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Boston Daily Globe: Wednesday, October 3, 1883 - Page 1

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   Boston Daily Globe (Newspaper) - October 3, 1883, Boston, Massachusetts                                VOL. XXIV.-NO. 94. BOSTON, WEDNESDAY MORNING. OCTOBER 3, 1883-WITH SUPPLEMENT. PRICE TWO CENTS. lALKS. TO THE lARBBS. Governor Butler at Athol and at Ipswich. The Importance of a Practical Education, and fflicro to Get It. lleasona for Thinking That America is the Old World. [Special Despatch to The Boston Globo.1 Athoi, October 2.-Governor Butlor, aocom-faiiled by Adjutant-Genoral Dalton and Colonel Svfeeuey of Ills military stafi, left Boston at 8.30 tills moniUiK for tlie purpose o� attending tlie exercises or I ho Worcester Northwest ABrlciiUural aud Mechanical Society at this place. The train, which arrived about noon, was the object ol tha curiosity of a dense crowd, which, despite the drlvlnp! rain, had assembled at the station with the hope of getting a glimpse of the Governor. Later, at the fair building, his excellency sat down to dinner with a hall full of people, who afterwards ilsteui'd to hla remarks with the deepest interest. lie was very l)rlcfly Introduced by Proildent J. H. Lee of the society, and addressed the assembly at length, saying: Mr. President, Ladius, Gentlemen, Follow-cltl-Kens-I congratulate you first of all upon this very line day (laughter), because I know each one of you lias self-denial enough to bo glad that it rains for the sake of so many others, iiithouiih It is a great discomfort to us. I congratulate myself, also, having to speak to you,that I have got you lu such a situation Uint you can't go any where else. (Liiughier.) You must stay and hear nie, because I tlunk I cannot make it any niore unpleasant luslUo than It Is out. (Laughter.) When 1 first becaii to contemplate with seriousness ray duties as Goveriuir, I had known but little of the horrors and customs of that peculiar gcntlenmn. I knew what his legal duties were. I determined that I should liave so much to do that I could not go to cattle shows. I felt It a treat di-piivatlon, I assure yoU, because there aro so many j)leasant thiUi;B to Bee and so many pleasant people to meet, aud 1 supposed that X sliouiU bu needed elsewhere. I said therefore to my iininediato predecessor. Governor Long, when he offered mo a large accumulation of Onttle Sboiv Speocho. that I should liave no need of them. But when I came to know what my particular duties were, I lound that tliere was nothing else to do in the fall but attend cattle shows, and that my predecessors tor a long time had so trained the people that it was neoess.iry to be present at cattle shows, and therefore I am here. (Laughter.) I shall not make a speech to you. I shall only have a little conversation wlih you. I'lrst of all X dcslro to call your attention to the dllYeroncu between oui' comforts now and in the past. Purlng dlmier I had at ono tlmo'on my plate before ine things which wu deem necessilloa, which Queen Eilziibetii, in all her pride and power, oven after she had conquered the Spauish Armada, could not have had upon her table. No turkey, no cranberry sauce, no brown bread, no BWi'Ct rotiitoes, no cojtee in tliat time. But lot us not go back .as f^ir as that. When we old men were boys, iho dally work of the woman and of the man. too, upon the farm was much more severe and arduous than It Is now. And It is owing to that condition of things that yon have learned from your mothers that farm life Is not dosirable-that there is something bettor to he giit somewhere else. lJut nowadays there Is no reason why the farmer's daughter should not be as mui'h of a lady as the lilghe.st in t,he land. There is no reason why the farmers' daughters should sei^k to marry other tiiiui farmers. The farmer is not now so driven with his labor tlmt he may nut bo as cultivated and as f!0bd. a companion as anyijody. else. , Yoang adles, look for a good, respectable farmer's 'boy. who has a good, unmortgaged larm In prospect. It Is a great deal better than to marry a man who has got 850,000 In stocks that are not worth ilfiy eents if you could get at the worth of tliem. (Applause.) I do not Icnow how far tliese views of mine mav chlino with your ideas, but tliey are the fruits of reflection upon all llils matter for more than GO years; and iht- saddest thing 1 know about Massacluwetis today is that her agricultural population is decreasing, that The Farm, uro Suf rorliis, ana that today there is more land growing up to woods in Maasachusotts than there was in the days of the revolution. There is one matter to which I want to call your attemlou, and that is the education of your sons. How and where shall yoii educate them? Many a iatherhas impoverlsiied himself to send his son to college anu make a ustlrss man of him. Send lilm to some college, if sou want him to bo a man, where hewlll have the least of temptation. The chances th.at you lose him by temptation are two to one to those that he conies out anything better than lie would havn been If he stayed on the farm and avoided temptation. Kow, the State of Massachusetts, using the bounty of the United States, has founded a oolloge which I am sorry to say, in uiy-judgnient, has not brouglit Itself sufllcleuily to the attention of the farming population* I moan to say nothing Invidious of any oiher coliego. I don't believe very much In Greek and l.,atlii-perhaps because X know but little of tlieni; hut I know as much as the ordlu.-ary college boy learns. AVhat Is wanted Is a good practical education. This our Agricultural College affords, I have been to that college aud examined Its oourse of Instrnctlon, and as good a praciloai i'duoatlon can' be got there as any man neeas. The highest education in tlie college boy generally makes Xilm a writer of soniething or other which will not be read five years alter ho dies, or puts him Into some place where he Is of but little use nine cases In ten. You will often find that where he has stored his heiid he has lost Ills stomach, and a good stomach is just as useful to a man as a good head, let rae tell you. (Laughter.) Now, then, X say there Is this colii'go where a good education can be got. The Legislature of tills State has made forty scholarships. Everything comes within the reach of every well-to-do farmer. It Is In a town said to possess tow temptations. Why It h.as not been well patronized, I suppose. Is because there U an Idea that nothing Is taught but farming, and that the boys arfe taught simply to drive oattlo and plough. But :hls is not so. i The Oonrse at Stndle. is as high as any young man need have. In the flrstplice the boy Is taught what he Is not taught .In any other college in this State-to be a soldier; and for an purposes la as well drilled ns a West Point cadet. This menus inoro than being tau ght to shoulder the musket. The young man Is taught to take care Qf himself as a soldier In the army does-to see that everything about his mom Is clean. He does not leave things for his mother or slater to clear up after him-his shoes in one corner .ind his shirt In another. He would do this if he could, because he knows she would nick them up afier him. I know,_because I have been there myself. X hud a ve\y kind mother. (Applause and iaughter.) Order IS being taught theiq, and that is a very great thing, let mo tell you. A boy had bettor be taught to be a soldier than auything else, because he learns to take care of himself. What caused the Immense mortality ol the volunteer army of the United States? It was owing to the tact that the boys had always been taken care of by tlielr mothers and sisters at home, and When they went Into the army they hadn't the slightest idea of how to take' care of themselves. Why, I took a regiment ^benl prst went out, and we led them all the way out on chickens and turkey; but when they cot Into an enemy's country, their food was portioned out to them-so many ounoas of raw bacon and so much hard tack; aud thev looked as though they never Knew what could he done with them. Six months after the voiunteers got to the fleld 87 per cent, only would be lit tor duty, out of the icfoo some 700, more or less. Why? Simply because they died or were sick, bacanse they did not know bow to take care of themselves. Let me give you aU illustration of what I mean. It fortunately so happened that, while I bad uot the teohnlcBl education of a soldier, I bad upon this point an education In The KerpuHy at ILeepInc People OIean ;xceedingly particular, and couldn't understand what would make the general peer Into pots and kettles, and why he was looking at thp bed-clothing, etc. Well, one iaj when It was bitter cold, 1 was inspecting � � Maine regiment, among other things looking hito tlie knapsacks. Now every knapsack should �ave had a flannel abirt, n pair of drawers and a : palrofst'okliigs, I found one that did not have : tJiem. parade ground double-quick until he gets warm." This .looordlngly was done. I did not see the man again. lu I8fi8 I went up Into the upper part of Maine troHt-Ushliig, aua wlillo lEtilliie on a Btazc-Oonoh With the Driver. the driver asked mo If I didn't know him. I did not. He said: "X was a soldier under ymi." Said he: "General, tlipro was one time In my llto when it I could have kllli d Vou and 11 would never have been known. I would have done it with a great deal of relish, but you saved my life by the very thing which made ino halo you." Then ne went on to say that h6 was tho man who had worn the two shirts, and he asked mo to get off and see his old lather and mother, which X was very glad to do. I give Vou this nnoo-dote to show you oxaetly what keeping cle.in means. And I trust Ihelarmers of Massachusftts will see to it that the Agricultural College has Its full share of usefulness. Tho State is taking care of it. The St.ato will take care of It to any extent just as long as it is seen that it is appioclatcd. It has met within the year with a terrible loss, tho doatii of its president, Paul A. Charibourne, I should be InoUned to think his loss was Irreparaliio did I not know that this world goes on just about as well after any one of us has gone. We differed m one thing always, but It was a very Immaterial thing-polllitis. We had good sense enough to befriends for all that. (Applause.) And X am glad that I have had this (ipixirtunity to pay a tribute to tho memory of one of the best teachers and one of tho best men that this Commonwealth, proline as she has been hi great men, ever produced. (Great applause.) AT IPSTyiCH. If Is XJxoellency Dwell. XTpon the Orowtli. KeprodiiGtlon and Decuy oC Plunt.. ACou and Kacei. tSnoolal Dospntch to Tho Boston QIobe.1 IrswiOH, October 2.-Governor Lutler arrived hero at 8 o'clock'.his cvemng, and went ininicdl-ately to the Town Hall, where the I'rult Growers' Association lair was open. Ovlng to the circulation of tho report tiiat the rain lad prevented his excellency from coming, only a moderate crowd awaited nlni. The seats wore more than occupied, howcve �, before he had spoken very long. General Bu;lor was introduced by Christian B. Fall, the president, and spoke as follows: Ladius, Gentlemen, I'ellow-Cltlr.ens-Thanking you, f.rst of all, for your kind greeting, I am only puzzled .about what X may say to you which may either amuse, Interest or instruct. Instruction in the matter of the display which I have had the great pleasure to examine Is impossible. Tli.it 1 m.ay interest you lu the tew words which lean say Is my hope. I will assume from the display that you are a fruit-growers' association, horticultural rather tliau agricultural. The earliest asBOCIatlon of that sort ever made together was a great many years ago, tho date not precisely remembered, where th'o fruitgrowers wore present, and one who was not a fruit-grower thrust himself in where ho was not wanted. That was that very remarkable fruitgrowers' association wliere the curiosity of a woman about an apple worked a great deal of evil to mankind, tlvaughter.) And, if you will allow me in passing, 1 never thought It.wa.s nuitemanly In Fatnor Adaiii to tiirow tlie blame olt on to tho woman. I think some of the men of the present day would have stood up to It. The apple has had a place In history from that time. It is the fruit which gi'ows far north and very far soulli on a higher eiovation, but it follows the rule which is universal to all Idaiits, to all seeds, to all roois, to all friilt. The further north it can be grown tlie hotter It is. That rule X said is universal. Take tlio tonato tor example. It was hut lately biought here, tor I can remember when it was cultivated as a partiou-lar plant, liy the l.idles, iu pots in the windows now-railroails, schooners, steamers, and, In short, every means of iransportntlou. Lot us consider this for a moment. What means of traneporlatlon did they have. Tliey used as mucli copper as wo'lo. Now, wh.it means did thoy have of mining and of trans. ?iortatloii7 Sometimes we sav they aro found in lie mounds on the prairies of Illinois, but when you Invesilgatc you llnd littlo left In those mounds-but dust. Again, go to Norih Carolina, and tho lincst Islnghisii or mica imno In tho world Is found there, but it was worlceu at some imUnown time, agi'S ago, and from nil tho Innlcaiious, it had been workt'd to four times the extent, yos, teii tlme-i tlic extent that It is worked now, and vet at the end of tlioso workings and in shafts wo nnd at the present time sheets of mica that would do for window-glass, such glass as sensible people use now, and windows that are much too largi; for the QtU'on Anue Ktyle of architecture. What old they mine mica for? Tliey certainly had some use for it. It was mined for somebody. Who \Veie tlie people that mined it? What were they and where aro they? Wo Oertiiinly Find Jio Beinalna of Them. Go to tho western coast .and you will find a body ol Indians called' tho Nav.ajo Indians, and among them you will And specimens ol sliver filagree work In llio sliajie of bracelets. II you come to my homo I will show you a cako basket of flUgro work made In Soudan, Africa, away up at the head of the Kivor Nile, by somo negroes under a hedge; tho lllagreo work 13 of tho same pattern as the lIl.Hgreo work found among the Naval.i Indians, aud you could not well distinguish which taught which. Did the Sondiii) negro tcauli tho Indian, or did the Indian teach tho liogio? When? How? Where? So 1 have eomu to the conclusion that this Is the old world, and X liave told you in all these matters the reason I believe that to be the case. We get no tradition, no history, no form of language, no fcuni of record here, whereas, on lliooihcr continent there Is nothing that we llnd there of which there IS not some tr.a-ditloii, Some hislory, somo form of language, something that we can depend upon. We have gone back some 7500 ye:irs only Into tho time ot the kings of Egypt, but h^ro Is a people greater than that, leaving only those liidfsilnct traces, leaving ho reccud, no sign; no tradition. Wnleh, then. Is the old world? It must hu that of which tho record is almost entirely blotted ont. Again, seeds may ho found thousainis and thoii-sauda ot years old, which, put In proper places and under proper conditions, will gorininate and reproduce their kind, but whether they wnl bo the exact kinds sown depends upon whether that law ages ago was as universal as it is now-that the seed sown does not in every respect reproduce its kind. I'crhaps these spoculallons of mlno may bo ot somo use to you. Thoy in ly open up to you trains of thought Intereatmu to the intelligent mind. They may leaa us to refloct that we aro relying loo much on the creature aud forgetting the Inlln-Ity of the Cre.itor. In the concluding portion ot his remarks the Governor dwelt at cousUlerabln leuglh upon the advantages of physical onlture |>ossesseil by those Inicrosted In tho practice of agriculture, aud urged upon all of his auditors tho necessity of culllvtit-Ing good healthy bodies In order to lit themselves for the duties ot lil'o. At the ennclusiouut his remarks he was liberally applauded. THE AICIEKTS ABROAD. Their Arrival and Entertainment in New York. - Rain Interferes with llie Parade-Reception at tlie Old Guards' Armory. The Welcome a Cordial One-Fine Weather Promised. fiiem. "Where are thoy?" I asked. "ihaveEotmem -on." said the njaii. "Got twobuV" "Yes.?"'What's .tbemiitler?" "law wld." "Wfll. what aw ypu Minir to dn next week foraolean shirt?" "Qb.t' be wm\m It \yas called tliefi the "lone apple." When I was a small boy I was told that that little round, red fruit was poison and I must not bite it. ot Course I Did Bito It) and the strange taste really made me afraid for a considerable time that It was poison, but I dare not ask my mother for any remedies. Tlie orange IS better the farther north It can be grown. Tho most delicious figs I h.ivo ever eaten were grown In the cai'duns arounn Fortress Monroe, which Is the upper limit for their growth so far as I know. The strawberry is better the farther north you find It. I don't mean It is larger, but strawberries of cultivation are monstrous, and, like all otlier inoustrosltles, will, not roproduce their species.' The most delicious strawberries X ever ate were from- the Magdalen Islanu, where theplouuh h.id never touched the soil. The next best strawberry that I ever, had wa.s many years ago. In 1836 or '37, In the woods of nortnorn Maine; that is-to say. In clearings where, three yoars before, the old primeval trees, hard wood, beech,- maple, had been out down and Iho whole land burned over thoroughly, around tlie stumps sprang up tlie strawberry, nourlslud by the ashes and partially decaying wood: and thev grew very large for wild strawberries. But where did the seed come from? Nobody sowed them. The common theory at that time was that tho birds brought tlicm there. But the birds must havo been exceedingly busy If they did, and there must liave been a greiit many of tliem, because these berries were growing ne.ar every stump. And that leads me further to ask where do seeds come from? You turn over the hardwood forests, the prlmev.al woods, and tho pine springs up everywhere, itltnough the ground has been Durned for some Inches deep. Where did the seed come from? How did it get tliere? Burn overthephio forests, primeval trees again and various kinds ot hardwood spring up. Where did those seeds come from? How got they there? How do thoy resist the Are which had been made to burn deep Into the earth? These are questions of great Interest and groat curiosity, and so tar as I know they remala TT^nn.werod i17 Bolenco. We used to think in the olden time that wheat was only lit for the horses tuid other animals, and we preferred yellow Northern corn, and we used to replenish our corn from Canada, assnming that the seed, coming from a coldtr oUmate, would grow more luxuriously. Hecurrlng Id seeds again as a curiosity, has it ever passi'd ihrnugh your mind that in tiie case of this cultivated fruit, the apple, the pear and the peach, you cannot by plaullng the seeil be sure of getting the same kind again. That must be got by grafting from some trte of the kind which you desire. Ail fruits that can Tie raised from the seed seem to go back to their original wild nature wbitn left to themselves. Tho potato which you have brought here In Essex county to the highest perfection, when Sir Walter Raleigh found It was but a mere little bulb, tough. Insipid and poor, and bore the same relation to the beautiful growth that I see here that that little louB apple ot a tomato, as big as llie.end of my thumb, did to the lucions fruit which is tound now In every garden. Cultivation will produco tho highest results in everything lioiii man to the lowest vegetable. But the universal rule ot nature is that K the race, whether man or fruit or vegetable, Is to bo kept perfect, you must turn back from tho higher cultlvathm to tho original. So men may be cUltlvatt^d until they run out, diminish and run down hi the great race ot years, as we see in the Chinese mid Japanese. Thousands upon thousands of years have brought these men Into a very dlmihlBhed stale; but When our Vathem Came from OnltWated Zluropu into these *llds they grew Larger, better physlo-.ally, stronger, more enduring, more energetic meu, with better minds and bodies thau the people from whom the came. We are told in our story books of tho knights of old,of their strength, their valor, and we look upon them as men of great vigor and sclinco. The armor, the coals nt mall, the greaves, the helmets, ot those old knights have lieeu preserved, and have come down tii us, and there Is not an ordinary-sized young man of 21 years In this audience who can wear a suit ot that armor. He cannot got into It. A youug son ot Essex county told me that the only suit of armor In the tower of London that he could put on was that of Henry AlII., and the trouble with that was It was oy far too short, Henry Vlll. being about 6 feet 5 inches aud he a good, honest 6-foot Essex boy. There seems also to have been another law from what we know of the traditional history ot the world, and that is that races run out and disappear. We see them run down within our own siKht, but that is only during a period ot a few thousands of yoars. But wo know strong men and enterprising men have entirely disappeared from the face of tha earth, and we must lielleve that those races went out from some Inevitable law that there should be a reproduction ot a better race. That is most strikingly Illustrated in this country, I believe that this Is the old world and the otiier the new. The evidence 1 find In a number ot things. Go with me to Lake Superior, on the shores of which we are working copper mines, almost suRleiently to supply tho world. There aro evidences that at some remote age, ot Which we have neither tradition nor history, an unknown people worked these mines to fully as areat an ekteut as we work them now. And they had some better means of working them than we have, bsoause we And large bowlders of copper there, so lairge that we have Xo Bfean* of Ueltiac Them. Tour Qopner oan bo melted in large masses by no other process yet learned. If one should give you a round ball of copper as large as would go In this hal}, he would simply give you an elephant which would be of no use. Jt would be too big to saw, impossible to melt, Impossible t-o blast pr to press, and you could not gn iw oil with a chisel enough of it to pay for. a day's work. And yet' we Qud pieces of copper, not as large as the ; pw, I bave dttsorlbed, but so very large as to.be pseieas; wltb' charcoal lying under I it.: 'sbawlqg (b^c somebody mined mn. W9U do npt inlne4;or fun tjjat dvej; I beard ^ ''Owynilnetft^fllUotwroebjKlyj �p4 �:�iey, NEW YORK  KNIGHTS. Seventieth Annnal (Joiiclavo of the Grand Coiiimuudery. � tSpoelftl Despatch to Th3 lloston Globo,! BiNGHAMPTON, N. Y,, October 2,-Tho seventieth annual conclave of tho Gr.and Com-mandory of tho State ot New York. ICulghts Templars, coinnienoed lu this city today. Notwithstanding a violent p'.orni, the city was densely packed with people. Between 3 and 4 o'clock the column formed and consisted of flvo grand divisions. There v ere fourteen coinmanderies in line, each aceomvanied by a band of music. Nearly as many luilghts were spect.^tora as there were In line, owing to tho condlllnu of tho streets. It was a brilliant i>ageaut. Tho conclave continues throe days. FORE'CN   NEWS. Bismarck Wori'ed by the Sooialistl. IBy CaWo to l'i8 Boston Globo.] Bbrmit, October 2.-."rlnce Wsniarck Is very much annoyed at the roce.n revivalof the Socialist propaganda, which has alt'ady spread broadcast great quantities of sedltlo.is literature. An extensive seizure of socialistic books and pamphlets has been made In Biideu, ne.tr the Swiss frontier, and a worklngman lu Cor.staiioo has been sentenced to three months' Imprisonment for coni-ihclty in bringing tho publlcatlom across tho jorder. In linhoiia, a small tutvn in Bohemia, several houses suspected of eircui.\tlng socialistic writings were searched, wlih the result of llndlng large iiuaiuiiius. of seditious hooks and papers. Ten workman, who .are known to havo bi'on on-gaged in disseminating readlug matter of this character, were arrested. Alfonso's Receotion by His Loyal Subleots. Madhid, October 2.-King Alfonso anlved In this city this eveniug and was entliuslastleally welcomed at the railroad station. Crowds of people lined the streets along the route from the station to the palace, iuid expressions of Joy at tile sale return of tho king were heard on all sides. Houses wore generally Illuminated aud decorated with Hags and hunting. As the cortege neared the iiiiiacc ilie crowd became so dense as to Impede tho progress ot the royal carriage, and the police good naturedly pressed Ihqin back. To such an extent were the maulicslatlons of delight carried that, after the King h,\d reached tho palace, large nunibeiB of peoulo of all classes invaded the royal chamber and kissed his hand. The Insult to'Alfonso Intendsd for Germany. P.miis, October 2.-The odium of tho Insulting reception ot King Alfonso last Saturday now rests chlofiy upon President Grevy. Not only are the populace nnsparingin tlielr denunciations ot his apologj' to the King of Spain, but the German embassy at Paris dlroctiy charges aid has reported to the German government the belief that tho outrage was direelcd aualnsl Germany alone, and not ngain.st King Alfonso. Marquis Lalglesia, the Spanish inlnlNter, has loft Paris for Berlin to consult with the Emperor. Desirous of Beoonninz Protestants. Beeun, October 2.-The Catholics of Lublin, a province ot Xtusslau-Polaud, Incensed by their treatment at tho hands ot the church dignitaries, whoso abuses have become unbearable, have declared their Intention to rcnounco their allegiance to tho Greek Church, of which the C?.ar Is the visible head, aud have signified their wish to become Protestants. They liave petitioned Prince Bismarck to protect them against the Eussian tyranny aud oppression whiph tlieir alliance with the Protestant church will bring upon them. The New Cable Company. London, October 2.-The bulk of the capital stock of the proposed Atlantic cable, which Is designed to connect with the Postal and Baltimore S: Ohio telegraph compaii(os In tiio Pnlied States, h:is already bceusubscribed tor, and the remaining necessary amount is guaranteed. Alderman Hadley ot the syndicate, whi-h Is composed of hiraseir, Robert Garrett, preshlent of tho Biiltl-more & Ohio Telegraph Company, and John Mac-kay, iireslUent of the Posta I'eiegrauh Coiiirany, will this week register the company in the Stock ISxchange. _  ' Into Parliament He Must Co. London, October 2.-Alderman Hadley, who was last week elected Lord Miiyor of London, but whoso elccthui was not coniirmed by his colleagues because of his Inabllltv to sustain the dignity and dispense the hospitality of the ofllce, will be a candidate for a seat In the next iiarllamunt In opposition to Mr. Foster, who wis selected in his stead to HU tho ofllce of Lord Mayor. A French Ambassador Chareed with Corruption. PABts, October 2.-It is now claimed against M. Trioou, late French minister to China, that in August last he demanded 200,000 trancs as the price of his good offlces In arransing a treaty in which that country should secure exceptional advantages. ^_ Rumored Chanees in the Frerioh Cnbinet. Pabis, October 2.-It is stated tonight that M. Challeniel-Laoour, minister ot foreign uftalrs, and General Thibandin, minister ot war, will resign, and that M, Waddiiigton, French minister to Great Britain, will succeed to the toUiistry of forelEu affairs.__ Arrest of Deputy Antoine. Bkblin, October 2-Deputy Antoine. the Alsatian member of tlie German Beichstag, whose papers were recently seized and published in the North German Gazette, and who threatened suit nealnst the Gazette on account ot the publication has been arrested.   _ Cable Notes. Colonel Thomas Ochiltree. M, C, will sail from Liverpool for New York on Thursday. The Pope insists that Cardinal Ledoiicbwaskl shall remain in Belgium, be being frienaly to the Vatican. Michael Bncbanan and .Tohn Getty were ar rested In Glasgow yesterday, ohiirKeil with betiis connected witn the conspiracy to blow up baUd-Ings wttb dypamlte last January. , .WalttecK' KouasenUi Fieuob minister of tbe tnterloMiAtarileretl.tiiatai 1 i>,uirv hot atiime^ rSpoclal Despatch to The Boston Globe. i New York, Ootobor 2.-The Ancient and Honorable Artdlory Company, which left Boston last evening at 6 o'clock, arrived at Fall RiVer on time, and embarked at once on tho Bristol. Upon aw.ikcnlng this morning the rain was pouring In torrents, with evoi-y prospect of a stormy day. The company breakfasted on tho boat, .and about 9 o'clock a committee ot the Old Guard ot New York waited upon Major Monlll. commander of tho Ancients, and tendered him an escort, hut tho streets were In such a bad condition, and the rain still tell so heiivily, that the street parade was omitted. The Ancients remained at the St. Nicholas Hotel during the forenoon, receiving the individual inenibersof tho Old Guard and offloers ot other military organizations that o;illod. At 11 o'clock the Old Guard band arrived at tho hotel, and In the spacious hall- gave a concert that was applauded by the visiting company ana Its friends. Reeves' American band and Clark's drum corps also played sororai selections that were received with applause. At 2 o'clock tho weather began to show signs of sunshine, and, as the storm had p.assed, the Old Guard delegation piv-valled upon .Major Merrill to try a march Insteaa of a barge rido to their neadqu.artcrs. At 8.30 p. m. tho Ancients, preceded by Reeves' band and the drum corps, and In company with tne Old Guard, marched to tho armory ot the latter. Upon arriving there they wire welcomed by Its commander, M:i]or McLean. In response Major Merrill said, after ilianking tho Old Guard for their hospitality, that "No place h.as a warmer spot In the hearts ot the Anelonts thau the homo of the Old Guard of Now York." A collation was sorred, and early In the evening the company repaired to tho St. Nlcholai. Tho recoptlon lu the evening was a brilliant attiiir. At 8 o'clock tlio Invited gnests began to arrive at the hotel, and as fast as they laid aside their outer garments they wore presented to Commander Merrill. The gathering was purely a military affair and but few black coats were to bu seen among the assemblage. Tho uniforms represented nearly all tho New York and Brooklyn regiments ot the Now York National Guard, heslclo the Loyal Legion and (4rniid Army of tho Rupnbllo. Tho badges worn by those present Indicated honorable service In the late war, as well .as tho National Guard.aiul also denoted that prollolenuy in rlllo practice for which the Now York ipiiilia aro noted. At 0.30 Colonel Ezra J. Trull gave tho command 1.0 march to tho spacious dining hall, aud M.ijor Merrill, wlih Major iMcLean on his arm, led the way, followed by I'Oth oriranlzailons, arm in arm. lJuring the hour tliat followed the acoualnt-auce of the hour ripened Into many warm trlenu-Blilps, and It was latewlien the last ot the guests departed. Among the distlngtilshod gentlemen present were Colonel Winchester, LletUenant-Coloiiol Bostwlck, Major Kemp, Captains Tiffany and Ray and Lieutenants I'iemlng, Crocker, Woohouse and Moores of the Seventh Iteglmeut Veterans, and Captain Ahranis ot the active command, General Cair, Colonel Hotohkiss, Surgeon Brewster, Captain McLean, Quartermaster Wilder, Colonel Dustan and Surgeon Albas ot the Seventh Rogi-meiit, F. S. Bangs, the actor, Coihuiissloner lircn-nan of the board of charities of New York City, Colleoior of the I'ort Hobortsou, M.a-jor Arthur, paymaster IT. 8. A., General H. A. Barnum, Judge Daly of the Supreme Court, General Gus P. Yatto of Brooklyn, ex-Governor Rice of Massaohusatls, General H. 0. iiiugof Goveinor OWveiand's .staff, General Benedict, Captain Charles Kretsrhiins, Chaplain Harris, Colonel Laird and many others. Tomorrow forenoon. If tho weather Is pleasant, the company will make a street parade, bo reviewed by the mayor, and tho work of the day will conclude with an enlcrtalnniuut lu Jrvmg Hall, tendered the Ancients by tho members of tlie Old Guard. Dinner will bo served at 1.30, and at B o'clock the company will march to the wharf and take i he steamer I'ilgrlin for Boston, arriving there Thursday forenoon. The reception of iJoston's oldest corps lias been cordial and genuine .and no adverse erlticlsnis made. Those of the Infantry wing provoked some criticism, but ^rhen the fact that must of tne meu had been members of tho loyal regiments ot the Union w.as known and that And they have  loarnod that Shoos from the CELEBRATED FACTORY OF SHOE- SMt^i  ..... iBUITON WASTE NOTMONKYON INFliRIOU SHOES, AND DO KOX I'AT EXTRAVAGANT PKIOES. ti.uy were entitled to wear the tilghest rank of t:ieir past service, the origin of their name began to bo seen, and they at once stepped Into popular favor, Both on the street and at tho forty the command received a warm welcome. Four of the party strayed away from headquarters and visited the titiiok Exohange, and they received from the members a warm woloome aud were gn oted by vuelferous cheers upon their departure. Tho weather Is beautiful and promises to give a fair day and evening for tho completion of tho work, and give tlie company a splendid ulght for their return.__ THE OI.OUCE8TER  BUROLARY. Iil.t of the Property Stolen-A. Oood Hani Made. tSpoctal Despatch to The Boston Giobo.1 GiotrcBSTBB. October 2.-Following Is the list ot property taken from the post oHice safe last night by burglars: About $14136 In money and S571 7C In postage stamps; certlflcaie, No. 3560, dated February 31,1878, for ten shares Boston Gas Light Company's stock; unregistered bond, No. 1027, of the New Mexico & .Soulhern Paclllo Railroad Company, for $1000; note ot 0. W. Cochrane, dated September 24,1883, for $6000, on three months, payable to tho Gloucester Gas Light Company; two $1000 unregistered bonds of the Now York & New Kiigland Railroad Car Trust, series A, due April, 1889, numbered 084 and 685, coupons attaehed; ccrtillcate. No. 403, for fourteeu shares Glouceslor Gas Light Com- �aiiy stock. In tho name ot the Gloueoster Gas light Company; certllicatu. No. 880,  " Why firs the Peonle calling for JAMKS MBANm' SHOKS? It i.s because his factory is ruu In the interest of consiiinor.s. His goods lire innmifaetured to give satisfaction to tlie wejircr. His goods aro not niad� to induce purchase by deceiving the eye. 35cono�iiictil people havo foniid that it is not Avell to wasio money on worthless Shoes, and they have also found that it is not necessary to pay extraviiiraut prices in order to secure the liost. Kvery ixiwu avIio lias worn a pair of JAMES MEANS' SHOES has. Icaruod that all goods hearing Ills slump can be DEPENDED UPON ! The James Means Slioes aro the MOST DURABLE MADE. FINEST CALFSKIN, FASHiOMABLE, PERFMT FITTING, ONCE TESTED, ALWAYS WORN. NEWSDEALERS' PROTEST. Tho Kew TTork aud ISroiiklyn FriiternUy itt A.rinB Acnlnst Two-Cenft Morului� Paper*. tSpoclal DoBpatoh to The Doston Qlobo.] New YoltK, October 2.-Tho newsdealers of this city and P.rooklyn, who have for the past week been protesting against tho reduction In the price of tho New York Herald and other morning papers, had a monster parade aud mass mei-tlng tonight. It Is ostlmatod that fully 2000 men nnd boys were In the procession. Stephen Richardson, president of Llnlon No. 1, presided, .and after stating the objocts of tlie meeting Introduced ,iolin Swinton, Who In the course of his remarks said that nithin the last few days tho nowsnapers ot this clly had been trembling under tho thunder of tho newsdealers. Speeches were also made by Colonol Bosomer of New .lorsey, .lames Reilpatli and others. After a greeting had been read rroin the New Kngland News healers' Association resolullons- were anopted protealing .-igalnst thu -small inargln of prolll allowed on certain morning papers, and agreeing not to soli tho Herald for less than three cents or duliver it for less than twenty cents a week. Tho meeting is consldorod one of the most important of its kind over iield In this city. WILLIAM O'DALE STEVENS. Tho Itoath of the I'ropi'lotor ot the Oront Aiistraltnn Cli-cas. tSpeolal Despatch to Tho lioaton Globo.1 New Yoluc, October 2.-In the back p.arlor ot a plain two-stoi'y frame dwelling, 841 West Newark avoiiuo. In Jersey City, a party ot mourners gathered last night around the cofDn of Willlaiii O'Dale Stevens. He had expired unexpectedly on Sunday �t heart disease, lu his 2Bth year. His fatlii'r", Carlottc I'ider Stevens, was tho original owner of tho AnMt^all.^u Circus. William, who was born hi Portsmouth, ling., In iSBi, began when 4 years old to take part In the performances. In 1861 tho Australian sliow mad� a tour ot tho world. Thu company sailed llrst to tho Cape of Good Hope, and thence to India, where they gave exhlbliions with great success In Bengal and Madras. They went to China, .lapan, tho I'hllilp-plno Inlands, New Zealaud, Australia, and Madagascar. In Madagascar tho cider Stevens died In 1872, and William then obtained a position with Clii-arlnl's Great Italian Circus. With tills sliow he returned to India aud .lapau. In the spring of 1873 he sailed for Saii Francisco wlih his brother and sistor ,Julia, known as "La Petite Jniie," wliri is DOW In Kngland. In this counlry ho placed with the O'fiiloii,Murray,London and Uarnnni clccuscs. He then married Miss Linda .leal, and In laSu wem. with her and her sister Eilna to Australia, whero ho remained six months and then relurncil. During the next seasnn he played with Ryan & Robnison's Consulldated Circus. Alter leaving them ho organlicd ashow of his own under tho old iiamo ot tho Great Australian Circus, and introduced the novelty of giving circus performances Most Durable lade. Finest CaSfsKiu, Perfect Fitting. Once Tested, Aiways Worn. EVERY PA!R WARRANTED. Tlio BhnoH you have boon woarlng Iiavo been mann-tactnriid to soil. JA.WKH MEANS' j^HBOlils are not maiinfacturod to liuluco imr^haf" '^''culvlng rbooye; thoy am tniuuirrtcturod to BfttlsCy .iiirt hold tho woaror'.i tratlo. SbncR rrom tho colobratod factory of -lAMES MKANS havo boon toatod many yoara by huiKlroils of thuusiindu ot pooplo. NcTor until tho IntrodHctloa of JAMKS iMliANS' Shorn bavo oconomlc;il pooplo booo able to purchasf* for $ii a porfootly Batlafactory shoo. This is now oastly wnhli: yonr reach, oviin If vou Uvo in tho most  i'nteniay morning tho thorniometor In this city Indicated 01^. At 10 o'clock It li.ad dropped ono degroo, and at noon it stood nt 48Va" whloli was thlrty-llvo degrees lower than tor the correspoiuUng time last year. Tho raw, easterly, winds which proviiiiod during the day, together with tlio almost coiillnuous rain, and tho chilly atmosphere Induced ni.iny to iijipoar In their overcoats. The onaohi^s and Btroot cars wore crowded during the day and evening hy crowds of iieople Willi damp clothes nnd wet feet, white on tho street pedestrians rnoelvcd tho drippings of their nelglihors' uiiibrelias.orolso had the mud sulashed into their faces by passing velilcles. Nearly every ono greelcd lil-s fiieud with some remark referring to tlie "wet WL'atlier." A conductor on aTromont strent car kept a record of tiio nuniher of people who nindo some ivinark to him nboul the weather, and witii tliu following result; Twenty remarked,, ns tlii'vgnt aboard tlio car. "Wet d.av;" fifteen merely observed, "Wot"; elghtoon dechirod that they lieemcrt It "llisagroo.ahle" : ten were nt tho opinion that It was "Quite damp," and sixteen were sure ihivt It would "Clear oil" betoro morn-lug. _ Four Inches at St. Johnsbury. i Special DeapRtoh to The Boaton (llobo.t St. JouNBBUitY, Vt., October 2.-Snow has falion here jiil tho afternoon, and tho hills In this vIcliiKy arc rovored. The total fail hero i3 estimated at nearly four Inches, although most ot It melted as It fell. The Whitn Mountains White. l.Sponlnl Doapatoh to Tim Boston Qlobo.l Littleton, N. H., October 2__The llrst snow storm of the season ooonrred this afternoon, leaving tho hills white. The storm was heaviest north and south of here. Indications for Todny. WA.SHiNOTON, D. 0.. October 3-1 a. m.-For Now Kngland: Clearing weather, north to west winds, rising barometer, stationary or slight rise lu toinporatiire. Cool Barsea in DanKor. New Haven, tlctober 2.-The severe storm ot todny sunk eleven coal biirgos bulonulng to tho New Kngland Tran.siiortallon Company off Mil-ford. Should the I'o-its break up, It will entail a loss of iiearlv SHO.OOO. It is believed tliat tho lioats will hold logi'tlior, lu which event tho coal call nearly all bo raised. A Missina Wit loos Turns Up. New YoiiK, Ociolicr 2__Chester Cuinnilngs, tho coloretl boy who (li-'*appeared Iroin the Remson House and who Is ono of tiic most important wit nosses in the .�10U,i�)u snlv of .lolinson v.s. llighiy, has returned again of his own nmord. It was lii-tiniatcd 111,It liio boy had been siiirited away. He refuses to tell whero ho has been. RECOMMENDS YOU TO  READ  THIS NOTICE, AS IT IS IMPORTANT TO CONSUMERS. * My facfory Is run, llrst and above all, in th� Interest of CONSIIJIEIiS. By girlng their cLalnis my first nttcnllon I host further the Interests of the rolall tr.ido, and, hy so iloinK, best advancs ni}- own. Tho JAMK--; .MEANS' �a SHOE Is tho first nnd only shoo over pUcod on the market nith the retail prlro flxcil and llmitod by tho manafactnrer for tho protcictlon of retailor anil consnmer. Thla Is tho ORIGINAL $3 SUOE. BEWARl! OF CIIKAP ANTt WORTHLICSS I3im� TIONS WHICH ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR OWN IN. FEKIOniTY BT ATTEMPTINO TO BUILD UPOS THE REPUT.a'10N OF THE ORIGINAL. Dly system of bnslnoss may bo Imitated, ny ad> Tsrllsomonts may bo copied, and mjr labels maybe duplicated, BUT 911 GOODS ARE BEIOND lUITA^ TION. None gonuino unless my fall name and tbs retalfii price aro stamped plainly on tho sole. CAUTION. -Cniisnmors should always look at{ tho solos, hccauso Inferior goods may bo packed iiV! old boxes bearing my labels. ' HOW TO GET THE SHOE. BUI   OF  THE  FOLLOWING   BETAILEBS  IK BOSTON; HOOK, corner ot Washington and Hanorer streets, 1 STOWISRS Jt SWAIN, 12a Court strast. E^ O LI.SH, 2S Eliot stroot. JACKSON, Bd EUnt atroet. HOWE, Bno WushlnRt.m street. CONTINENTAL sioKE. 130T Wsshlngton atnek DAY, l-.i03 Tromont atroet. BtJVNTON, 60 CainbrlrtKO stroot. IN ]-;a,ST liOSTON, MONROE. IN SOnXli B(l6T0N,,r. *P. DYER. Found in H13 WbII Altor Twenty-Two Years. MiuFonn, October 2__A resident of this place has lust ivcoverod SBO In gold whk'U he had lose in tils well twonly-iwo years ago. Plies,roaches, aiilB, bod-bugs, rats, mice, crows, olilpnmncks, oloarcd ouiby "Itungnun Bats," 15c. PAnK's musty ale-hnest in tiio world. IKE TOCSTRATION which follows Dlphtlioria, and the persistency with which It ollngs to tho patient, aro well known to all who have hud any experlenoa with this terrible disease. Tho following letter shows how tho ro-Storlug and Invigorating properties o{ U overcome It, and nOOU S bow by vltallz,. _ ...   lug and eniiclh Sarsapanlla '"^  ^lood u / neutralizes and eradicates tho poisoned matter from It, bringing to the convalescent tho color, lUa and vigor of robust health. Lowell, JUaa. Messrs. (j. I. Hood & Co.: Gentlemen-, Bly little girl had tho diphtheria last AprlL The dlaeaso loft her wery weak, blood poor, with no appetite, aud .she could uot seem to rally from its elleets. Hoo0'.s Sahbaparil-la was recommended by a neighbor. After she had been taking It a few days wo noticed a change for tho better-she began to eat with a relish. It seemed to take ont the poison tho disease had left In her blood, tha change being very noticeable In her face. Bhe took It two months and fully regained her health, much to our delight. 'We now recommend Hood's S.^hsafakilla with a great deal ol pleasure. Very truly yours. J, n. SMITH, ' 10 Sutt�rfleld Streets "That Extreme Tired Feeliag," "The first bottle has done my daughter* Kreat deal of good; hor food tloes uot distress her now, nor does she suffer from that extroim Ural feelliKi which she did hetors taking uoou'B UjUtBAVAlULLA." Sold by all druggists. Price $1 a bottle or six bottles for S5. Prepared by C. I. U00l> ft CO., Apothecaries, I.uwcU, Mass. flood's rootA-PoujSer, Only    Oents^ EVENING STUDIES And Good SleigMng That Meaus an Early Winter. DO YOU WANT AN St. OfAif Heavy CMii? If so, look our stock over. If yon clou't bay iier�, yon will learn what is Stylish and be able to judge better what yon should pay elsewhere. aiMMYSCfl.. The Clothiers, WASHINGTON ST. Opp. Globe Tlieatie. Now Ready AT 48 Canal Sfc, sfAliEsme, stuttering and all dofeets In sueooh cured for llfebf the stammurei's frlond. I'BUF. OHAl>y, (roiu rotaa. to, UnC.  CousulCiitloa frae. UOlca, S CaubrtiUa JUoatun,   Ko cure, uu pay.   ttefareuoa: Itav. vf, liuuhou. le lumule �i.__1 � USutt aW COI.i;.�ND�R BILLIARD AHO POOL TABUa Theb�at�iiaoheaDMt^ AtUIlwvot ond-bitna Tal>la<,'Uall�; fintba, and ot;fi   

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