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News Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1907 - Page 1

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Location: Frederick, Maryland

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   News (Newspaper) - August 20, 1907, Frederick, Maryland                                FROM; PIUNTEHVS f %K. Ontsida of Baltimore THB____ U published In THE! MAIN POINT. The main point In newspaper advertising: to place toe advertisement In netrapaper which most people read- Xhat'K THE NEWS- 261. FBEDEKICK, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 19O7. SO CENTS A MONTH Pianos. Pianos PIANOS and ORGANS. the history of Blrely'i Palace of Sluslo hare Plauoi Otgftnu.been offered to the public low KB we are offering them this season. Magnificent Upright Pianos In rich figured mahogany or Circassian walnut for and upward. Organs for and upward. Remember, erery Initrnment told by us is FULLY WARRANTED ARD GUARANTEEB for 6 to 10 years. You cannot afford to buy a Piano or Organ until yon have examined these Instruments. Oaah or easy Payments. Birely's Palace of Mosio? Corner Market and Ohuroh Streeti, Frederick, Md. Aluminum Pfesorvo Kettle, fJ.OO, 1.25, 1.35. The Shaker Sifter Is the Strongest Made. 253. Tin Enamel Collar.dcrs 15c to 35c. Grm'er nd Sheer, I5c. ALLEN G.QUYNN CO, E. PATRICK STREET. B. P. S. PAINT-MURKSCO. Diamonds, Jewelry, Watches. We carry a rery complete HBO of Watches comprising all the beet Standard Makes. Oor prices are very low, quality considered. and look them over. DOLL, Watchmaker, Jeweler and Optician JTIKBI NAT. 13ANK BUlLLUlfta. MO, (J. A P. 42 K. Co. Fhom OF WOMEN'S OXFORDS, 150 pair of Women's Oxfords and Strap Sandals in Vici Kid, Patent Colt, Gun Metal and Tan. 50 and 75 values for 99c. H City Hall Store. 412-2. __ HAND AND MACKiNE-MADE BRICK, Baylors' IxshlRh Portland Cement. Anchor Roasndalo Oemeni. Terra Ootta Pipe, Fire Olay and Frlok, Building and Crushed Stono, Hard and Coal. Dynamite and Powder. Prompt delivery of orders of any size. Maryland Brick and Supply On F. K. R between Fourth and 1'ltth 8tu. Roth Phones. FOR SALE, Dailrablo bmlnesa nnrt residence bullcllne on Court Ht choap to quick Also 217 Patrick St fiu-i roo dence dteam heat and nil modern conveuiencos, Other choice In small homei. Money to lonn. L. Wi. NIXDORFF, Jr. EUROPE'S RICHEST BRIDE .'rincess Marie Bonaparte to Wed Prince Georne of Greece. Paris, Aug. 20. Princess Marie Bonaparte, a kinswoman'of the United States attorney and said to be the richest unmarried woman in Eu- rope, is about to v.-ei Prince George of Greece, grandson ot the present king and in direct line for the throne.' From the maternal grandfather, "Monte Carlo she inherited a fortune which is now estimated at Lord Townshend's case, in Ixjndon brought to light a matrimonial agency there that was claimed to be necking a suitable husband for this orincess. exDecunsr to aret a comrms- i ion cl CO. Cut there is nothing fn show that r.ho Unc w anything about i 1 L. Tuario is a, great admirer of One 01 her closest friends v.v.s ir.te v.-'fe of Count Reventlow, D.inis'1 minister in Paris, who before Mary Davidson, a SL I.-cuir, be'le. Yi banning, of Florha'm Park. X. ,T.. plead guilty at Trenton to forging notes against Plorham Parlc boro-.igh for The state supreme court at San Francisco rendered a decision sustain- ing- the legality of the removal of Mayor Schmits ana the of Mayer Tayic-. ONE-PRICE OUTFITTERS. Shoes Crossett is mon- arch, Crossett" on the shoe-strap signi- fies the courage of its maker's convictions. We remember that our reputation is at stake every time a. pair of Crossetts is sold. Conrt Bank. ft K a IT TRADE WARN __ Call on our agent in your city, or write us LEWIS A. CROSSETT, Inc., No. Abington. Mass. AUGUST CLEARANCE SALE Of Rugs Portieres, Larae Curtains, Table Lin- ens, Bed Spreads, Clocks, Pictures, Mirrors, We also have a few and enda ia Furniture In dlsooatlnaed pat- terns which ha sold at 25 p3r oent. lesa than marked prices, worth 25o. 80o, 35o and 40o par yard (piece rolls only) 15o. OIL Oloth worth 23o SOa, 353 and 40-3 per yard (one to five yards) 19o worth Soo, 40j, 50o, 60o and 75j per yard Uen to sixteen yards) aE 293. OASH OB OKBDIT. SCOLi, BROTHERS, MARKET AND PATKLCK STS. Phone491 3 J, M. Mgr. Agolnst holes. No mose darning If you buy HoSsprooP S- _ gjg? All the popular colors. ORMKs: Ecyptian Cotton (medium or Sold in boxes bis pairs for FOR LAnirs: Esryptian Cotton: RI'N pairh for 52 00. ..1 guarantee Lul.fl ivith each pair. THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES. And the BEST quality of Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Farming Im- plements consult THE FREDERICK GOUHTY EXCHANGE, Carroll Street, Frederick, Md. TUFT SMS Ciscusses National Issues Be- fore Buckeye Club. Columbus. TO VISIT THE PHILIPPINES Secretary Received Enthusiastic Greet- ing When Introduced as "Our Next President" Speech His "Political Confession of Faith." Columbus, O., Aug. H. Taft, secretary of the ar department, mp.de what he "was pleased to term his ''political coafc-siion of. faith" at Memorial Hall. The auditorium, waich aas a seating capacity of over 3000. packed to the doors, and several thousand people who also came to hoar the secretary speak, v.'eie unable to sain admittance. The secretary under the auspices of the Buck- w. n. TAJTT. >oj'e Republican club, and thp vas notable from the iact that it is regarded as the platform upon which ho will make his campaign for the Republican nomination for president. Air. Taft made no formal announco- nierrt ot his caimirlacy, but he was in- troduced by Governor Harris as ths "next president ot the United States, which was the signal for a. prolonged outburst of applause. This city is Mr. Taft's first stop in the all-aronnd-the-world trip, which ho began on Sunday. The secretary's objective point is Manila, but he will make1 many stops on the way to thn Philippines and deliver a. number cC speeches. Secretary Taft spoke in pert as fol- lows: I beer invited by your body to clJs- thf n.ition.il is.suos. Some of these involve the abuses over which thf public conscience ha.s been aroused .ind the prop- er irtmedles J'ur their The first, and pos.Mbly the Kred.te.st, abuse, has in the of Ihe aiterial system of the country whah the intet.state rail- roads form Any unjust discrimination i i tho terms upon which transportation ot freight or is alfoided .in indi- vidual or .1 loi ility pir.tlyrrs .ind with ers br.MTn ss of ihe induidual 01 the locality exactly as the binding of the ar- torte.s aril leading: to a member of human bodv- do.stiovs its liTo. Railroad Rale Regulation. Made aware ot the moribund condition of rniiw.iv regulation under the old law and of til'1 v. Idespre.'id which pre- vailed in railway management. 1-Me-ident Roosevelt, in h's message ol rei oni- mendnd tluil powers of tile eommis- sion be UK fast d, Hirft ena- bling the i to lix and. second, 111'Ivi ip, its order eftoctn o QKiip.'t tin aimrs without resort to court.-, fo 1 portormanci. lie asktd II be m lit in nlimnihti ilue tribunal with n il IHIWII- This was done by Ilie passage "I 11 bill in t'Kni. Tlie neu .let iP'h'i tin i oinmisMon t" I'-v. rates and irn f'i< ti j to all of Us nrders by providmu it'1! shall tfo into foet thiu.N d'lvs.titii tb' ale mule iin- o. r ot co'irt and failure in to. i; I-, v.Mli iluni i- punishable by .1 01 i U dmnm' tlie s 'M ;PJI -lm  IPI isdn ot tl'" com- mission .union ami is Thi n t jrivfs the on.: sie i power Io lix th. i (or tile i i! 'Ps nieidi nt il ic s portormi c] rl'.' i>   IM- perfoi m, d toi i ei MI, It 't i, i s from ind i x- tli, ri in ai'd a i i h I tn rn, t nui h i v e 1" n .'h'l in r ni.iki tl. K' 'i in :depial tn li.inihh ears wthoiii u.- i'n 11 ifo i foi tin inovenT'lt ,1 (i '.'is I.KJ- .ire I'l I'lil! !MC.-s to poi i i [.i t p-1. ,n foi htdd t lu ITI all r tK t .1 I to tur UK 111- seh s .11 ii '.i I v, i' i: is ri'i'iided for -tin ir u- i o- ii ii-i i i. i Opposed By Nevi r IP-: sm-'i a timteil i.pi.os.i b it- l11 o d nil i M-si s to a il in  the of nt< in." Jl th .t bill t .1 i i on- iiipo lion. "I l.f olu-'lio.' .vvMinst it it u be 1, t i' i a d irti.i, t rom lai'.- st-7. f.itr" 'ii'i- as is mil a srep and ei nnif nt The sei ond of xt ,i tii i', il I'k, thi- commission wa4? i.f.erlv nn.ibl' to fix rale" that tile iK- ,.Mir 01 i it a diffi  nei.'es- sar> the of the puts of ,1, lehme to ihe (o'lomiea! and more rtpid in tnrr of whit in -ilvl times vv is in id. by hipd Tne should pot .nti with the one anv lion ill .n t'ie iithi'- In thf proper op- ri.u'nn ot t ot, t.inu, r'm p-abllc will roon share wt'h tl'i imnul acturer the nd- M. pi'ces. evi r s-ii lommii. Mo-is not onl> loner fit- to but are abl. to control the pi'.ket and in-.mtain or to" pi i, tin pnblit derives no bt'n- 'nd ss m t'l hands ot a monopoly. f, ir ot t'.ie exist of h 'in abuse t i pis-.tc. or the i'iti-ii law in ISil It iim.iiv. two inrnis in w'n. h this evil in be m nut lined. One bv fin asrn eiivnt .iinin.ir ,1 of differ- ent m mill.u In-1 is of .in arili-le tor the m iiTUctiaiK e nf t''e i ice ol artirle tlie of omp-'titlon tleiioinued the eonlrut n slr.iint of InteiMate trade as a tint the pi.l hie by tine ..nd iinpi i .nnnirnt and a spirai which be re-iii lined bv MI a i ivil suit. Tip oth'-r f denoniH'd with "inuiir nu' Tt ported linllv r tl'iouch tl'p Spanish war and have had a of prosperity and an ipcrease and of trad" unexampis d in thf his- of this or any coutitiy. The neimbhcan pr'nr'p'o of protective tr. Iff !s. rs 1 th.it through the law a tariff should be collected on imported prnduof that compete w 'th American products. whU-li vji] t equal i difference ir, tin- cost of nrodiifl.on in this countrv and abroad, rixid nro-.er allowance should be mado in Ibis fif-'epco for the re prof- it--- io T'T- nnanufacturf-r. The of protectionists, and It has been notified in the past. is. that 5 proticiion "ppp.rrs i> high rate of wn.S-.-s and tb. t the it Rives to j tii" hoTtie hsd'.u-trv nprratinpr under the in- i of ,1 n energetic competition b.-'- I ,.n mrinufac'turer.s. induces such io reduce prf-atly the j price Or Ihe benefit of the Amprict'n puli- Iic -nd mij-tes it posible. to reduce the wltlioi-t deprivincr of npedeij protot'tion and a good jrofit. Tiie present imsipcss system of tre cointiv on proactive tariff, r.nd r.n: aitemnt to it to a free trade basis "T'airb- leni oniv to disaster. Tn riff Revision. rtuf ot the Ui'piililli-an partv. r. to s't. in it th.it the tar.ff on im- '.es not exceed substan- lie 1-e.tsonilily perm umnt differen- t'al bnweep 'he of pDduetion m thr fori'i-n coiin'rii-s- -nd that in the Kt't-- and tberr'oie when thamji'.- take p. 'ce in th"   iitep'-p vlqor prp. .lis n 11-1... h" to the Republican pan? A i polirv in f of the i.rnof of busir.ess. "id cor'Hvate rr woa'.d cer- t.-pilv h 'v d-iven tlie p-Tty from power, r I.t He .'ib-'ity lor them i ti'd b> p-ti- li.i-jfii to it. I! was not I'li.Kii a' 'idvan'..-" ".vhieh t h- prevalent n Th -s" reifirr.i- but th" bet- tt i t .'f "iidUMMT- whieii he has f- Still tht b, hcf th" peop'e in his h.- "iiiiaari his amizii'4 Io: doiii" on iK'h'ilt s ie- mm a bo'.d on th" Arneneiii ilili .t w.'i'h OM-n bis b.it.-i.-t 01.po- e! "d v ;M< H nrds n .oi'' i ilelt- i-i th pol'tual 'I'.f t of u..tf tii-i a p.iit' wit re- 'in- iu- ni m dir s r t te against it. :is nimiojuilv o." ni trade, and i the union o'' th" i na- spirmcr eonip.inii'S n.to one i ompanv. which, hv ovvninur ill th" pl.nt 01 all plant in th. n. i; nf.u fn e Of the pi r..1 'i t. and 'iv nli.i r ile- vi< e.s lonrrol- the I.MII Tin- --11111 1 aie court nf tlie 1 nit, d S; ites i, not d" ini'd what i monopoly u id iul its relation to the urdsw- ful Thf taritT adopt- ed tft-r th" Hr Reached Her Heart By Stclcn Ladder. X. .T., Aus; Mornn had iiecn pleodlng with ilrl'if- O'llagan to marry him lor month.s. hut she put him off She vvonf to rh" haymow on the farm, where shK> h.is been oniplme-rl. and he stole the ladder awav. "Let mo come down'" she dP- manded. "Xot till you promise to marrv me." he said, firmlv. She scold- e-1 and threatened and entreated, while James, xiho owns the adjoining; farm, sat on a bale of hav and waited. "The dinner will burn if I don't attend to it." she blushed at last, so I'll have to ccme doun." James put up the lad- der and his arms. SIDES ARE President Small, of Telegraph- ers, In New York. MAY ARBITRATE THE STRIKE President of Telegraphers the Raising of a Fund of By Labor Forces of Coun- try For Mutual Defense Fund. Xew York, Aug. leaders of the striking telegraphers said that they expected their national president, S. J. Small, to arrive in New York to- day. At the same time, they the United States labor Mr. Neill, would reach town. This was taken as an indication that there might be an effort, possibly endorsed by President Roosevelt, to end the i strike by arbitration. No change was apparent in the I strike conditions. The officers of both. the Western Union and the Postal Tel- egraph companies again said, they were well satisfied. E. J. Nally, vice presi- dent of the Postal, told of reports from outside points to the effect that oper- ators were seeking to recover their positions- In New York, too, he said, officers of the company had been preached by strikers with propositions to return to work. "We are working now nnder almost normal continued Mr. Nal- ly. "with improved traffic and increas- ed force. There is not a single place in. the company's system where we are not gix'ing good service, or where we are not prepared to give prompt hand- ling to any business the public may file with us. So far as the Postal com- pany is concerned, the strike is over." Activity on the part of the strikers centred in the financial district, whers "missionary work" was being doiie with a view to ascertaining if the men on the lessad wires wmjid, join the strike. These attempts were not sat- isfactory, so far as could be learned. Belvidere Brooks, superintendent_of the Western Union, said with great positiveaess that the company, -was moving all its business with normal dispatch, and that the strike was real- ly over. At the Manhattan Lyceum. .East Fourth the strikers', pickets had a secret conference. George' Edwin Secour was in command. J3e declined to tell what orders he had given, but said that the strikers had no idea of yielding. The first issue of the official, organ of the union was mafife today, and bears the name of Fair Play. FOR BIG STRIKE FUND Ten to Small Would Raise From Twenty Millions. Chicago, Aug. Sylves- ter J. Small, of the Commercial Teleg- raphers' Union, made his first direct appeal to organized labor for funds to carry on the operators' strike, and the situation now has resolved itself into a strr.sgle of endurance between the sfikmg telegraphers and the tele- graph companies. Coincident with his appeal for funds, President Small an- nounced that "Commencing now the telegraphers will settle down to a steady and Ions fight." "We have made up oar he said, "to prepare .for a sixty days', and, if 
                            

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