili>id and riitud KnlvuB, tun ItoK-(fl s llroa. Al (iiono gomi-Ino uulo,n hearlnit thla staiuiil I'ark,, ijpoous etc. The Above I,lue ot Oeoda Kotull nt Wtaole-al� I>ri�i�. C. W. BALBWIN. 24 BEDFORD ST., OppoHlttf St. IZ. White**. air ot A SifB Gyrs for Gfllil Fee Xnvcat 40 fouta tu a pal Aiidrewa' ]*�'tf�it Slorae-lliiir iMauIra, with {e olld co nf irt, try a pair of Thouiaa Kinamon'] Son*' J^aak Buckle Gaiters, iho boat and aasiest ahoe aver woru. AAIIO.N HOOK & UO., 68 -Waabluitton at, HqIb Ag�ut� for Boatop aud vlolulty;^_It RUPTURE HeUavaduiulouToa without tba injury truasu U. iU�iorlu(�i(�rsaoawituUDar, rhatoKraVju  t Ult�. Any customer huying ons of the�� sets will be presented with one dozen Glass Qoblets. 24 & 25 Pemberton Sq., 4 & 6 Deacon St., Tremont St. Juat r�eclvi.-il, a vUolnr lot of very flan out Btuuea, n-hlc-li ivill he ofr^risHi to ttao tr*de at vKtrenivly law i�>ico�. 'rho�e nliout to l>nir�' obaae %vlll Oud It tu llieir udvautUKO t� C. W. BALDWIN, 3S4 Uedford Slr�at, oov, K. IS. WliUw'a. An Immense variety, now being, offered LESS THAN COST at SALESROOMS, 115 WashiBgtou Street^ WAKEFIELD RATTAN COMPANYl BRACELETS. Tba l�
                            

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