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Democratic Alleganian Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1858 - Page 1

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   Democratic Alleganian (Newspaper) - July 10, 1858, Cumberland, Maryland                                 iiSmk  SWU&'I  •mm  mesm  DEMOCRATIC  i- ■■A '  i i  ■ v>" o*. 1   *k--o    ij  Ui     lip TV ill. W’chir 1 Non. thx lixxxtv of tm* peoFLX—tiix «ovxrxiomtt or the «tatks—the fkrfktvity or the wstdiii              VOL. XXin - CUMBERLAND, MD., SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1868.             THE ALEEGANIAU  IS PUULISHt-D  KlXIi Y 8*1 T V H U.l Y MUILYLYG,  %* WM. WS3Z2XI & SO2?>  1EHM3,—One copy, 7Vr« Dollar* j»c-r annum, p v) *bl« luilf yearly in advance. When payment i* delayed until after the expiration of the year,  ?<eo hollars and Twenty-Jive Cents will l>e all V Kyi  ADVERTISEMENTS will be inserted at the fits of One Dollar jar square (12 line*) for three insertion*, and twenty •/ire ants for ouch continuance. A liberal discount mode to theme who advertise by the year.  Jl»H I BIN 1 !N<j ot '■ v0, 5 description, such , ^ HJ#n wr jtt«n, gjj  0 f which oho indignantly rcpu-a« Pamphlet*, Pay Rolls, Mau.fwU, ItadnsM    «, veu    lit ic*    claimed    Jl.uner,    but    the  From the Washington States.  LOLA SIONTEX.  1 have before me tlie "Ixtture* of Lola Monte*,” embracing an autobiography of thla moot remarkable woman of our titne. The lectures were v»ry extenrively commented upon and quoted at the time they were delivered, but the autobiography presents point* of jiormaneut aud atnrtling interest,  Lola tells her story well, and apparently with all the impartiality reasonably to Unexpected in giving a history of one’s own career. If we do not accept this version of So eventful a life, we shall certainly lcok in vain for a ntoro correct and . reliable account. At least twenty-four differ cut  <  biographies of this world knowu fen mis have  Cards, Bill H«*uls, Posters, Ac., executed with neatness, accuracy and dt»p stch, and at low rate*.  Kcd*Oflko ou Baltimore Street, third door ftom P*mt OUioe, Cumberland, Md.  C. W. lMENGLE,  UAd alway* ou hand a fite* RMiortnicnt of U “-tj and .Shoes, Uats and Cnpa, Trunks, Carpet Bags, Umbrellas, Ac., Baltimore Street, opposite r s.t Ofti.T. Curi.iarUn 1.  ANDREWS Sc SWARTZ WELDER,  DK.AI.EIIS in. Do \r. S tSomry ami Mmcy Us-te, IVt’iln. Street, mi Ui til. MueUin R>4us, CuinU rl.•ml, M<J.  FREDERICK Ml NEC.  DEALER 111 Ihn.tS, Shu t, IVttnl.s, «te. Baltimore tltr t, U nitre lt«>»m **f McKaig's Row, Cumberland, M l.  J. W. MAC HU DM B.  YxLALLU in Ihr h 'ue and Irvn*V>tvvr of mF Baltimore and M •-l.iui . tm, Untn) ••riand,  h. dTcahleton.  MERCHANT TAIlAilt, ha always on has d . a full supply of Cloths, Cu-riincrc* and Vestings, tali lylvs ar.lqudiuts. t b tin g made t > order at -k.it i-otic**. and on t uton.iU* t iius. C*m*r df i re«t*iu so l    Streets,  opposite th" Mineral l’u».k. Cumh rland.  J. T. MAG ILL,  MANUTACfUitMU *<1 Tin, C»:>i«r 1 Sheet Don Wait. Ureiers from a di*»anoe will be prom pi iy filled, hi itiiut* Rw, Baltimore Blr-et, ('uukrlitol, M 1.  Hose hill clmltll y  f)EKMJNfi donning to purchase Burial Lets in nils Cemetery, will pleasoApply to Sir. Ju-tU pepper ut ihm CViutUfty# to t ,i© u!i<l©t•  s /noJ.    TUOMAS P. WUITK.  J.U-. •»    K.    ,ei .t.*.k»t.  JOHN H. VOL NO,  lil.AUCU is  WOOS AND OOAL STOVES  asii nsecracftiaaa ok TIM.COPFKR ASHKBT IHOM WARE  l'articuisr attentioo paW t<* *»rder* fnan abrosil. Stare ou lultirm re strwt. m**' lletvklere llau, Camber land, Md.    [J ut *«  N S. LAWRENCE’S N B W  PAPER. PAMIERS' CARO & ENVELOPE •WAEEKGUSE;   m Yo. 405 Commerce Street, Fuiladefpkta* ii •» Cssb buyers a ill led it for tli*ir misrrst  utX    [>**    * 8i   KUSSELI. &. SON, Carriage Manufacturers,  CEATJIK    LllMtit.HL.iXl>,    Ml)    ,  KEEP constantly on hand,  CsHRI Atlh**, ftorssWAV*.  t*n\r.TO!f!t *"•* HLEitslWi.ol ‘hi Isisst stylea*d Aaisb, ami all other tiu i*ol *»• IIICIAs, lo suit rity or ruuutry trs.ir  cARHIAGk HARNlSS OF DflRf DESCRIPTION.  ,*> KKI'AIUINl* ol sllkiud# done u^oo »h »rt  ** *Kl»evsfsl SKi OM) HARD CARIIUORS far sale < teap. hreeral HtUhlFJ, swly a* I >o>) a* »•«, l«fl with u» for *ate» which will •’  ■    Mt    hHEI.I. A M»N.  If-  SM.  U vrir ntr«r «*pt b,IS4U.  AUGUSTUS OMlTH, Cabinet Mukcr itntl Inderiaker,  N. Misuasu Hraatr, Ceusaatsae. Mu.  rv'le has * * -•>■    ------- . . ....  uttke to ord-r, «)•« vari.ius *ic. • »i imn* * I 'F-  r'l.v,* dh ”‘“* i!;iAiL'rr^mr-  N B -Me will ■»•*!>  !  funeral* In *i»y p»*tuf ihirountv nr In the srfj-uda* couotic# a \». tala isifNsaifl**>b  f | US At  i‘ '•'» ■» ** "* *     r r    -    -  C .n*'*er land s* jtl, .^,1 • ®  ni.%i itiMiit  ■    vet    utini.isiir.i)  RrineU P i •• Bn. t. Heady |t^ lioi te  Massoier, » r .ft. v f M.-mUm* Aid  dr.I. Hl.ip HulU... a„.» I •>".* *t Or .I.  ,t..i 1 lh> “ rr, Hsnks *«d Moit t  AWAftrXWEI.IIhlfJ* Pml “     1   N«w#f>aper licgot, *tee*t * 1 1 'he u< *  «en l># h*d >• •o<m *« i»>ui ill .»* (trrrl, uudrf MoSr um  Mey I. I*-*.  • ui Tr »• K»r  • nirs  • i.tl io nit.us l, l-i.i* on It.lu  t Uiuto i l*U>d.  C I. t > C' K S!  THB BEST OX.OOKS XZf TOWN  AS I* FOR Til L bOWSIT MURKY.  s. J.P WHILMV* Halt n.u*. !H <y  l.li.t    upp.wiMiSavmg*    U    nk  SOUR FLARTKR*  biographers have given Lnl<t Montcz to more than three times sot eti cities. One makes her burn in Spaiu. another in Ocncva, another in Cuba, another in India, another in Turkey. Loin hiut had a innre diflkult time in being bi.ru than oven Minerva, who sprung from tbo brain of Jupiter, f »r she ha* had a now birth from the Separate brain of every mutl who has attempted to write her history. I.et her thercforo speak foi lietardf.  I/da begins by claiming the j.rivilege, so doai t> AmeH:aus,of “defining her p itiou." She do,i not a)togc‘1.#r < odder tin. duty a pkasant j * on •; but at L»t Coadudes that a woman, like h man <*f true courage, should prefer to f.icu the puhli*: tktnls of her life, rather lltau skulk and hide away from her own historical presence.— The Bavarian GnuitcSK does n t fear tlie e<^i*e-.jir'ii c< of a fiug upon this principle, hut find* justification by !r .tiling tliat Woman must e.th.-r be t i.t“f t w.th nn exceedingly narrow sphere, nr experience the womt results of daring to an inuovah.r or a heretic ; that she must lw either therrvant or ppoited plaything «.f mau, or must t tku tit ' re*jKHi».bility »f m..kitig herself a target, to la; shut at by the u»o»t corrupt and cowardly ul b«»th «xm.  Lula according to her own story, was born in liru«.ri< k, Ireland, in the year hi’). l! *r f.itle.-r was a s»ai of Sir Edward Gilbert,and l«*r mother, it is said, *:ii ccn»id«ml one of the Lsn.Lomcst women of her, day. Tie fsmdy name at her motht-r was derived fr-^n the Spauisli nolle race of Montalvo, once among the wealthiest and most (Miweriul in Spain. The M<>nialvcs were J twigina'ij ,f MooriU. b*uud. The cut unit, Uterv i lore, v. hicb courses through Lola’s veins is a  (mixture of tu» Irish aud Spanish-Moorish—a rather CA.'- hua’ible eorr ’ »und ’.ter fit:.'r was ! bi.t twenty years of <m»-, and l»« r inutlter but j fifteen, when i l .i y w. . marri.«l L Si wa.- bor.i | two a cars ait. r\ nd and  M  a* bapt zed by the name ot Maru Dolors K'ixxH iM' naCilliert.—■ She iv«> always called Dotorea. as she is uow known by its diminutive, Lola.  Boon after her birth hor father was oiderud to India, and hi* family went with him. One of th" fever* of the onuntry quickly carried him off.  At l.i* !a.it bronth, he cunti.lc.1 his wife and child to a friend, Captain Craigic. Tac latb r Vi. f. arful of Hot beiug able properly to pnnrd and protect the widow .“.nd ad *pto«l th« plan . f marrying h-r. When Lola wo* al**ut six year* old *l»e was suul t» Scotland, U» ties hou.m »*f Csptiun Craigiv's father. She coutinuc 1 here until her removal to the family of Sir Jasper N.J..4*, in IjOadou. Her education having Uxn t nolicd if ordiug to the standard of that day,  1/ la’s mother came from ludi* for the purpos.* of taking her daugliU r Inuk with lier. It soon turned out tliat 1/ la had Wn promise.) in mar-riage to Sir Abraham Lundy, a rich and gmty old ra.sca! of some sixty jear*. The weMn.it was to take place on Lolx's arrival iu India. Of course, tire little mad-cap fried and storm«’>! at this piece of tews. If the mother was dcter-uuu»l so was the child. Lola sought list* ad vice of a Caption J amen. In tears and despair, she appealed hr him to WlA'e lar from this Atislnl inuriiaj,o— a tl.iug which be di.l tn<wt t lkvlu.d- j ty by eloping w.th her hiuisetf ou thu next dry. j Thu marriage proved very unhappy. Kuna way matcl.ee, like runaway horses, aio a!ui<«t sure to and in a smash-up. Lola’s a Ivtre to all young g.ils who (onUi.iplMte such a step, is, that tlwy had better hang or drowu themsJven just one hour I* fore they start.  Caj/t. James and hi* child-wif. remsiiie.1 eight m .nths in Ireland, and lie u u turned t j Ind.a They went on a visit to a Mrs. Loner. One mornmg the captain and Mrs. I.4ucr went out riding together, aud never returned—they had eh p<*l to Nc.lgDrry I Jill*. Mr. Lon.er wa*  . ir;.uti. ; but L> U ahcrnalely Isugl.vd and crud I. utily. It t o# ihni.lcl to Mud hir to her mother who had returned to England, me ting was m-t a pleasant m.e. Mr* Chaigh 1  had never forgotten the elopement. LJ* was locked in a chamber, mid <nnfine<l until a certificate that the hub* prisoner was iu ill-health wn*  raft and •** 'he* NKW **  now UN    fhey    ill    up  Elms.  K*rmri * *rr lnJ' # *l •«» MOUf. FLAM MW”  \ 11 al i to  ruus.  Di^t!,    jor.    (V»u«    am*)    Lli    Ate-  ornos movuo  (lBn <!. FKtlHV kaerertioved l»i* • flee «  an opportunity of coming conspicuously upon the political stage. Ever since leaving I/mdnn she hail spent her timo almost exclusively in diplomatic circles, at* the courts of Saxony, Prussia, Poland, and Ht. Petersburg. Prior to her advent hi Bavaria, she formed the acquaintance, iu Paris of the young aud gifted Dujerrier, editor of /x> Preset, and a popular leader of the Ikpublicau party. Dujarricr spent almost every hour that ho could spare from his editorial duties,with her and in his society sbc rapidly ripened iu knowledge of political affair*. 81 to became familiar with ti.o whole system of European governments, and enthusiastically embraced the An engagement of marr iage took place between these two cougcnial spirits, hut Dttjariier was shot iu a duel hatched up by certain parties w hom hi* writings had rendered mortal enemies—as hat* lately been the case with M. do I’eue. I/da regret* that him was not a-ble to take Dujorrier’s place, and give his antagonist all the satisfaction desired. Dujarricr left his cutiro fortune, some $100,000, to his iutend 1 ed w ife; but LoU very generously tuado it all over to the relatives of the dccefeed.  Alter the duel, Lula went to Bavaria. King Louis is described as being, Contrary to the gen crally received opinion, one of the mo»t learned, enlightened, and intellectual monarch* of Unit period. He was attracted by the beautiful aud list nguisl.cd manner* of the danseust; and on further acquaintance, became enamored o( the origin.iI.ty of her character, her mental powers, and the hold and novel p-diti -al views w hich she frequently laid heforo him. Under the couu-st-is of Led a. a total revolution took place in the Bavarian system of g ivernmcut. The existing ministry weft dismissed; new aud more liberal adrh rs wore chi«4 u; ti.eJcM.tu were driven from pjwi-r, At.strinu iufiuences repelled, aud a foundation laid t r n<aking Bavaria an ilwlepeud-etit men.bo. of the great family of nations.  The title of Cuuntoat of Lan»i«Ult, occoiiij n-uiol by an estate, were conferred on I.olu for her service*. But the nobility began to be aroused; they raw that tht*r power aud privikgc* wcie suffering front *he energetic aaaaultaoflhisCouu-Us» of Lnuisfeldt \V eu she arrived iu Bavaria, the nobility had :;uch power that a trade*-mau could not ponsibly collect* debt of them by law. To remcilv this enormity, LoU hod ob-taiued tr.c promise of tlie King that he would intro*luce the Code of Napoleon ; aud oho waa having it copied when the revolution broke out and drove her Iran power. .She doe* not ascribe j the success of her eutnncs to their superior tuct | and oagacity. but to the brutc-forct produced by | Austrian gold. Lola win hopelctdy bamat.eil from Bavaria. But, licLre quitting the kingdom fur ever, »he obtained a hmt Interview from the  Ktng, and vs.tied tt m him a premise that he woahl abdicate—#i;« couia Tiot endure ine  thought that he should, with bis own land, destroy the reforms which l.e made at her instigation .  The promise of the King was faithfully kept;  he abdicated in favor of his son. Switzerland r«*ceived Lila with open arui* ; the republic wss not ungrateful l**i tb*j phtical servica» rendered by I/Ja while in power. The 8wu- Government offered to bestow oil her an ealablndmiciit for life, lut she allowed this brilliant opportunity to pa**, and went to I/iiidou to enter upon another marriage exjwrimcut, of which n<>thiog hut sorrow aud mortification was the result. —• The time which she aftcrwarJs »iwait in Paris w.u pleasant and improving. Her house was the resort the of moat giited literary ginitiws ol gay metropolis. She also entertained mauy A-muricans who chanced to he in Boris.  •The next step of any public uetu Liken by I/da, was her pasoagfi to America ooming out ia tlie satne ship with Kjssuth. Sliatureol in fortune, and broken in health, she came with yearning hope to thu shore* of the New World. Not much is said of her carter iu tlie United States. On arriving here, she found that the Jesuits, who ha 1 mercilessly persecuted her iu Bavaria, had filled the papers with a thou.-anj false rumors aud aiiealotes. Among other things she hud the honor of l«r»u-whipping lu t* I red* of men whom she never knew and never saw. If she were to attempt t*> collect all the falsehood* ab.ut herself to bo nut with iudificrent newspaper* and lk>>k*, the would, |*erhaps, lie able to fi rm n tnouutaitt higher than Uhiuibordzo! 1 must say, however, that this u. rather a strong illustration. But she did n<>t mind thosestorue. .Sinrw the commencement of her lectures *h« ha* received nothing but kiudnuos at the hands *>f the cutiro respectable pres* of the country; aud of this she would carry U* k to the Old World a gr*»tful remtmbranee.  ,pj Hucli is the ant.-biography of L*Ji Monte*. Countess i f lamdsfett. 1 have bimply diawu the (acts from Ur own statement, and connected them together. Let others make thuir COM-uieuU.  GKITING A SUBSCRIBER  Tired and fatigued from a long day's ’ride,' covered with the duet we have gathered on a dry, eandy rood, we called at Squire Hobb'a to wet our mouth, reet ouv hoesp aud have a chat witli the Squire. On our pwt, however, there was very soon a dispoeition to talk leas and does more. This Hohtw—a good humored soul—perceived, as by Intuition, and own left u**to the soft influence of “nature's sweet restorer.”  Now hew long we slept, we can not tell, and our reader* needn't keaer. It waa net long, however, for long bilking in 0>c Squire’s office soon aroused us And wulistanul to a conversation highly interesting to us, If it wss caves dropping it was no fault of ottrsw U seams that Jo-ocurn Oulio—Old Joe, a clever eober-sided neighbor of the Squire—had called in to talk shout “the crops,” and nutter* and things in general.’'  “Well, Squire,” an 1 Mr. Oalic,  fc ik» you know where a fellow can buy a right smart chance of a nigger boy, thcs>e times ?”  “Jteally, Unde Joe, I don't know at liiis time. There was a sale in town last week, of six or right at one time.”  ' There was f  “Yos, and I got a right likely negro boy, lit year* old, for fiLOO. My w<wd for it, I would not take a thousand dollars for Mm to day.” “Just my luck—why I never lieard a word of it. Who told you Squire?”  “Oh you know I take the pftper. I saw tlie sale advertised, aud us I had to go to town any way, I went on the day of the sals thiukiog I might hit a bargain t. ire.”  “Well, I swear, 1 havo got to htve a hand son;show. You see I have put iu more than 1 have hand.! to Work. Who’s got* boy anywhere about  “You're touhard for mo again, Uncle Joe— the hiring »*« in is over. About a nnnth ago  all the negroes belonging to the estate of H *,  deceased, were hired very low.”  “The d—I you say. Why didn’t you tell roe Hqntre t"  “I hardly know why, I *s^k it xdvcrtiacd in our paper; and I tuppoeed every lo iy took that, I didn't know you wanted to hire. Did you knotv 1 Lai sold my Hardin tract of land ?” *“So, indeed. Who to?”  From the. New York Uercury.  A KISS AND ITS CORBKqUENCEB.  Our boarding-houee i* not a common house, nor are our boardere common boarder*. I do not, by this, wish to ton-vey the idea that there is anything peculiarly uncommon about us or our house-only that we reside in an aristocratic portion of the town, and consider ourselvea, on the whole, rather a select set.  But, however select a company may be, the fact that they are select is not an infallible proof that nothing disreputable can occur among them.  This has been especially proven in our case. We have just been deeply agitated, excited—shocked! Happily for the reputation of our place, the affair of which I apeak had a gratifying termination.'  In our boarding-house resides an in vet-erate old bachelor named Wiglry. Mi. Wigley is by no meana such a person as some people invariably represent old bachelors to be. neither in appearance nor disposition. He is a portly, middle-aged, good-natured, fun-loving, sociable fellow, and likes the society of ladies far better than three-fourtha of the married men.— Mr. and Mrs. Pickleby art also of our company : the former, a commission merchant, is a very quiet, and a very respectable aort of man. exceedingly fond of his w ife, and, withal, a little inclined to jealousy ; the latter is a beautiful and affectionate creature, who dotes upon her husband, and i.-n’t jealous at all.  One day last week, Mi*s Cel**sti.i Xobb* —another of our hoarders, and a msiden lady of thirty-five or thereabouts—heard a noise in the hall below, and, stepping out of her apartment, the leaned over the hani-ter*. to see what wa« the cause of it. She distended her sioik-iike neck to its utmost limit, and listened with breathless interest.  ‘I am so glad you are cotnc V she beard a voice, which she at once rrrogrised as Mrs. Plckleby’s exclaim; and, the next moment she saw that lady pass beneath her to meet a gentleman, of whom she could get but a partial view. Then, a ki.-N was given, and Mrs. Pickleby  announcement of the name, and, for a few. momenta, gave tome tokens ot an intention to swoon; but, thinking better of it, •be refrained.  ‘This is a terrible. thing.!' said Miaa Nobhs, earnestly, after enjoying fully the sensations she had created.  •Terrible, indeed /’ uttered Miaa Dobba.  'And not to be borne!’ exclaimed the indignant widow, her face assuming a very erubescent tint as »be spoke.  'It must not be borne !' said the spinster; 'tH# reputation of this house will not allow such tbings-to pass unnoticed!'  'And our own reputations!' chimed the other maiden.  'Think what we should be made to suffer,' cried the widow, 'if it should become known that we live in the midst of stfch iniquitous scenes t*  * ‘Our characters are not to he trifled with thus !* exclaimed Mia* Nobba, with a determined air. ‘and this tiling must not be suffered to drop here /'  'Poor Mr. Pickleby " sighed Miss Dobba, ‘I pity him from my heart !*  'And I,’ said the widow ; 'for I dare say he has not the least suspicion of his wife's perfidy.’  'He must know it!’ uttered Miss Xobb*. speaking in a low and deliberate tone of  voice.  'You are ri'ht—he must know it, but how ?' inquired Miss Dobba.  • Me must .tell him !'  'Will it be proper ?*  ‘It will be doing our duty. 1   ’Yv*P said Mr*. Briggs, ‘it will be^but the performance of a Christian duty. We must tell him!'  ‘And I, for one. am ready to go and perform that duty,’ remarked Miss Xobb*, with a meek and resigned look, as if *he had taken it upon berscif to suffer at the •take.  ‘And I,' said the widow.  ‘Oh.I will accompany you; I am sure 1 only want to do what is right,' said Miss Dobbs, submissively.  •Then, let us go at once.'  •Yea; the sooner he has liii mind disabused in respect to his wife, the better.’ Forth, accordingly, the immaculate trio  (oud  said, in a somewhat lower tone of voice; j tallied, as soon as they could make the •Come with me—come to my room; Mr.    j    necessary preparations, and    bent    their  Pirkleby is at his ofiice, and I am alone.'    ;    course toward tha store of Mr.    Pickleby,  Then, both started to ascend the stairs,    !    j n  the lower part of the city.  ""by, a rich old iriiow froiu Goorgta. It |  ai)l | Mi*» Nobba hastened to withdraw into • TK# »».*»••»• !•••»»♦ **?* b”*i!y engaged in mtos the day before yesteiday, and I got the | her room, but uoi before -hw had taeghi a tne ttsiiseUioo o.    bu«ine*s, when  ‘yellow boy*’ cash up—only six dollar* per ( better glimpse of the man who was with acre.    i     M  rs. Picklthy, and di-covertd in him, as  He said that he came acre**our paper iu Ala-1  %h «* thought, no other than Mr. Wigley. bam*; he liked the description of tie* country , j  T ‘'»‘ pieman had been absent in the  . .    -    i    .    .    .    .    country Jor a week, and she had seen him,  saw n:\    wee Lit of    acmrttsmcnt, and come to \    .    '    ..    .  .    ...    ,    ;    ju his return, not more than an hour pre-  ’’    "• * truck 4 L "”*“  ni ’' v.ou., .nter th, hou-e.  Mh** Celestia Xobb» i* one of those pur*  me  pro ur< 1 On the strength of Ibis certificate *!ie  A Tiiot out uk Dxxtii.—To du ! This wsrci  wa» avnt to Europe, Bite was to he placed in ‘ lieait to U* stilt and cold furrier ; these limbs  Da tiR‘1 tl. FKHKI Ms# rooiown no ■ «u< r » M«r«*ids»‘i’.»ufc. **    •»»**•.    *    »«•  ui *,r, (i mu it.H I'uiirii »q«a»a.«Md O a; riM# Iwlee Mr*, til*'-'her'# llotrl.    (Mai    LlS.lSt#  UQ tUV’M tl>tt ELUTHIB®  AUimUavlktsuf INady-Mada CtethlanAcpI consiauily <»•» h*«o*, and w ill U» soiif vr.y ross o>«Uls Cat I at Blsk'a *n^ rey Min twfois pur.,lta#in( staewbxr«, a* be i* determined •** esl INSA* res ea#«.     Wl     *  WATCHES! WATCHES!  JU«I uvriws, » |<« I iiiuriinf ul vl Pi** •*»)  u»r.uu *<j  r  wmanT N.  Nay I.    Opyosllelha    Daviuf* Hsi»k-  HOI’** KKKPING ARTICLF*,#o b •«Knife  Clasnsrs, Oysit i Broibri, E«f Bsaiars.tsd r-..n RiMars, BiaaBTaasiars. Oust Pens. Islly Biralosrs. Csfst f#U aad TU Wars, r*« U Lund *t    TKtli iollNH,  Mty I.    Coiavr Ball. A Cnniic sis.  »n£4 TB A Yd. Table Cssto'S. Laatarna, Fo* ks« I and Table Knlvraaad Karha, Meimmes, Tea  iStXISF c ”*    *  Nay I    earner Balt k Esmr# at#.  %KT mTuLAK F.lu.iu.1 r.c,.«d .nolb.r TV    .rcivi»>4»    **f SwCm*  n«rti and VM' nve wbleb b« willmabawyin nr  d#r at erierem S’lh !*• rime*. All f*'tde fues-S«*f*'i Sn b* a* r» |*r- stn'-d.    P»    ■*    re  chfirp* of a brnnch ofth« Crsiulo family, which lived iu Biitb, Sc (it laud, llut aitliough Mr.  Dai id Craigiu was, on the arrival of the vessel in England, *!u? positively r« 4 fii-ansl to go. The little yrass-w idow went to L H.don aud Uwaroe a *lu mistrma of her ow n fau. Her money, about $10,000, waa ruu through with in Uw* than a year, ami she waa compciiud to |ts4 about f »r a mean* of support. The theatrical pr<jf<»xion w a first thought of, but ih fUicnt Lugnah wo*  0 u*i>!«itxl a bar to her imiu* lute appe.iranoe, so it waa re tiled that site should U a da use use.! I can fancy U all. A Hor studying Ur art four uiouths sho tnodv her debut at Her Majrety s Then!re in I/mdon.  The dehut was a aucceasaful one, but waa liroken .‘J 1 >’ a -VJUultji os Ui li rm** Au opmuug wo* anon aaode for her at the lh*y*l Theatre at Dresden ILr i<erforiii:imes created a penVcl furore. Every p'SMilJu Uhioi and att<Hition wo#  that are eo active now, to lie uiotiouh'v* mi the cojliu ; tlie*c eye* to bo ekwrel on all tbey have luved—aliH closed, tit 'U„'h pxsaionitle teari a;id kisses should fall upon them. It is a atr*nge thought ’ NY hat would the anil he doing then ? NYliat would it think of tli* few mourners who bent above tha w orn • ut ••uamei.t it had kit h r-ever ? II* w would it look upon those w ho had bexprei curcea up >ii tlut unconscious boad during life, and who c.-uwe to gloat over tlieir work, whon hate,anger and revenge emild do no more.  mm 1 can see tiio small prucee-sioti enter tlw burying ground. I can sea tne wet day, the dying latvea, and tlie grey and sombre aky. Tiwrc are children peeping through the railing of the ehnrehvard fence, with a half ft inhumed, haii-iniee*:e i air. fiwre are one or two, it may be, etmoUiig be*uU th* open grave, who lutve love and memory busy at their heart*, and Huy can weep, tlu r *1 are hi lent. They lower tlw entbii into the damp. «l >rk yrave It w*a ^ **mc one ben k orwant. and the fir t * 4* rattle  ga.n m no ; time."  *•1—* l«/t    I K.v. Hwnl.oia* In  well a tract of land for the but two year*, »ud oottlJn't get a dollar and a half an acre. It's better land thau your * L«>. and you know it, Squire. VN'ell, 'what is, ’us, and can’t be uo 'tiser but J reckon Squire, I’ve I eat you on sugar. I bought last week, two lurrels of sugar at 7 cents, when every body hod to give 9 cent*. B<at that then f  “With all ease, Uncle Joe— I bought uuno at 5 eeiils.”  “No sir—I don't bdievo it. Now say where f*  At the house of W — ■■ A Co. I g-*t a rare bargain. You see they advertised in tlw paper that they were selling oft at coat. I knew groceries would go quick, so I went tu and l*ouglit a years' supply. Tlw groceries were alt sold be-fore uight. I didn't pay the money either, for they took my Uuited State* laud w arrant at ft;-2o jxr ac re.  “Now, uow, 8quire! That can't br, for law-yen told me that it was not legal to sell try loud warrant.*  “Very true some time sgo; but the news count lately in our p:q**r. that Cougrrss had ma le them aaslgtnthle ”  “Well, tiscnt Cur—itsrascally ? WliAt right havo these editors to get all the news and keep it ihcrusolvm ?”  “Ah, Uncle Joe, you don't nuderstaml it.— FaliLtr* and pnutrrs labor uight and day to gather tlw new* and give ittotho poop!e—to instruct their reader*—to iufurm tlwni of the improvement* of tlie age—and ameliorate the condition ' of society. Thu paper goes abroad aud iccoiu-tueoda our country to enterprising and intelligent emigrant*. Can they labor thus for nothing? Should they n-A be paid? Is there a tnon who is ii 4 benefit trel by a paper? Is not every sulre-r.bei repaid-four-fold fur the pittauoe ot $2 his subscription price 7”  “8top, Sqmre ? atop right tiiere! I’m gmng to tako the paper. I’ll go t > town LHRu<>rrow and take us, and seud back to uiy kin f4ka in iioorgta.”  “You uereln't go n* Ut that, .here's the KIt-tor right iu the next ruotu."  Utrc the parties rushed in upon us, where w« wire acting out must admirably a person f*»t irit t p. It is euough for us to say that alt r an introduiLuii, the naroo of Joacuni Onlic was eu-1 red ou our ntte book as a subscriber—pai l iu relvai.ee. Aud now wlwn the part es alluded to; shall read tlua, we hope they will portion u* for giving to the public (be substantial fact* urged by the Squire—aiding so efibctually in “yetting a suhtrrdxr ''  B»t».*    r*   t  Wherenpon, before the oflter cottM tit. ter i word, he cave Mr. Wiglet such n blow on the head •• to stagger him not a  Httle, and, before, h>* eofiW recover from his aurpriae, it ws« followed up by anothet blow on the other aide of hda head, which mad* hit ears ring in a most wondarful  manner.    VY    wi    rr.' •  This was rather too much for the |om! nature of Mr. Wigley, and •© he nerred himself to the task, and commenced #kj. taYiation. Being nearly double the weieht of his antagoniat, he soon had rt all Bis own way; and, to t» brief, in iOea than ten ffiientea, Mr. Ficklehjr cried loudly for quarters, admit ting, himoelf to he al well-whipped a man as he had ever encountered.    j,  1   •And, now,' said Wigley, after halpiug his adversary to hie feet, 'now that our affrir iv settled, please tell me what I have flogged you for*  ‘For intriguing with my wife, at yon well know,' replied the defeated, but alill indignant, niaii.  ■It s a lie,' said WM ‘If* the tru •and 1 can pro • You can t and nee Mis. me a witnc-s,  •Verv wi ll Mr. * Pickle hi> face, i a- well as Wigley Miss Ungg* ' deinan Xobbs uttered, of the i wife's a|  Mrs. was no' soon as and adv •My bi  who had Miss •I fear, uniuteuti must be *0 like M luvc he As tlie trio, ture, Mr Picl vet* malediction! meddnug, bu*y.t hut he soon recover plained tlie whole affair  Pickleby ,  e, w# will go  herself, and show an.*  st what I desire.* washed the blood from his disordered garments d, and accompanied Mr.  I t    .    .     a  ,  Miss Dobha, and Mra. called, and an e^>tamitir»n the accused Wigley. Miaa ng in the truth of what she hole party, at the request ‘ husband, proceeded to bi* nt.    ...  by, to the surprise of all,  ; a man waa with her. A* klehy saw him he smiled, •nd shook him by th# hand. r,'*ilJ he, turning to those ed him.  Ibcb became crimson, stammered, ‘that I have tnade a I!,.Stake. This •man I saw; and ho it that I waa bed to It* I beg pardon.* IbATBiit day# to otter dial!  ho saw the tbret ladies approach him.—  He suspended operations, and iuquirrd    _  what happv circumstance had brought but he soon reviver^Hhis temper, ei-thern thither.    plained the whole afTairTn his wife,joined  ‘It ia a sad errand on    t^hich we are    !    heartily in the laugh that waa raised al  come,’ >*1 i Mi-- N ibhs 'luk.iig her    hevJ    i    hiv expense, and ended by invtlmg Wig-  with a melancholy air.    I    ley to join their party tbgt evening m 1  •A dreadful errand!'    affirmed    Mira    j    game ol whist.  . _ J    -V  w hose hearts it 1* that ootliing ainful shall occur on earth, and who, feeling tbem--elves to be spotless philantbrApically. as they seem to imagine, spend their time in prying into the affairs of other people, and dictating to them the course they should pursue.  Ah! ha.'* said the spinster, as she closed the door of her room, and walked on tip-toe tu a seat—'it’srome to this, ha* it *    1 always thought there was some  thing more than everybody knew going on between the two.’  She tat for half an hour in deep meditation upon th* matter, and then she arose and moved toward the door.  •Ifthe wicked,shamelesacreature thinks,' said Miss Xobb* to herself—'if she has the faiutest idea that such actions will be suffered in this hou«e, she will find herself mistaken, I can assure her.'  She beard footsteps without, and, as •he pa*»ed into the hall, she saw Mr. Wigley descending the stairs, and heard him leave th« hcu.e.  ‘Left her, have you she uttered under her breath. ‘Well, wall, I nevei expec-ted to witness such goings on—never! But you're found out—you’re known— both of you !*  She hastened !o the room of Miss D-»bb#, on the lloor above. Miss Dobbs is a confidante of Miss Xobba, a few years older than herself, and a few degrees thinner in |>erton. Mis* Xobbs was gratified to find Mrs. Brigg* iu company with her friend on this occasion. Mrs. Buggs, I may as well state is a widow lady ol* some twelve years standing, who hud’ long endeavored—it is generally believed by nearly all the house—to captivate and ensnare, in the meshes of matrimony, Mr. Wigley.  Mis* Xobb* smiled mysteriously, as she enteied. and, carefully closing the door, she seated herself be»ide tier friends.  •I am glad to find you together,' she said, ‘for I hive something of the gieateat i importance to make known.'  ‘Do tell!' exclaimed Miss Dobbs, with an eager air—‘what is it ?'  •Something you'll be surprised to know. Oh! it is the most wonderful thing in the world how deceptive aome people can b**!  I never, iu all my life-*'  ‘But wtul is it ?' cried both the ladies iu a breath.  ‘The most shameful goiufs on you ever witnessed, I'll be sworn /' replied th* excited virgin, in »o impressive a manner that th* curiosity of her listeners became almo»t unendurable. Then pausing a mo-ment to let bar wordatake full effect, Miss Xobbs looked solemnly from out to the other, and continued:  Will you believe it. ladies, wbeu I te.i  Sou that I saw, with my own eyes, Irs. Pickleby in the hall below with a—  nii ,ii‘    t 9   ‘A more dreadful errand you could not imagine V added Mrs. Briggs, making a strong effort to shudder.  •For mercy’* sake, ladies,' cried the alarmed man, turning pale, 'what is it?* 'In thu fir»t place, Mr. Pickleby,’ said the first spinster, 'we wi»h to assure you that you have our warmest sympathies— tbtt we feel lor you.’  From th* very bottom of our hearts,' added the elder maiden.  'And nothing hut a deep sens* of duty.' remarked the widow, 'has induced us to take the atop we have, in order to reveal to you such distressful news.'  ‘What is it’—what is it?' exclaimed the merchant frantically. ‘Don't keep me in suspense—w hat has happened ?'  'Your wife/' uttered Miss Xobbs, in a significant tone.  •Yes, Mr. Pickleby, your wife’’ repeated the other two, in a breath.  Mr. Pickleby staggered backwards, while • lo k of deadly terror overspread his featuies.  •My wife ?' he gasped, 'what of my wife 5  I* she tick ?—is she dead P  Miss Xobbs doted her eyes, and shook her head slowly.  Then why do you alarm me so ? What would vou have me to uuder»taud ?*  ‘Is there not something that, to your noble mind, i» worse than death ?*  ‘Eh .'—what—what do you mean ?' 'Dishonor **  'But Mr*. Pickleby—she—she—'  ‘Mr. Pickleby, your wife is dccivmg  Secak OtT-—Don't tion or circt mlocutiou, _    _  fttay be true of langoagw, as vdgedby the uictiouary, and as charged upon it by a famous satirical writer, that if ingly invented to hide thought, instead expressing it. To this purpose tha and 'ands,' and the 'perhapaaa,' he., very frequently put. But we Wavn more earnestly again*! tlieir prevartci use, if you are desirous of mainti your seli-respect and pfraoaal Inti No, no. Never prevaricate, Jf tion is asked you, answer prc chne answering altogether, ter course it is your privilegl an improper question ia put to idle curiosity, or some worse motive.—» There is nothing more attiactivein young people than frankness of bearing—frankness of look as well as of vpeeh—an open countenance and a truthful tonjue—no eye that never winks beneath the burden of a falsehood—a Hp that refuse* to let w lie pass over it. I bcre are no words in the English language more valuable than the little monosyllabic* -yes* and 'no.'—> There i» no prevarication in 'hem when properly uttered, tt.t when they *r*> drawled out into ‘ve c *‘ and ‘no o-o,' then they become word# uf prevaricatio.i Ool with them, In a clrar riug of the voice, when you speak them. Only so will you do justice to your native sense of propriety. Only so can you be contented with yourself. ' Only *0 can yi»u be truly happy. There is nothing’so safe iu the I01.2 run, and suiely nothing more beautiful than ttutli—truth jraukly spoken.— j Speak out.  ( yrivticu amau of sense, no matter how humble hu orig;.« or degraded hie oc-cupstiou may appear •<« the eyee of th# vain and foppish. is treated w ith couletupt lie will foun forget it ,* but he will be sure to put forth all the euetgies of his ii.ind to rise above thole who look down fc1 scorn upon him. My shunning tha merhiniu wt exert an mllucnee dctoealory to boft-*»t labor, aud moke it unlsshionabf* for young men to leain trades, or labor for a support. Did young woman realise that for all they possess they are indebted to the mechanic, it would be their desire to elevate him and to encourage his visits lo their society, while they would treat will •corn the lasv, the fashionable, the 1 aud the well-dressed pauper.  •Y..u d v   heaped upon h**r by the my al family at I»u*d*!i  wbuiu i  was engaged. 1 rom Drureku Lula wait tolki  lm. frmw Berlin to Warsaw, *cd from Wi---  n> Hi ivt«*i..ir .1. «vfrww»u.n. fLflfUvtnu mueeetm Bwes wb* wept, turn |u look at the mound they  mm. 1 rtereiMir„H, sxcrywirereaemevrog.iiccwe  jMfl     UMud,    os    tha    iroi    gate    elu*ee    alter  end receiving tbs most marked lavuea from roy-    ^     M    mi ] y    a     gUmre,    they    turn    away  al hands. Here ends the bteSary of her lift prt-' au l wgb th-11 step in the waiting > arriages and  ...» tut M. ,*Nm* M—U. «! J—)*•  it w ts »*f cU4 nut lung slmw Uiat *hs j to sae a ainril there, i'lie grave ie tilled,  and the ands lad upon it- the nreaasshm games slowly from Ike lonely place. It might be that  bwtery of her life prior to her g<4ng to Bavaria. .  The period of thia truly remarkable *000*0’» sojourn in Bivarte *«• be fsi the iuo4 imper-  tint bar life. I oittine hrie fai red her w ith  eigh Hum step in the waiting > arriagea and ere whwled away.  Ilw lonely gravn remains bshmd, and th* rain fella, and tbs i-otUug autumn wtud whirls tbs  wet end wi»h#te1 JcuVfi ermind, It u is a dreary pts'v  '• I'll EY BAY."  “They ssy ! who are they ? who are the cowled monks, the hooded friers who giidrel with shrouded lace* in the procession ol lit*-, uoutiur in an uuknown touguo wonts of iny*l«n< u* import 1 Who arc they 1 toe matiugui aosawinH uf reputation, wh > lurk in by-lauus of »a<iny, with dagger tongues sharpened by invention and tfuveimmrel loaltcu, to draw tiie blood of iiiimrence, and hyena like, Uaoquet on the ‘lore!.  Who are toey ? Ttwy are a inuilittnii* no m<u can iiumt>er, blrek-sowM familiar* el thu iuqui-aiikm ol •laodur, searching fee victim* in every city, towu aud village, wherever the Iwart of huuiaanty thro!*, or the ache* of mortality find  ve*t. Oh, coward, coward world ekulksrsl, .    ..    .. ...    .,    .  Give nee the blood brigand, who thuodres along that Mr, I’icklebv wae not at Lome—and, the highways with Hashing weapon that cut* eo, they went of together, Oh I it's *1-the sashes— as well a* tbe ehadaw give — tha moat incredible, ettck ebsB»lm MBdtNtY*  ^ * ‘Tbo immodeat, tuiMtithmg thing " JS2* gj.    ,    e»ai«w#d tbo widow, IndignooHy  ia a velvet shoalh.whMis bfidfli ef death ia vov- '® u ^ w ko IM* aha waa with f 0   •Mr. Wigley.’  'la Vt possible “  you f  ‘Cruelly, shamefully deceiving you!’ ejaculated Mis* Dobb*.  ‘Undoubtedly, and in a manner not to be borne" said the widow.  Mr. Pickleby looked fr<»m one to the other in *pcethle-* a^ony.  •Briefly, said Mi-# Xobbs, 'while you are ab-ent, your wife is receiving the attention of other men.'  ‘We have noticed withgriet,' continued Mi*s Dobb*. ‘that one of our sex should so far forget her modesty as to do ** she has done.'  ‘And for that reason,' added Mr». Iki*g*  ‘a* I have already seid we determined to acquaint'you with the fact.*  •flow do you kuow this ?' Cried t!i«* met-chant, in a voice of rage. 'Are you cer-tain of wrhst you *sv f  ‘Quite,* answered Mist Xol»b*: I saw your wife this morning with Mr. NVigley, in the hall; heard them kiss ; aud together they went to your room.*  'Wigley. Do you    mean    to say    that   Wi f!*V* *!**    i    at    \ r, *    mn*    I    heart—4*e    would play at hie brother a  • IN •£ fey * repeated    Mi»s    Xobbs,    em.    f uorrl | —WO uld gamble upm his moth-  P........ . .    er 4 . coffin.'  A Scan da tots W *«**.—VVeli did Dr.  i Mott say, 'the finished gambler —  Tb* odious villain,’ cried Pickleby, •eixing hi- hat •• he spoke—*he shall repent it bitterly.'  ||a m.Lad fr.vsn tha store, a* he sfMske,  ; urii. ...    :• .it in the most uucere-  'Shocking r exclaimed Mr*. Unu*. (tnouiuu* mvnner. They quietly proceed-‘Trua, every word; hut thnt isn t ellt I ed homeward, congratulating each other *'    tlsist tlrey had evidently haan llw meana  of putting down a vary giant of iniquity.  Mr. Willey has an nffica in Broadway. Mr. Pirkfeby, soon alter his interview with the ladies, stood in the pre-am.* of Mr*  heard them give a kiss; and Mr*. Pklfe by invited him to bar room !'  •liraciou* heavens/" ejaculated the listeners simultaneously, »lavating their bands in horror and surprise.  'Yes; the told him alt* waa all alone—  Horace W alpole mentions aa of a man having, iu hi* time, down dead at the door of Whit#** hou it, into which ha was carrieit members of the dub Immediately bets whether ha wae dead ar not upon ita being proposed la hfead wage tars far his death Uterpoeed, iog tbit B «0«li ifitU fe| * * bet.  tog ibfU -J9«. Dra'.f.  Mrs. Briggs was strtckcu dumb by Use 1  by  Wigley, who smiled, and ottered hi# head . is*>uD liti .--So.o* ofwwr  u, lb. aka. Mr. VMM., OUw 3L?a?S2kM., JtSu  expression of score m" hate, dacimad to caiva id* narne*»*»ne wrspi tout hit.    Hart fee  Permit me to inform yon,* said the merckaot. almost cbokiag with rag#, 'that I know all.'  fe tt  y     I tylm y l(Ml^ re/| n| a k. ** EBPfi^diF ^ |L  astonishment.  •Ye*, sir,' c  ,’IkBOW  A Waslera h«« HiWthren  nm*   

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