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Hagerstown Mail Newspaper Archive: January 16, 1835 - Page 1

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Publication: Hagerstown Mail

Location: Hagers-Town, Maryland

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   Hagerstown Mail, The (Newspaper) - January 16, 1835, Hagers-Town, Maryland                               BY OTT WEBER. OWN MAIL. Md. Friday, January 16, 1835. NEW HI. No. 8. Sheriff's Sale. BY virtue of a writ of fieri issued out of Washington County Coutt, at the of D.ivij Bowlus, against the goods ami chatties. and ttneiitentt'of Ma- thias Nichols, to me divected, 1 have seised and taken in execution, H I the es- tate, fight, title, progeny, interest, claim and demand, at law and in equity of the said Muthias Nichols, in.and to. liJp acres mountain land, a-'joining the- lands of Jo'hn Hciann, Poonnan imd others--Ami 1 hereby give notice, that on Saturday the 31st inst. at 2 o'clock P. M. in front of the Sheriff's Office, in I will cffur for sale the said property. seized and taken in execution by public auction to the highest bidder for cash. WM. H; HTZKUGH, Jsntn'ry ____________ Sheriff's Sale. BY Virtue of a writ of fieri fachs, is- sued out of Washington County Court, at the suit of Jacob against the goods and and tenements of Samuel Brantner and Samuel Cramer, and lor taxes and fees, to me directed, 1 have seized mnd taken in execution, all the es- tate, right, title, interest, propeity, and demand, at law and in equity of the said Santiitl Cramer, in and to, 1 Gig and Horse, 2 ten plate stoves, 1 table, desk, chairs, bcneh and 2 I here- by give notice, tlv.it on Monday the 19Ui inst. at 2 P. M. on the premises of the said Samuel Cramer, in the town of Boonsbnrough, I will offer for sale the said properly so seized and taken in execution, by public auction to the highest bidder for cash. WM. H. FITZHUGH, January _ Sheriff's-Sale, BY virtue of a writ of fieri facias, is- sued out of Washington County Court, at the Daniel-Cobb, Samuel Nymnn and Samuel G. Nyman, against the poods and chatties, lands aiid tenement of Hen- ry Lewis, and for taxes and fees, to me directed, -1 have seized and taken in exe- cution, all the estate, right, title, property, interest, claim and demand, at law and in equity of the said Henry Lewis, in to, 10 Horses. 1 bmad wheel wagon, 1 two horse, wagon. 19 head of steers and 1 I hereby give notice, that on Tuesday the 20ih ir.st. at 11 o'clock in front of thV Sheriffs Office, in Hagers- town, I will offer for sale the s.iid property so seized and taken in execution, by pub lie auction bidder for cash. WM. H- FJTZIIUGH. Colonel jjtmou's I'UESIDEKTIAL ELECTION. COL. BENTON'S LE'ITEK TO THE STATE OK MISSISSIPPI. WASHINGTON In. 1815. Dtmr S'u Icarnvil that you naruile- your name iu fee iiM-d, can- eliuril JicJaltr Cor Vice Ihe and that you liai'e udJri-nK'il Kll.T lit dial S'jiiii- linn- Miier, lu the Committee of the Slate COM of liy whom you wort' in time before your di-tcrmination, C'lininuiiicutfJ through that CMI known In lite People if the IJiiiifil we therrfure, reqiit-gt f.ir that high iiHice. It will be a eimiidi-rablc But, wttat hajclke tlont.' What has Mr. Van Burin d> aeTihut he should be elected President? 'Ois is the inquiry, as flippant- ly, as who would veil or of this gen-, tleman, when itwfuld bjf much more reg- ular and periiiipito ask, what tmtuch a man as this thai-he should not be made But, to answer the en- quiry as put: perhaps, be tuffi- dent, so Car at feast as the comparative merits of comprtrtors are concerned, to in mi; vinn'ii fsiaitf; we mrri'iure, ri'cjuvsi in- i vor of a capy of your K-ISi-r. if you retained one, m lllH.t fur publication at Out place, in order that your high to ________ point to his cnuruc tha Senate of the U- dui inglthe tight years he sat fa- --i- ln friends tlwwhrrr, well have an early opportunity nf turuing tbrir altvntiun to sunic uthcr snttuble person. AORKRT T. LYTLE. (of Ohio.) nr.-vi'v ii.... HEMtV IUTLIFF HOON. li.Jia.ia.) II A. MUI1LBNBCI5G, (of Peutwylfania Honorable 11. BESTO.N. CITV. January 2d. IS35. Wd.... 41 f herewith send ycsi a nf m Icttrr. declining the nomination of the Mississip Slate Convention, for Illc Vice Presidency "f the United States FairiirM towards my political in ctrcry part of the UIIHHI. J nn- 10 let tin-in kiuiir at once what niyiK-ttTniMiatioii and I bar i1 done in many private and in ail tlii-c which I nave ln-ld IMI the j'-Cl. Tin: niiniinalinii in wait the line which came from a State Convention, and there- fort-, tlie first (me which seemed In me In justify a public lelter, and to prm-nt tlie qT-slion. in a itl 2 i neri-- i in i j form as save mr frnm of uccliii tlv.it on Monday the 19U. hml had offl-ml. Tlk- Mirrmftlii ShcrifTs Sale. BY virtue of two writs scii i facias, is cued out of VVashiiigt'wi unty Court, at the suits of Cornelia StiBler and John W. Holliday, use of Towner and Hatris, gainst the Rorxls and chatties, lands and tenements of Samuel Lynch, jr. and for taxes and fees to me directed, 1 have seized and taken in execution, all the estate, right title, property, and demand, law and in equity of the said S-unuel Lynch, jr. in and to, a tract of Land called Cheney's containing about 30 acres, lying in the WiHSamsport District, and ad- joining the of Thomas Buchanan, Esq. and Samuel Lynch, I here- by give notice, that Thursday the 29Mi day of inst.at 2 o'clock P- M. in front of ihe Sheriff's Office, in Hagcrs-town, I wilJ offer for sale the said property, so seized and taken in execution, by public auction to the highest bidder for rash. W H. FITZHUGH. Januarv jug what _... sisaijipi wan inleiidi-d for public midlusave my any further trouble nn my account. U wan io reach, in its circuit, my friends in eve- ry quarter; and as ynnsugfrM that it must be a cnn- btf.irc il Could return from the State if through thi- and that in the Rii'iititiiue, my etaeu here, wish esrlit-r infurmatioii, that they mieht turn their :.t- Irntion lo same other I cheerfully comply with your ix-qupxt. and furnish the copy for publica- tion. Yours, Respi-cifnllv, THOMAS H. BENTON- Mrttn. R. T. LVTLB, H. B. II. A. WASHINGTON- CITY, Dec. DEAR Y-ur kind letter of the Sheriff's Sale. BY virtue of two of fn-ri facias is- sued out of Washington County Court, at the suit of Esther Chase and Richard M. Harrison, use of Dr. Ficilcrick Administrator of V. W. Randall, against the goods and and tenements of Jeremiah Legget, and taxes and feet In me directed, I have seized and ta- ken in execution, all the right title, inter- estate, property, claim and demand at law and in equity the snd Jeremiah Legget. in and 18 ncrcs of Und, more or less, tnd the improvements thereon, ad- lhe of s- Kennedy. Ketdy and And I heretiy give no- tice that on Wedntsdav the 28tU day of Jamary inrt.at 2 o'clock P. M. in front of the Office, in Hagervtown. I will offer for propeny sested taken in execution, by public auction to the highest liiddrr for rush. W II. FITZHUGH. January 3w __ __ Sheriff's Sale. BY Sundry writs of fieri fa- cias isswed cut Washington conaiy Coart, the cf W. Kealhofer use of Johnston Garreu, of Adam Kinkle, use of John against Chmtwa we of Jonathan Hager. John Ragar. usv of Samwel Young, Daniel Schnrblv, Alexander Nrft. Executor of 1 wt viler, Samwel Yowg, and to me directed, Mi lor fret, I have seurd and taken in exec-tino, all the estate, He, property, mtereM, claim ami demand taw and equity of the satf Samuel in and to, the following property to his cut lie nf Lrathcr, CCMI- aHthrg nf a quantity of leather, skirt- inc. opper leather, olf skins, sheep skins, hides in the hair, general 40 "f and Kitchen 6th ultimo has been duly received, and 1 take great pleaMite in returning you my thanks lor the friendship you have me, and which I shall be n.ippy to acknowl- edge act.s rather than words, whenev er an opportunity shall occur. The recommendation for lhe Vice Pre shleney of the United Suites, which the Democratic Coirvenii'Mi of your S'ate has ilone me the tumor to make, is, in the high cst degree, Hutu-ring and honorable tome and commands tiie expression deep est gratitude; bat justice to tnyscil, and to our political friends requires me to say at once, and with the candor, and decision, whicii rejects all disguise, and with tio retraction, that 1 cannot consent to go up--ii the list of candidates for the eminent idfice for which I have been proposed. I consider the ensuing election for Pics idenl, and Vice as uniot.g tht most important that ever took place in our country; ranking with that of 1600, when the democratic principle first triumphed in the person of Mr. Jefferson, and wilh the two elections of 1328, awl 1832, when the same principle again triumphed in the per- son of General Jackson; and I should lock upon all the advantages recovered for the constitution; am! the people, in these two last triumphs, as lost, and gf-ne, unless the democracy of the Union shall again tri umph in the election of 1836. To succeci in that wiil require the most per :ect harmony, and union, among ourselves To secure "ibis union and harmony. have as few aspirants for the offices of President and Vice President as possi- ble; and, to diminish the number of these for one, shall refuse to go up on the list; and will remain in ihe rank; the voters, ready to support the of democracy by supporiini; the tlectioi of the candidates shall be selectee by a General Convention of the democra- tic, paity. But, while respectfully declining, for myself, the highly honorable and flatter ing rccotiiiiientlatiiin of convention, 1 take, a particular pleasure expressing the gratification whii h I feel at M-eing lonuiiatioii which you have made in favot of Mr. Van Bureii. I have known tha gentleman long, and intimately. We en terrd the Sei.atr of the United States to- gether, thirteen sat six years h xrats next to each other, were always prr friendly, generally acted togethei on leading always interchaiig ed communications, and reciprocated fidcnce; and thus. occupying a position to give me an opportunity tho hly acquainted wish rJiaracUr. the result the whole has that 1 have r him. so indicated him to my fi iends the most fit and suitable person to fit the presidential chair after the expiration of President trim. In political principles he is thoroughly comes as hear the any statesman on the Mage o lifr. la abal.tics. habits, lie IK-VOW! the cavil, or Pn he is innltwk 1 desk, oM bowd. 1 eight clock, Meads and look ing pipe, nvens, fcc, 1 Cow; 1 nt gro also, his in- terest NS 1 two stmr brk.k cast Wash- Street, in the proper- tv in wfckh wow I tfvc fttNice. OK Friday tUe 30th inst. A. M. m ike I talc wwM property, n teited Kifll for the whole ot" private life contaias not a swgJe act whicii rrqwire txnlanatfoa or defence. In temperament he is adapted to the station, the times; for Ibcmg could more free from evcrr of envy, malignity, or or, conic possess, in a more eminent degree, tha happy conjunction with wiavily o much to the successful of public and b essmtial. iKrcoming, a high public The Siate from which he and whkh. aaccesftive two aw) iweaiy yeats ftove be the favonic wn, also to be taken into thr acccnnt hi the list of his greaf in the eventful r' 1800, turned the of the has ported every democratic that day to this; a State whicii MMbers two tuilltawof wihaniUntvffiTes lyjtwo in eltetka never aaw awe of her he has been icall d by his native State, by President jack on, by the Amelfican People. This might be sufF.cient Ijebreen Mr. Van Bu- cn and but it would not be buftl- ient for himself. Justice to him would tqtiire the iinswer to further the war of he waia mciTi- jcr cf the New York Senate; when the ate of Mr. M ad ration, and f the Union itstlt, depended upon the oniluct of ilint men IK! greater in pofcitinn; a rnnlrer to England and .to Canada, British anus and when that condpvt, to the liMnay of every patriot seen 0 hang, for nearly two years, in doubt- til scales suspense. The federalists tad the nujoiiiy in the House of Hepre bintativcs; the democracy had the Senate md the Governor; ant! for two successive sessions nn measure could be adopted- in support of the war. Every aid proposed jy the Governor and Senate, was rejected by the HOUM; of Everjr State paper issued by one, was >y the other. Continual disngreements ook place; innumerable conferences were lad; the hall cf the House of Keprestn latives was the scene of contestation; ant every conference was a public of parlranientary public tria1 .-.f intellectual whicii eacl side, n presented ijy committees of its a- blest and in the presence of boll and of assembled umlti'.tuk'S ex rrted itself to the utmost to justify ksdf ,md to pet the oilier in ihe wrong, tooptr- .te upon i.ublic opinion, govern the iai jiendii-g tloctions, and acquire the asccn ik-r.cy in the ensuini; legislature. Mr. Van Buren, then a young man, had ust er.iercd tlie Senate at the commence went of this extraoidinary struggle. Ht entered it, November, 1812; and had jus distinguished himself in the opposition o 1 sis t" the renewal cf the first na- tional Bank charter, in ihe support of Viet Ptekklei.l I lintcn lor giving the casting vote against it. and in thea- in.ble support of Governor Tompkins, for his Roman energy in prorogneing the General Assem- bly, (April, which couUl not other- wise be prevented from receiving, and em- bodying, the tranamigratory soul of that defunct institution, and giving it a new ex- istence in a new place, under an altered name, and modified form. He was p >liti- caliy borne out of this Conflict, and came into the legislature against the Bank, and lor the war. He was the man which the occasion required; the ready prompt rouncellor; courteous in in inflexible in principles. H-.- contrived the forward the bit's and the drew the State papers, (especially the powerful address to the republican voters of the which, trvei.lualiy, van- the federal turneil the  r Tompkins, in the extraordinary meas- ireof proroguing the New York Legisla- ure, to prevent the metempsychosis of he Bank, and its revivification, in the of New York; to repeat nothing of all this, and of his undaunted and brilliant suppoitof the war. from its beginning to ts end. I shall refer only to what has hap- u-necl in my own times, and under my own eyes. His firm, aad devoted, support of Mr. Crawford, in this contest of 1824, when that eminent citizen, prostrate with disease, and inhumanly assailed, seemed to be doomed to inevitable defeat, was that non-committal? His early espousal of General Jackson's cause, after the election in the House of Representatives, in February, 1825, and his steadfast opposition to Mr. Adam's ad- ministration; was that nor.-commitftl? His prominent stand against the Panama Mis- sion, when that mission was believed to be irresistibly popular, and was .pressed upon the Senate to crush., the opposition mem- bers; was -that also, a wily piece of non- corjfcrnittal policy? Ilssi4etlaratir.n against the Bank of the" United States Vthe year 1826; was that theinnduct of a man wait- ing to the he could take his side? The; removal of the dcposites, and the panic" scents of last winter, in which so. many gave way, and so many others folded their arms uMil the struggle was over, while Mr. Van Buren, both by his own conduct, and that of his friends, gaVe nn undaunted that master ly stroke nf the President; Is this'Wso to be called a line of conduct and the evidence of n temper that tees the it The fact is, this ridiculous and nonsensical charge, t absurd, so easily not only but turned in the honor advantage, of Mr. Van Buren, that his friends might have run the rink cf bejrii suspected of having invented it, and puti into circulation, to give some others o his friends a brilliant opportunity of cmbla zoning his merits, were it not that the bltni enmity nf hiscomprtitors'hasputthe accn safinn upon record, and enabled his friend to exculpate themsel vcs.and to prove homi the 01 iginal charge against his undisputed opponents, For one thing Mr. Vin Burcn has reason to be thankful to his enemies; it isr foi having began the war upon him so soon There is time enough for tnitU.arsd justicr to do their office, and to dispel every clon< which the jealousy of rivals, tlie vengeance nf the Bank, and the ignorance of dupes, has hung over his name. Union, harmony, self-denial, concession thing lor the cause, nothing for bt Hie watchword, and" tc of the democratic party. The obligations upon good men to unite when bad men combine, is as clear in-poli tics as it is in morals. Fidelity to this ol.l; gation has, heretofore, saved the republic and was never more indispensable to safety than at the present r.t. The effcrts made under the elder Adams, above thirty years ago, to subvert the principles of our'Govcuiment. produced a union of the productive, and biirtSirn-bearing class- es, in every quarter of the republic. Plan- ters, farmer-, wilh a slight infuMon from the commercial and professional intcrc.-rtp, whether on this side  y Cato, in the assembled presence of all Home, with the glorious appellation of Pater of his Country. The demccracy of the four quarters of the Union, now united, victorious, happy, and secure, under the administration of President Jackson; shall it disband, and ail to pieces the instant that great man re- tires? This is what federalism hopes, fore- tels, promotes, intrigues, prays, and for. Shall this through whose fault? Shall sectional prejudices, lust of power, contention for office (that bane of shall personal preferences, so amiable in private life, so weak in politics, tliall these small Lilliputian suffered to work the disruption of the democratic, union? to separate republican of the South and Wett, from brother of the North and East? and, in that separation, to make a new opening for the second restoration of federalism, (under its aliut die tut of whiggism.) and, member of thai tHtr.ty ago. the" body, alrove two-ami Ami for the politics fund banks, il has. re-; ccntVr.and authentically that a vaM Nwjutiiy ol are r ihc nf his moil determined and active oppo- No public man h.ii to the of the hanking tban Mr. Vaa Burcn. The of the New York show that the many years during whwh he was a promi- nent mtnibet that body, he txcrtcd SiiitJStll in a cmitinucd and zealiMS tino to tht inctcasc if banks; and, upoi< his devalinn the Chief Magistracy ef the Sfcatc the syslcm of banks so incorporated the ami imer- csts the Penile, to tinder lo the establishment rf such franilulcnt, or CTtn j.rtitet i the hrltftts of ncitrs against The safely fond Mem was the re.vnU this and if cmnplete MKCW hitherto has failed voder il) and the mpport and confidence of the rejsrcscntalives two not swdicieJst to aitctt its efficacy, there is me considera- IHW ai whkh thwild so far in its as w h from the swera if who kll what the system and that is, the perfect and compnsare with whkh the wVnle of ihrse rode owl the storm of Scnato- and United slates Bank attack, pane and prcMwre, vpon laM wmlrrl Thia twaaWI Mr. Van ef VMM people. right, and the sense of common dangrr. and tffrcted that first great union of ihr Democratic pariy which achieved the revolution of 1800, arrested the downward course of the Oovrrnment, and turned back the national lo re publican and cccnomical hab- its. The sagacious mind of Mr. Jtflerspii well diseciiifd, in the cJc- nu-iilsof whkh this united paitv was com- posed, the apjirojiriate malcrials a rc- Govrrnmcnt; and to ihc nrnt of the these element, be constantly looked for the wily barrirr to the of and atbtocracy. Aciwaird byatial which never been excelled, the nf the eauM-, he labored assWnnwIy in his high versus and Ictteis, to comment, MI vain, and pcr- p J3jiy of whkh he wlrly rclifd tlie pre- i repnMk. It was thr po- wer, iii5 from this unsfijcaras My nothing several other   whkh rarrird us and tu- hanUy thtongh the late war; enabling ihe'Gf vcftunent to withstand, on the paralysing machinations of a dfeaffcct- Amtctratr, amd to rrpel on the oilier, the hostile atVucks of a nitkr. The first relaxatioii of the tki trhkh hound together Ihe DcmT.racr cf :J North and Smith, East and the to fowcr ol federal awl the in thr _ -i__ _ t t 'jMM udministratioii of meaMret, The yoanjer Mr. Ad- the ami erepl into power thrwfhihe breaah that was >a iwt be ojje.coinjbg as near to the standard (to say more might the permanent enslavement of the pr how themselvet superior to sectional bigotry. devctcd to principle, intcat upon the gencr-l harmony inaccrssable to intrigwr.or to weakness; and to support the cause of cracy. whclJierlhe representative cftht cause eonics from >ide. rf livc-r. or a A and a XVcrt-rn man this is the state of my own fcelsncj.and I n jcice to see that your convention acted apou And if. what 1 have here written, (and which I could not lave written if I had atcefNrd the and gratifyhtf lion of y ur coflvrntion) if letter, the actaMofi but for frclinfis! if it shall contribute to pierent tJic dismf'tion of the rrpuMiraa party. after having al for forty years, otit and consequent recovered for the and the People, nailer of the then feel the of having dtmt ter to the it to lake, than I ever by office. cf rowr Convent ion may bite fct fnJJ effect in it way aa far at ta traly THOMAS Cfiieral   

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