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   News (Newspaper) - June 9, 1893, Frederick, Maryland                                FREDERICK, MARYLAND, FRIDAY. JUNE PRIO2 ONE QBNT. W.L PARSONS. OD" TRYING AOKNT and dealer in MOETGAOKi ki! of which will be aold or bought OB COMMISSION at OFFICE. Mutual insurance S-jOdipr. .Frederick. Md. I offer J2O.OOO la coupon bonds of the Fred- erick Brick Works at par. These are secured by a arst aiorcgBge on all me real fate aadptaot or said company and bear inter- eft at the or 5 percent, per annual, pay- able on the first dnysof and November, and are exempt f Tfaete bonds are alt in of and are a Bret lien 02 ftSO.OOU worth of real estate and miking taem a desirable ic- vectmenc tor oar people and on an en- terprise brtgh- prospeeu for the fu tare. For particulars call at toy office. STOCK FAKM FOBS4LK. I have one of the dnest stock farms ID the (tale for sale oaurttice. Tue farm oouUuni 55O aerea of land. 45O of walch is In a itate of cultivation, the balance is in Qnc-c'asB White Oak Umber. The farm divided into seven fields with running water la each field. The improvements consist of a Frame House, with 9 rooms. Stabling for IS head of horses, (recently also other neoeeaary out- buitoloK. This property is located within 2 ot Pooleevilie. Montgomery County, also within Smiles of C. i O. Canal. Mr. White the owner means business and offers the form at a tow figure. For particular! as regards price. call on or address me at my omca. FOB SALK. I offer that beautiful little place lately oc capicd by Mr. Uriah A. Lough, lying west f dcy en the Montevue pike, containing two acres of land, -this property ia improved with a two story brick house of modern style, containing S rooms and kitchen, with water In the house. There Is a large arable, chicken house, on this property with fruit of all kinds in abundance. This property also an extra building on it tnat Mr. Lough used as a stone cutting house, which could be couver- ted into a small dwelling. As Mr. Lough has moved into the city, he offers this property at a low figure. Call at my office. JOB SALS OS KENT. 1 offer the elegant countryresldeuoe of John a. Williams. Esq., sltuatsd at Braddock. three mllec of Frederick, on the National pike, tor sale or rent. This is one of the meet beau- tiful country residences around Frederick, containing 36 of first class land with targe two-story mansion house with all modern improvements, gas and water througho it the whole house and surrounded by beat-tiful grounds, with shrubbery and fruit la abundance. It has also the farm buildings, consisting of a comfortable two-story frame house, bank barn and all necessary outbuild- ings. Also a beautiful tenant house located Immediately on the turnpike. This place must be seen to be appreciate! Call at my for particulars YOU RIDE, RIDE A. RAMBLER. TITHEN YOU WRITE, ON A REMIKGTON- you will be as Bmcb "In the Swim" as if you -were really swimming. Call, See and Try Them at THE NEWS OFFICE W. T. DELAPLAINE, Special Representative, Frederick, Md THE mm. LATEST H APPKXES GS OP THE DAS Daniel F. Beatty In Trouble. Yonii, June F. Beatty, organ and piano manufacturer, five times mayor of Washington, X. J- before United States Commissioner Fields for alleged violation of the postal laws, and was held in bail to answer. Tlie complaint against Mr. Beatty is that he seat a circular through the mails to W. A. Coley. a clerk in the postoffice at South. Xorwalfc. Conn., inducing him to buy an organ which the dealer said was worth but which, as a matter of fact, is said to be worth only 515. Resolutions by Georgia Bankers. SAVASXAH, June Georgia Bank- ers" association's second annual meeting was held here. On motion of T. B. Xeal. representing the clearing house of Atlanta, and R. F. Burdell. representing the clear- ins bouse of Savannah, resolutions were adopted urging Georgia's senators and representatives to use all efforts in their power to secure tbe repeal of the Sherman law and also declaring tbat the association was opposed to free coinage of silver unless 100 cents worth of silver was coined in the dollar. THE NEWS BRIEFLY TOLD, Secretary Carlisle decapitated sis divi- sion chiefs in the treasury department. Thomas Brown, a colored deckhand on the River Queen, aged 45, was drowned at Fort Washington on the Fc-tomac- Tlie Maryland Coal company has de- a semiannual dividend of 21-2 per csr'jt on its preferred stock, payable July 1_ Gold bearing quartz assaying a high has been discovered in Montgomery tountv. McL, near Washington. Consider- able excitement has resulted from tbe Snd. Leona O'Deil, the aeronaut, ia descend- ing from a balloon ascent near Washing- ton, dropped in the deepest part of the Potomac and was rescued with some diffi- culty. Owing to the breaking of a heavy oaken from which the mold was Mispecded, toe casting of the Columbian Liberty bell Las been postponed. it i< probable that tlie casting not occur nnder two weeks. Miss Condit Smith of Washington was married to Cyms Field Judson of New York. Tbe ceremony was performed at the historical old St. John's chnrcb. Justice Field, grandfather of tbe groom, gave the bride away. No PXrate-s In New Jersey. TUCKERTOX, X. J.. June report tbat Collector Barrlett of this port had just received special orders from the secre- tary of the treasury io a sharp look- out for filibustering- were trying to ship ana- to Cuba, is without foundation. An Old Time Race. ST. Lofris. June have been by which a big river race wilJ be between this city and Cairo, Ills. The steamers Dick Fowler and Spread Eagle will make tbe run from Cairo to St. Louis July 4 for a purse of 1E W SPAPEfifl Several Imports nt Officials Who Will Go Abroad. THE DATS DOINGS AT WASHDTGTOH Commissioner Loenreu Hints ttt lu Obtaining Pensions of of Scboouer WASHIKGTOS, June 9. Following are of the numerous appoiutees of the prtiideut: Murry Vaudiver, collector of internal revt-BUe' for tlje district embracing Mary- land. Delaware aud tbe District of Colum- luuibbt, is a of Harford county, Md. He U a lawyer by pivCrstion, an active Democrat, and for tbe past six or eight years has beeu a member of the Maryland legislature, serving one time iu the capaci- ty speaker in tbe lower house. He is a man of about 50 years of age and was ap- pointed on the recommemlatioff o Goruian aud tbe of the Maryland dele- gation iu Congress- Frank Bond, iuterual revenue collector for the fifth district of is a man of about 43 years of age, a lawyer by pro- aud a member of the state Demo- cratic ceutral committee. His appoint- meut was strongly urged by Senators Har- ris and Bate. Some New William H. Robinson of Washington, appointed consul at Hamburg, was se- lected after much owing to the fact that Hamburg is the port from which the greatest danger to this couutry from cholera infection is expected. His record in the consular service is excellent. He was appointed consul at Yarmouth, Xova Scotia, by Mr. Cleveland eight years ago and was transferred aud promoted to the consulates at Moncton, Xew Bruns- wick. Fort Hope, Outario, and St. Gall, Switzerland. within four years. He was relieved at the last named place by the appointment of a Republican in 1S91. Mr. Robinson is a son of General Beverly Robinson of Virgiuia, and is about 31 years of age. The youngest man appointed to a con- sulship by President Cleveland is W. EL Seymour of Alabama, commissioned as Mnsul at Palermo. He is 25 years old, was educated at the United States naval icademy, and has served in the Alabama legislature. An Ex-Official Appointed. After a lapse of eight mouths in private life, following nearly 40 years iu the ser- vice of the government, D. J. Partelto of Washington goes back into government employ as consul at Sonneberg, Germany. Mr. Partelto had served about 30 years in the navy department as chief clerk of one of its bureaus, when he was appointed con- sul at Dusseldorf iu Mr. Cleveland's first administration. He remained there until hist September, when Mr. Harrison filled the position with a Republican- Francis H. Underwood of Massachusetts, appointed consul at was formerly consul at Glasgow. At one time he was connected in an editorial capacity with The Atlantic Monthly. Incompetent Pension Examiners. WASHIXGTOX, June 9. The question of reorganizing the boards of Dsusion eiam- iug surgeons throughout the country is just now under consideration by Secre- tary Hoke Smith, Commissioner Lochren and Deputy Commissioner Murphy. There are of these boards, each containing three members, and their work is a very important factor iu the administration of tbe pension laws and in the adjudication of claims. Officials of the department state that careful examinations have revealed incom- petence and gross carelessness in the work of some of these boards, and in some in- stances tbe evidence indicates that im- proper influences have been successfully apolied to secure reports in pension claims favorable to the applicants. In view of these facts it has been decided to give this branch of the service a general overhaul- ing. While no formal plan of reorganization has been announced it is the stated purpose of Commissioner Lochren, with the ap- proval of the secretary, to appoint on these boards only men who stand in the very front rank of the profession in theirrespec- tive localities, and men who keep well abreast of the times in medical science. Another inflexible condition to appoint- ment will be that of unquestioned integ- rity. The politics of applicants will not, it is said, be made of first importance, although, all other things being equal, Democrats undoubtedly will be given the preference. An official in speakipg of the matter said that recommendatioBx by men of known character in the medical profession would be more efficacious in securing an appoint- ment on pension boards than if made by politicians. The active -work of reorganiza- tion will be begun. Ford Reappointed. N, June 9. -Secretary Car- lisle has appointed Worthington Ford of Brooklyn chief of the bureau of statistics, treasury department. Mr. Ford is about 40 years of age, and during the last Cleve- land administration served as cbief of the bureau of statistics of the department of state. Mr. Ford is appointed to his pres- ent position on the recommendation of Edward Atkinson and David. A, Wells. He is said to be worth nearly inherited recently from his father's estate. Department of Justice WASHIXGTOX, .j nne 9. At torr.ey General Olney has appointed Edward Baxter assist- ant to the United States district attorney for the middle district of Tennessee to as- sist to the prosecution of the  by bands of by Catholic and by 000 francs. "Tbe American pilgrims gave francs. VTant> MCNTCH, .Tune Preying, tbe Centri-l leader. in t his city, advo- cated the recall of Prince Bismarck to power. Bismarck, the count said, had created a policy friendly to the farmers and would have the of the agra- The count added that both be and the late Htrr deplored the of Prince Bi-tjiarck. Under Prince Bismarck, the count declared, every- body knew where he stood, whether as friend or fue. Northern Pacific Railroad Syndicate. Nr.w YORK, June 000 remains to be sub-cribi-d of tbe syndicate organized to underwrite an equal aniouut of collateral trust notes which are to be sold by the Northern Pacific railroad to pay the floating debt and provide the company with working capital. Present security holders would have the first right to subscribe for the notes. HOLIDAY AT COLUMBUS. Tl.p Arrival and Krpubllrnn Stato Convention Blade Thliio Lively. COLUMBUS, the Duke of Verugua as the city's guest aud a Ke- publicaii state convention iu full blast, this city has been unusually lively. The convention unanimously renomi- nated Governor William McKinley for governor and reaffirmed Its fuith iu the principles of the Republican Kinley bill aud all. The most remarkable enthusiasm was throughout the meeting. The .Duke of Veragua and party, escort- ed by Commander it-presenting the president of the Viiitwl States, arrived here and were escorted by the Biirrarks band aud ofticers of the Fourteenth regi- ment and the Junui Hussars, mounted in full uniform, to thi; handsome ninimioti ot Henry T. Chitteiulen, whose gtu-st. the ducal party will be during their stay iu Columbus. A sensational event marked the close of the school children's parade iu honor ot the duke. The duke's brother was stricken n-ith angina pectoris and fell prostrate on the gnuul stand. He suffered frightful igony, and the attack seemed likely to result fatally owing to the terrific jam of spectators and the inability ot the author- ties to force back the people ami give the nobleman air. Bishop stood ready to administer the last sacramunt. An electric liattery was brought into op- eration by the physicians who hud beeu called, however, and the necessity for action by the bishop gradually disap- peared. The attack was probably brought on by the excitement of the day. the cheer- ing and tumult in the convention which nominated Governor McKinley and the remarknhle sight of the procession of school children, which proved to be miles in length. _________________ FLORIDA ORANGE CROP. Cheerful Muilo at the Meeting oT the Fralt Exchange. JACKSONVILLE, June annual meeting of the stockholders of the P'lorida Fruit Exchange was held here. Several hundred orange growers of the state were present. The annual report of the president. Major G. R. Fairbanks of Fernatidina, showed the growth of the industry iu Florida had increased from boxes in 1SS5 to for the season just closed. The average net price to tho grower at the nearest railroad or steamboat station has lieen SI.31 per box, an increase of nearly y) per cent, over the average of the previ- ous year. President Fairbanks says the coming crop will exceed in volume all previous yields. A conservative estimate phices it at fully boxes, of which over will markeU-d. It is the pur- pose of the Fruit Exciir.nsc to market a considerable portion of this crop in Eng- land and other foreign countries. MAKING A NEW SCALE. Worlc of the In Convention at I'itt-iburji. PlTTSBCKG, June Amaiipirnated association convention did some rapid work on the scale. They completed tbe memorandum of agreement, the boiling, the mnck or puddle mill, scrapping and busheline, knobbling, heating sl.ibs and shingling, and the bar and nail plate mills. Work is pretty well advanced on tbeguide, ten inch, hook and cotton tie mills. Secretary Killgallon declined to say what, if any, changes had made in i any of tbe scales. The rapidity with which the work is iiidic-ites that j the wage committee have Ix-C-u unu.-nslly i careful in preparing the scales or that the tbe present scale Ls good 1 eiioiigh for and! her year. It probable that a conference will held w ith the manufacturers rtatnrday. Kdwin M. FirJ.' May YORK. June District Attorney Weeks, who conducted the prose- cution against Edward M. Field, under ilr- dictment for forgery in connection with the sensational failure of Field. Lindley, Wtathers in i'S'l, said in rela- tion to the report that. ?ifr. Field Ls now sane: "If Mr. Field rs sane, I think he will he brought kick hf-rv and tried upon, tbe old charge. It was the understanding when he went away that if be recovered his raahon the district attorney would be notified without delay su astocontinue his trial at An Kric Train Derailed. JAMESTOWN. X. Y., .lum- '.t Erie train i Xo. was thrown from the track in this j city. The unuine, two tmggage and two express cars were demoli.-ued. Fireman j Smith of Greenville was tcalded, and En- gineer Williams aud Houser, both of Salainaiica, were hlighUy hurt. Kntlrc Block Burned at rituburfr. PlTTsBURG, June broke out in a nest of frame buildings in the, block bounded by Penn, Euclid and Highland avenues and Kirkwuod -street and three buildings with contents were destroyed and three others seriously damaged. The loss will reach ElMLIE Metropolitan and Cosmopolitan Population All Out. HER WAY FATED WITH PAKSIES tjoot In Amnremi-ut at thp Bewildering -jf thf Whit.- City With Its Straiigo IVopU- Krotu of the Norway's Valuable Rxhiblt Opvued. CHICAGO, June infanta of Spain made her tlrst vUit to the World's fair. The grandttur of tlui white pal- templra of art aud stored with rs of human iuU-grity. and the wou- .size of beautiful structures wax such that at the time the fair mtervd the until she arrived at the Adiiisuistnitiou building her face wore the u of iu liefure the hour of the arrival of the and her eulouragw the road- way over which she to was lined on either side Jiy thourJUHls upon thou- .sasidsof [HHiplc eagerly waiting to cjitcli a of her royal highness, and the grand plaza around tin- Administration buildiug was black with a surging mass of Immunity. The of ;uliiiinistnitiou estimated thut thore were 10O.OOU people on thw gruuudt when the priuivss nrrivoil. As FARGO'S BIG FIRE. OUT SKIS tSFAXFA Kl't.ALlE. the procession entered the plaisunco a mighty cheer went up from the tens of thousands of human throats that fairly mndv the buildings while tho hands in tin- various pavilions with ono accord begun to play. As thp royid parly and the escort entered the phutuuice they were met by the joint committee ou ceremonies. The proces-slon then .started down Midway pluihiutcu. tho cadets of the Michigan military academy closing up the rear. There were strango sights seen along the Midway. The sav- iiges ot the Dahompynn village, the bar- barians from the Chinese tin-litre und tbo streets Iu Cairo und other quaint aud "queer resorts were all out to we the prlucuss and all attired in th't fantastic costumea of their native lands. On reaching the Administration bnfld- ing the guests were escorted to President Palmer's reception room. When the royal party entered little flower girls preceded the princess and paved her way with pansies. The royal party left the Admin- istration biiildintr nnd were to Mrs. Palmer's reci-ptioii room in the Wo- man's building, where they were received the committee ou ceremonies tho bonnl of linly manngura. The infuuui retiral to tbe rooms of Mrs. Palmer, and after nn hour's rest repaired with the members of her escorted by General Unvis nnd President Pal- mer and other officiate, to the private din- ing room of General Here an in- formal supper was wjrvwl. after which tho entire party assembled again in President Palmer's room iu tbr- east side of Adminis- tration building and viewed the magnifi- cent fireworks. The infontn was cheered vociferously by the crowd who saw her alxiiit 0 o'clock. About 10 o'clock, when her picture wus on NORWAY in firo, the crowd went wild and yelled and cheered 'or tln-ir suest. In response to the cheering tin- infnnta appeared at an open leaning the arm of President Palmer and bowed and waved her handkerchief to the sen of faces below. The eff'_-ct was niftgic.il, and the voice of welcome that went up was caught and echoed by the crowds in all parts the grounds. To add to the din, tbe whittle of every engine in M.'ichinery hall, and on every steam vessel and engine near the was. turned on, aad this tumnit. which lasted fully ten minutes, deaft-mnic. Kind, which was plavinc   half fiiii-bf-d arid did not attempt thfircfmcert. After the were ovcrllif inf.'int.i for the city. Her c-irriaw left the AdininNtnitinn buildir.ir after HI, followed by th" clieer-% of the crowd that the fair the grounds were Sumlny Oyminc The federal court a of two to one devidt-d to injunction prayed for by the 'ji-trict .ittorn-yto re- strain tiie i'K-.-ii from ojx-ning tbe Wori'V- fnirLT.t'v- on Sunday. V.'oixi- nnd favorwl the th" s-' while Crusacup held ihefontran Iviniii XV.ilVir. roiifbvl fur the World's pnijeil an apjieal to the !ii  in nx-j" -.lid he would t'..i! 'in-' nl-T vf prayed for sin- "Tin- Norwegian exhibits in the Manu- factnr'-v" Iniii'iir.i; wasopened to the pub- lic withmit cert iiiony. The exhibit w.v> :i large jiumher of invited gue.-t-. -.vi-n.- rotvived by the royal geiienil. The display con- si-.t-. of tbe tjxinliii.x meichants in the principal cities N-nuay and is a very creditable The paid admisaionb at the fail were aud of FAIJGO. NT. 0. J uatr The TOM tuoruiux upou a city half of which is in Thrw thousand people were mado homeless by the Bat few rneu iJept las-t night. Tbe school houses, churches aud public buildings left standing were all utilized as places of shel- ter for r.-ouieu aud children nod it cannot be said cue of the hundreds driven, oat by the flames suffered for want of shelter. The good women of the town turned oat in farce and organized to feed unfor- tunate ones. Early ia the morning: relist trains with meat, flour and other provis- ions began to arrive. Minneapolis, St. J'.tul, Chicago, Dululhaud Milwaukee and other bin cities will bend liberal contribu- of food. Clothing is much needed. All night the people were in a panic, as the ilamea xremed not to diminish and the .ky was lit up by the >creat flames, mating 1 1 uinht almost as clear as day. The re- lief corjM. orsjauired bore received many re- s of pwple who an- missing, and with- out doubt it will develop a namberof Urea bnvi- Ix-vu might an well hare fought as to battle with which, driven by a fierce :kle, swept through the city Hke a prairie Hre. The sttttemeat Ls given out that a meat- ing of insurance men tho loss of itiMired property at and inorv- on iu the outskirta unin- ed. _ _ ATTEMPTED ROBBERY. Stoppcil Mr. Tun hi C. Quick at KuIU Church. FALLS CIIUKCII. Vn., June The mea who itttempted highway robbery herejhave not been apprebeudm. There were six" of the vill.-unn and of nitnd ali :ie prevented them carrying out their erinn Mr. "Tunis C. Quick, with a, lady, was turning from in u buggy, :u just after crossing llu' mil road track at Torristons, ou turning ;i Iwnd in the road, he noticed u lire by the side of the rood und six oien gathered around it. lie took: the precaution to draw his pistol und have it f- rviuly in of emergency. As they one of the men left the group and stood in tho and as he came up took bold of the bridle of tho horse, but Mr. Quick had drop on him, and with more energy than polileumw said- gi> thut horse." It being very dark the intin could not see that Mr. Quick had a pistol, but the 'men on the side of the road saw it and called ont to the man: "Let go, quick, or he will shoot you.'' Tltu man let go in a and ran, anil Air. Quick pursued his journey. M'GLYNN AT ROME. He ViMltn tin- Ktvmul City In Obedience to Orders Frum ttin 1'ope. XEW YOKK, Juno 9. Dr. Edward Mc- Glyun will probably iu Koiuu Saturday or Sunday. He goes to the Eternal City ia obedience to tbo order of tho.uapftl able- Mgr. wlio reinstated him in Ids priestly ollice.. The departure of Dr. MeGIynn was cret, none but bin intir.inte friunds being avrarc of it. How he went or under what no one will tell. It is known, how- ever, that he sailed eight days ago. The fact, that Dr. McGlynn had gone created exfitumcnt lu Koman Catholic circles ia this city. Tbe secret has just leaked oat. An intimute friend oC the ex-pastor of St. Stephen's said: "Or. McGlynn goes to _ Rome. He simply obeys the order of the pope's reprvscntatlve. He will come back, weiirmly fully and absolutely vin- dicated in his course so far as the land question aad politics are concerned. "The known leaning of XIII to democracy. strengtlHin-.-il by the attitude his holiness ifcwumnl toward William II of Germany, 11-4 confident in that _ of Tynff. NEW Yoisii. June Tbe nmrriago of Miss Annie Griswuld Tyng, daughter of the lute Kev. Dudley Tyng of Philadelphia, to tbe ftt-v. Ceoriji' H. Botlomc, assistant rector of fjnice church, Uiok place in Grnco church. The bride was given by her brother, Stephen Tyng i.-f Boston. She won: a iimictiifieeiit gown of white satin en train, trimmed with point lace. There werv no bridesmaid or moid of honor. Tha nnptiiil knot wsts tied by the Rev. Dr. D. W. K. HuuUn-ztrtU. Did Xot a Lockout. NEW YORK, .Tune X. Hornthal, Albert Hecbstiulter, D. Xcwborg, J- Trow- en.sU'in. Kaufmsin and B. uiemlK-rs of the Clothing Manufacturers' nssoci.ition %vho were charged with coa- spiracy. were rele.-ised from further liabili- ty, the grand jnry dismissing the com- plaint .-upiinst them. It was alleged tbat they ordered a lockout because of a strike it) one of the places by a member of the association. Death of a Noted Southern Man. MOXTOOMF.RY. June Kev. O. B- Blue, of tbe church died at Greensboro of heart f-iilurc. He was a of the secession convention of Ala baina in ISO! and has represented Alabama in the gfnem! conference of the Methodist Epii-cop.il Chureli South. MARKET QUOTATIONS. XKW YftRJC Winter wheat, "vititer wheat- fair to fa SiTiV wir.t.-r whr-sit intents, Rye westers, -i 47V i ii-. OH July, Au- Tflc. Cora Not 2, July. August, 4T-V, Oats -No. 'A wl.jse. Xo. 3. 36c; >'o- 3, iy. extra rness, orn sroam. Old mess, new mew, State dairy. IS creamery, western dairy, ]4 Slate PoniUiyivaais, per caw, Coffee Spot Rio. 7. I7c. Gnvnuiatcd, Wool Serce. palled, y, 1'vaimtA, Iiait-l Western super, @2.4is: western snpt-r. extra, Si.Vi-j3.iii; western  ample, Xo. 2 Xo. 2, lilted v.-estera, Kye-Xo. i Good to Ihou-e Cotton M 
                            

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