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Alleganian Newspaper Archive: September 27, 1845 - Page 1

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Location: Cumberland, Maryland

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   Alleganian (Newspaper) - September 27, 1845, Cumberland, Maryland                                B.VMCLANAHAN. v -iiiE T. jt.V-'-- i "'iV jy_.y JjT.t, annum, it" paid Jii advaiitw'or within-jhe of .the and uLiLitts AND when IJULL-ltU AS I) I iiaymuni Is delayed u'nlil.alVr tho onpiratiun of Uio Dox.iJiiis.ASu CESTS will the American Uqviow.' rs THE .saniu.-proportion. ,vlXf-AH advertisements not or- spocifiu litae." will bo until Vitb CIIAUUCU J'J.'lluuui.KSQS, Esq. Lillle Croasings, 111 Mn.t.uii, Esq.; Wusternport Juii.s J, KEI.I.KK, l'..M.. FrtMthitrj, .ii' JM'xvifiu. Esq-MOhUTowu, Br.'unv, Flintstone. J KKKI., Esq., Fifiecn MileC.-eek, .IOWA. lliii.iEiiAiu, lisa.. Glades No. 10. I'. UOMAX STECK. Eaj.l Alt. Savage, -f. PO ETR Y... SUM? OF .Till: DCMUCUAUY. not n revel Uacchal 90113. No xvifd and frenzied i ry out Our mrird But heart xvith In-art, :md hand xvith hand onxvurd court the light, "'A bbldj a UUP, a faithful h.md, In in -We come llie tv.npoim oflho free Are in each liar.l Jiul brawny Iui.il, And and Mlcctly V Tliry currujitinn fruiirtlic land. Uiif It-ail rive ofyoic found rir-.LJiMla' tight aiid fjilliful ivi-r; WitlV'uclrt dti.! hand we rally louiul One u recreant nuv. r. Wccomu and proudly jic Uaiuirr Ihut our liuiu To cunqiirst or to jialriot gjarrc, Whvn Uiit'uh iniiiioiirt llirongt-t! our thorc YCJ, fi.tUful .lu.irt.-i throiV; thuu round, luiincr of the brave lind frcr, rwplvo rarli lu-nrt is liuund -To citn.jiii r or t-11 xvilli tlu-u. Br Three hundred years 'the-tale nut long sincu, from, the mouth of. one educated like a white but born of lhu race of Whom Irfigah and Tecumseh hundred ago; there lived on lards now forming an eastern coun- ty of one thu most powerful of the American stati s. a petty Indian tribe, guvcrnrd by a brave and chidlain. This cuicllaiii xvus called by a jiame which in our language signifies His deeds of and subtlety made him through no small portion of the northern continent. There xvere only txvo in self and his youthful son; for txventy moons had filled and xvaned since his xvife. iolloxved by four uf her offspring, .xvas placed in tho burial As the" Unrelenting sal alone ono evening in hia rude hut. nne of his people came 'to inform him thai a traveller from a distant tribe had entered the village, and dt sired, food.and repose. Such u titiun xvas never; slighted by the red the messenger xvas sent back with an invitation to the stranger lo abide in the Judge of ihe chic! himself. -Among lh.it simple race, no duties xvere considered more honorable than arranging the household com- forts of a guest, those duties xvere noxv performed by tiiu-hubi'd oxxn hand, his son having nut yet re- turned from ihe linatuii which he had started xvith i fexv young companions at early da.vn. lira lit le ihe wayfarer into ihe dwelling >y liiui xvho had given the first notice of his arri- val. You are welcome my ssid the Un- The person to xxjium this kind salute uas ad- ln.-s.-srd xvas an Indian, apparently of mid- dle age, and habited in the scant attire of his spe- cies. He had the war tuft en hU forehead, under xvhieh flashed a pair of brilliant eyes. His rejoinder xvaa friendly and brief. The chiefs tent is people are a- 'I" continued the stranger, after a pause, cast- a glanre uf inquiry around. My brother bays true-that it other answered. Twelve seasons ago, the Un- relenring saxv five children in the shadnxv of his xvigxvam. ard mother .was dear to him. He xvas strong like a cord of many fibres. Then, the breath uf .Maniio snapped the fibres one by one a- sunder. He looked xvith a pleasant eye upon my sons and daughters, and wished them for himself." The Unrelenting tnrnt-d as he spoke, and point- ed lo an object just inside the opet.ing of ihe tent. A moment or txvo befure, the figure of a Iniy had in and taken his station back ot The t-h'u f-gradually-wrought -himself up-tu, a pitch uf liU lioarsu at ihe last part ut, hii ndfralioii, "'irough liio .lodge. At iba't iii'inu'iit, the deer hide curtain kept all within darkness; iheiiPXiTit was lilted up, and a Hied of mouulighl filled tho apiritnent. A linjj sight.was back.there then! The strange In- 'dian his his distorted fea- tures glaring toxvards the anconacious'ones_irt front, with'a hmk liku that .lo his antagonist angel.. His lips were teeth clenched, his arn.3 his nerve and 'sinew in .bold .relief.'' This spectacle of fear lasted only for a Indlan'at oncjs nank with the'Skins wrapped him as before.! "Jayf ;withs- the '.f '.It an. advanced.liuur of tho night. Wind FJOI felt exhausted travel; ibd father and son twm iliwrseats at ilm Si rTtired to rect. lira littloxvliiloall from ihitdarkaMifjitfcich surrounded" .the bcii of the stranger, flasned txvo fiery urbs. we a Fu 1 Fii'itluiii'd ri.i.'ifil cause Our tiruili :iro inn-, our luiuU arc strong, light riju.i! and laws, 'I'm- fall.iii Tlic holy, piiju; lili-d, ii nr sort iiu'.ti.lly rai-w fctir ni cw.vn our our ;id lir.ll t thrillin.: it 'OLD STVI.K IIVMXS. hi- vorvs an? Piriect o in Congregatlanal churches bn- f.ir.1 lhu days of l.'r: am! xvhieh xvere grad to give place to the hymns noxv in the t-astc Jur it mirnhutelirs. ".ho.previous ointment Djwii 'Aaron's bean! did beard it doxvnxvard went, skirts imtn." sort of address to xvhaJca, and ather nilling about incessantly ..like tlio eyes of an angry wild beast. The lids of 'those 'orbs closed no', in slumber during the night. Among the'turmer in- liabitants of this continent, it xvas considitrcd -qide- in the highest degree, to annoy a traveller or a guest with questions about himself.his last or" his future deftiuation. Until ho was made wtlcumn to whether for a short time or a long one. Thus on the morrow, whoi tho sirangn.Indian showed no signs of departing, chief shjiwed not tho least su-prise. but fell in- deed a compliment directly paid. to his powers of entertainment. Early the succeeding day, the Uiynjlcntiti; turn, would probably luke him till night fall. He enjoined the boy to remit no duties uf towards his guest, and bade Him bu ready at evening xvith a welcome for his father. The sun had marked tho middle of the afternoon, when the chit finished what he had to do sooner than he had expected, came back to his own dxvell- ing, atfd threw himself upon the .Hour to obtain res: for the day, though a pleasant, had beer, a xvarm one. Wind- Foot xvas not there, and after a little interval, the Chief stepped lu a lodge near by HI make inquiry after Si'tin. The voung, said the woman who ap- peared to answer went awa} with thu chief's strange guest many hours sir.ee." _ f The Unrenleting turned tu go back to his ten'- "I cannot tell the meaning of added the woman, hut hu ot the fiery eye bade me, bhould w itnpuHiiblLV For a'moment only 'they jiausitd. Then tin) Unrelenting >ii.rangolT.'utierluji thobai- tlo cry ufhis iribe.aud the Test joined in the cho- rus, and fidluxvrd him., .-i As the sudden xvas swept along: by; the reritt'to the. KansiVear. ho-jumped and xvith that wonderful which characterizes his race, determined at what w.s safest .and sured, for .him to dul 1 lo- seized Winu-Foot by the shoulder and ran, toxvanU. lhu holding. IliH.'yoy's person as a shield fntiiianjr iho pursuers might attempt In launch af- still possessed the advantage. It, xvaa a'fvaiful race, and the Unrelenting fidt.hW heart groxv sick, as the Indian, dragging child, approached the" xvater's "Turn, whelp uf a the chief madly thoii whoso coward arm, xvarfust. "ilying enemy to the ears of tho furious The savage did nol liMik round, but' his lefl arm, and pointed xvilh his lo throat. At..that moment ho was xvilhin twice hisleiigtii the canoe. Thjb boy heard his i, faint and were tho father of Wind-Foot ask about him, say to the ihiefthese words. Unless ices you L'.osil', tluti Llaud uiars tluui lutlf.its siscct glided noiselessly the chief. -Hardly twelve years seemed thu age 'of the nexv coiner. He xvas a noble limbs, never distorted xvilh tho of civ- ilizL-d life, xvero graceful as the ash, and springy as the bounding stag's. It was thelast and loveliest .if the chieftain's soft lipped nimble Wind'foot. With theyoiith'n assistance preparations for iliet.r.tyjral meal isliing" h, as 1 }.ery himself .had mtered ;.to..the the lodgrf, and hb It xvas a lovety stimnicr'B evening. -I ho moon uest_anj back.again. Kh-.r.c and the stars twinkled, and the thousand yoi- of Kansj in lliatured countar- im mgliLsoiimled m every 'lhe ,01, conscious for wlilt iTlie chief ami his. stm reclined at the opemng of Wind" Foot xvas-iir tho f nest .Tho UnrGlcnttn-j il a scorpion had stung him. His lips trembled, and his hand invol- untarily moved to the handle of his tomahawk.. Did his cars 'perform, tl.eir ofiicu -tridy _ Tliose souiiiia xvere not new to him.. Like a nijit, Urn gloom uf past years rolled away-iti Kn' for th giisl, lii'at the tif I ariiits; Im not slioglit, iunjec'is for taleiit-i.; :The Irnjfiiented'during- thel wa'nii xvisithcri on "aaronnt oJ-tuaingtiUirly.pure andltvholt-soine. Irisulevalfii-a gteat ab-ive Cumberland; Si; generajljr.visiied." ot ihe hotel JiidgoCessIia; Jin ricolv lout iiianj.ts a jrSixl democrats." Uliic noriheui vie td itiost hle aTid loolU mudt'likv no ono wtljo irun.wurks.ilUtaiiU by railt Mad.'leii miles. It is'aij immVii'o fitablishinenl. I. was astonished to find; in the .very heart of the where only five years ago, .jjrew alone the' mountain tutk and a nltnnst realizui1 thu enchnntnifiit of Eastern I iti thu a town) containing a of three llintiMntl touts. There are live hands fotistai.tly fiigayedat ihi'su works! Ovi-r hundred ws are erected fur'ihe accujimiiK-.atimi-'uf them and their The amount of caji'uul inve.stod il Tim ivotks, as, you father's gathered his bruised as hu'xvas. I'ui a last his For a moment only ho him- snlf from lhe of foe, and fell UJMIII the '.That.moment, was a .fatal ono to _ the Kansi. the sjieed of the chief's boxv '.vas up at his eon1 txvangrd poison 'lipped arroxv sped ihrongh the air. Faithful tu its mission.it pierced ihiT liii dian'd side, just stooping to lift Wind- Foot inio lhu lioal. He gave a wild shriek; blood bjwuted the wound, and he staggered down thcMand. His strength hoivever xvas notyrt gone. Hate and revetigp- thu stronger that they xvero "bafiled, raged with- in hiiri, and shot through his eyes, glassy they .xvere-beginning to bu xvith death damps. Txvist ing his body like a liruiM-d snake, hu worked him- seFf close up to iho bandaged'Wind-Foot. Ho fell lo la's'Waistband and drnxv forth lhe weapon of stone.. He laughed a laugh of horrid Mouiil bavage iron works ani.dnytn are really stupendous, and there are aboul-uvu hun- ttred londofiron niaTiufacturrd a iyeeh. only "Amcriiari tMlubHsl.meni in the'inanufacture of heavy railway iron now and manufactured in, and England.." Ills a fact, which is no less than true, that thu effort made last. uinu-r ta re JKC'I the on railroad iron, u'as and before those very taMcru tarill chaniiiMn who were bo anxious to I p Io.duty on all articles in winch they had an interesi! A similar ffl'url, and.fnim the same .minrter, be tnadt; a I the minrte ensui' ..sessiun of' AND BRtiTH lield'fi power' to is tii ivd3 nufonly'arrcstpdi but naiuru'ttet vigorously to work tu the tton" g'rmv the tvliole' twith'wai afhcbre! 'TJiis 1 know to be a Every one knows that charcoal.i? au Every mil. 'and is used in' boxing. u p aniriiarpr to krcp tliu'samcclifciiiical' principle, it tends tu j Ihe.teelh "and svxeeten the breath. danger.ln swalloWing- Ujpii ctinirarT, small quantities have in lhe inward system. suirerinjj from "ih.it" clasa'br T incident to summer..' .ItwouJdnot bat' tt-e-ttuuu renders itar hose wlioare- trouMed :ireatl: it "very and swalla but lt: is peculiarly itnportanl tpf cl and rinsfi mouth thoroughly "before" going bed, other wise a ifreat deal of; the destructive a will during iho night. ?__' sliiiiittd raised the xxeaputi in thn air just as the dealli-ralihi sounded in his throat, the instrument (the shuddering eyes- nf thn child saxv it, and shut lids in intense ismie down, driven too surely to the heart of lhe lielp: less boy. When the Unrelenting camo lo his sun. the last signs of life xvere'fading in the boy's coniittinunce. His eyes opened and turned lo _the chief; his beau- tiful lijH parted in, a smilo, elFirl of expi- ring fondness. On Us features Ilitiei! a lovely transit'iil aslhu ripple 'athwart llio a the wial and fuel supplied from llitrir.oxvn mines, neartho wurkt. Tl.o coal of the WIIIK character a-i that of lhe .Maryland iMiiiing ed to in the preueding mm her of tluis-u nkinches. Th'-y use daily one hundred and fifty tons of coal, and Uunsporl oi.e.hundred'liinsdaily tu tluv astern inarkt-t. by .iheir own railroad lo Cumberland, and by tlm llaltimore and Ohio Uailroad, to Tide day.from "have altw constrncti'd a i .i. ..i..... slight' tremor shook him, Foot was dead. and thu next minute 'Finin the blCETCHES luri.pike fruin the xvorkato thekuim Tin- linding'lho atmosphere pultuted'.and rendered al lutely uiiliealtlily fur the (iri'per.nse uf'.waier and charcoal ri" wholesome and" pleasant as a'bree 'Of a, loM-.thrwigh the great Coul utld Iron JUgiun, monsters of.lhd bubbling Your .Makcr'rt praises spoilt; r 'Up'from tlio'iands yc codlings peep, wag j'oiir lails Tlierc is much truth, if nut postry, any tho fol- vv Tho.race is not foreycrgoi faRleal runs; the'halllo by 'thia'o people, That.'shiiot witli thl! longest gims." i '-t The folluVing Sun chimes very well with iho preceding, aUhoiigh-of moro mod- "'t All hail thott glorious Sun! jf Ijrighlusa noxv liti pan! r ,Thou roundest, V clicssb Utit remember, though box j'i Iti. tho'pluntl makes r Should To which .an exchange adds: -Amrromoiiilmr, though Iletico., 'In' iho nlnral Is fleeces, j.-i plural ol gooso Aro'nl nor gccics; may also bo permitted to.aild ._ And renionibcr, though honso 'in ihc plural is houses, V- That tho plural of ..'v not ___ ,1 f Ho 1 Scf.orDon! _ You losl'tlie years ago; 'You should not, biiould.chooso to marry' U., S.; i .BBt'giya'iway tho prairio floxvcrV the tent, enj.iying' the cuol breeza xyhlch bluw fresh- ly npun thciii.'aiul pieoe.ordeer hide that served for sometimes flinging il to darken tho apartment, then raising. it suddenly up again, as if lo let in the bright moon beams. Wind-foot s-jHike uf his hunt that day. lie had mut xvilh no success, a boy's impatient spirit." wondered why it xnw thai other's arroxvs slitiuld hit tho mark, and failure b'e reserved for him alone. The chief heard him xvith a sad smile, as he remembered his oxvti youthful traits; he sooth- ed the child with gentle xvords, 'teH.ng him that bravo warriors jonipiiiaea xvcaI with tho.sarne fortune. Many years said the xvhcn my ciieek xvas soft, and my arm? felt the numbness of ofbut'fcw myself vainly our hunting grounds as-'yoii have dune to-day. The Dark Influence xvasnniund me, and'not a single shaft would 'do'my bidding. And my father brought home "nothing to his asked iho hoy. The Uhrelenling" camo lhe other answered; xvas dearer to him 'and his people than'the' fattest doer or Iho sweetest bird Lrouglil the scalp of an accursed .r voice of the chief xvas deep and sharp in its tone of hatred. V Well my said --.The child slirlcd and paused.'" An exclamation, a snddon guXeral ncrso, came part oftlte lerit .the stranger xvas slcepir.g. dry skins which formed thii if ho who lay there was'changing" his position, and thcn.all con- linucd pnicecdeil m. a luxver that" tlicyx had almost' broken tlio slumber g'ticst. A' hu: you ktioxv'a.part but not all'tho.caiiso of hatred' therb is'boiwecn our nation and (lieabhorred iiamd'1 m_entiuhed. Longer back-than I can-fpinember, they did mortal xvrong to your fathers. ;il'he scalp? of iwo of your near kindred han'rj in Kansi I have sxvorn, my sun, to bear them a never ending- ha- tred.. _ On llio ninrninrj of which It spoke, 1 started with fresh litnlisand light hearl in search of game. Hourafkcr hour I mimed tho.forest, but xxith.no success; and at tho selling of Iho sun I found try- self .xvcary, ;'and nuiiy miles from my father's Knlqe." I laid doxx'nat tho foot of lhe Irce, and sleep came over me. In iho.ilopih of the night, a vyico scetned Tny cats; it called m'q lo rhc look round. I siartcL1 to my feet, arid found no ond'thtrc'but myfeelf; I'knew that llio. Dream'Spirtl had been .xvilh me. 'As 1 cisl my eyes" aboul ia tho saw a distant brightness. Treading softly, I approached. Thn light .waVthat of. n and by tho firo lay txx-o sleeping laughed '.hu qniet laugh of a deadly mind, as I saxv xvho Kansi warrior, and like you. my in age. I of ..my my hate. I crept" them as! crawls through tho .grass.. .1 bent over the slum- bering boy; I raised I thought ihnt weru ihcy both slain, no ono wiiujd carry the talo to tlio Kansi ,lribo Aly ycngearico 'xvotiid be to mo if-' they it and I spared tlio child. Then I glided'to the oth- er; his faco. was of tho samo cast'as thn first'. lor purpose 1'oot xvas m tno hands of this man..: tla sallied .forth, gathered a fcxv of .his warriors, and started swiftly the child." Aboul the same hour thai thn Unrelen'.ing ,rer lurried frotr. htsjournoy, Wind Fto', several miles from home, Was just coming up to his companion, who had gone a few rods ahead of him. and was at thai moment seated on the budytifa fallen tree, a mighty giant of the woods that swine wliirlxvind i.ad iimibled to the earth. The child had roamrd about with his new acqnainlancc through one path ami another with the heedlcssiiess of his and noxv, tlielalier satin perfect silence for sev- eral minutes, Wind-Foot idly spotted near hiir. It-was a solemn spot in direction around 'xvero patriarchs of the- wilderness groxv- ing and decaying in selilude. At length the strati Wind-Foot." The child who was but a few yards ofT, approach- ed atthecall. Ashecamenearhestopped.inalarni; his'companions eyes had thai dreadfully bright jjlit- wliilo thoy looked at''each- other, forebodings the boy's soul. Young said the stranger, you. must "Tho bravo is at play. j-iWftid-fuot is but'a 'was the Serpenls are ?mallat replied thesivnge t is built uiv7n the site of' old Fort xvhieh, during ihe French and Indian xvarsinl755, xxasonu of .iho extreme frontier Ilritish outposjs, ind the safeguard of the colunUu agaitifit lhe in- cursions of "the French and lndiatiri._ "Wo wfre feelings of no ordinary interest, tho site of this venerable xvork. I'roin ita walli issued hat splendid army, under tho command of the rash but ill-fated Uraddock, of oil, suiTerings, found inassncre and a bloody gravenn iho borders of .thti Uhiu.< We xvrre bhtiwn al'o Ihi? spot where, one year ago; stood-an humble Ing house, sanctified as being once tint head quarters of Ueorgc Wasliin-rton, tliKii a lieutenant colonel commtnding the provincial troops at this This .interesting relic of frontier preHiden.1 and malinger of this estahl'tf tnent, is Ciilnnitl Win. Young, xvho receives a ary of. a .is by Mr. Wellh, who obuiiim'a salcry of per annum, the agiint and engiiieerof ,slockholL ihese.'getillemcn accoino- da'.injf. and'elficiunl V' Such in a bn'ef and imperfoct skolch (ifan under- Wriknu uin run BnmsH, Ther of recrimination betv.een-the. "enrseciions the fwhijr jiarty; is, likely some. pleasant if nut reputable, velopments." The last stage' fcadv bring accusation 'ninji "Journaragainsl ihe N. A nEPosiTi: tieiiian of'ibe.wi-st tu hia hojiuful. boy, I li'avu the bagying and ropn we're talking, of, to and Tealilniit leave gii dti'wn lii the bnruain can for ta mij credit in one uf 'the city 'haiilts, and comu home.'.'., aiuairiliny lo '.'tCm- for the city, arrivt-2 "in advance, uf.lhu cottoii I'- I I I Iff! t in teuliation foriner Jiad had and. .having thrown o is ax ide nnld of truthi: duly deposited ma c'uy ,f A iiionth or more after, the'old gentleman called Li the can conceive the feelings' of inn, when_asutn -scateil by I" the the his tribe point to him and ''His lathers Mlorus.the wigxxam of lhu lodge of iho 'Uiirelcni ing.' But the xvigwam of the Kansi.. is bare hi 'The boy's .heartbeat bcal true to llio Mern cotirago of his ancestors. v "I am iho son of a checks cannot be writ wiili-lrars." '-j y-Thc'Kansi looked at him a fexv seconds with ad soon gave ,vay to Then producing from somo inner patl.of his dress gladdened me; I (then knexv they xvero of a witho of elm bark, lin stepped to began binding his handn. It xvas useless' lo at- tempt resistar.cerfur the disparity of their strength, the boy was unarmed, whilj the savage had n't his waist a hatchet and a niilo wrapon re- sembling a: poniard.. 'Ho pointrd to Wind-Foot the direction ho must take, gavea significant touch at his girdle, and fulloxvcd close When tho Unrelenting and his people started to seek'for trie child and that featlul strangcr.they xvero lucky enough find' the' trail tho absenl ones had mado. None except an Indian's eyecould ihem lightand devious aguidc. Uul the chiof's sight wassharp xvith on length cctiitng'to tho fallen tree. -The trail noxv xvas less irregnhr, and they travelled with greater rapidity. Its direction reemed to be towards the thores of a long narrow lake whu-h lay adjacent to their ler- risthu juheank'in the wrM, Ihcy saw his last flitting beams rfflectrd in the waters of this lake.. ,The grounds xvcrri .tl- most clear of trees, and as they camo out, Un- and his warriors ?xycpt the. tango with Was it so indcihl 7 Thnro txventy yards from -the they wugh fastened rieir by w They saw f his'posture that iho this, too, that tl tho Kans should.onco get him boat, andI cain_a Mar history has only lately given place to the elegant mansion; but xvo were pleased learn that, pre- vious lo its demolttibn, n sketch xvas pre'scmd. xvhieh will, proba'ily ere long bo hands of the engraver.-and so be savcdrio posterity. To this spot Washington in, 170-1, during lhe xvhislu-y insurrection, as magis- trate of lhe country he had, released from liriiish oppression. Who cat "patriiit and statesman fireside iif'lhe humble building in xvhieh, in youth, lie had mused on those visioiis which, in nfierjvars, led him ffreatncss-and renown? Forty years before, his most extravagant ambition had never.conceived sucli.a' le'rininalion to his labors as tlio future was thu.'t'dim and un- tho execulive chair, even VIM great and never iiiingined that, in another span of lhe land of, Washington xvmild'liavo reached an and achieved a renown, lo which "the'attcntion of 'hirthn world xvoilld bi? directed with wonder, and admiration; and oil Iho very spot whence, eighty-fivoyixus an- terior, the lint of tho young ofiicer stood, were to Lu seen the indications of improvement and enter- iriseof the must stupendous Wo were also shoxvn tho traces of. the mad consructed under the direction of nbhi Washington, through a then aliniHt irnpcnc- Irablo exploration of .which was iiirkiicd.uiidor pxtr.iordmary cha'r- actcr, to the very lines of the French and Indian II U remarkable, thai 'Ibis identical up his buy, and 'the lull conversation ensu- ed: V bagging viiu soli! fcir ii1 1 Yes. sir. forget thtfnatno.at this moment." 'The old gentleman to his desk, lintk up a turned to' ihe lluiik Note Uelecioi, and asked if tho money' was thb'I.'ju- isiana Hank. '.-r' -'Nil" '-V gwt to tho adintn'stnitioii they helfied u. (in I ilrinrtititro'" _ In the Citizen's 7-.' tlwrkren rto tho ;pfrwuis was a I'erhnru U tn-tlio'Ca'naH1.' H'miist'Iiaro bmrin the said the old nun xvith" astoiiishmunt. w.hai'coiiipronirses ____.r, was .will be apt the fact charged, working1, a tarilT which hejiroiesse'd to advocate, aa of siderably inure V, lie Uuvernor is lo lie a slifp w right. The Governor ofNew.'HainrPfi jhiru is a xyheelxvright, and olina. '.UiU iMisaisiii'i-i can-brat the ioii at thatVamo, as iiiaking willoii, baiika, of debt, 'anil breeding Stie electe'd mechanics to'lhe .''irslofijce in, her. gift H-a.tailor j saddler, What bank xvns it; thcnl" old. for the monih diuvii.thoyriver the l-jw- cr jilace.'J-r Jyur'tf TjfJ'Ua.l- route was afterwards selected by the United Stati-s in uf a ginrsprs, of that great xvork, tlm national- road; -ih'tis Bhoxving tho xvundetfn! skill of hero; Tin- town of Cumberland rapidly increising It has recently received the cliarifi contains at preseni, over five, thou- sand inhabitants, and theroare noxv more than prosperity, acilv. It hundred building In" amrwi of erection, and year will odditions.' -It is one of iho natural'outlets of the rroductsof the, rj'rc.it West} and'riiiiik'forward to tho rrO.iii! of lluvinost the' coimniMi. mosil poribctly fimlish thingiiin iho is Ui quarrel, matter xvith xvhoiu man, wo- man or child; what pretence, provocation, or occaMiHi. whatsoever. There is no kind of nrcfsi- ty in it, no manner of nsu in it; the fact may If, theologians, p-ililicians, law- yers, and quarrel; nations, tritW, xvomen. children, dogs and eals, beasts, quarrel about all tttanner: of things. in tho Union where lioTyer.ihTtheir the.Charleston xvas then pii t n iider.its win v; in .'a the bird bhouk i l.no.I tltt ikltim RitEST 6p.A____ Fiirtr.Ka.' Icarn'lrom the Philadelphia icly, .I'reiichnmn.v. charged nibbed the esi; an noorxvar to to pertM, at no distant day, when of in -vast mineral wealth will cause every hill-side tu smoke xvith furnaces, and every valley in its to the" clank of.the' hammer .and tho forge. Cumberland now (and xvill 1m foi years, noiwitlislanding tl.e expectations of of ihotpenpht of western of llio jBslli- Ohio ruilroad. ,Hcrc.aVo.5s tin: destined tcfminus of ihe Chesapeake and Ohio canal; and, nr.Ul this work iti pushed "forward, to point, the capital already expended iti Itscon'suuction has been vainly invested. Cuiiiberlandisliaiid'omelv located al ll.o fmil of tho Alh-ganifS, and justly cnthlJil to its nnmo of "the mountain It and all nnnner of optsishms. If there is any Ihing in thn xvnr'd that xvill 'make a man, feel ex- cept pinching in tho crack nfn door, it is unquestionably quarrel. No man i-ver fails to think less nf himself afler -lli.fli he did Imfoit! one; it degm'les him in his own and" in the eyes nf oiliern; ic it Ui disgrace- the one hand, and in- enacts lhe jHiwer of on the oilier. 'The truth the. mme' quietly and more (H-aeeibly xve all gel'nn.-the-lmttfr for ourselvi-s, the bi'tter for our V In nine cnfisj out U n. the cnurse is. if a.man quit him if he is nhiisixv, qr.it liin paiiy. jf lie slaiiu'erv you, lukc.care to livr thai iiotHKly, will hvjieve hint. innil.-i xvho ho he misur-ed yon j tho witcst'way is gene ly just toh't him for then! WhaMmkw you spend'yoiir .lim'o srt freely, close kindred. t I raised r.iy iralhercd. my should.onco get him boat, and cain_a Mart A Jack'7'' 5v the only thinir 1'havo'lo thnnppoRttp somo of ...i iiKiutvcring "I'1' .-T it" vV his tifto wcro-thch waiting for. lies in iho vallryi and looks reptisitiir. In a lovely "natural hasin. fuirruumlrd (inrihrce< by lofiy hills covered with wild vrrduro. :Secn mountain heights, it I resi-iiiblanco to Ucoding. Pa., though not more ll half as Inrgc. Itsr viririty abomidb ii: beautiful than quiet way ot'ilpalirtii wiih Iho n j -1..... 2 t An liFhhinnn, abiiiit tu.matry.a suuthjrni'jlir! for her.money, on cum was aiNiut payInK 'ther Frenchman, confined 1 Ii L i u nil ,t .ingury ni, five Miverelgim and a wallet HI jlifii-rciit banks left .1 letter, was fiHitKl in iv.w French languagtv _ wv f m _ W tains important infofOMiiowifgJa i her boot 'xvas loiind a; ciid.a iiiiiiilwr jif Iho fame villaiiV that the V "was'latuly'comp'lijnli U lEWSPAPERI VSPAPES.I   

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