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Frederick News Post Newspaper Archive: May 9, 1927 - Page 2

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   Frederick News-Post (Newspaper) - May 9, 1927, Frederick, Maryland                                PAOI TWO THE FREDERICK POET, FREDERICK, MD, MONDAY MOEKIKQ. MAY Airplane View Of Greenville, Miss., Under Water Graphically telling a tragic o{ the Mississippi valley floods, this extraordinary airplane picture shows Greenville, tinder water, refugees concentrated on the higher ground and at the levee's edge -waiting for the relief boats, are neanng the landing. The picture tells better than arty story the tragic flooding of Greenville. A sea of -water stretches back in'.o the city itself. The entire city flooded to a depth of 25 feet in places. Greenville is the largest city to be inundated by the floods thus far. BILLYEVANSON SPORTS For Tunney's Title. Will Jim Maloney or Jack Shaik- ey get a chance at Gene Tunney's crown? These two Boston heai j eights are now rated among the leading contenders for the heavyweight championship. They are to meet in New York on May 19 in one of the many heavy- weight eliminations that Tex Rick- ard is staging. One of them is cer- tain to go into the discard. Jim Maloney, by his surprising victory over the colorful Jack De- laney, has won for himself a laige following over the country. But what about the hometown folk and their opinion There is no place one can get the low down on a sport cele- brity as in his old home town. If f Boston Famous In Ring Circles. Umpiring in Boston- while the national amateur ring champion were being- staged, I made it a point to take in the battles between the" and saw some great milling. Around the ringside I bumped in to many of the leading Setic charac- In New England. This section, by the way, has always been noted for the classy ringraen H turns out. At present Red Chapman, Honey- Boy Finnegan, Johnny Vacca and Al Mello are just a few of the promin- .snt title contenders in the classes. It struck me that a canvas of the opinions of the fight experts who were familiar with the ability of loney and Sharkey would be menu than passing interest. I found the Sharkey supporters far outnumbered those who Maloney had a chance. The impression seems to be thaf Sharkey has Maloney's number. In other words, Maloney is matte to order for Sharkey for many reasons one of which deals with psychologv Like Sharkej's Chances. "Sharkey is a cock, aggressive fellow, while Maloney is just just the opposite." was the "way a -nell-knov. n Boston manager p it it. "In two metinss between them Sharkey has had z. decided edge. He recalls It with a boast, Ma- loney is a much better fighter tlian he really tHnks be is It has taken much persuasive talk on the part of Maloney's manager to impress on him." On all sides I heard Sharkey's courage commended and while no one accused Ma'one..- of lacking still the "nterence that one would naturally get from Uia conversation -wa? that Sharkey carry on farther than Ma'orey if hard pressed. So if you are willing to lake Ins opinion of the home town folks in Boston, Jim Maloney is in for a trimming wien he c.ashes -with Jack Sharksy. Knockout Of Roberts Unusual. Also got a new s.an-t on the knock out of Eddie Rosens Al Mello, which one of t'.e h.g surprises of the year. Melio is one of these unorthodox fighters who sticks tbe r ght hanj out instead, of the left He most h's dangerous panchinp ri1 a left hook or swing, whl'e he jabs his opponent into v, ith a tantalizing right. According to was the victim of a most peculiar punch. Meeting in the center of rinp Melio cut loose -with a I'.'t sw.ng that landed high on the chest. Roberts turned in such a way that the punch instead of land- ing solidly slipped upward and the rpal con'act was on Robert's throat The impact off his power to breathe anu I am tolrl he fell ward on 'or one of the freakic'l njso'k'ii.'- c'-e" seen in thic section. V Tsose TIG: a position- to eee the fii.i fo-re of the blow landed thoncht Roberts was taking a dHe, A as Infl'y burf. Paris Peach In Texas Pageant This is Miss France, Mile Roberta Casey, wlio will take par; in rhe second International Pageant of Pulchritude Galveston, Tex, JJay 21- 23 Her tmbobbeyi were pre ferred by judces, who chose among hundreds of bobbed heads in a contest conducted by Le Journal of Paris. Sunlight For Health By OR. E. C. KEFAUIEK County Health Officer. It is a matter of history that the ancient Romans recognized the value of sunlight on the human body and lecommeiiued sunlight baths as a therapeuu measure for their soldiers; the} also dressed in loose fitting robes and hied much m the open places. The physical perfection of this age and race has neier been sur- passed. Other .aces, as the Amer- ican Indian nnd the inhabitants Df many tropical countries, wear little clothing and much expos ed to the sun, are noted for phjb- Ical perfection ever, with the latter races, the practice of sun- baths is enMronmenta! rather than, (iof to of its -value Since tne -Killings of the elder Phnj concerning the -value sun- light on the 1 uman body, no more definite study of the was irade until Ifiof. Glisson and committee published a cotnpre- repoit 01 r.ckets and stia- shinn. and after this the subject re- ceivc-d but passing interest until the nt century. One notable ex- n to the last s'ste-nent, ho'v- e.ei, is the -aork ot Dr T A Palm, of Lorulon, tvho in reported his observation on a of rachif'c trpated "successfully with sunlient, but bis rpport bv unheeded. 1-5 3 80S, Hiiscn, 2 Scsr.fll- na-.ian reported thai a series oftu herctilosis ie'-ions cured bv the of modified "ttnlieht: in ir-O0, Dr Rollier, at I-ey- in Puifrerl-nd beean to treit depp MircKal t :bfrcuiocJs -wit'i siiii- iicht: in P. rbolz trfatcd I'D rtchitir xvjt'i and iTTterl Thp work if "lie11? but passing at .on. The pp-'o-J. tn tbo present timp witnessed much ectivity on thf pnrt of thp ribsennrs of the clinical rffe't of "MinlicM on the hu- man body and in rnnneotion xvitli this sturlv m.inv on an- imals havp bpfn conducted, all of wbirh pro'vr roiclusnrlv that sun- prfvonts riflrls ana promotes linriiiv T IIP norh of Kin and IJo'l'cr iias ed for its fall -value. Fmscn is now honored by a great institution bear- ing his name, where thousands of patients are treated yearly; the rather obscure beginning of Rollier at Lysen is now regarded by the establishment of sanatoria, "where people from many countries go to avail themsehes of the sun treat- ment for tuberculosis The investi- gations beptm bv Palm and Bucholz recentK been successfully con- Unuptl bv observers Yet it is nnh- within the last de- cade and due to the experiments and observations of Hesse, McCoI- lura Elliott, Shiplev and their asso natps that the subject has been Thp rrrofs of its ef- ficiencv bepn established and the methods its have been stand Its general use- fulness to manKird has been popu- larized. until todav. sunlight is known amor.s: The masses as a health nr, ing agont of first rank, The eTpenmpr.is nf these observ- PIS JII'VP conclusi-ve proof of follow inc- fl) That r.ckets js a rleficiencv dispasp. If animals are deprived of both sunlight and certain foods, es- pecially rod Ir.er oil and butter thev rickets and that when thev are again en en these foods or to sun light, tne condit'on (6) That It is light and not heat that activates and protects against rickets. (7) That sunlight as -well at the quartz lamp or x-ray is capable of doing much harm if improperly used. Hesse demonstrated that certain foods as olive oil, cotton seed oil and lard not in themselves pro- protection against rickets could be made protective by short exposure to the quartz lamp. Using Sunlight. The parents greatest concern is for the -welfare of the child, and the child like the growing plant cannot long thrive if secluded from the sunlight We are often slow- est to accept our most obvious ben- efactors. The sun v have always had in the heavens and its warmth and light have ever been not only welcomed but sought by both plant and animal life. Who has not no ticed the response of the bulb or seed, that has lain buried all win- ter, to the first -warm rays o! the springtime sun, and who has not seen the animal life of the fields as well as children and adults play and bask, in the sunshine? Instinct has often directed us into the paths of the sun and we have enjoyed its comforts with but little thought of its healing and curing properties. As has been demonstrated by the vaiious observers sunlight has the property of preventing or curing rickets and promoting general bod- ily development as well as eserting a curative effect on certain other diseases, especially tuberculosis, it is, therefore, important that every infant and growing child receive his share of sunshine. But sun- shine as a remedy should be used with much discretion the same as the i ray or any other powerful agent, as it may do harm it the child or invalid is suddenly expos- ed to its rays for a long period of time or when its rays are very in- tense. Beginning with the spring months, the method of exposure ti sunshine, as usually recommended, is to begin by exposing the hands and face (the eyes being protected) to direct sunlight for 15 minutes and every few days exposing an ad- ditional part of the body, first the arms, next the legs and finally the whole body. The length of time the expos- ure beginning with ten or fifteen minutes is added to by additional five minutes every second or third day until by the middle of June the entire body is exposed to direct sunlight for from one-half to one hour twice a day, preferably around 930 In the forenoon and 3; in the afternoon. During the winter season we must be content with what sun- pbme we can tret. It is usually pos- sible, especially during favorable weather, to place the baby in front of an open south window and ex- pose the face, hands and arms for a few All babies are verv prone to de- velop rickets at an early age. so much so that the condition is near- lv universal. Therefore, it is very necessary to bepin exposure to the sun a.s early as the beginning of the second month, and to augment th's treatment .especially during the winter months by suitable doses of cod liver oil. No Qtuttion Enjoy Playing That gtmtf teems borne ottt toy mott people't obserra- tiont. It to a common thine, for instance, to tee a cat and dof. broufbt up together, playing hide and teek. There if a game which can often be teen played by dogs on any open space where they foregather on Una mornings. Children pity it. too. In the south of England they call It and In other parts and "Tig." Thlt Is the game in -which the one touched has in turn to touch another, and so on. can watch lambs in a hilly for any length of time wlthont concluding that they are playing m game. One takes its stand on a hillock and the charge for it and take possession. They keep this up in turn for honrs. It is a sort of "King of the Cattle" game. Mott young animals are fond of playing tag of war. A litter of pup- pies will play it for honrs with a length of rope or an old duster. Otters play at shooting the chnte. They hare a tort of tobog- gan slide on the bank of a stream and play follow-my-leader round and round, climbing the bank in rotation and sliding back Into the water. Bat It Stayed in Family A story is current describing the; only sale of real estate John Ja- cob Astor is thought to have made. He had Just watched the com- pletion of his Astor house, about 1830. Xert day, he brought his eld- est son William down to tee it. 'Tather. that's a fine said 'William. "I wish it was mine." smiled the father. "Well, give me a dollar and you can have It." According to the story, the dol- lar was produced and the two re- paired to a lawyer's to prepare the deed. Training Ttacheri The first genuine effort for the professional training of teachers undertaken In the world WEB un- doubtedly bv Jean Baptlste de la Salle at Helms In 1681. At the begin- ning of the Nineteenth century the development of institutions to train teachers took on a new life and the Prussian system of normal schools was firmly established. Sii normal schools had been organized in that country. It was about this time that the "subject of preparing teachers for public schools began to receive attention la America, BlindnetM No Handicap In spite of total blindness caused a gun accident, Henry Fawcett to high gosition in British pub- life. He was born In Salisbury IB 1883. At the age of thirty-two he entered the house of commons, where his ability and devotion to worthy causes soon made him a prominent and influential member. In 1S80 he became postmaster gen- eral of the government of Mr, Glad- stone, and during his term office brought about many improve- ments in the postal service. He died In 3.834. (2) Tnat ricKrts -nbicb thought to be caused by a diet de fi'-ient in vitamin A. is due to a'de- ficiencv of a ncwlv discovprecl vita- min known as v.tamm D That r'Vkpts can be pre- or riiicd by Pithcr di- 'prt sunliclit. meiourv quarts iamp. rarbon arc lamp, or ruent- cpn rays. C4) That in the prevention and cure of rickfts cor] liver oil is orniallr as efficient as sunshine Cod lix'er oil and other fish is the onlv known fond substance tha' normally contains t'lis racbitir provonfive property to any marked That if IK liaielv 1o t a rapidly fat o.ibv- from ripvolopinc; r'ckpts his is more rapid thin is tne ability of his bones to calcify. urtgfn Now Household Words Two English county the Hurlelghs and the Burlelgha, had a feud in Queen Elizabeth's time that kept the countryside In an up- roar for many years. Hence the term says the Phil- adelphia Bulletin. Odin, the god of mythol- ogy, had a SOD named Boh, a gnat general and a terrible fellow all 'round. the exclamation, recalls the fame of Odin's dreadful offspring. Col. Francis Xegus In Queen Anne's time invented the drink that still bears his name. John Pinch- beck, a London goldsmith, put on the market a cheap, flimsy sort of stuff, as It is called to this day. The cardigan Jacket was named for Lord Cardi- gan, and the raglan coat for Gen. Lord Raglan, who designed the coat for aoldiers in the Crimean war. Shrapnel, macadam roads, dollies, mackintoshes, broughams, nnd a hundred other things are named after the men who Invented them, or take the names of places. SMART BOBS that fit your type We i3o more than merely bob your hair. AVe try to suggest a cut that best brings out your personality. Scores of women have learned Our Haircuting Is and Better Haircutting floor CHicmasKemp rridwua MM Bhemood forest wu an fMwt In the west ot No Knglud. In hilly between Nottingham and Wo The tract covered abmt 200 and was formerly a reyel forest famous as the scene of the exploits of Robin Hood. Only a small portion of the forest, nesr Rotterham, still remains. The rest of the country it covered is now occupied by country seats and private parks, and is for the most part bare of-trees. Unclaimed Hundreds of thousands of doi- lars in- cash are taken annually from the In the TJnlted States where letters have been improperly addressed and delivery Is impos- sible. One post office alone took in cash from such although in this instance of it was returned to the sender. The other letters had no return ad- dress on them. This same post office reported perfectly blank en- velopes n-lth letters inside deposit- ed In the mails in one year. Synthetic Synthesis means putting togeth- er, and it Is, the opposite of analysis, which means taking apart, splitting up into Its constitu- ent parts. In chemistry, is making rapid strides, and sub- stances are made now synthetically to such an extent as to do away with'the necessity, in some eases, of producing them by natural means. The production of Indigo is a striking illustration of this fart. Too Much Men are very generally spoiled by being so civil and well disposed- Tou can have no profitable conver- sation with Them they are so concili- atory; determined to agree with you. They exhibit such long suf- fering and kindness in a short In- terview. I would meet with some provoking strangeness; so that -we may be guest and host and refresh one another. It Is possible for a man to -wholly disappear and be merged in his Satire 'Tellow Plush Papers" were writ- ten in 1837 by Wiiliam Makepeace Thackeray, fhe well-known English novelist and contemporary of Charles Dickens. The papers form a playful satire of flnnkeyism, whether it be the nnakeylsm of the wealthy or that of the servants. The papers first appeared in a mag- azine, but In 1841 they were pub- lished in book form under the title of "Comic Tales and Sketches." Difficulty of Middle Ages Perhaps the hardest time for a middle-aged man to think he feels Just as young as he used to be is lust after he has gone up n couple "of flights of stairs at n fairly brisk State Journal. Woman Pioneir Lady Wolrerton was the woman in England to occupv a po- sition in big business, when H she became the dirpctor of a known banking company in .oa- don. j Those who shun the ordinary and demand smartness with economy in their motor car invariably choose the There is a vast difference between cheapness and sensible economy in automobiles the same as in clothing or other necessities. Those who are forced to buy the cheapest rarely ever get a bargain. But those who can afford to pay just a little more find that the added cost is well worth the money in style, smartness, and pride of possession. All we ask is that you DRIVE A STAR before you decide that any other low-priced car is "just as good." Then buy the car that suits you best. Fours and Sixes MILLER MOTOR CO; 55 East Patrick Street FREDERICK, MD. An easy triumpli of Wifehood YOU are a wife. You must be a nurse, a home decorator, a domestic scientist, a seamtress, a laun- dress, a beauty specialist, a bureau of information, a buyer, a banker, a hostess. You must be all these professionals almost every day yet you must not be tired at dinner. It must be a good dinner. You must have good news. And you must not only keep up your professions, but grow wiser in them each day. Sounds hard, but is it? Not if you use your daily advertisements. For here are the best safety-firsts; the most beautiful, most lasting draperies and home furnishings, and how to arrange them best; new food or new delicious ways of pre- paring and serving known foods; the finest in dress, in cold creams, hair washes, manicure methods; news of insurance; thrifty buying, happier ways to enter- tain; something of business, literature, art, of almost every science known. The information in advertisements is latest and correct. Yet a brief glance is sufficient to give you their news. Just a daily reading of the advertise- there's an easy triumph of wifehood! In selecting, buying, arranging, using. In keeping fresh for dinner. Saving work, saving time, saving wise! Reading advcrtisments Regularly means keeping to the fore. Read   

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