Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Morning Herald Newspaper Archive: February 24, 1936 - Page 2

Share Page

Publication: Morning Herald

Location: Hagerstown, Maryland

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Morning Herald (Newspaper) - February 24, 1936, Hagerstown, Maryland                                THE MORNING HERALD, HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2f, niiiminiiiiiiiiminnimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiioiimiiiHiiuiinii.....mi.........IID......iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii PERSONAL MENTION Fred Foreman, who lias been ill ill his homo. 24 South Locust street, Is slowly Improving- Mrs. Ben ha Tuylor has returned 'to hor homo at Hotel Charles from :Xhe Washington County Hospital. Mrs. M. K. Morin. Hotel Clinrles. RELIGIOUS DRAMA TO BE PRESENTED who has been 111 Is Improving. I Fine Cost of Young Peo- Jack Talhcrl. of T'uiikslnwn. i Mrs. N. K. Osborm! has returmtl: -to her home im Hamilton Bonlc- tended tho Junior-senior prom HI Hood College In Frederick on sal-1 urday nighl, as the gnost of i Kathleen Duriier. ot Frederick. This Week The YounK People's Peparlment id (he Church of the Brethren, cor- Snrr Washington and Mulberry Krank Malsack. Jr.. stndenl i slreels, will presnnt the religious the week-end with Ills parents, Mr. Mary Hitchcock, beginning Tiles.-- ami Mrs C. Maisack, Kasl Antic-1 day. Ken !S. C. U Hartaock, who has heen j The story deals with a wealthy, nt his home, 101S Hamilton lluiilc-' arrogant Jewish prince, whose, main vnrd, is slowly improving. CACTI il HltACHiM Ir.terest In life accumulating and holding wealth. Later in the play h'1 finds his second interest In Re- becca, the daughter of one of his her home in Pittsburgh. BIRTHDAY PARTY Miss Lorraine Hovis -was Iho. guest of honor at a birlhday party held at her home on Gullford avc-j nue on Friday evening. Dinner was j served to 35 guests. i The guests were: the Misses Charlotte Arnsparger. Marjorle i Shlpp, Jane Rudlsill, Jacqueline Bruno, Blossom Hovis, Mary Jane Carlraugh, Mailiyn K. L. Kelly, John Rlcdrich, Jim MacDon- aid, Rodger Haver, Dick Snydcr, Henry Adams, Al Smith, Ross Arns parger, K. L. Kc-lley, I-aymen Har SPECIAL PROGRAM WILL BE RENDERED baugh, Mr. and Stanley Anniversary of Jean Sibel- ius to Be Marked by Orchestra This city's contribution to the in- ternational celebration of tho seventieth anniversary of the birth of Jean Sibelius, the famous con- temporary Polish composer, will be presented on March 12 when the Hagors town- Frederick- Way neaboro- Chamber-sours Symphony Orc.hes- ArnaparRcr. Arnsptirgcr Bender. Mr. i and Croquignole Wave uiltlrtr IN llnlr Ilri-kN A. Trim Gale's Beauty Salon OUT. Wlthitr Without Ami'tm't Tele, SI W. St. 1 d Ross Urn will play tho powerful music of Mrs. Haxfilen i his symphonic por-ni, "Finlandin." This number will also be a tri- bute to Finland since the music so aptly expresses the rugged strength of tho country. At the two form- er cnncorts held hrrn tho orchestra rondorod I bo Mjirch by Brrlioz, which is a fuvoritn Hun- Close Out Prices On RANGES and HEATERS Goorl opporttinlty to obtain your heating equipment at a reduced price. Liberal terms. A whole year to pay If you wish. MEYERS BERKSON, Inc. U. Frnnklln St. WASHERS Jones' Appliance Service K, Krniiklln 51. STANLEY'S NEW LOCATION "Public Square" parian Tchaikowsky's creditors. Misfortune befalls him because of his cruelly. He is fin- ally led to the Master and healed, and throiiph his healing he learns the srcat lesson of humility and merry. Tho pageant is very capably di- rected by Mr. and Mrs. I. S. Wamp- ler. The east is very well suited to their parts and is as follows: KM. Prince Stephen's steward, Robert Thomas; Daniel, t h e prince's scribe. Alartc Bowman; Kuth. Anna's maid, (Jracc Spitzer; Stephen. Prince, of Judea, Herbert Sarah, one of the prince's debtors, Anna Kagey; Rebecca, the prince's betrothed, Louise Wamp- lf-r; Tabitlia, Rebee.ca'a aunt, Eliz- abeth Sprocher; Martha, Rebecca's li and ma id, Tbelma Holsinper; An- na, the prince's mother, Ruth Kcons: Jude, the Samaritan, an- other debtor. Roy teller; Rabbi Joseph. Priest from the Temple, luue nnd Man-he Slav, which contains the ROBCOR Heel, and Ksau. slave in theme of the Russian natioiuil i prince Stephen's household, John WliitinoiT. j The play will be staged in the school auditorium at anthem. Stephen the director, lias Felected a most interesting pro- WOMEN'S HATS i L. B. Hat Shop( Latest Styles 16 East Washington "Choice of House" DRESS SALE SELF-SERVICE SHOP Krani this fourth cont'ert of the season proinisoa to attract u large audience of the musk-ally minded. Bestdos the Sibelius composition the program includes (he difficult Overture from the opera, "Oberou" by Wclicr; "Cortpjje de Bacchus" from llu; orchestral snile. "Sylvia" by I.eo Dcllbps; Ihn lirst and third movements from- Mozart's "Sym- phony Number Forty in G "Zwlsrhoimkt III" and the familiar "Marchc Mllltalrc" from the hnllet mnslc nt Krnnz Schubert's "Rosa- "Jlai-rh of Iho J.iltle Wooden Soldiers" by Gabriel IMerne. TWELVE INDUCTED AT CHAPTER MEET Honor Society of So. Po- tomac High School Re- ceives Members HOW'S YOUR HEALTH? r.illtrd HT l.nirn (InUxton For the York A my of MrHlrlnr The Cancer Problem "Cancer has ceased to be an un- accountable mystery and we need no longer fear that its solution sur- passes the wit of writes Dr. W. K. five, director of the imper- ial cancer research fund of KriK- laud. An abstract of his review of progress made in cancer study follows: The pessimism with which hoth THE At a recent meeting of the mac Chapter of the National Jtm' ior Honor Society twelve pupils public, and medical profession were inducted into membership. viewed the cancer problem at ttie Membership limited to pupils beginning of the century can hardly who rxcet in scholarship, leader- tie appreciated today. The extreme ship, character, and service. The confusion nf thought in this field ramlle-lighf ceremony was in warranted much pessimism. Thir- (harpe of the. officers nf the, years ago it was thought by ter: AHre. Itohrer, president; Dor- olhy Auxt, vice-president Michnei secretary; many thai '-nicer was a disease lim- ited to man and that it occurred Robert Mattson only in civilized rommunities. The j impression was also widespread, as 56 W. Washington St. Callus treasurer ami Helen Piixson. The pupils -ivlut achieved this! it still is in a measure even today, highest conferred by j that cancer is increasingly rapidly, ihe srade Hodcr-1 Talk was common of cancer fam- lick Mason, tlerlrude McClaln, Rlcil-1 ilies and cancer houses. Almost ev- iird Morin, Rhodii Xadlei'. Itn'.-'i j erythinK was for it. Oeo- j lieeder, Retty Shnnian, A'eruon logic formations, soil, climate, diet Horn: grade S. flladys Altshire, j and dwelling proximities to trees ''y I.OIIR. Randolph .Mason, Alice K, j and rivers were suspected of bear- Spielman, Martha Vcaklc. ing a causative relation to cancer. Miss Katharine I.. Mealy, junior! Cnuccr was Ihnufht by some to school supervisor, pave the i be infectious and even contagions. newly elected members an inspir- iins Uilk in which she. cautioned "Cancer genus" were "discovered nnd re-discovered" lime and again. NOTICE Dr. T. A. Chappe'ear Announces the reopening of hn offices at his former address 170 W. Washington St. For the practice of General Dentistry Office Phone 2S17 Reildence Phone 2402-W Until March lit. Call information nftfr March 1st. jtbcni not lo he satisfied with the j Many theories were propounded to 'niccess already attained but to j explain the orifin of cancer, and he- ptrive for higher ;u coniplishnicnta cause of their number and the the second year South Po- flimsy hnsia on which they rested, lomac won the special iulerscholas-j they added to confusion rather than He: craftsmanship coach compel! iindcrsiandinjr. lion of Hie Klsher Rody Crafts- The break in this reign of con- .man's lluild. Jlarold fusion came with Ihe realization built Ibe model which brought this j that cancer Is not "a disease of [recosnitlon to thu school a ml won civilized inaii.'" First veterinary a plaque signifying his attainment, surgeons observed it in dpgs and j for himself the state prize of .horses. was presented to the school an-l' Later It was shown lhat cancer is j accepted by Herbert I.ogsdon, in- t" found In rats and that tilmors duslrial arts instructor. on" rat can bo transmitted to Other numbers on the program other rats by the transplamalion ircludcd: Cello solo by Victor Mills the cancerous tissue. Ilnman Daris Weajley, accompanist; bra-s cancer, however, could not be prop- I trio. TiiUl Moulden. Donald Kret7.tr. iipaled in animals, nor could the William Shaffer: tlulo solo. F'hyl- cancer of one species of animal be Mis WeaKley: vocal octet, Mercmv transmit led to another species. Rloom. Doris Fiakcr, Me Lic. uor and Samuel Sowers. Are Built Up REGIMENT "QUEEN" TO LEAD BALL .vurd after spending sometime, at i ihe of Maryland, spent ,innna. "Whatsoever Ye Sow." by] Min Louin As "queen of the regiment" of North Carolina State college's R. 0. T. C. unit, Miss Mary Louise Shepherd wjji Jead the military bail to be held at the college early this spring. Miss Shepherd is from Greensboro, N. C. CABARET DANCE TO BE HELD BY CLUB i Alsatians Will Dance To- night at Hotel Alex- ander Kvorything is in readiness for thn Alsatia cabaret dance to be hold this evening at the ballroom or the Hotel Alexander, with danc- ing from f) o'clock until I o'clock. Music will furnished by Al (iruber and his Club Royal Orches- tra end he has promised the dancers the last word in dance music. The committee is arranging for many novelty dances during the evening, including the ever-popular Paul Jones. Many valuable door prizes will be given. This dance, which is to be strictly informal, is the second in a series of closed dances, being for Alsatians and their lady friends oiily. The dance committee of the Al- satia Club announces that it has been able to secure the services of Ted Brownagle and his Band, fea hiring Red McCarthy, world's lead- ing bass violin player, who will play for the club's Easter dance to be held on Monday. April at the club. This dance will be an in- vitation affair. The committee in charge of these dances is composed of L. F. Obrist, .7. V. E. C. Ryan, P. H. Schilling, C. H. Adams, and D. F. Hull. o'clock, February 25, 26 and 27. The public is Invited and a silver j offnring will be accepted. Harp's Orchestra will furnish the music before the play and between lids. Cilinry's Floral Shop is furn- ishing palms and flowers for deco- rations. Fiirnilurn is bring donat- ed by the Rhnckey Furniture Com- pany and the Reachley-Relchard Furniture Company. UNIQUE SOCIAL IS HELD ON THURSDAY Secret Sister Party Given by St. Mark's Ten Is Tlir members of St. Mark's Ten held their secret sister party on Thursday evening at the home of Mrs. Nellie SUnc, 51 Wayside avenue. Each person's "Ten ter" was revenled by the present- ing of gifts and new sisters were chosen'for the coming year. Attractive decorations of cherry trees, red candles and (Ings were carried out in the table appointments. Games were played and Miss .Mary Miller was awarded the prize for finding the most ar- ticles in the scavenger hunt. Those present were: the Misses Mary and Anna Milter, Vivian and Jeannette McClain. Flossie Hchultz, LoiTidne Hurk, Frances "Wellinger. Melon Rhodes, Kuth Catherine Marker, 1'anliiif Bolt, Pauline Woltnnl. Dorothy Price. Hazel Rhodes. Kilythe Dclnuder. Virginia Dnffclinycr, Vivian Wilkes, Ann and Vilda Selbnrt, Mesdames Hosie Smith. Muriha Snyder. Sarah WifbH, Helen I lovermill, Leonn Miller, Helen Wllkes. Virginia StoulTer, Emer Elgin, Aletha Nigh, Loretta Delauder, Irene Maugans, Geneva Oayhoff, Katherine Shank, Nellie Stine and Kada Snyder. ENTERTAINS CLASS Miss .Geraldirie Calhoun enter- lained the M. E. Workers of the Washington Square Sunday School at her home, 304 West Washington street. After the business session a social hour was enjoyed anc later refreshments were served the following: Misses Charlotte Pangle, Pauline Calhoun, Kathryn Crockett, Doris Fleaple, Mary Jane Andrews, Dorothy Lear, Rrlta Mar qnart, Betty Dundus, Dora Shook, Jane Worth, Betty Calhoun, Catlv erine Shifflet, Mrs: F. A. Worth Mrs. E. 0. Shook, Mrs. T. B. Cal noun and Geraldfne Calhoun. MEETING IS HELD The b. and L. Club, formerly th3 Sorority of Friendship, held its semi-monthly meeting at the home of Miss Louise Dunlap, Howard street on Friday evening. Refreshments were served to the Misses Louise Miriam Holdcruft, Doris Martin, Elizabeth JMellor, Mary Louise Roof, Knthryn Rowe, Catherine and Jane While. The next activity of the club w ho a bowl ins party to be held this Thursday evening. OUR DAILY PATTERN LEARN TO KNIT Free lessons in knitting will be given daily (except Saturday) in order that you may loam the new fashiun notos offered by the "Flclsher" Yuni Company. Time: 2 P. M. to 5 P. M. Place: Third Floor Join Cltllel Undtr Suptrvlilon of Flnt February 15th. Leiter Brothers WASHINGTON. 22 The troasury reported today stocks c.' bonded whisky have been built j up to a level exceeding the pre- prqhlbitino average. At Hit1 end of Jnnuary n total ot tax gallons were in bonded warehouses throughout the (Otuury In contrast with round fiftiirc nveraga of gallons before passage of tho 18th amend- ment. Tho pre-prohibltion peak of Rations was established In .tune, 1M4. Hiinflowcsr are being culltvaled as A new tourco of rubber In Soviet Russia, Peplum Dress With Military Air Or Without Peplum and Shirt Collar By ELLEN WORTH Such a host of cunning new styles, copied from grown-up mode, and here is one of them. It the spring military note in its stand-up collar. I'rcig trim down the front of the little moulded bodice, that it accented by a wee shaped peplum. A very thin navy blue woolen, pat- terned in bright red jomethins; like made this frock. The frog trim matched the red and the nayy. You see, it'i highly practical lides being charming. Of course, cottons could be used equally well BT way of another suggestion, make another dress without the pep- lum and wiih the shirt collar. Sec imall view! Style No. 1671 is designed for 4, 6, 8 and 10 years. Size 4 requires 2 yards of 35-inch material. Our new Spring Fashion Book will enable you to have imart clothes for ICJB money. It's just full of new idea.'. Price of ROOK 10 cents. Price of PATTERN 15 cents, (coin is prff Wrap coin carefully. liiiluru Mail Address: N. Y. Pat- tern I3urcau, The Morning Herald. Mohawk Bldg., 21st Street at Fifth Avenue, New York City. SALLY'S SALLIES Annual Banquet Pleasant Event The foannual Father and Son ban- quet sponsored by the Boy Scouts of Troop 13 of the Church of the Brethren was held Wednesday in the Sunday school auditorium. Perry Huffaker, director of Chris- tum education at the church and also chairman of the troop com- mittee, acted us toastmaster in the absence of Prof. E. Russell Hicks. The speaker of the evening, Paul Shields, former scout executive and present field commissioner, was introduced by Donovan R. Beachley. The speaker talked on "The Price of Crime in Our Own Washington County." Other entertainment -was pre- sented by the scouts of the troop when a first aid demonstration was given by John Schnebly and John Lehman; a piano solo by William R. Wolfkill, Jr.; a comic stunt by the Flaming Arrow Patrol with Glen Moser, patrol leader. Credit for the success o[ the ban- quet should go to the troop commit- lee consisting of Perry Huffaker, William R. Wolfkill, I. P. Wamp- ler, K. R. Hicks, John Shockey and the ladies that prepared the din- ner with Mrs. Grover Sprecker in charge. Tho acting scoutmaster of Troop 13 is Howard Stottlemyer. ANNUAL BANQUET IS A PLEASANT AFFAIR Haters town Review No. ]S of the Woman's Benefit Association held its annual banquet at the Dagmar Hotel recently. State Dep- uty Mrs. Jeanette Jones was un- able to attend due to Illness. A corsage was presented to the president, Mrs. K. T. Leasure. A program was given as follows: Piano solo, Miss Florence Garlick; snugs, Mrs. Edw. R. Cusheu and Miss Elsie Hawn and sketch, Mrs. T. H. Royd, Miss Evelyn and Miss Retty Royd. Those attending were: Mes- inifis E. T, Leasure, C. Largent, H. Ritenour, O. Dcrr. D. J. Weaver, I. Manious, J. P. Richard, C- K. T. H. Boyd, R, Moruingstar, Lynn, V. Manious, C. K. Sellars, E. Shoap, G. L. Rickard, Edw. R. Cushfin, C. Hawn, A. E. Mcllmail and Misses G. Hipsley, B. Boyd, E. Manx, W. Lynn, L. Barr, E. Martz, IV. Lynn, P. Wolforo, V. Weaver, E. Hawn, T. Hawn, E. Rickard, F, Garlick, E. Richard and V. Richard. When a girl's face is her fortune it often runs into a nice figure. CORNET PLAYER IS CONCERT SOLOIST Birley Gardner Pleases Big Audience at Academy Theatre Birley Gardner, cornet soloist with the U. S. Naval Academy Band, triple-tongued his .way into (he hearts of Hagerstown music overs yesterday afternoon when he appeared as guest soloist at the concert of the Municipal Band. The Academy Theatre was packed to overflowing and a num her of persons were forced to tand. Mr. Gardner played the "La Man- difficult lantasie, witll the greatest ease, but was almost worn out- with three encores manded by the large and apprecia- tive audience. In introducing the artist. Peter Buys, conductor, gave a brief his- tory of the life of the musician. Gardner did not take up concert work until he reached the age of 23. but developed rapidly under tbj direction of Herbert Clark, one of the cornet famous. Helen Cavanaugh pleased the audience with "The Velvet Dark- ness' and "Beautiful In addition to an encore. Her soprano voice carried well into the far reaches of the theatre. The diversified program was well chosen by Mr. Buys, and well played by the local musicians. A feature of the program was series excerpta from raches composed by John Philip Sousa, who died four years ago. The band members demonstrated their mastery In the execution of Tschalkowsfcy's "Symphony in F Minor." Arpeggois and difficult us for the most part, the musi- cians bad little difficulty with the famous composition. a s. Slvlc H7I. I 'R- (Irxt BRIDGE SERIES TO CLIMAX TONIGHT The duplicate bridge tournament which was to have been held at Fountafn Head Country Club on Monday night will be held at the Hotel Alexander in parlor A. Play will begin promptly at ;-lock. This is the last game of the series and prizes will be award- ed for top score and (or the team totalling the greatest number of match points during the series. Two FLOOR SHOWS NIGHTLY DANCING NIGHTLY The "ALWAYS" WILLIAMSPORT PIKE Youth Forum Will Be Held Tuesday A young people's forum will be held on Tuesday, February 25 at o'clock in the church build- of St. John's Lutheran Church at which time E. Russell Hicks will be the speaker. His subject will be "Are Our Youth Thinking To- day, and if so, How May They Best Put Their Thinking Into Christian This forum is being sponsored by the Youth Council of St. John's Lutheran Church to foster Chris- tian fellowship, to encourage Chris- tian attitude and to challenge Christian action among young peo-' pie of Hagerstown and the vicinity. There will be an open discussion i various questions concerning young people following the address by Mr. Hicks. This forum is being held .for young people regardless of their denomination and others will be conducted throughout the year. The theme of next forum will be "Physical Abstract of Youth." All young people and adults interested in spirited youth arc invited to attend. MISS TRIBBY WEDS JAMES F.BARGER Wedding Performed Satur- day Afternoon at M. E. Parsonage Miss Catherine E. Trlbby, daugh- ter of Mrs. Mary 3. Tribby, 711 East Baltimore street, and James f. Barger, son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Barger, 121 Ross street, were quietly married on Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the Wash- ington Square Methodist Episcopal pafionage. The Rev. Lloyd Davia performed the ceremony in the presence of the immediate families. The bride was attired in a dress of Aliee blue with which she wore dark blue accessories. Her cor. sag ewas of rosebuds. Both Mr. and Mrs. Barger are graduates of the Hageratown High School. Mrs. Barger has been em- ployed at Letter Brothers and Mr. Barger holds a position with the Maryland Motor Company. Following the ceremony the cou- ple left for a wedding trip to Rich- mond, Va. The couple will reside in this city. CLUB MEETING The regular meeting of the Arts and Letters Club will be held this afternoon at o'clock in the (jommittee room of the Women's Club. 80th Anniversary Premium Send the top lid or cover of the cardboard box in which Father John's Medicine size your name and address, and you will receive our beautiful 80th anniversary heavily silver-plated measuring spoon, suit- able for many uses. FM OVER N YEARS FATHER JOHN'S MEDICINE HAS IEEN USED AS A triitmint tor nlils, wujtu ihii to ecldi md been- ehM Militant, A POSITIVE PROOF OF MERIT "MAJOR BLOW'S AMATEUR HOUR" First Christian Aud. Mon. Tues. Feb. 24 25 Adm. 25c 1Sc 8 P. M. SPECIAL HnrtlfT No. 1 ..........HT.Ofl Jerrtmc Start............. .fJ.Stl Jerome Kgg J. W. ROHRER 30 W. Bilto. St. Phone 1115 ONCE USED CASKEY'S OLD HOME POTATO BREAD February FURNITURE Sale New in Progreu Henett Honest Dealings MONTGOMERY WARD A CO. Plastic Wood Casein Glue FRANK S. SCHWARTZ 41 1'otonifie St. WHAT PRICE DRUDGERY? Phone 2550 The Hagerstown Laundry, Inc. Lftunderen   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication