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Alleganian Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1865 - Page 1

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Publication: Alleganian

Location: Cumberland, Maryland

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   Alleganian (Newspaper) - June 28, 1865, Cumberland, Maryland                                FOLTTME II; CUMBERLAND, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 1865; NUMBER 8. VEllY WEDNESDAY MOKNHTG. flico on Ittocliuuu! Street, ucai- Nutiomil House. TI'IIOI? UK WO r.r iho nnJtri.tWv in iiiHnnn1, lur it Kfi tL.ui six uUeul JAS.SVItll. krl. uf the Cin nit UKil.L.V. iji-hT  I closed to us that could have caused K total frequently inierposed and regulated for il- change in her very nature, could have par- Dry Goods House. TLLIAM DEVHIES CO., Xo. 312 Baltimore Street, Iktncca Howard ami Liberty BALTIMORE, ma, ronsHntly on liiml, n Ijinze nn.l Attractive aiwk" uf Foreign unit Domestic Xlry Goods, Notions, "our purchases twins made Cash, will he prqwcn: to Rif P nil ailrant-igM c Ibis or olhfr ,'itmut) 13, 1EC; 6111 ffcreil in such us the Constitution Kill if this rrf.i nnl crident from the in-lritmonl il- telf, the chdrnclcr of (he men who composed the convention, and the spirit of the Amcr- I ican people at that period, would prove it. Hatred of a monarchy, niadc the more in- i tense bv tho conduct of the monarch" from j whn.sc Government they had recently cope- nnd a deep-teated 1 >vc of CnhslTtn- lional made 'the more keen and ac- liveTliy tl'O ;icri3eos which had illustrated their revolutionary career, them could never ho induced to del- i egatc anycicculivc authority, uaUo -jarcful- jlf. lint with us il was thought tafo-t to give the entire power to Congress, since Himmary and severe punishment might IPB inllietjd at the mere t7il! of the Ktecutive. .Slorj's Com. .-eet. I.IH'2.) Xo member of the Contention or any com- mcnUilor on the h a inti- maU'd that even this Congreiiional power could hi applied to tit'uens not belonging to the army or navy. The power given lo Cotigre--U "to make rtile-s for the government and regulationa! of the land nnd naval forces." No artifice of ingenuity can make words include thosj who do not belong lo the army and naiy. And they arc thcafore to be con- strued to exclude all others, as if negative words lo that cCect had been milled. And this ia not onlv Ihc obvious meaning of the terms, considered by but is de- monstrable from other isioin of Ihe Con- stitution. So jealous nere our ancfctora of power, and fa vigilant to protect the against it, that they were nn- xulling lo leave him In the .safeguards which a proper constiuclich of Ihc Constitution, as nriginaliy adopled, furnished. In (hit they resolved that nothing should be Itft ia doubt. They determined, therefore, not only lo gtjard him agaiast cxcsulive judicial, but against Congressional abuse. AVith this they adopted the fifth Cjnititulional amendment, which declarer, that "no person phull be held to answer for n capital or oth- erwise infamous crime, nnlcss on a present- ment or indictment of a grand jury, except in rases arising in tbo land or naval forces, or in time of war or piibliuilahgcr." This ucw is elaborated by reference to tieipated in the crimes iu question, it ia al- most impossible to belie; c. Such a belief can only be forced upon a reasonable, un- suspecting, unprejudiced mind by direct and uncontradictcd coming from pure and perfectly unsuf peeled sources. these "i Is the evidence uncontradicted Are Ihc Iwo wilnc'sci, AVcichman, nnd Lloyd, pure and unsuspected 1 Of the par- ticulars of their evidence I pay ncthiyg They will brought before you by my as- sociates. Hut the conclusion in regard to tlie'B witnesses must have in the minds of the court, and is certainly strongly imprc-s- cd upon my own, that if the facls which they themselves ttatc H3 Id llteir con- nection nnd intimacy vrilh Bnolhnnd 1'ayno arc Iruc, their Knowledge of ihe purpose lo ceunnit the crime and their participation in them is much more satisfactorily established than tho alleged Imnwlcdgc and participa- tion of Slrj.Surntt. As far, gentlemen, as I am ccnccrncd, her is now in ycur AW ILLINOIS 'WEDDING. At the age of eighteen I married n minis- er. Kuccne Morrison was my first and last ove, aud though I must in trulh say that he life of a minister's wife ia a sort of re- ined slavery, itill I never for a moment re- rrelled my choiw. first call, after our inanbgc raa to the village of Muall ilacc iu the Stale of Illinois. Our home was primitive, bnt 1 had brought vith me many luxuries from the and both were young and hopeful, and life ras not unpleasant to 113. 1, of course, encountered Ihe trials of nost minister's wives. I was criticised and bund fault nith, until I wondered if I was lot tho incarnation of original sin itself; and frequently had ileubts whether anybody in he world was to be held responsible for heir ill deeds but myself. My theology was very dubious at this time, aud my faith frequently went below low water mark. My parishioners were exbsodiiigly faithful in pointing out the beams in my CVLS. If ever a woman hud incentive to reform on the aduce of then i had; not a day last but I was admonished in MHHC way. Jiiss Eolitwoed said T dierscd too much. A minister's wife to set a better cs- before, the younglings of her flock. laid her admonition to heart, and took the trimming off my bonnet, and wore it with nothing but crape. '1'hen Mrs. Hale called lo tell me that I waa a disgrace to the pir- wearing such a dreadful bonnet. Peo- ple would think I was of the Quaker per- suasiou. So I put the Irimming on again. Then old Mrs. Stanley met me in the slrcet and said so riuch blue ribbon was unbefit- ting the wife of a preacher of the gospel. So I laid tli5 blue aiide, and appeared in LroiTii. Aunt Sally- Lane called the nest day be- fore breakfast to know who pf my fJlks was bad noticed that my bontiet was trimmed in mourning. If I called on a few of our parish, they eaid I was gadding, and pitied poor Mr. Morrison, dreadfully; if I ttaid at home, 1 was "too stuck up to visit poor folks." Just as surely as the supply in my larder ran low, 1 would have an influx of compa- ny, and the air of IJrookboro was peculiar- ly favorable lo Ihe growth of appetite. All the straggling ministers, tract agent', beggars and vagabonds came to (he parson- age; aud we were obliged lo entertain them, bccaiiFO, Kugctie said by ihus doing we might entertain angels unawares. In endeavoring to obey this command I gate shelter to a man who called himself a colporteur, and who proved his right to wear rings by stealing a dozen silver napkin-rings and a butter knife, given inc by my .sitter. Hut I did not intend to write my own was going to give you a glimpse of an Illinois nodding. One fine day in early winter, my hus- band received a summons to llurke's icttle- ment, to unite n couple in tho bonds of wed- lock. It was especially requer.teil tint hi? wife fchould accompany him, and we !-hould be expected to remain all night, and partake of the festivities. Usnrr.noon. ThcTJiclimoud liltii states that Juilgi Underwood is the oc- rupant of a house in Xorfolk, worlli twenty thuoiiand dollars, which was confiscated in his own court, and which ho purchased for the sum of fifteen hundred dolliirg. It K also ttalcd thnt its former 'tfwncr, Mr. Mc- Yoigh, a goatlcman of Cfly years of age, nlthougb lie never held offieo of any sort under tho Ccefetierato Government, besides hiring Iii3 properly conGjcatcd; was indict- ed last wccl: by the Graad .lury at Norfolk for higa treason. U was twenty iniics lo the FclUcmcntand we reached the log house of Mr. Uurke, the father of thb expectant bride, about noon.' A dozen tow haired children were at the gcr into ycr as good as n soap- alone." A fateful squall announced the execution of the rooster, aud shortly afterward he waJ bouncing about in a four pail kettle bung over tho fire. Sal returned to the churu, but the extraordinary fisitc'rs must "have made her careless, for eheup'set the concern; and butter and buttermilk went swimming; over I1 e floor. "Grab the ladle. cried Mrs. Burke, "and help to dip it up. Take kecr, don't put that f narl of hair in. Slrango bow folks will be so nasty. Dick, do you keep your feet out of the won't bo fit for the pigs when the gathered. Drive lhat hen oul, quick, she's picked up a pound of butter already. There Sal; do try and churn a little more kcerful. If jou are gwiue to be spliced ter morrcr, you needn't run crsry about it." "I'd advise you to dry remarked thu brida elect, thumping away at Ihe churn. 1'y Ihe lime T had gol fairly thawed, dinT uer was ready; and you may he sure I did not injure myself by over eating. Night came on early, and after a social chat, about the evenl of the morrow, I fcig- nified my desire io retire. Sal lighted a pitch" knot, and began climb- ing a 1 idder in one corner of the hesitated. "Come cried be afraid." Pam and BUI, and Dick, nnd all of the rest of ye, dud: your heads while Elder's wife goes up. Look cut for. the loose inarm; and minJ, or you'll smash your braiua oul against that beam. Take kecr of the hole wlierfl the chimbly conies through." Her warning came too late. I caught my foot iu the end of a and fell headlong through what appeared to be interminable space, but it was only to Ihe room I Jiad jutl left, where I was saved from destruction by Bill, who caught tiie in his arms and set me on my feet, remarking coolly: "What made you come that I We ginerally use the, ladder." 1 was duly couimiscra'led, and at last got lo bed. Tile less said about that night, Ihe bolter. Bill and Dick, and four others, slept in the same room with us, and made the air vocal with iheir snoring. .1 fell asleep, and dreamed I was just being fired from Ihe muzzle of a Columbiad; and was awakened by Mr. Morrison, who informed me that it was morning. Tho marriage was lo lake place before breakfast, and Sally was alreadyclad in her bridal robes when I descended Ihe ladder. She was magnificent in a green calico gown, a crinoline full four inches lar- ger lhan Ihe rest of her white, apron with yel- low neck ribbon, and white collon glover: Her reddish hair was fastened iii a hind, and well ndorned.wilh Ibe lail-feath- ers of Ihe defunct rooster before mentioned. When it was announced that L'cinV Lord the groom was coming, Sully dived" behind a coverlet, which liad been hung acrors pno corner of the room to conceal sundry pots and tellies, nnd refused to come forth. Sir. Lord lifted one corner of tho curtain, and peeped in, but quickly retreated; n slew door, waiting our arrival. ed the iieir.s instaul'y. They telegraph- Mann! inarm! here's the Hhlcr ur.d his various legal authorities, nnd the Coastitu- It" a Lady "throw.? herF< dcrstand sac Carried for tion.il questions ure at length. .t "comfortably uuderslJinl The sixth, amendment, which our falhcrt I ricJ a Tcallby eld man flliam she hates woman! Tliej'rc nothing SheV got a mail's hat on, and a turkey wing in the front of il; nnd his nose is just like dad's as n cow horn wjuash." Alas for Mr. Morrison's nctiuilinc nose, of which ho was a lilllc vaiu! called a shrill female voice from the interior of Ihc cabin, "run out and grab the rooster, and I'll clap him into Iho pot! yon tjuil thai churn and sweep the floor. Kick lhal corn dodger under (lie bed! IJill, you wipe the tiller out of that cheer for thu minister's wife nnd be nboul Further remarks were ciit short by our entrance. Mrs. Burke, in calico sllort-gown, blue petticoat, and barn feet, came wiping her fnce on her apron. "How do jou do, Klder? d'ye do marm. ?Iust excuse my head haiut had no chance fo comb it siiice hft week. .Work muft did, you 1'owcrfnl frharp air.haintil? Shoo, there! turkey out nfithe' bread trough! Sal, lake Ilii lady's ihinga." Set right up to the Ore; marm. I land's Well, just .ran 'cm. .in Bill's we keep it long n purpose." Bill presented his shaggy head, but I de- clined with an involuntary UimJdcr nnd a fevr sharp words from advising him lo mind his own bu'siucsa., __ j A'cry soon Ihe company and in half an hour Ihe. room was-fillecl. "Xow, cried Ihc briJe-grodm, "drive ahead! I want it dune up .abort. I'm able to pay for the do .your best." "Come father Burke, Irot out-yer gal." Bui Sally refused lo be She would bo married where the was, or not all.'. We argued, and coaxed, but she was firm: and it was finally concluded lo kl llcrhave lie'rown way. Mr. Morrison slood-lbc happy couple hands through a rent in tho coverlet, and Mm ceremony proceeded. Just as Mr. Morri- son was asking Lemuel "will you Imve-lhii woman, down 'came the coverlet, en- veloping bridegroom aud pastor, nnd filling thu house with dust. Dick had been the loft, and cul ihe string which held it._ Mr. I'ltrrison crawled out looking decid- edly sheepish; and Sally was obliged lo.lw married openly. To Hie momenlous qucs- 11911, Lemuel responded, "To be else did I come here font" and Sally replied, if you must knovr." "Sainlo your said Mr. .Morrison; when all was over. "Now Kldcr. what is th'e da'magc? ba afraid lo "Whatever JOH ton.'. _' a of pir from hii pocVel. TsC '.'There, ljq; Jlia'-iKeilXljrdjiujdn nu'd vou'tOj wclublnojortlje, Jrull it.1'-., JIj liusWid Fiowedjiix t'h .jispplo-wcnttodaaciog. M.ropBurkejscnt to Bitting nud, ,t, Mr. clincd with an involuntary shudder love, if file is' if sht tt'in'l actually a Mrs. iu i. 1 wood. Iletc.'warm, take ivl,   

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