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News: Thursday, September 17, 1959 - Page 1

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   News (Newspaper) - September 17, 1959, Frederick, Maryland                                Weather Forecast Tair, cooler tonight, low 32-3t with scattered frost. Friday fair, high 55-60. Saturday considerable cloudiness, cool. North to north- east winds 6-12 m.p.h. this after- noon and Friday and light vari- able tonight. Hood Instructor Is Killed In Wreck See Page 34 VOL. 284 Press Run ss Boa TOday i f -y-a> FREDERICK, MD., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1959 34 PAGES 5 CENT3 Frost Seen Likely For Tonight As Mercury Is Expected To Be In 30s Forest Fire Season I__________________ Begins Locally; Month: j fje Loses Patience, Very Dry With Only I ,48 Inch Rain Get out your winter there's a feeling of frost in the air. And the frosty feeling is not misleading because the forecaster said scattered frost should strike the area tonight. Thus a warm summer has ap- parently come to an end and if the. temperatures stay like this until next spring it will be a long hard inter. The temperature ernight reached a bone-chilling 43 degrees but the forecaster said tne mini- mum reading tonight would be 32- 38 degrees, causing the frosty con- ditions. With the nighttime temperatures on the cold side, the afternoon temperatures won't be much bet- ter with only a maximum of 50 degrees being forecast for today. The maximum yesterday was 63 desrees. A shower during the night sprinkled .05 of an inch of ram over the area but failed to relieve tender dry conditions existing locally. i Forest Fire Season District Forest Supervisor man Toms issued a warning ihatj But Wouldn't You? CASPER, Wyo. 'AP> A woman complained a city em- ploye used abusive language after giving her car "a good whack" with a broom. City Manager Hesry Rofles said a street employe admitted "cussing" the woman. He told Rofles he lost his temoer only after the woman: Drove around a not en- ter" sign, drove over freshly painted parking area stripes and rammed him from behind, knocking him to the pavement lie said his broom fle'v into the air and landed oa the car. The matter has been dropped. Nikita Hopes Sun Shines On Soviet-U. S. Relations Herter Gives Plan To End Tensions Addresses Assembly In Major Policy Speech j Aimed At Red Premier I Khrushchev Beauty Wins Fiakt To Free c- Her Father NEW CHURCH STEEPLE A new steeple has been completed on the Mt. Zion Methodist church at McKaig. The new addition was necessitated when lightning struck the old steeple during a storm on July 24. The steeple was rebuilt and other sections of the tower were repaired after bein? damaged by the lightning bolt. It UNITED NATIONS. N.Y. f of State Christian A. was covered by insurance. The perter today laid down a broad, lightning ran through wires to the 'Program to end East-West tension reV of the church and split a peaceful change in the tree. The bolt also ran out "wires :goliacal- economic from the front? of the church and ;pted rebuilt the tower, congregation is now in the oro- cess of remodeling the basement. Rev. Richard D. Thompson is was reported that the damage I pastor of the church. th e forest fire season oegan local- ;v Mom solit a utilitv cole. Services were fussed the 82-nation, not intemiDied while contractors "General Assemoly m a major The church speech enviously aimed at Soviet Premier Nikita Khrush-; chev. who will speak from the same rostrum Friday afternoon. While denouncing the use of force by the Communists in Asia' and other places, such as Hun- Herter appealed for serious1 negotiation of disarmament, outer space cooperation, and on such political problems as' Berlin and the reunification of divided Germany. Satellite Designed For! X15 IS Cut LoOSe From _He blamed the noncooperauon Colorado Of 1951 In 4-Year Battle With Montana Authorities jj g Jo Orbit; Rocket Ship Zooms To Flight four- vear battle to WIG commutation ly Tuesday and persons burning her father-s 30-vear prison sen- brush, etc. now must comply wlia'teace :nas ended successfully for several regulations. prettv Jo Ann Colo- Jumping the gun on the fire sea- jgsj. son was a woods fire which burn-. The >iontana Pardons and Pa- ed one-third of an acre of Board, accepting results of a land near Unionvilie Monday after- detector test long sought by noon. Miss London. 27. recommended _.__ Toms said that it was believed jfae be freed. Gov. J. Hugo Aron-' CAPE CANAVERAL. Fla. f AP) i EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, major oppormnity that the blaze oa the Amanda :Son has signed the commutation United States failed today Calif. rocket ship jj, an appeal Haines property about three miles order. to put into orbit a satellite de- which later this year may blast a be directed to Khrush_ 'of Uhionville on the Only processing of parole papers signed for experimenting with a man to the eage or space, made chev be said; .-rhere CQuld be Black Ankle --oad was caused by remains. That couid come this global navigation system. its first powered flight toaay. no more dramaric illustration of a Fighting week. More than an hour after a three- It skimmed m lor a 200 m.p.n.- Khrushchev Pulls Into New York On Hand Outside Train Terminal Along With Swarms Of Police, Security Agents Experimenting With Global Navigation Ship Desert Test Center race of the past 10 years, but de-' chev are accompanied by Henry clared that the United States re- Cabot Lodge, center, as they j gards the forthcoming talks next year as "a' ment illegal squirrel hunters. peaceful 'Since confirming data has not teet over this desert test center at a.m. NEW YORK (AP) Nikita S. Khrushchev hit the big town to- day in brisk, sunny weather, ex- pressing hope a bright sun always would shine on Soviet American relations. The Soviet Premier's deluxe special train from Washington puled into this city of teeming millions at a.m. on the sec- ond ieg of his epochal tour of the United States. Pennsylvania station, where the tram arrived, swarmed with po- lice and security agents. So did every other strategic spot on the fast-paced itinerary laid out for the boss of world communism. A crowd of more than 2.000 was on hand outside the terminal on Seventh avenue, waiting for a BUSY DAYS Soviet Premier leave Blair House for a busy day glimpse of the bouncy visitor from Moscow. I The Soviet boss was greeted by j Richard C. Patterson, commis- isioner of the Department of Com- irnerce and Public Events, who is the city's official greeter. The welcome took place in the termi- nal's baggage room. At the Waldorf-Astoria, Khrush- chev's first stop here, several hun- dred schoolgirls stood on the side- walk more than an hour before Eisenhower said today his talks j turned out to greet Khrushchev in' Soviet Premier lined Khrushchev have oeen extremely j interested in seeing Khrushchev. friendly, but it is too early to tell] Police estimated the turnout nF -T, r -t T- KhnKhchev and Mrs Khrush- Washington. Lodge. US.S. am- of the Soviet Lmon for the arms and Mrs. Knrusn bassador to the U.N.. accom- party on entire L7.S. TOUT. Talks With iMkita Extremely Friendly, Eisenhoiver Says ASHINGTON (AP) Presidenthis estimation very large Washington area to see whether the Kremlin leader has'the issues. jThis compared with an estimate' ne succeeded _ of stace President a news con-'of more than a million for Brit- vas mostlv concfliatorv Khrushchev's man-fain's Queen Elizabeth in 1957. with the "Soviet Union ner deportment indicate he! he pulled no punches on really is trying to reach agree-.. The Forest pointed Sentence Suspended burning controlled will extend vears_ Another judge, however, that the Satellite did not go into Much of the flight could be seen until December 15. Tne spring tire sentence, contend- orbit." from the g r o u n d. Crossfield ag secreta season lasts from March througn .mg- lhe was ?rsjudiced. The satellite, riding on a combi- zoomed to 50.000 feet, made some year Hel May- Mysrka. who was hiking through nation Thor-Able launcher, lilted maneuvers while flying a 100-mile ;n deaIinE The following regulations apply irontans on a summer vacation, cleanly off the pad at Canaveral circle, then landed after his fuel but he when burning within two hundred-went to on the London's east- at a.m. The second stage exhausted. Chinese "Communist re a r di ng feet of woodland or mflammaole Montana ranch. He was killed rocket engine fired on schedule. The stuboy-wmsed. oO-ioot black thg material that could ignite and.by a rifle shot in a bunkhouse The Advanced Research and X15- more engines, Herter flatlv reiectpri "hp. "r was Eisenhower's first I------ _._ carry fire to woodlands outsioe'Aiig. IT. 1955. The Londons Projects Administration had said zs expected to rocket more than So_.iet meedng WIth newsmen since the of incorporated towns, jclaimed it was accidental and that the new navigation system if nigh_at_faster than 4.000 nationaf cWerence on trouWprf'one hour and 45 minute >V Burn Only After 4 p. m. 'pleaded innocent. it Corked would be more accurate m.p.n. later tms year. -Laos. m-nhie-m conference with the Soviet chief, Burning shall be permitted only After release from Montana than any systems now available, after 4pm and before midnight State Prison at Deer Lodge. _the The satellite xx 7th grraf 175 excen-- when the ground is covered elder London must return to lex- with "snow. Uncontrolled burning is as under the terms of his parole pjve JJ t j He once taugnt school and Khrushchev expressed his hope J for sunny Soviet-American weath- his special at a.m. :age. Khrushchev may have a surprise for the United Nations. U. S. Secretary of State Verier laid down on behalf of thn United States a bro_d program, designed to end East-West ten- jsion through peaceful exchange in, jthe political, military and econom- ic fields. prohibited at all times. Other regulations to be complied rancned m Texas. Morning Citv Accident China Has Shake-Up Laos- Xhls problem hp -------1 T being handled bv the" U N "securf.Tuesday, and his talks with! hunting season got oft to ty Council and its special fact-find" Khrushchev at social events. a slow start m Frederick county ing committee now in the iiffiZ The first Question put to the j eonesday with unless there is a break of at leas: ten feet in surrounding the area to be burned which is free of inflammable ma- terial are: the construction of a fireline at least ten feet wide com-1 pletely around the area to be burn- ed, free of inflammable material; When London entered prison he his ranch near Circle for Frederick City Police reported 10. He filed an appeal which persons slightly injured in one "J? tfie high command of its armed denied. He then appealed to accident in the past 24 hours. forces today. Marshal Lm Piao. Supreme Court. This" too was At o'clock this morning a a deputy premier, replaced Mar- denied." 1951 Mercury coupe driven by shal Peng leh-nuai as in the I'll nrst Question pui 10 tnei noon because of the soutneast Asian kingdom" .President was whether he" sees cool weather that has set in. A 1 T> 1 Herter called Red China's inter- any concrete evidence, on the ba-j "There weren't quite as many -TlLLltl OUJllCCl vention in Tibet a "revolting S1S of the talks- that Khrushchev, doves out as were sighted last TOKYO Red China shook spectacle" and charged "brutal Imay hls Position on week." Guy Garheart. regional DENVER, Colo. bache- lntcrnallonal issues. game warden for Region 2, said playboy, heir to a sizable for- Communist ament Tibetans." repression of __ fundamental human rights of repnea mat it However, the hunters who tune, was shot to death and buried still a little bit early to go u-j unripr 7-nr-tc -.n o To X" announced this Robert Fred Jawkowski of Mil- minister, 'waukee. collided with a 1953' Radio Peioing 'Ford driven by Sherman Leslie and other changes without expian- Credit Myers of North Bentz street. Both ation. of the-drivers claimed that tnev. Pens has been prominent for Testifies Against Some __take to the fields had detail or come to any conclusions' good he said. on that matter. He went on to say. however, that Khrushchev's' provide sufficient help, with York to prevent the fire from _ and have at least one watchman: The Ox .fibre Brush Company of had a green light when the acci- years on the ground until the last spark Frederick will exhibit their full dent occurred at South Bentz and is out. BALTIMORE (AP--Consumers line of brushes and sweeps at the South streets. For example D-or re" 1 Rodion ha VP o a e ly dry and create a A fl Rainfall for the month now totals J> only .48 of an inch xvith less than a d i'n hardware and allied pro- temple. Sherman L. Mjers. the, and Lin both figured in half the month remaining. Tne stra closed Tuesda tion is over 1.000 of America's driver of the second car, cut lip: the Korean War. Lin. 52. com- mojjjjD g manufacturers. Mel Gary Kelly, address unknown, cut manded Communist Chinese de- and badges whil tectives suns s de- very under rocks in a lonely canyon. The body of William Scott "Doves tend to migrate south found Wednesday f cool weather hits Garheart mgnt' Pollce toaa-v sald a COHPIe general attitude has oeen extreme- .whom Wright had bpfripnriprf ar? said, but there is still an adequate  iance. lhc drucr was ap_ Drtlirp Mlp Soviet Ambassador Mikhail Men- Loyd L. Simpkm.. the cover- parent ly of a heart aUack. ri HP3r shlkov front of a TV nors executive assistant, said the Mobilizing all his strength, the _! set. governor probably would act on patient moved the body and j What program or station they the request within the next few lhe ambulance two miles to the HISTORY WILL DECIDE were watching was not disclosed days. If he approves, it will j WASHINGTON (AP) History aisciosea. DOUBLES new cattle barn, erected for 4-H club exhibition at the Frederick Fair Grounds, doubles the capacity of utablt ipace for 4-H The barn is of pole-type con- struction with aluminum siding. It will hold 72 head n[ cattle, the same as another barn locently built at the grounds for use of 4-H club members. barn wag Photo By Frank J. Reefer completed during the summer. With a record number of animals to bo shown at the fair this year, the barn is already slated to oe filled to capacity. The barn mew- wires 120 feet by 36 feet. sent to Gov. J. Lindsay Almond i Doctors said he is recovering. of Virginia. King and Griffith were occu- BUT DOES HE LIKE 'EM? pants of a boat fired on by Mary- DURANGO, Colo. (AP) A land Tidewater Fisheries Com- mission inspectors last April off Colonial Beach, Va. Berkeley Muse, 31, a third occupant of tht boat, wai killed. will decide whether capitalism or communism is best for the people, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev told the Senate Foeign Relations political decision has been made Committee Wednesday. by Dist. Atty. Bill Caldwell. lie told a Rroup of Colorado legisla- tors: "I wouldn't run for this job L WUUIIUI If 11111 iUI llll.t riUUCTi MQ tor til tyi applet in Chin t." I if R did. What if capitalism wins out? That's impossible, he said, but added he would have to go along NOW U.S. CITIZEN LOS ANGELES (AP) Bntish- born actress Pamela Mason be- came a U.S. citizen Wednesday night. She was among 200 persons admitted to citizenship in court ceremonies. Her husband, actor Mason, it t Britlah SPAPERR R CHIV   

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