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Alleganian Newspaper Archive: April 5, 1865 - Page 1

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Publication: Alleganian

Location: Cumberland, Maryland

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   Alleganian (Newspaper) - April 5, 1865, Cumberland, Maryland                                .VOLUME 1, CUMBEBLAND; MARYLAND, WEDNESDAY, APRIL r i t i NUMBER D .1JX.XJB -fcJ.-fci.JL> EVERY WEDNESDAY WORKING. Ofllco on Mechanic Street, ncnr tlie National House. ERMS 01? DO1.IAIB pcr.vcnr, inramibli In Xu giiWriiilluil tukui fur u tetj [n.riud tl.au MX Judiieul the Circuit JAft. SMITH. Clerk of the- Circuit KfcLhY. IJeUist.r of HOOM.lt. T. RAULin; Ruir'a Attnrnu Ol'O. A. IIITHISTOX. CI11SIIOI.M, Judged of tlie UriililM's .1. Jl C UIPDHI.L, iMjrill.As ram, A. M. L, I1LM1. t'uunU Coliitliu-ioli> II UiI.ES TUnnni.V, KI.IIMI .1. u. .1. t, T u S loU'NdllUMl. Clerk tu CunuuUiioiirro JAC'OU CHAS. C. SHRIVER CO. WIIOI.hSALi: i ISETAIL IN DRUGS, CIIKMICALc, J'ATXTS, i. un'Sami LAW coon'. rniircMr.nv. ami F.V.NCV Toii.hr A in ICI.KS t'urncruf lltllmiorc and MLch.imc struct? i HO j. M. SUlILKV'a 3..VAV OFF 1C 12, VEST SWK Of WILLS' CliKCK, JI ATTOBWEY AT LAW, L-e Wi-it of ills iretk, in tlie Kooins klllltrtl M7 tlie'lMlKL of tilt. TllOIIIOS HIM r> 11, it. LI: FKVIII; co., filUJPGISTS CHEMISTS, ttllttmtrt, Ltliften Crii'rr Mrrrt', CtJMlJIUtLA.XD, rx K. urcic FrijoMercr and Taper Haiijcr, And Ik-nkr in 'Wall Taper, Curtmus( etc.; etc. stn.it. i fen dmirS 1'o-t- Ullt-c. M. M Dealer in WINES, LiQcor.fi, PROVISIONS, nsit, CHEESE, TOBACCO, CKUifP, Ac. lEallimurc strcf Is. nppft-iitc A.M. Tolnc- co ild. .Mill 10, 1ILT.MIJIHD Hfiltrs in Iron. Sicrl, rlcM II sluul, lorucr Iltltiiiuirc mid tlmr'i FUKDllHldK MISKB, in Siiors. Caps, Trunks, flc., n Sinn Illmk, I) ittimoro slrnl. AVILI.TVM uf Till. Copper, ami Sheet-Iron riiufcj' IJliiek, Ihr liillumirc "trft. HALi: Ife.iter in Books, Stationery and Fancy floods, I'nilir Hthttttre Hall, Itivltininrc street. AXDUKW OONDHU, in Ready-made Clothing, S1IIIITS, UKAWMIA iTr., llnllniitiro street, tlie SAMUKI, MERCHANT TAILOS, A X D 0 I. 0 T II 1 V. 11 THltilnorp street, near tlie Puljlie A. r. sirE Duller in Dry Xotlons, etc., 3 Stun illm-k, IJ-iltii. erntt, fc .TOHNSOX, ilrrs in Clocks, Watclirs, Jewelry, Silver anil 1'l.ATKD cle, N'rit   H num to uitet uS; Ilium lisuitt, mid inih Whin there wlin jrrei I op PUISCOT LIFE. It is rarely that nic'ii adapt theuisc-hi-s to a compulsory mode of life. They may M in it, and v.ith n ee-riain degree of unforced cheerfulness, but it can liardlj be called tiling, iu tbe Sense of the term. An eu'iily b-ihnced and fiirly tempjrcd man can submit himself with re'ignition to a fjto which is iuciitiiblo, nnd men who gone through n career of WiieS, as for instance the fortunes of war, can resign Hiciiise-h e-s lo a compulsory con- dition of life easier thin any other of num. lie-nee- it ii tint of war, ordinar1> 5pe.il ing, endure- bc-ttc-r (lie h.ud- ahips and of j long rajifii th.in any other cbe- of men could endure a Male fraught with Minilir woe'. ]'iobibh no il taken from among our citizen-, could c'ldure- a tithe- of thu Miflcr- inps endured by the Kcdcr.il prisoners in tho rebel birricks at Aiidcrconvillc, Georgia, simply because they Inic not ci countered ibo-e lici'-itudvs in the life of a soldier winch him to be resigned iu a mea- sure lo the fate of tho prisoner of war. 'I here ire instances recorded in history of irtcn piling yo.ifs of eSptivit} in lo ithsomc prisons, in dungeons where the light of the sun timer enter, and eion on "f.ir off isle's" of the, "en, out of society nnd rcmc'tnbr.-iiicc- Of all other humans; jet year? of hope-less ciptiiity, which (he active, onto world pronounee -i liung death, n ere full of enjoyment and cheer to the captives. One f-mious personage in history who endured long jeiri of imprisonment in a dungeon, amused himself by the taming of A celebrated Cardinil of Trance, who was clo'cled in the L'nstilo by his king, ninn-cd himorlf by writing the life- of his j.nlor, with the utmost itnp-irtulity. Many other instances could be adduced to tint cn under the- most compulsory condition of life men do frequently, against naturr-, ss it would seem, ad.ipt chc-crfnll} to their surrounding, adverse lo hap- pincf. The in-inner in ubicli onr Northern men, held in the of the South, manage (o endure the p ings of nii'iif, and such imprisonment too, as- many of the in fiom all accounts arc to, aro wonderfiiJ. liut nut Ic-s wondi-rful nre thu modes adopted to JHCSS anay lime and sweeten tho gloomy hours, among the Con- fedprisonera which we hold. Camp olfcrs- a f.iir specimen of Xorlhcrn war ]iri-i- on life1, and no duubt a book, and a vcrv in- teresting ono al that, might be written, (.ik- ing its mtbjivt, the prison lifa, of the at tliH cimp. The- details of pris- on life, and the interior daily routine among the cipthcs, m'ght -ilford, hi interesting in- lidcnU, material cnottgh fur a readable book. Tlicrc are not ninny people in Chicago who can conceive of wh it the inside of tho "pritouer's squire" at Camp Douglas can produce in the shape of fun and frofic. A n will derclope the f.ict that the rohi arc bj no meant given to the melancholy whirh "dries up the blood" or produces a doing away with It is true it is a hard fate to bo conpcllcd to go to brd at sunset and bo there confined the nett Outsiders would pronnuncu this but the reb-i inaicc up for it during tho hours of minlight In the Summer time, bill, crick- et, m.irble, along with gimes, such ns blindman's bull', le.ip frog, pull n- way, etc., fil( ttp the interim; and afford ono long round of enjoyment Mtd forgetfnlnesa. 1'oor fellows, jcarning for Cl-cir houici and the old familiar ficet, nnd the cheerful precincts of their hills and Who would wish to- like away from thecc poor, resources for whilisg away thu sad hours of imprisonment? Certainly only the veriest fanatic. The v-intcr pi'stimcs of the prisoners are very limited. ,Card playing is-practiced a- mong them to a universal extent, indoors. There are a very largo number of i; crj i them, however, and thofru entertaining orthodox eoruplca do not liractie-e the amufcmcnt. Thcru arc some slating pirkn in tlifc shape of small ponds within the "prisoners' which arc Crowded from morning utiltl night inds of "soldiers." .No tkate-s are lo be teen, although roinc uf iho prisoners have made rcijuosts at different times to be allow- ed to pnrclnse tkalcs. The latter are of lotirso t ibbooed. The jirisonerb are allowed of course no treapous of any kind, but their pocket Lniuxi, of the dirk or iMXvic knife or- der, they are allowed to relain. These are ail cndle-s bource of amuHincnt, and to a hourcu of actual profit. The pen krmcs are kept constantly going, in a in-in- ner anil to tho ctids which would put to shime the inhabitants of pei'ple, who are fiipposed (by a fiction) to in tho arl Uf whittling, as in most oth- er It id n notable fict, howcicr, thai "wbitlling ]iractice" ii as uniier'nl in thu Souili as the practice of thu in fact the two go together. The pen knife in the- crafty and btibtile banda of yome of the prisoners, is made to fashion some curious, and if the1 A'c'turaus lleseric :uen are lera- most astounding phenomena of work- in One pri-oner is c-rcditc'd with the eUriordin.iry feat of lining manufac- tured --olely with bib pen knife mid .1 fcinuli file, a miniature locomutiiv nnd train of cars to boot, with engineer, conduc- toi and posa-ngci to bs peen in their proji- cr places! The inateriais tf-ed were of tin jnd wood, and the whole said to be one of the mo-t eoniptete piece1? of mcchani'-m of the kind utcr seen. Another prisoner h is nnnufacturcd nut of pine, a niiniiturc' battle scene, which covers a board .1 jard and which represents in {he act the cm rent ol a heavj fight between the Fede- rals and the Confederatei. Thelitllc wood- en figures to represent files -nul columns of the udiccrs, gencr.il and Hue; the cnv- alry ehirging, the-irtjllery wheeling into position and belching forth, in fact all but the "thundering of the c-iphitia, and the arc car; cd out to life, and prc- bculrf altDgelher an and spirited battle scene, such a- (Jrlande rurioM) would haxe fain gazed upon with delight. Of ctmr-e the in the blaze of uctory and driung the blue co-its mcll. The on liar uf the briliant tceuc offered to contribute it to the coming Samtarv Fair, but liu was politely informed by the roni- mnndcr of the that it would not be ippropmtc, the being dmcn and the rebels the drivers. lie was inform- ed tint he might do well to complete the piece, portraying the second day of the bat- tle as an addition, in which it be be-irtily rccchcd as a Einvcnir for the Fair, or any ctficr object. The cunning pro- jector of the piece aioircd witli some asper- ity that he would tee the Yankee nation en- tirely and collective fir-t. lie will prob iMy not complete the scene. So much fur the pen cs. The prisoners have T sutler. They are allowed nne ont of ch iritj it is supposed, but sutler differs eomcirli it from other sutlers, and foam-in el in bis way. 1IU 's are moderate, bis goods are of a limited and bis profits are whatiniv be caltul enormous. The goodi for lie pf combs, Inir and tooth brush- es, pens, ink ami piper, and a few other ar- lint he- keeps no confection-try, e ikes or Iwcr, and is svpjtoscd to keep no whiskey, but from the fact lint row and then a plethoric (pecuniarily iking) oner isfoi'iid in a rapturous slate of ublir- it is thought (hat an occasional bottle of the ardent finds way among his tlorea. The article of tobacco, (lie most import-lilt of the Hitler's staples, was acci- dentally omitted from liit. weed is sold to the prisoners at a grievously ux- trnvnginl five cc-nls a chow, Imt then ific chews Liken by somo of the chivalry are a of grief to the plug of lobjceo from which they are taken, and cause the sutler to lopk during tlie operation. Sutlers ,irc about tho rwl unpopular per- sonages, in the armj, and the present tntler at Camp Douglas if no exception to his sphere. Among other sources of amusement adup- !ctl by the- Onnip Uouglaa war captives, the Confederate Stock fcchnngc should not lie omitteil. The Confederate Stock Ktehangc a serio mock instituttcn, established by tho most financial of llic prisoners t-omc months rineo. It ha.i its bulk and bears, who assemble on change, as the variutl1- rep- of the Confederate connnerco, iuiaginjtiTn'.a-.id real. Cotton, Coafcderato slocks nnd Confederate money arc all imlis- crimiualcly bulled ami Iwarcf! nith tho must frantic, io that thbwn ou tbe Btrect. It is-uniieces-jry to fay that Con- federate wcuritic'S are liefer below par, an tcotton is king. Other amusements of a very peculiar character, the rebs instituted (nutl discarded) from timu to time. They organkcd a theatre and ininstrc company. The theatre fatlc-d from Iae-L o1 tho necessary dramatic aecompaniiiicuts, but the minstrel compiny pro; cd a grand f ccs-i, being so uuiiucntly a Southern institu- tion. They had at one time a very profitable species of nmuscincut, dcrivc-d from the holding of mock court marti.ds, in which the principal "Tatikee" characters, political am military, were iinaigncd and lien ISutlcr was condemned to bodravtuant qmrtered, and Lincoln to bo hung in cfligy, which 1 ittcr tuiteiice from the nature of the i nsa was deferred indefinitely by order from the post commander. The literary abilities of most of the pri: oners nre below the- but better than has been represented. All of them view a newspaper in the same light in which very young children look upon nit Those who can read, read with aiidity, and those who cannot, read to A Confederate piper six months old will any time- bring n hundred dollars (in Confed- erate scrip) or probably or sis in Fede- ral money. The prisoners employ thcnisch es much in epistol iry us is known being allowed from to anil front.) JJnt, poor only a few of thc'ir tenderinr sh eah of necessity reach their des- tination, being subject. Id tbo conjoined u- eissitiulcs of miscarriage, fire, unle'r, the plundering cucnij and tho roving guerilla, who spare neither friend nor J'ost. _______....._______ Cheerful Houses. What snrt uf .1 bou-e do you Ih e in We do not sisk whether it is costly or cheap, wide or Harrow, of three stories or Whether it in the citj or country, we ciro not. Tt may command a fine prospect, it be shut in by sand banks or li> high- er buildiiigi. Thcfo things aro incidental. Hut we ask i" your house chtcrfult Out- side- has Trry little to do with this qne tinn, it is a matter of inside care and tiste. Othc-r peojihi pee the eiteriors of our hous- es; in- liro inside. They pass along and look but a moment; we slay in our rooms long hourt, dajs and months. Now we assert that the of a house depends almost wholly on the way it is "kept." The grandest mansion can bo in idc- gloomj and repulsive, contributing to a 'fplcnidid misery." Some of these rough cst, cheapest houses are choicest to in Wh.it in-ikes the difference? ly by way of suggestion, but we may be al- loircd to offe-r or three htnfs (o those who can ntc them. Let there be plenty of sunlight in your house. bo afnid of it God flood the world with light, and itcosU you an ef- fort to hhut it out. You want it as ninth as plants, which grow sickly without it. It is ncc'c'SMrv to jour health, spirits, good-na- ture and happy inllucnee. Let the sunlight stream freely in. Sjdncy Smith used to say, in his t-hccry "Glorify the and the shutters were opened wide to the god of day. I'lowcrs and vines are good in their places, but never allow them to keep out the HID. Let every room be thoroughly ventilated. Light and frcsTi air i-hould go We called awhile ago on some most excel- lent people who showed us into the parlor. Itw.13 a bright, clastic day without, nnd the house WIE prettily situated. Uut within in that room It was cheerless and Abominable close blinds were on tho wind- ows, and stranggling unei made them hard to open. The air was The furniture was handsome, but it could not shine; there wns a prc-lly on ta- ble, but ill beauty useless. Kntcrtain- cn and entertained were alike hngtml; their comcrcition nat) <-talc and flat, if not un- profitable. That wanted light and fresh air; thews artd a cheerful, hearty bear- ing, would have made the visilors glad to stay. As it was, they were glad to go. We do not believe in keeping a best room (br rare company.- We think the dwc-llcM in a boucc, those who are there constantly, and to whom, all, it needs to bo undo pleasant, should enjoy ita best pirts. We do e in ha; ingacarpct which will not bear the light. How absurd to keep its (lowers bright, wbilo the fade on the cheeks of yota- wifc and children! Have only whnt wilj bear proper use, and it. Let not cost bu mistaken fur Many a housekeeper sighs for now furniture when taste and good judgment Ja'ud, possibly thai absolute essential, tidiness, arc mud: more wanted.' 1'roper outlays should nev- er be grudged; for where can well spent M in making homo pleasant and Hut tho best comforts arc thutc within the reach of till. Where lovo' and true polituicca and cordial manners prevail, a homo can cafily ha m-ide pleasant. It is no clipht thing cheerful dwellings. A house should be made attrac- Ihe to the busy mother, toils iu it the day through: to the Cither, who comes home weary from bia cares; to the children, who are all the while moulded by outward im- pressions, uicn Hie It fliould be made agreeable to neighbors and friends It should help to contented hearts, a licaniing kindiie-sH of manner, buoyant ui'il happy and Christum Monthly. i THE LITTLE GIBIiS. I cannot well imagine a home, more'in- complete than that one where there is no lit- tle girl lo Eland in the of the domestic circle which boj-s never fill, anb to draw nil hearts within thu magic ring of her pre- sence. There is something aboiit little girbs which is especially lovable; even their will- ful, naughty ways, Ecem nllcrly of e- when they arc so soon followed by the hwect penitence that oierfiows iu such gra- cious bhowtri. Your boys arc great; no- ble fellows, generous, hning, and full of good impulses; but they are noisy, de- monstrative, and dearly as you love them, 3011 are glad their places is out of doors; but Jennie with her little step is always be- side yon; she brings the slippers for pipi, and Tvith her pretty, dimpled fingers unfold the paper for him lo read; bhe puts on n thimble no bigger fairj's, and with some mjstcrions combination cf "doll fills up a small rocker by mam.i, f Jill a wonderful assumption of womanly dignity. And who shall tell how the thrc-id of speech that flows with such sweet, silvery lightness form those innocent lips, twines it- self around the mother'b heart never id rust, not even the neat little face is hid a- mong the daisies, as so many mothers know. Uut Jennie grows lo be a woman, and ihcre is A long and shining Irack from the half latched door of childhood, till the girl blooms into the mature woman. There are tho brothers who alwaja fofltr their voices when they talk to Ihcir bister, and tell of Ihe sporls, in which ehc lakes almost us mucl: interest as they do, while in turn she in- structs them iu all the little minor details of home life, of which they would groir up ig- norant if not for h'cr. And what .1 shield she is upon the dawning manhood wherein so nnny temptations lie. Alwajs licr sweet presence to guard and in-pire them, a cheek upon a li% ing bcrmoii on immor- ality. How fragrant the cup of tea she hinds them ai the evening meal; how chee- ry her voice as she relates the little incidents of the day. Xo silly talk of an incipient be-anx, or love of young men met on' the promenade. A girl like that Ins no empty space in her head for duch thoughts to run riot in, and yon don't find her spending the evening in the dim ptrlor a blc young man for her company. When her lover comes, he ruflst vrlial ho has to say in the family silting-room with her father and mother, or, if ashamed to, there is no room for him there. Jennie's joung heart has not been filled by the per- nicious nonsense which results in so unhappy marriages' or hasty Bear girl, she thinks all tfic time of what a good home she has, what dear brothers, and on bended knees craves the blessings of 1 leaven to rest on them, but shedoes not know how far, v cry far for time nnd eternity, her own pureejcsinplc goes, how it will radiate as a blessing into other homes where a sis- tor's memory will be the consecrated ground of tho past. Cherish, then tbe iritln girls, dimpled darlings, who tear their aprons, and cut the tablecloths, and cat tbe sugar, nnd ait: thcm- sehcsthe nail of life! A "DvconTrr. OP remarked a schoolmaster toa jonng girl who had failed to give a satisfactory answer to a ijucstion in arithmetic, "when: I was your ;e T could answer any question in arithmetic that was asked "If you please) sir, I can give j ou a, question I don't think joti can "AVhatisit, Susan 5'' "Why, suppose one npplo danscd the nun of the whole humnn Jiow many such apples would it toko to make a barrel ofciderV'.. Schoolmaster A gentleman tlm other day, objected Jo, 'laying cards wlth-.i lady, bocansKShft h.-ql' way aboul'hcrv1 jt's Tho Wonders of NevWaT i Tha YirginU fci- tirjirisc contains a iule'festipj; the; extensile works of the'silver mines iu and around that There.an: whole communities and ground with cars, steam engines, aud many of tlig other appliances of upper world says: Descending at the Chollar works by a perpendicular abaft over four hundred feet in depth, one may waude.r oflT any direction. By two or three different roada we might travel eastward nearly balf a mile-, finally coming out to tlio light of day ill Iho southeastern suburbs of the city, among the mills and miners' cabiua; but we -will take another course.1 Leaving the village of j tho Chollaritcs, wo ''Along the sides of the narrow streets arc gliiamcr- twinkling far ahead, like distant stars, and othcia flushing suddenly upon us as we turn the corners with' d blind- ed affluence of'light. As we 'proceed on' our journey we meet with many picturesque gfoflps of miners at their labors. If ere-they are- Selling otit chambers in Iho prec-ious silVcf and there hoisting into place the stotlt i Hint arc to support the mountain and the city above AVe'piss through roomy caverns, w hose space robs our candles of -light, and: in whoso w alls j awn gloomy lead- ing we know not nA'd -aoout and within whose bl.icl: portals cubic pyritcf and brilliaht quartz crystals flash back Ibe'ligbt of our candles in n thousand mcrry'glow- worm twinkles. After passing through tbo' stibtcrrnncaii of divers mining com- panies, we come to th'c'ihrhing settlement of the saingc people." Having IfallcJ in their hospital bamlel long enough1 the Iciest underground news, 'and lo make spine' inquiries fildive' tj our road to -the villng'i, tbe home of Gould fcurry tribe5; we take our' leave4abd pnraife hot journey. Of course we see many vron'dera; meet with numerous adventures, and encounter more.' than one solitary not tary on the brink of more than one" yawning chasm', and jeipeHenco numerous and mixed reach the Gould Curry clan in We Cud them quite a civilized Although more tlifrn400 fcetbelow tho streets of the city, we hero- fifed a large with a hugo btcam enginc'in it, puffing Sway ns cornfortablyas though there was'nQ  his- sing engine, wonder whether we are rcaffy within 'th'o earth or upon it. ''Lamps'aro bunnng upon the passing- through the room in which we nro seated, aro going down coming !np stairs: bustling in every new face' ca'cH minute." We appear to have" stumbled up- o-i tbe gnomes. We Hnd, in passing throngli tho illage, thai the people bore have rail- roads running in direction; and, nairi tlio world above, have to clear the track for the rushing, trains dash wrnthfully out from dark aud loacsomo roada. With a "whiz" the cars fly past ns and away down along what seems one of tho dreary lanes to Satan's sooty kingdom! by-wny leadingstraightintothegmoky" capital. About us.we occasionally hear the sploshing of water, mingled with croaking sounds, and pass through places iwhere the air strikes damp and cold upon our. checks- to enter where it Is hot nnd stifling. Suddenly peals of thunder heads, nnd every galfery anil cavern echoes- its roar. Our nerves are soon quiet, forwo know that the noise was but'tho discharge of a toil of ore through some of the chutes abobe., There are inhabitants far above ns toward the surface of (lie place is like a huge ant hill. .Again, upon a sud- den, 6ur cars ari rent by on explosion- above, which causes usT for a moment to suppose that the, earth has burst iu its centre nnd is no longer a thin" of substance. We know that it was hut a blast which thus caused the place to' shudder, and smile at onr Ufo ncrvougucai. There are many roads leading' Gould Curry; and wVinight travel mile in several but -we'wilt con- tinue our jouruoy.northward am! rise to tho surface at the works of, the Best Belcher, through a shaft of hundred feet n depth, llcro we land nearly one hundred rolls noi-ln- of whcro Our underground., highways 'are being leitcndfil direction-, .wia.wiH- won, bo' those of tStt GohJBill mines ind'Jthcse1 those'of STafc-Z-In a very_ few years More' M miles on miles of nndepind limning1 ftoirf ono to our titM, 11   

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