Annapolis Sunday Capital, June 23, 2013

Annapolis Sunday Capital

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Location: Annapolis, Maryland

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Annapolis Sunday Capital (Newspaper) - June 23, 2013, Annapolis, Maryland capitalgazette.comi 01jr ^unííau (Capital- ^ JUNE 23, 2013    A    Capital-Gazette    Newspaper    ©    —    Annapolis,    MD    $1.50A Capital-Gazette Newspaper © — Annapolis, MD Special home & garden section inside Annapolis Junior Rowers rank 12 th in nation dim SPORTS / B1 Photos by Joshua McKerrow, Staff President of the Anne Arundel County Library Board of Trustees Hall Worthington, Chairwoman of the Annapolis Regional Library Capital Project Joan Beck and library Executive Director Hamilton “Skip” Auld sit in the children’s section of the Annapolis Area Branch, which is scheduled to get a new building. Library officials plan for new Annapolis branch Site could move to land along Rowe Boulevard T By ALLISON BOURG [email protected] ■^his isn’t your mother’s library. Fifty years ago, a card catalog, study cubicles and stacks of old books defined your local library branch. Today, think rows of computers, coffee shop-style couches and bright displays similar to what you’d see in a bookstore, said Hampton “Skip” Auld, administrator of the Anne Arundel County Public Library. With $3.5 million in the county’s 2014 capital budget to spend on site acquisition, design and engineering of a revamped Annapolis Area Branch, the library could move to state-owned property along Rowe Boulevard, Auld said. That Annapolis location on West Street opened in 1965, making it the oldest of the library’s 15 branches. A new library branch three times its size is projected to open in 2017, at a cost of $39 million. The branch will be the library’s fiagship location. Free analysis/treatment plan for fine, limp and thinning hair from Alexander s of Annapolis, COUPON / AlO GET YOUR COUPONS: As much as $125 worth of money-saving coupons in todays paper THE LAST RIDE \ Community still haunted by fatal Kent Island wreck On a hot afternoon in April, four teenagers died on a rural road on Kent Island. Today, apart from the roadside monument, there’s no trace at the accident scene. Across the road, horses lazily graze inside a white split-rail fence. The traces are elsewhere: A 73-year-old professor still recovering from his injuries. Young firefighters haunted by finding one of their own inside the crumpled car. A police officer who can’t get the scene out of his mind. Bereaved families that never had a chance to say goodbye. High school friends who endured four funerals. Happenstance brought the victims to 1700 Cox Neck Road at 4:01 p.m. on April 10: A professor decided to linger at the office. A teenage driver decided to call in sick at work. A witness decided to stop for fuel. Such little things draw the line between life and death. (See CRASH, Page A13) BY TOM MARQUARDT SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT Because there is only one meeting room in the Annapolis branch of the county library, members of the Maryland Writers Association hold a planning meeting for the 2014 Maryland Writers Conference at a table between the stacks. À A Auld said. “So it’s half a century in the ‘ making,” said Auld, the system’s administrator since 2010. (See LIBRARY, Page A14) ONUNE EXTRA • See the library master plan at capitalgazette.com. Clockwise from top left, Tyler Elzey, 19, of Chester; Michael Ringenbach, 19, of Stevensville; Corey Pessagno, 18, of Chester; and Harrison Smith, 18, of Chester. The four teens lost their lives in April in a car crash on Kent Island.Stormwater project would spend $400M in next 6 yearsMore than half would go to north county watersheds By E.B. FURGURSON III [email protected] Now that a dedicated fund has been established to reduce stormwater poUution, Anne Arundel County is set to proceed with a roughly $400 million plan to address the problem, with half the money targeted for the Patapsco River watershed. The stormwater program, funded by a law set to go into effect July 1, would com plete 1,134 outfall projects, retrofit 314 ponds, and restore or retrofit more than 23 miles of streambeds by the end of fiscal 2019. Just how much money will be raised, however, remains in doubt. County Council members have said they hope to adjust the fees after July 1. And on Friday Dels. Steve Schuh, R-Gibson Island, and Nic Kipke, R-Pasadena, called on County Executive Laura Neuman and the council to pass emergency legislation halting the fees. The plan has been in the works for more than eight years. Detailed maps with layers of data — such as impervious surfaces, and the results of on-the-groimd inspection of pipes, outfalls, road crossings and streambed conditions — have been developed for each of the county’s 12 watersheds and more than 300 subwatersheds. The plan includes retrofitting stormwater ponds and drainage outfaUs, as well as restoring miles of streambeds damaged by years of runoff. Spending 49 percent of the fimd in the northernmost part of the county makes sense, county officials said. “It is driven by the amount of impervious surfaces,” said Deputy Director of Public Works Chris Phipps. And the most densely developed areas in north county, he said, have the most impervious surfaces contributing to the stormwater problem. Most of that development occurred well before there was any regulation of stormwater runoff. “Anybody can see most of the population is in the north end of Anne Arundel County. More population, more houses, more impervious surfaces, more damage done to creeks and streams in north county,” said County Councilman John Grasso, R-Glen Bumie. (See PROJECT, Page A8) SUNDAY'S WEATHER S3 70 HIGH LOW CHANCE OF STORMS Monday: Chance of showers. C2 BUSINESS Four Mctions, 40pagM Arundol Report.............  Cl Buelnoss.......................A9 Calendar.......................D2 CLASSROOM TO WORKPLACE: County students shift focus to summer jobs. A9 Classified......................C6 Death NoticM .......  C3 EdKoHal ......................A12 LIFESTYLE % TAKING FUGHT AGAIN: Book chronicles flight of famous navigator and son. D1 Like us on Facebook capftalgazette Follow us on Twitter capgazaaws Health & Fitness D3 Lottery..........................A4 My Time........................C5 Mk General................410-268-5000 Classified.............410-268-7000 Circulation 410-268-4800 Obituaries .....................C2 Police Beat  C3 Puzzles........................C12 Sports...........................B1 Television......................C4 Volunteers.....................A6 ;

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