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Alleganian Newspaper Archive: June 7, 1865 - Page 1

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Publication: Alleganian

Location: Cumberland, Maryland

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   Alleganian (Newspaper) - June 7, 1865, Cumberland, Maryland                                :bLTTME II: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1865; NUMBER-5; J. U 'ERY WEDNESDAY MORNING. Ico en Mechanic Street; near the National House. TKKMS OF SUBSCIUI'TION vuir, iiiviiriiW.r in arivaniv. fur .v less itriod tbaii tli lea of the Circuit Hon. JAS. SMITH. cf tve Circuit HORACE RtSLLY. It- of W. HOOVLr.. CASUi T GARLIT2 aro .A. rsansios IS CHISHOLM, Js. TJOfGLAS A. M. KMJAH KHIE.VU, .101IX UKI.Ii. J. FTAI.I.1XOS. J. I. TOWSS1IKSD. S I.. rk In 1IHOWS. HAS.C.SHRIVER CO. 1IETAH. UCVLElid IN IPOS, CIIKMTCALS. P. OILS. LAMl'SnmlLAVl' nmn.UV. ami FAXCV TOILET AUTirUSs. Co-ncnif ItiUimore and VeclmmS sltii.ti. luliu S, J-. _ _____ .7AMES 711. SCULLY'S LAW OFFICE, B OF cant'K, ATTORNEY AT LAW, VUXBEEL I.VU, J-Ofliif Wist oHVilfc in the .MI i. llic of theUcTboiius I uiuir. ll, IfetJj. II. LU KBVKE .t CO.. DHUGGISTS CHEMISTS, HiLuiuire, Littmn f.iljerlii ,j Centre CUMUKIII.AXP, 310 JOHN K. HUCK, Up'iohlcrcr ami Taper Hanger, Jcr in all Pnpor, Blintls, Curtninsi bto., etc ILilto. 'tRLi, ii ftn doors iboii I'tat- Ullue. M. M. KKAKNRY, 30.10 t Dealer in TEIS, risii, tllKrSsC, TOIIACCO, C1GAUS, Ac. [In lore jlntiU, oppoJiti> A.M. I.. s Ti.li.t'1- Ciiuilnrliuul, Mil. Maj 10, ItM A. LONG, Wuilcrj in anitt arc.' Iron, Sltrl, Cutlery, rtr, -Till.r'Mdil startil, corner lUltiiaorc anil 31e- pi) Hats, Caps, elc. M 1C MU WILT.1A.M J Till, Copper, anil Slicrt-Iron IVaro, i I.liitl, nc ir llic bridge, IWItimoro strcil. IIALi: SWAllTZWE DlllLF III M Slalioncry and Fancy Goods, 1 niler Ilih Mere Hall, lUlliiimrnlrtet. AXDKK'.V OOND13H) Dealer in ailj'-matlc Collars, Cr.itats, PIIIUTS, DltAWEIIS, nr, Itilliraore-ctrcrt, the SAMUKL T MERCHANT TAILOK, A XI) ULUTIIIUK, illimure. street, nisir tho I'uUie A. r  il or diplomttic oflici-rB, domc'-tic or foreign agcnta of the prctcndei Confederate government. 2d. All who lift judicial stations under the Uuited States tu nid the rebellion. urd. All who diall lnue been military o; naval ofiiccrs of said pretended Con'edcrati [ovcrnmuut above the rank of Colonel in the army or Lieutenant in tile ttavy. All whd left in theCongrcfsof the United States to aid the rebellion. 5th. All who resigned or tendered resig- nations of their cotmnisMouti in the army or navy of tlio United States to otadc duty in the rebellion. Cth. All who liave engaged in rtny way in trenting otherwise than Ian fully, as prison- ers of war, persons found in tlio U. State" service us officers, soldiers, n'.itncn, or in other capacities. All persons who have been or arc absentees from the United States for the pur- pose of aiding the rebellion. Sth. All military and naval officers in the rebel scrvice who were educated by the Gov- ernment, in tlio military Academy at AVcst Point, or the United Stales Academy. Dili. All persons who held tlio pretended offices of Governors of Stales tu insurrection against the United Stales. 10th. All persons vlio left their homes within tho jurisdiction and protection of tile United Stales, and passed beyond tho Feder- al military lines into the so-called Confeder- ate .States for the purpose of aiding the re- bclilori, lltli. All perKmswho have been cngng'dd in the destruction of the commerce of the United Stales upon the high SCM, mid all pcrrofcs who Imvo made raids in In tho Uni- ted State? from bcerf engaged in destroying tha commerce of tlm United States upon tha lakes and rivers Ihatscpcr- afo (ho British provinces frorai the United States. 12th. All persons tfhtf at the time: wncn they seek to obtain the benefits herein by (aking tho cnlh herein prescribed arc in mil- itary, naval or civil confinfitrfcnt or custody, j or under tho bonds tho civil, military or nival authorities, or ngcnls cT the UiulH ns iirinmcra of war. or persons dc- I force immediately before the 20th day of ind, cither bcfo'ro May. A. date of the so-called ainwl for oflencos of any kind or after com iction. loth. All persons who voluntarily iurlii.ip.ltcd in rebi-lliou. and the esti- mated value- of whoiu taxable property is twenty thuii-iind 14th. All porbOtiswho have taken the oath of amnesty, as prprcribol in the I're'-i- dent's proelamation uf December Sth, A. D. ISOli, or an oath of allegioni-e- lo the of the Unilul States einee tho date of said proclamation, nud nliolinic not ihenceforward kept and tiiaintaiiled the tamu 1'roxidud that cpceial applieatiou may be made to tlio I'rcaidcut ftir pardon any potion belonging to the cxceptcd classes, and .such clemency will be libcr.dty cslended as may Uu consiateiit with the facts of thu cabos and the peace and dignity of the Uni- ted Suites. The Secretary of Stale will establish rules and regulations for administering re- cording the said amnesty oith, so as" to in- sure its benefil to the people and giFard the government against fiaild. In whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the teal of tho Uni- ted Slates to bo affixed. JJdie at llio city of IVaghingtatl Ihe twcnty-nitith diy of Jlay, in the year t'f our Lord Olio thousand eight hundred and sixtj-fivc, and of the Independence of tho United State the eighty-ninth. A.NUr.mi Joitsso.v. the WM. II. Sun ABU Secretary of Stale. Proclamation ns_to IT. Carolina. tlie uf tlic L'uit'il Ktitlit. AVhcrcas the fuurtli scetion of tlic fourth article of tlic Comtitutioii of tlio Unilcd Slate declares that thu United States sllnll guarantee to every Stale in llle Union a re- publican form of government, andihall pre- lect each of them ag unit invasion and do- mestic violence: And whcrcts the President of the United States is by Ihe Constitution made Conlman- dcr-in-Chief of the Army and N.ivy, as well as Chief Civ il 1 Executive officer of the United States, and is bound by solemn oath f.iitli- fully to execute the oflieeof President of the United States, and to talc care llril Ihc laws be faithfully executed. And whereas tbc rebellion which has been waged by a jwrtion of tho people of tlic Uni- ted Suites aeainst the properly eonstitnted authorities of tbp government thereof, in the violent and revolting Turin, but whose organized and armed forces hive now been almost cntirclj overcome, lias in its revolu- tionary progriss.-deprived tin1 people' of the State of North Carolina of .ill civil govern- ment. And whereat- it becomes nccessiry anil proper to carry out aud enforce the obliga- tions of tlic UniU'd .Si.lies to the1 people of North Carolina in securing them in Uiu en- joyment of a republican form of govern- iiiciit. Xcitr, Therefore, in obedience to Lhc high and solemn duties imposed upon me by tho Con- stitution of Ihe United States, and for the purpose of enabling the leva! people of slid lo a State government, where- by justice may be established, domestic tran- quility enjoyed, and loyal citizensproteetcd in all their rightl of life, liberty and pro- perty, T Andrew .Tolmsotl, President of the United St.itcs and Conimander-in-chief of tilt Xtnij and navy of the United Stales, do hereby appoint Wm. AV. Iloldcn Provisional Governor of the State of North Carolina, whose duty it shall be at the earliest prac- lieable period lo prescribe such rules and regulations as may tie necessary anil rropur far Convening a convention cnmpOHnl of delegates to lie chosen by that portion of llio people of slid Slate who are loyal to the United and no for the purpose of altering or amending Ihe Constitution thereof: and with authority to exercise within the limits of Stn'o all the powers nrid proper (o enable such loyal people of the Stjte of North Carolina to restore said Sfci'c te its con'titti- tional rclatims lo the Federal govcrntncnl, and to present ftlcli a Krjiublican form of Stale government as will cnlitlr the State lo the guarantees of lite Unilcd States llicrc- for, and its people to protection ny tfie Uni- ted Sin tea again.lt invasion, insurrection and dontolic violence; provided th.it in any elec- tion that may be hereafter held fur choosing delegates to any Stale Conventions, rts afore- said, rlrifoii shall .-.s arr'elec- tor, or skill be eligible as a member of convciititrrj, unless he simll previously taken and enbseribed tbe oath of mnucsly as set forth in the President's pruclamiition of Mny'sOtn'; A. D.S1805. ami is K voter (jualiEcd as by ihc ,and uf tltc Stalc-tf Norili Cnfolina in ordinance of secession and the said con- vention, when convened, or the Legislature that may Ire thereafter assembled, will pre- scribe lira qualification of e-leotors and the eligibility of persons lo hold office under llic Constitution nud thu law: of the State, a power the people of the fcv oral Stales com- posing the Federal Union have righteously from theoiiginof the Government lo Ihe present time. And I do hereby direct, First. That thu military conlmaudcr of tho department and all ofiiccrs aud persons in llfj military an'l llaval tctvice did atid as- sist the said Provisional Governor in carry- ing inlo cnbct this proclamation, and they are enjoined to abstain from any way hin- dering, impsding or discouraging the loyal people from the organization of a State gov- ernment herein atttliorirctl. Second. That llic Secretary of State pro- ceed to put in force all laws of tlie United States the administration whereof belongs to the State Department applicable to the geo- graphical limits aforesaid. Third. That the Secretary of tlic Treas- ury proceed lo nominate for appointment .assessors of laxca, collectors of customs and Interim! revenue, and such other officers of tile Treasury Department as are authorized bylaw, and put in execution the revenue 1 iws of the United Stales within the geo- graphical limits aforesaid. In making ap- pointments, the preference shall be given to tpialiflcd loyal persons residing ttithin llio districts where illcir respective duties are to be performed; but if suitable residents of the districts shall not be found, then persons residing in other States or districts shall bo appointed. Fourth. That the Postmaster General pro- cbcd to establish postofiiccs and post routes, and put into execution the postal lafrs of the United States within the Fiid State, giving lo loyal residents the preference of appoint- ment, but if suitable residents are not found thc'e, to appoint agents, from other States. _ Fifth. That the district judge for the ju- dicial district in. which North Carolina is in- eludrd, proceed to hold courts within said State, in accordance with tho provisions of the act of Congress. The Atloruey General will instruct llic proper officers lo libel and bring lo judgment, confiscation1 and sale, property subject to confiscation, and enforce tlicndiilinistrniion of justice within said State in all matters within the cognizance and jur- isdiction of the Federal courts. Sixth. That tlio Secretary df tile Navy take possession of all public properly belong- ing lo the Xavy IJepirtuicnt within B lid geographical limits, and put in operation all ai'ls of Congress in relation to naval affairs having application lo said Stale. Seventh. That the Secretary of tlio Inte- rior put into active force the law1- relating to iho Interior licpartment applicable lo tlie gcbzrnphicill limit? aforesaid. In tcslimtitiy whereof I have hereunto set my kind ahd caused the seal of the States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington this twenty-ninth day of May, in Iheyoar of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty- fire, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-ninth. .Aftniu.tv .Tonvsof. Hy the 1'residcnt: II. Srwtim, Secrcta'ry of Stale. AV'i. A Beautiful Sentiment. SKIT! Amr nflcj nhli pleading cjfi, "Di-ir C'lurle.i, IcaLli ihp, vtill ion, The w wnli 1 htsirtl rour aiiitain wj I kliuulil like tu drill ran." "WliMl littls j'cfii lake coinni.inilf Will, Ami, I'm In nucli .as j o irs I can'I tcb li-uch otcr there, niul Ring out Like sunil ut CLtp" "llli. Uiu'll ivtl.e up '.l.lirp, Unu't eluiut'likv ilnit, ilrar, pUiiv." ptniul at like this j ou And then 1 timl Rrarco nitlllloii Tim next touimniul M.U liare tu Is Una one, "Xou, Auir, fiuiirllr, aflcr me, (You're sun.', dtar, it tlnu'l burc in inli-lialt-froul-rigtil Tlitre, nou', I'm close before 'PrFHiil it Joc3 look odJ, You don't Ulieve 1M Irillr hold our urnis just like 111 drill without the tiilu. "Xou sny 'Silutc jourodiarr Charlca, fur tlmuie, Imw l-nn you? I thought 3 ou H( rv at trick, You niii'i, juu." Clmrlcs 'ordinnl without command, She htr rmuplctl liiir, Anil jKiutnl, Irouncd, anil MiHlitil, nud tlicn Sflid Boltlj were." DON'T complain of your birlh, your train- ing, jour employment, your er fancy jou could be something if :you only hnd a differelit Idl or sphere assigned to you. God urdcrrstaildrf hia otrn plltls, and kiibvra what jou want belter than youjlp. The very things that you most deprecate as fatal limitations and Obstructions, arc probably what you nioit want. What you call hin' dranccS and discouragements, are probably Dpp'ortutiities and it is nothing to dis- likes his or any certain prooi Ihat they are a trUcu to" all sueh impatience. Choke thai devilish envy which gnaws at your heart because you are not in Ihe same lot with others; bring dovri jour eoul, or rather bring it up td receive Gud's will, aiul do his nurd, in your lot, ii jour sphere, Under your cloUd of obscurily agaiubl your temptations; and then you slml find that j'our condition is never opposed t your good, but really consistent with it. An Idea 6f Pnitli. A female Icachcr of a school that Btooi on the bank of n "stream wished to comum nieate lo her pupils an idea of faith. Wlnli hhc was trying to explain to them Lhc inear ing of Ihc word, u small boat glided in sigh along the stream. up the inciden for an illustration, shu "If I were to tell jou there was a leg o mutton in lhatboit, you would believe me would jou not, even without seeing it your selves r "Yef, rcpliid the "AVcll, that id the sehoo luLilrcss. _ The next day, in order to lest their re collection of Ihe lesson, she "Vi'lutw "A leg of mutton in a was th answer, shouted from all parts of the sehbol Shortly after the dcpirluro of llic lamen- ted Ilcbcr of India, he preached a sermon which contained this beautiful illustration: "Life bears us on like tho ttrcam of a mighty river. Our boat ut first glides down the. narrow channel tlirotigh tlio playful murmttrings of the little brook and ihc wind- ing of its grassy borders. The trees shed their blossoms over our young heads, tho flowers seem to offer themselves to the young hinds; we are happy in hope, and grasp ea- gerly al ihc beauty around but the stream hurries ori, dnd flill our hands arc empty. Our courrc id you'll! and luaua'ood :i alorfg a wilder and dcrpcr flood; amid ol jccts more striking and magnificent. We are animated at the moving pictures enjoyments and industry arorind us; we are excited al some short lived disappointment. The streams btirus on, and our joys and griefs are alike left behind us. may be shipwrecked, bat wo cannot IH> dofaycd; whether rough or smooth, the river hastens lo its home till the roar of the ocean .our crfrs, rind ihc los- bing cf tho waved ii Ecn'eallt our feet, and Ihc floods nro liftecl. up around us and we take our Icaro of cffftli nfid its inhabitants, until of ouV there is rio' wit- ness save tlto Indefinite and Ktcrrtal." The moon Ls tho beautiful lily wIiicL the "earth weiri upon her bosom. ATT INVITATION TO DINNER 11 was observed thai si certain covctou ri.'li min never invited any one to dine wit him. "I'll I ly a said it wag, "llial will get nu invitiitiun frulu llini. Thu wager was accepted. Ilo goes th next day to the rich ihanV, house about th time he was Iodine, and (ells tlioscrvanth must xpcak with his master immediately for he can save hiln a thousand pounds. said-the servant to his, master "here ia a niau in a great hurry to rpcn with you, he siytf he can save you a llion Kind pounds." Out came life fnaslfr. "What is that, sir? 1'ous.iyyotlcansav mo a thousand [founds 4 'Yes, fir, I can; but 1 see you arc a will go away, arid call again.'1 "Oh pray, sir, come in and Uskc diunc with me." "I shall be troublesome." at all." 'Ihc invitation was a'cccplcd.' As soo'tf a dinner was over the family retired. "Well, said Ihe man of Ihc house "now lo your business. Pray Ict-mo kno how I am to E.ITO a thousand "Well, sir, 1 Near you daus to' dispose of in marriage'.-" "I i j. "'And you intend to portion her-with .tc thousand pounds." Vl do, th "Why, then, sir, let mo have will take her 'Ilo master of tho house "arossjn passio iind kickol him out of door'.' i GOOD NATUEE: .-I c Tho other day we happened lofall in with casual (specimen of a'good'nalnrcd gcntlc- lan. Ho had some before time been unjustly rented as lie thought by another, man in, a cgotiatioh; Jnd was accordingly, 'ihough. .of happy Icmjiercmcnt, considerably incensed. Ir. A. (so wo will call him) resolved never hold any intcfcbur.se again with Ihe man wlio' hnd offended 'him', "and" IIP said EO. lark haw Iho flint carried fire." About 'a. a friend" aKjcsIclcd t'Ji 12 received a .note from uliii ceommcnding the perech who had done the- to a "lucrative bank whereof he was one of itie dircciora. Tho riend was niu'elfsu'rpriscd, and a lay or two meeting Sir A., in- [dired "how he came lo be'cxcrting liiinsolf n benefiting art enemy agatnet rwhom ho lad vowed rcvcrige." lie opcried his and seemed just "vTakfd up to a conscious- ness of tho position of affairs.- 'iWhy to onfess.the said he, cct that Jittlo eircumstanc'd'.nt tlio icxt time I liave a quarrel be ibscrvcd with a smile, "I mttst take care to nnkc n memorandum of it." Wo shall not nuch fear the spite of 'a gentleman' who has o write in his note boolf, lest he'may'forget t. Let us all show our indignation at in- urics done aiding tho wrong doer to 'btain employment. If such ta- :cn we cannot answer for the coniequenccs. Oho will lie, ill all probability; away with a great iUaliy anti-societies; wo ake it, ia an abbreviation of societies. .ludimn i _ How to Prevent a Divorce: When the sciiipr TrumbuU'wai! joveni'or of. a gentleman, call- ed at his house requesting lo EGO Ilia Excel- lency in prhale: .Accordingly he was shown inlo his sanctum sanotb'fuhi; and Gov- cradr cairie forwardlo ufcetSquire niqrriing, Squife tho, salutation, addibg as he did EO, "IL called an n.vcry errandjjhir, your foA- vicc. M Jr wifa ;and .1 do not live sliappily togcllicr, and I am now thinking of getting a divorce. What n The Governo'r'Eat a few in Ucep' thought; thcti turning t< la SquiroAV. said; "lloir did you treat 3Ire. W- when yoawero courting her? and how did you feel towards her at tho time 'of her Squire W. replied, "I treated her as kindly I could for I loved her dearly at Laid the Governor, "goyoit honic and court licraoir jusijks you.did then, and. lovo -her ay when you married" her.': Do this in the fe'ar of God fo'r one year, and tell me the Tho' GbVcrnor" th'eii said, "Let us pray They bowed in prayer and separated. TTtc'ri a year' had'passc'd away, W. called again to see crnor, and grasping his bandi said: led, sirt lo thank you the advice" you gave mo; mid lo you that my wife and1! are as happy aa when weTwero marriod.' I cannot be graicfuj enough for your 'good "I amglncTto heir Jlr. and I hope ihal you will conluiue to court your wife, as long aa you live." r The rcsnlt 'was Ibal Squire W. and his wifo lived hap1- pily logelhcr lo the end of theif'marricd 'LctlhOic'wIio'nre Ihinkingiof separalion.id there days 'do likewise- n j.n1 A Each mother is a hLtdrian'.-? Shi. writes not iho history of empires, or, calibha on pa- per, but she writes her own history on tho impurishablc mind of her cnildP That" tab- let and that r history, will 1 remain 'indclibli! .when time shall.be. rip That history each mother will meet again and read witli eternal joy or Unutterable grief in cotuing, of ctctnily. This thougbL should weigh on the mind of- every molhcr, and re'lider her -circumspect, 'ami prayerful, and faithful in her Solemn work of training tip cuildrca forncavfln and im- ij: -I z: The minds of hc'r children are. ccplible and word.-'K look, a frown, miy engrave on Iho mind of'a'child1 which lapsVof Irmo tari or names iu iho smooth. '.whi out so feel, according C hut the' returning' wnjli o wrilo'inipnasioiis ill of jour child, nnrllic .stonnfl-of, ,uqr Death's, rn'ovirig Bgw.of.clcrnityi'oblit'rtlp.l -f.   

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