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Acton Concord Enterprise Newspaper Archive: January 16, 1918 - Page 1

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Location: Acton, Massachusetts

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   Acton Concord Enterprise (Newspaper) - January 16, 1918, Acton, Massachusetts                                 VOLUME XXX.  4c PER COPY  WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1918  NUMBER 21  MAYNARD  © 4  CONCORD  arc direct agents for the G. M» C. Trucks  From 3-4 to 5 ton Capacity  <t> o  o  ISmmmlt us #®r your  «  Exceptional Bargains  in used  ■ Ó  A  o  Cadillacs  Fords  Call ané Lmmk &wm &m SJs èttCar B@ßät°imemt  ¡Torrcy & Yiallc, Iöc  lain and Waiden Streets Concord, lass.  TELEPHONE 245R or 6622  Private John Hardy, Camp Devens, spent the weelt-end with friends here.  Dana Jones reported Tuesday as a seaman in the Naval Reserve force at Charlestown.  Private Ralph Llngley, Remount station, Camp Devens, was home over tho week end.  Harry Brearley of Itillingsly, ct., was the guest Thursday of his son, Earl Brearley.  Mrs. Charles Williams, Concord St., has been confined to her bed with neuritis the cast week.  The annual installation of officers of Assabet lodge, I. O. O. F.^ M. U., will be held this evenine.  The F. E Tayior uo. nas secured the contracts for prJ-iting the Stow and Maynard town reports.  Mrs. Sarah -Woodart of Portland, Me., is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Orrin Boswort'h, Great rd.  Ralph Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs . Benjamin Brown, Main st„ is on the sick list with German measles.  Eugene Tourville and son Arthur visiter the former's brother, Fred, at Duxbury, over the week end.  Patrick Kane, called to the colors as a member of the U. S. Naval Reserves, is stationed at^Hingham.  H. J. Dwinell, vice president of the Maynard Trust Co., was in New York city during the week on business.  James Mullln, Main St., will be a candidate to succeed himself as a member of the overseers of the poor.  Miss Mary Lane has returned to+f' Providence, R. I, after two wcelta spent as the guest of Mrs. William Reid.  William O'Leary, Great rd., who is working at the Millbroolc Woolen Co. plant at Norwir"  r 't., -was home over the week end.  Mr. and MrB. Irvm Howe and Mrs. Gilbert M. HawkeB attended the installation of the officers of Concord Grange the past week.  George O'Brien, student at Holy Cross college, Worcester, was the guest during the week of Mr. and Mrs. George McCormack, Main st. . Benjamin C. Brown, Main st., announced today that he will be a candidate for the Republican nomination for overseers of tht poor at the coming caucus.  Mr and Mrs. Joseph Glickman, Wal-tham St., attended a meeting at Marlboro the past week held for the ¡purpose of raising funds to assist the war sufferers in Europe.  The eighth grade of the public cchools enjoyed an old fashioned Sleigh ride to Hudson Friday'-night. Miss Elizabeth Hayward, teacher of the grade, chaperoned the partjK  Privates John Stanley and John Ec-cles of Camp Devens and Nelda Billings of Framingham, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Btanchard Weaver, Great rd., a few days of last week.  Private Frank Morris, U. S-"" Murines, who has been at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Morris on a 10 day furlough, returned to barracks at Quantico, Va., Tuesday.  Daniel Connors and Harold Morgan defeated Howard Jamieson and Ever-erett Toop 80 pins in a bowling match during the week for the championship of the clerical force of the Assabet. mills.  Private William Baron, Camp Devens. was home over the week end. This was his first furlough in six weeks, owing to quarantine regulations;  Lightning struck the machinery connected with the fire alarm whistle" on Saturday „morning ana burned out a coll. The trouble was located and fixed during the morning by Driver Collins of the department.  Mr- and Mrs. Arthur Jordan are the guests of the latter's parents, Mt. and Mrs. John Sunderland, Parker st. Mr. Jordan entered the employ of the itiverside Cooperative store Monday, in a clerical position,  A large block on Waltham st., the property of Robinson & Coughlan of Clinton, dhanged hands during the week. John Nojonen of Maynard. was the purchaser through the office "of M. w; Heklcla, Maynard's block.  Horace Bates assumed his new duties as superintendent of the Congregational Sunday school Sunday. John Flood, Walnut St., has occupied the position. the past two years, resigned at the annual meeting of the church Wednesday evening  > The streets and sidewalks were a , glare of Ice Saturday, and many of , the people got bad falls. , Swift running water covered treacherous Ice  ' and pedestrians- without creepers had ' to feel their way along. Heads up  1  meant feet from under.  > Mrs. Howard Wilson, president, , Mrs. Bessie Richardson, Mrs. Gilbert „ M Haw-ea and Mrsf Hiram Parkin  of the Maynard W. C. T. V. attended ' the neighborhood meeting held at the  * Congregational church, South Acton  * Wednesday afternoon, i Mrs. Maria Abbott, who has made . her home with Mr., and Mrs. Irving , Howe, Acton st., the past few years  left for Rosllndale recently, where  >  B ) 10  will "pend the winter with rela-' tives. Sue was accompanied on. tihe  * journey by Charles Abbott of Reene  * N. H.  > Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Damren  > Brooks st, returned Friday after  > month's absence, during which time Mrs Damren submitted to an opera-tion for appendicitis at the New Eng-land Baptist 'hospital, Roxbury. Her  * tnany friends will be pleased to hear  > she Is on the road to full recovery.  > The Maynard -Checker club has re  > ceived a challenge from the Wells Me . morial checker club,, for a match in " Boston In, the near future. The local ' club has purchased five new checker  boards of the latest design and feels -that It can meet any.emergency.  Installation will be held at the Willow Rebeltah lodge Monday night, Jan. 22.  Freelan Dunning of Norfolk, Va., is visiting nt the home of hir> uncle, V. J. Tnttle.  Miss Leona Clem of Somerville was a recent guest of her sister, Mrs. John B. Gates.  The electric cars are again running quite regularly, after several days of non appearance  R. W. Ellis and family of Tyngsboro are back in town for the winter, stopping on Thoreau st.  Many residents of this town have been kept busy the past week thaw ing out water pipes.  Quite a lot of coal has arrived in town the past week, so that the coal dealers are kept busy.  Mr and Mrs. Steven Flannery are ■ejoicing in the birtn of a baby boy born last Wednesday.  Miss Caura Derosie of Lowell was  recent guest at the home of her aunt, Miss C. E. Barrett.  Miss Gertrude Towle ;  .attended the Freshman reception held at Mount Holyoke college last week.  Miss Gertrude Holden lias returned to her nome after spending a week with relatives in Worcester.  Rev. Ralph A. Barker of South Acton exchanged pulpits with Rev. Geo.  Towksbury Sunday morning.  The vice president; secretary and a ew members of the Sons of Norwav went to Boston Saturday night to visit the Nordlyfdt lodge. \  Moving pictures for the benefit of the Red Cross are to be shown in tho armory Saturday night, Jan. 19. A large attendance is hoped for.  The Charles A Ske)tcn farm on River rd. has been sold through the agency of J. W. Raymond and Mr. and Mrs. Skelton have moved to their new home 'in Bedford.  Tickets are rapidly selling for the annual I. O. O F. ball to be llield in Association hall, Concord Junction, Friday evening, Jan. 25. The pro ceeds from the dance are to be given to the Red Crossi.  As there was' no suitable ice for playing, the annual hockey game scheduled for Wednesday afternoon at Concord between the Middlesex school seven and the Stone school team was indefinitely postponed.  The 13th annual winter meet of tL. New England Fox Hunters' club was, held in Bedford lade week,; with a large nunlber of catclhes. Percy , R. Foss- was a lucky-ma» Tuesday, catching a fox among the others.  The rain and the warm weather flooded the Middlesex school rink with water,and ; made the ice soft, so that it was impossible to play the ice hockey game scheduled there for Saturday afternoon with the Milton high school team.  The annual meeting of the Trinitarian Congregational church will be held Thursd. y evening at 7.30. There will be a business session followed by a roll call and the serving of light refreshments. It is hoped that all members will attend.  M. B L. Bradford has had the lights of the Concord Curling rink cut out of the" town's electric circuit, to help save^coal. Though this cold winter has furnished perfect ice for curling, since Dec. 12, the rink has not been used once for the 8 to 10 o'clock evening play.  TELEPHONE 1£-11  ■ L. P. G OULDING  PIANO TUNER Player Piano Work a Sppclalty  Pianos Bought, Sold and Rented SOUTH SUDBURY. MASS.  SOUTH ACTON  Daniel Hennessey has glvon up his work with the American Woolen Co.  Mr Prescott of Maple St., is suffering with an abscess on his left wrist.  The schools opened Monday for the midwinter term with the full quota o!" pupils.  Mrs J. E. Priest is quite ill at her home on Acton st., suffering from a tumor in the ear.  John McCrossin is temporarily out of work at the Woolen mill. Maynard, because of a slackness in his department.  The increasing demand for oil has forced Mr. Bursaw to purchase another big horse to assist in delivery to his customers.  Kittle Gray had the misfortune to get a couple of bad cuts on the face Dy contact with a wire fence while coasting Saturday night.  Mrs. C. C Sweet came up from Concord Junction last week to stay a few days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Smith of School st.  Miss E. M. Halliday returned Saturday from L'ewiston, Me., where she spent her two weeks' school vacation with her mother and brothers.  Helen A. Westwood of Lowell Normal school will take charge of the prl» mary department or the school while Miss Hinckloy is away on sick, leave.  Rev. G. A. Tewkabury of Concord occupied the Congregational pulpir. Sunday morning and preached a most helpful sermon from 2d Chronicles 12:4.  No trace of Mike Tuttilo, the Italian who murdered Mrs., Di Tenio on Jan 4 has as yet been found. He was indicted by the Grand Jury and tho State has offered $100 for his capture.  Elizabeth Hinckley, teache v  of the primary department of our school, is sick at l]"- "lome in Hyannls, where she will bo forced to remain for a month or more while convalescing from an attack of bronchitis.  A Maynard man put a jitney auto into commission between Maynard and this village when the storm tied the electric caars off the schedule, but. his trips were irregular ant) tire trouble made his trip very uncertain.  DOING BIG WORK  The Red Cross workers were out in force Friday and their new quarters in Davis block resembled a regular beehive of stitchers, who sewed to help the boys. The meetings will be held once in two weeks in the new room every other Friday. Jan. 25 Is  meetings  are necessary dud notices will be sent out  EDGE TOOLS SHARPENED  Razors, Knives, Manicure Sets, Chisels All fine edge tools sharpened Send by mail or deliver to JOSEPH HANNON 4 East St. Maynard  INTERESTING TALK  Lewis C. Hastings .-gave a picture talk Sunday nisht to the Y. P. C. U at the Universalist church. He showed the pictures he had collected while on a trip through the west. Colored picture postal cards wtih the help of the stereopticon were shown on a large screen and were very interesting.  ICE HARVESTED  Whitney and Hastings got their 1918 ice all harvested in 1917, and it is much better quality of ice than the mill pond has furnished for many years, if ever, 13 inch ice, clear as crystal. That was one good thins Jack Frost did, but J F. got In many hard knock out blows in the homes of our people when the water supply was frozen, and'many calls were sent in to the plumbers who were simply unable to accommodate everyone.  CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH  WEST ACTON  Sumner Hayward of Omaha spent Sunday at tho home of It. B. Moore.  Tho public schools resumed their work Monday after a three weeks' vacation.  Joseph Rood left Monday for Florida, tor the l-ost of the winter, in the interest of the Wonilor Mist Cq.  Mrs. George S. Reed left last weok for Lawrence, where alio will spend the winter with her her daughter.  Everett Richardson of Vermont spent a few days of tho wcok at tho home of his mother, Mrs. J. E. Richardson.  Mrs. L. M. Mead has ' closed her home and has gono to live the rest of the winter at the home of her son, H. E. Mead.  Miss GTace Sylvester of Bronxville, N. Y., Bpent her two weeks' vacation at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Sylvester.  A good number from hero ""tended the drama at the South Actoi. ilriiver-salist church TIwsday...nlght, givqn.by the cast from Maynard. ' "''  Mrs. C. H. Mead is reported as getting along well, after her operation last week. Miss E. M. Harrington, nurse, is caring for her.  William J. Bonere, the rural mall driver, is off duty and taking a much needed rest. George Richardson of Boxboro is substituting for him.  Word has been received of the safe arrival of John Davis and Ernest Whitcomb at England. They will join the Lumber unit at Ardgay, Scotland.  Rev. John Case of South Actonu preached at tho Baptist church Sunday morning in the absence of the pastor, Rev. C. L. Piorce, who was ill.  Miss Delena McCharles, the eldest daughter of Mr anc? Mrs. Daniel McCharles, was married to Lewis Webber of Boston, New Year's eve, at Boston.  W. J Benere, rural 'hialP driver for the past 1G years, is taking a much needed change and may not resume the work again. George Richardson of Boxboro is substituting.  1AWARD  DIED IN WORCESTER  Geor 0 e JortfaP^Wf^ffr Resident HerCk—Funeral Held Tuesday^  Gcorgo former res  ident here, died Sunday flight at tho Odd Fellows home -at Worcester.  With his wife, Elizabbth, ho had made his home there tho past year. He was at one time agent of tho National Express Co. here, and, for a time was in the employ of the American Powder Co. Ho left here 16 years ago, and entered buisness at Brewer, Me. Ho is survived by his wife.  Funeral servicos were held at the Odd Fellows home in Worcester, Tuesday afternoon, and the body was brouglit here for burial this morning. A delegation composed of Kalph Case, Robert Lester, William Bishop, James B. Lord,\John W. Flood and George Meadp, ¡representing Maynard lodge,  T o. 131, mot tho body at South Acto». Burial wbb in the family lot at Glanwood cemetery. ;  SLEIGHING PARTY  Friday evening about .30 pupils of tho two eighth grades of the Summer st. school onjoyetj a sleigh ride to Hudson, accompanied by their teacher, Miss Bessie Hayward, as chaperon. All enjoyed the ride and reported a good time. ' A brief i> top was made In Hudson and every one had refreshments while tho horses had a rest. While at Hudson three other' sleighing parties from Marlboro arrived and flocked Into the . stores to have refreshments.  The party arrived 'home, aiten.12 o'clock, safe, sound ' and happy, but Bleepy.  This interesting report of the sleighing party was written as one of the exercises of the eighth grade Monday. Master ICajander's artidle was selected for publication.  TEACHERS RE8IGNE0  Auction 8ale o. hay at the farm of S. Bresth, West Acton, Mass., Jan. 25, Friday, "at 1.30 p. m., 60 tons or more of English and swale. Farm is known as the Reed farm.  On Saturday, Feb. 2, 45 to 50 registered Holstein cows, heifers and bulls, for C. F. Rich, proprietor of Ouer look farm, West Medway, Mass. Electric cars from Dedliam, Medileld and Millla pass directly by the farm. The dteaiii cilrs rtfii wltliln Ave minutes' walk of the farm on N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., out of South Station, Boston, on Woonsocket division. Farm is 26 miles out on this line from Boston. Catalogues of the sale will be out in due season and sent on application to C. F. Rich, 185 Summer St., Boston, Mass.  At the sale the 14th at Groton several cows sold from $102 to $135 each, ■without their calves. Several Of the calves brought from $13 to $20 each to voice. Many brought from $18.75 to $21.25 per ton. Thero were over 100 tons sold. Otis H. Forbush, auctioneer, sold the sale and has the afjove sales to cry.  Rev. Ralph A. Barker, pastor.  Sunday morning service at 10.30. Sunday school at 11.45. . C E. at 6. Topic, "Young Christians Reaching Outward." Gal. 6:1-10. leader, Miss Emma Halliday. At 7, the third of the series of stereopticon lectures relating to the 300th anniversary of the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth will be given. Subject of this lecture, "Pilgrims in the Wilderness."  Friday evening prayer meeting at 7.30 Subject, "Profiting by Life's Experiences." Phil. 4:10-13.  SIDNEY £. HËéCLEARY  GROCER-BAKER  71 MAIN ST.  MÂYNÂRO  BUTTER, fine creamery lb. ♦ ♦ 49c COFFEE, best Santos, lb. . ♦ 23c WAR TIME SYRUP, bottle . 30© MAPLE SYRUP, strictly pure, bot. 33c OLEOMARGARINE, best grade 37c  Cream of Nut, Oleomargarine PRUNES, new goods, lb. . MINCE MEAT, 2 lb. jars .  34® 15 c  33©  Mrs. S. J. Marshall  Practical Nurse Cor. Main and Pine Streets Maynard, Mass.  Miss Elizabeth Hayward, tëacher of the eighth grade, tendered her resignation to Supt. MlUlngton ' the past week, and has accepted a position aa teacher of mathematics at the Orange high- Bchool. MIbb Ruth Stevens, teacher of Spanish at the high school, has also tendered her resignation.  Many of the teachers of the public school find It difficult to. get' a suitable place to board. Since the Are at thé Maynard 'house, the' matter of securing meals }a an unsolved probj !em with many and is discouraging. ■■  MEN WILL HAVE CHARGE  Two nights' program of :  vocal and instrumental music, dramatics and dancing will be presented this week at Parker st. Itall by. the mar. rled men of the Socialist club. TIiq entire program has been planned and will be carried out by the married men, even to the preparation and serving of a collation each night.  CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH  Rev. Frederick N. Rutan, minister, Morning service Sunday, Jan. 20, will be held In the chapel. Evening service will be omitted. Coal conservation.  Joseph Dahl, Brooks st., enlisted as a member oi the." Naval Reserve force and 1b expected to report at Newport, R. I., Friday,-  1  THE KIND THAT BURNS USUAL FAIR PRICES  Honest Weight—Prompt Service  \ Supplying Coal to Concord Homes for 50 Year»  James B. Wood & Son Co.  Phone HOW  Office, opp. Fitchburg Depot  II TWO TON NATIVE SQUASH j  At Wholesale Price  3c. per 1 k  Groceries—Provision s-  -Meats  i KALEVA CO-OPERATIVE ASSOC'N  48 Main Street  Maynard   

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