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Alleganian: Wednesday, December 27, 1865 - Page 1

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   Alleganian (Newspaper) - December 27, 1865, Cumberland, Maryland                                VOLUME II. CUMBERLAND, MABTLAMD, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1865. NUMBER 34. CUSHY AVEDKSSDAY 2IOKHIHG. o Ofllce on Mechanic Street, near the j Kutiounl Tl-.l-.Mri Or TWO llOUi ir ji ir. 1111 i.i iM; i'i juli I_HIUOH t..l.ui fur .1 U-.J llii tiumlii-. t1 -nit l UnitM i: r of v. in v.'. ijouvi.n. lirXCA.N. .-uu-3 Au.in. A. THfll' JTO.V. b J nitsiioi.M. JB. of til- U.'hllTl i rt J II II. CouinL Tax r..ricinr K juii.s J. J. I.. 1.. .lAI'tlll Di: I-IEHSY J. DIESEL. llelle-.m- H.i-piial Mid- VT ii.itr.illi i f..rmirlv ---ti.- Oi.ii' .ifl'r-. Sin.l. J- ni i) l.t 1W li YnrV l.itl-te-nlr.iit SMVIU.I. in I" r, i.-tn.'h tflir-tu in tlic v.'rious tir.mlu- tn I. rriif' MOM. ,-i-n U.M.TIMOU1: m -rJMnm- ic- in ;h-' OH S.i liv's 1! I'liii.- _ ATTOKIIEr AT Piittth s-idr of Wa-htnji'on .--tre'.t, .lAMKs M. wzsr MIX AT WVI -Hi- i-i the Kan-. III'.M- of t'i- UtcTl.oni.it I'OLUUKM. J i.nnn 11, THE BIRD 01' A noltlia of mill Hull il'i'ui .1 ruiulxiu Ami 1'iiii.iii .11'nliliii I ifl In.- whulr Tin uin til Liuiunl it j.ic.> inn tl ti> thi v la.ird: [I w I.'K- of It i. IjirU! A'M M-.....rroiv Til--11. ii Mini All. Illl t "till :M IllUSnil A-. in lull' 1 i: liu'il ul tlirc, Ati'l of lli; I'roiiNH'l v onl: It l.js I lui ci U 11 M bird! Tl Jnii.M In- a lion-c, niil 1 up irt; 1} tirt-t fi r !i ijipint d t- -'ill i fuilliful l.i.irt. An it Wujhi ic'-rr Ic j r-'t.TriV It t'n. liinl ul llnpc----I'itt It u.m c'-i t'inl! MADAM SCAMDAL. A lone time aeo, in tho western part of I'li-hud, there lived an ag'd couple who-e time away, since early youth, in the every d-iy round of f.irm life, and who had ncvir been known to h.ixe the least lllz, feiliug toward each other, since (lie good old time when good old I'ar-on llcriot hnd united lii'-m ill the hii'.y hon.is of wedlock, tvuitv-fiveye.irsbi.fuie. xv.-ll (In- fant of their conjugal hnppim.-s'.noxTn, th.it "Tin1-'.' are theeaiiEO- of the trouble, and a> leng as thi-y remain, xon had belter look out. Now, a-! a friend, 1 would advise you to cut them the tir.-t time you get a ill.mei-, and end the trouble, and I'ing as thv-y remain, you had buter look i Soon after tbia the has started for home, and made it convenient to meet Mr. 15. mi the way. Much the panic talk in ti-lition '.i hii d-jinctiie happine'- pa-cd bUvvc. n him and the old unman. "IJut friend ISIm-ford." Mid .she, "1 think it my duty .in uChrUtimi to xvaui you to be on jour guard, for 1 tellxou xour wife intends xuur itiiti." Old Jlr. very much aslanialiid, xet he could nut nliullv ait-credit her xroids. When he reached liniuu he threw bimtelf a bed in perplexity; and feigning rclf btiidied the matter oxer in hi-, mind. Hi-, uife thinking tliii a good oppor- tunity fur cutting off the obnoxious hair, took her husband'-, and crept softly to his side. Now, the old lady was much frightened at holding a razor to close to her lin'-biind'." neck, and her hand was not to stiadv as it once wa-; bitttecii the two.  n, he had not been able to induce ]K.r -hoes. At uion or cntre-ity c-mld i-nuxincu him l ry forever within the limit-, of the country, t'lom tint tiinu tlieic huj, Leon ratified by each one of these .States and all with the exception of from which no official information has been a. Etc. P. corner of I'dtimore .V Canal Streets, '.r II L- i'.i i wit. -7, i CHEIdlSTS, ,v C :'r- ST CUMUKPl.AND. Ml'- .lilHNl-iTlirCK, iji'iaMrrrr an.I Ami l-ri'ir in V'all r.ip'or, Ulirc1..', Cuitivins, etc., etc. liil-.u. sin.-, .1 ILA I'PIIM- i'i Ol n-ii, TO.S.UYO, if, liii-li'.- Til .11- i Si t'u rir.iui, 'iM- M UUNO, l) ,h.- in the old jrentk'man to grumble about brcak- being tyo 1-i'c. or the old xvoman to a biugle eurt.iit: Keture. After repeated efTorts, the Devil became di eoaragid, and had he not been n person of great d-'termination, ho xvould doubthfs haxe given the xxoik up ill (Jne day r.s he walked along in a very Fiirly iiHud, nftT nnoth'-r attempt to get old Lidv to ipi'irr.'l nb-iut the pigs pitting into the x-rd, he met an old lidy, a neiylilior of tl.e n-cil 1'ntiple. As Mr. Devil and the w were verv pirticul-ir fiiciid-J, they mu-t neitl- -tup on the way and chat a little. "Go-'i t-aid .-lie "and piay the appointed tiin; she repaired to the tpot, and t'oiind the JJevil at the place. lie put the shoes on a pule, and -landing on the op- j g polite .-ide of the fence, h.mdid them over tii her. She was mueh pleased xviili them were eiactly the article. "lint theic is one thing. Devil, I would liKc lo have is, ivhy yon baud them rn a Flick "Very easy to replied he; "any one who has the cunning and meanness to dn ar- you lux e done, docs'nt get neari r than Ixrentv feet to me." So saying liu fled in terror. After nxxhilc th- old wonnn died, t. xvhen rfc.. Ililliu WIU.IAM Mil 1 fir of Tin, fapprr. ami KiirU-Iron Jilin't. m.ir tin- Jlnlliniiin- I'wii-. SlaJioncry "aacy Tuilir IMliiiinn-i-t Dn'cr in flolhSnr, (Y.ilnrs, fravaS--. Sltllfl.-', ir.', Riltimnn: 'trcci, oppi, it- li c IV c. METlCnATST TAILOB, A N" P C L O T II I r. H .__ TMtiiinie .ilrcot, nt >r the I'ulilic A. P. Dnlir tn Dry fl.iBilJ. SntioiH. f.irprtinr, 3 Story mock, Hallo, street. JOILN.SO.N', in 'Clocks, irntchcs, JrwrJryj Silver .1111! nc.. Scst iloor to I'allimorc rlrwt. .TOHN 11. AVrOKXKK. jrsiin: OF Tin: OfTicc nn lljiltinmrr strtclT nc.ir J'ttMtf ,c; ('i ire. nhat on r-irtii nukoi you look 50 bad thh i she applied for admittance to the lower re- yioii1-, the Devil would not lit her in, for fear '.he might dethrone him, as vim so much his superior. So the old woman i_s yet condemned to nacder over the crcitinj: am'. >triftf in pcaieful fam- ilic- and neighborb' V.'otild jmt her name'' It i- Madam Scandal. When flic died, the joung Scand.ih were left orphans but the Devil, in con-ideration of pa-t services done bv tin1 mother, adopted them, and to you he i-, father to that ehis" called si iiiiilirl-ninniji rf. Kcailer. don't k-iiotr sonic mcnib.'n the fjimih'' I-n't the bt-'twecn ihc ciniri lies doing good tcrx icu K'' "Vi-." "I'li'l Ibacon making plonty of bad "V.-." "Weil what tlu matter, my highly liouomi ma-tor V" H going on well cnmigh." replied the De'.il, "but (and he loukul a" poar a5; a minkex" on a enib apple tree) old lilueford and hi< wife mer here aro injuring; the terribly by (heir bail sample; and afttr tning fur fottryrara to induce them to do 1 mu-t fiy t consider them hope- It The Ing Muni a minicntin deep thought. "Aro yoti that xoit have tried every "Ku-ry xvay I cnn think of." "An- you replied .-he. "if you will promi'c to make pr< -u'lit of a new- pair of shoe-, in e.t-J I MtCK't'd. I will mal.u the aitcnipt iiivi'lf, and if T tan a ijtiarrcl bc- tu 'it To tlii-. the Devil glad- ly a-fin'eil. 'J'iie olii bag went her !i) old liini'ford's and found 3ir-i. nhiefurd btfiiy ruzai'ed in things ready for her hii-baiid'- comfort on his re- turn from work. After Ihe uMial compli- mciila had jn-'cd, the following dialogue took plane "W.-11. friend 15., v.ni and Mr. U. have lived a long lime year.', the vcmber." replied Mr.-. "And all this time you have never had a A SciuiTfii. An a- aiT.iir occurred at an of-pi.itu.il m.in- ifcttatinns at on I'riday night. A -hrev.d ['erf-uti present, in order to -ati-'fy and in nearly all of them, measures ha; e been adopted, or arc now pending, to confer upon the frecdmen the privileges which arc essen- tial to tin ir com fnrt. protection, and security. In VW'uU and Tivas the people are making commendable progre-s in restoring their tate governments, 'and no doubt ia cnter- ained thut they xrill at an early period be in a condition to resume all of their practi- cal relations with the federal government. Tn tint portion of the Union lately in rebel- lion the; aspect of affairs is moie promising than in view of all the eireum-tancca could well been expected. The people through- out the entile South evince an audible dc- bir.- to renew their allcghnce to the govern- ment am! to repair the devastations of war by a prompt and cheerful return to peaceful pun-nits. An abiding faith is entertained that their actions will conform to thrir pro- and that in acknowledging the su- premacy of the _Con'-tilution and tho laws of the United States their will be unreservedly irivrn to the xvhose Icuteiify they cannot fail to appreciate, mid v.bcfo fostering care nil! roon restore them to a condition of prosperity. It is true that in some of the States the demoralizing of the war are to be i-een in occasional dis- but nre local in character, not frequent in occurrence, and are rapidly dis- appearing tlio authority of the civil pow- er IB extended and sustained. were mturally to be expected from the great and sudden change in the relation between the tno races but sysiems are grad- ually developing under whiel the freedman will receive the protection to hieli he is jtihtly-in'.itled, and by means o: him-'elf to the enrporealiiv of a ".--piritu i! j his labor mate hin.felf a ns  a ddioiiiHfini'ti! of the alV.iir a" a Imm- a dcnhlofthn imprcachmciit, and a prand finale made up i.f indignation meuting of the audience, and the passage of resolu- tions declaring tho demonstrations of spirit- nali.'in .1 very decided phy-ical rhnt. Tun hus- band "lloft- it we never Mrs. I wiil till ynn. One have rivcatly derived from the rcliabl authority, I am induced tn cherish the be lief that icctioii'tl animo-itv is turelv am rapidly merging into a -pint of na tionalily mid llmt cimnrrtn it p in n litinnini !oat mtomli'on riltitiHin nf tfif In'Jir I'niini The report from Carl Sehur.: is hcrewit transmitted as by the No report from the lion. John Cox'ode ha been rcccix-cd by the 1'r's-idont. The at tcntioti of the Senate is invited to the ac compaiuing report of l.ictitcnat licnera liratit. xrlin recently nndc a tour of i v i through several of the States whose ir tier-nil can t make a i uarrel. .N-i-.v, it 1 am ,i iii> hatntanta narliciratcd in the rebellion, in a rjnant'l-wne biiinnr. indbrrik mil. mj H.II.J.L wife remains and collected, and d-v.-n't I ,-ay n word. If my wife ispecxiih, and I plays more temper than ia be coming t-j one j of her beautiful sex, I, her huihmd, remain ANM-.I.XV Vi'ashinglon, 0., December IS. The report of ticn. (irnnt is in full with the I're'-idenl.'a ttatement. He say.4 A North Curolinu Vioxv of the War. The Hon. Thomas L. Clingmau. and formerly member of Congreis, and inuru to yield that ready obedience to civil author- ity the American people have generally been in habit of yielding. This xvould rsn- er the prrrciice of small garrisons through- tit those States necesa'iry until such time as ibor returns to it's proper channel and eixil uthor'iy is fully citablisbi'd. I did not icct any one, cither those holding places nder iho Government or citizens of the outhcrn States, who it practicable to illnlnuv the military from the South at refent. The xvhite and the black mutually ijnires the protection of the General Gov- rnment. There is tucli universal in e authority of the General Government ronghont the portions of tho country xis- ed by me, that the mere prcfcnce of a tilitary force, xvithout regard to numbers, Fiiliicictit to maintain oidcr. The good the euuntiy, and economy, require that force kept in the interior where there re many frcedmcn (elsewhere, in theSouth- rn States, that at forts upon the sra-eoast o force is nece-'tury) thould all be white The reasons for this nre obvioui, ithout mentioning any of them. The rcsence of black lately slaves, de- oralizc h.bor, both by thair advice, and by ruiahing in their campi a resort for the recdmeu for long distances around, White troops generally excite no opposi- !ou, and theiefore, a Pinall number of them an maintain order in a gix'cn district. Col- red troops must be kept in bodies sufficient o defend It is not the think- ng men who xvould nse violence towards ny cl.ifs of men sent among them by the jeneral ('ovcrument, but the ignorant in ome places might; and the late flave seems o be imbued with the idea that tho prop- irty of his late master should by right be- ong to him at leas't, ghontd have no pro- cction from the colored soldiers. There is [anger of collisions being brought on by itch My obi-crx'ationslead me to the concluMon hut the citizens of the Southern .States arc to return to self-government xvithin he Union as poon as that whilst reconstructing, they want and require pro- cction from the Government; that they are n earnest in wishing to do what think s required by the Government not humil- iating to them as citizens and that if such x course was pointed out, they would pursue it in good faith. Tt is to be regretted that there cannot be a greater commingling at this limu between the citizens of the two 'cctions, and particularly of those entrusted with the Ian-making power. recently ill the Confederate army, ha.i pub- lished a letter tracing the causes of the civil xvliieh he charges- upon the efforts of minorities in both the North and South that erroneously regarded the opposite parlies aa representing majorities. He states xvilh ref- erence to existing issues "The great practical question now prcs- enl? it'elf AVhat ought to be the action of the United States towards the South am not mistaken when I say that in Xorth Car-. olina the determination to support the Con- stitution and obey the laws of the United States is universal. There nre to be found here and there, perhaps, individuals in that State who xvill assert the contrary. They, are, hoircvcr, men without consideration or character, who have been disappointed in their attempts to get office, and who charge the people of being disloyal because they will not vote for them, "N'o man living in the State believes there is at present ty there. The lato elections have been de- cided by personal preferences, aided some- what by old party associations. Our pea-" pie think that when they hare complied with all the requisitions of the President, they have a right to choose their representatives. I knoxr no man in the State, however, that I believe can take xvhat is commonly called the test oath" xvithout perjury. If this be insisted on, our State will have only nominal or counterfeit representatives. Soou-; ner than have such, many think it as well to have no representation atnll. If the men chufen are true to the Constitution, tho more talent and consideration they have the better for the Government. AVhen an army surrenders, it is done by tho officers in com- mand, and not by men taken from the guard- house or the rear, because of their ineffici- ency. So is it not better that the people of the South should come in with their rcpre- scnlathc mcuV In this manner the Gov- ernment and the Administration will obtain the entire support of the States." as unmoved as lh" monument, or cl-c cheat j "I a'" satisfied that the mav myself into the belief that t listening I of South accept the present sitna for the mom i cut tn heavenly of affairs in good faith. The questions ituaston- ncrclofora divided the J-cnti- o ifhing, if yon leave ipiarrcl alone, hoxr very of llin of ttro ctions soon it dies That's our secret, madam, I ?Hvcry and gtatj ur the right of n and I flionld advise yon, and all Xantippes Tho Best Way. When the honeymoon p.is-es awny, set- ting behind dull mountains, or dripping t-i- leiitiy into the stormy sea of life, the trying hour of married life has conic. Ueixvecn the parties there are no more illusions. The fi-veri-h desire of has gone, and all excitement receded. Then begins, or clmuld, lliebu.-inctn of adaptation. If they find do not love each cither they thotiaht they did, they should double their attention to each other, and be jealous of cvcrythinc whicli tends in the way to separata them. Life is too precious to be thrown avray in secret regrcb or open And let mu tay to all tho.-c to xvhom the romance of life has fled, and who arc discontented in the j-liphtc-t degree with their condiiions anil relations, begin this reconciliation at once. Itcncw the attention of earlier Draw your hearts closer together. Tall: Ihe thing all over. Acknowledge your faults to each other, and determine hence- forth jou will he all ill all to each other, and, mv xvnnl for it, you will find in your relation the sweetest jny earth has for you. There is no other ivay fur you to do. If yoti arc Iiappv at home, you must be happy abroad; the man or xvomati who has settled down upon 1'ic conviction he or flic is attached for lifi- tu an uncongenial yokefel- low, and there Is no way of escape, has lost life; ihcro is no effort too co.-tly tn make xxhich can re-tore to its settling upon the boiom the missing pearl. to follow it.'' Uo the best von can, whatcvrr you nn- front tho rr- i gard as having been settled forcvcr by the man r.in rc- ilcrtakc; if yoti" arc only n s-trcel sxycepcr, ?nrl l to learn from the I !-.vrcp your best, MK, Canadian 1'itiance Minialcr ofC.innd.1, who went to Washington on a fpoci.il conneeled tvilh thff rcn'-w.il of the 1'ociproeily tronly, i'i havo re- Tho City of Damascus. Ramntcus is the oldest city in the world. Tyre and Sidon have crumbled on the shore; liaalhcc is a rnin I'ahnyra lies buried in the sands of the desert; Nineveh and Ba- bylon have disappeared from tho chores of the Tigris and Euphrates; Damascus remains trhat it was before the days of a centre of trade and travel, an Island of verdure in .1 desert, a predestinated capital, with martial and sacred associations extend- ing beyond thirty was "near Damascus" that Saul of Tarsus saw tho 'light from heaven above the brightness of the Ihc street which is called Strait, in which it was said "he still runa through tbo city. The caravan comes and.- goes as it did a thousand years ago; thorn is still the fchckikh, thetiss, and TTatcnrhcel, the merchant of the Knphralcg and the Med- iterranean still "occupy" these "with Ilia multitude of their xvaitcrs." The city which. Mahomctsurvcycd front a neighboring height and was afraid to enter "because it is given to man to have but. one paradise, and for his part, be was rcsohed not to have it in this is today what Julian culled "tho i'i e of the as it was in the time of Isaiah "the head of Syria." I'rom Damas- cus came the damson, our blue plumbs, anil the delicious apricot of Portugal called datn- damask, our beautiful fabric of cotton and silk, with vines and flowers raiseil upon a smooth bright ground; the damask rose, introduced into Knglr.nd in the time of Hen- ry A'lll; the Damascus blade, eo famous the world ex-er for its keen edge and wonder- ful elasticity, the secret or the mantifacturu of which was lost when Tamerlane carried off the artists into i'crna, and that beautiful art of inlaying wood and steel xvith silver and kind of mosaic engraving and sculpture united called damajkccuing, xrilh which boxes and bureaus, and sxvorda and guns arc ornamented. It is still a city of flowers and bright waters; the stream.-) from Lebanon, the "rivers of the "rix'cr of still murmurs A spar- kles iu the Tf.ElTMOT OV FRPiTUD CUrC the intolerable itching thai follows frost, bit; ten toes, it is necessary to totally cxcludo the air front the affected part. If it is not accompanied with swelling, gum shellac dis- solved in rdcohal, applied so ad to form :t complete coat, is Iho that I know of. It dries soon, and docV not adherp to the stoekingi, and until they arc the Ucsh bcconira swollen and painful, plasters of go'od sticking palvo I mill r.hoi.i uictlliat llp'y u'.'t turned to Canada with no i-m t.i aro of groat service, biit'if highly. inHnmed any miid poultice that "will eicludu .the DIJ-J gen or the air from Iho, diseased part, and keep it "moist, rccnrwratlw   

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